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Hudson~Litchfield News 11-1-2013

Hudson~Litchfield News 11-1-2013

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Volume 24 Number 17 November 1, 2013 16 Pages

Supported Through Advertisers An Independent Weekly Newspaper
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Daylight Savings Ends
Sunday Morning.
Set those clocks back!
submitted by Gloria R. Eno, Nottingham West Elementary School
On Friday, October 25, students at Nottingham West Elementary School celebrated
National School Principal’s Month by honoring their principal, Peter Durso. “Hooray for
Mr. Durso Day” included the presentation of many notes, cards and letters from students, as
well as donations of books to the Nottingham West School Library in Mr. Durso’s honor. The
highlight of the celebration was the “Dress like Mr. Durso” event - staff and students donned
shirts, ties, jackets and reading glasses in their best imitation of Mr. Durso’s style. “Hooray
for Mr. Durso Day” gave the Nottingham West community an opportunity to thank Mr. Durso
for his many years of leadership in a fun way.
Hooray for Mr. Durso Day!
by AJ Dickinson
Since 2007, Litchfield residents have driven past the Mosnicka’s
house on Hillcrest Road around Halloween to enjoy the many hand-
carved jack-o-lanterns on display in the front yard. Carving jack-o-
lanterns were a hobby of Robin Mosnicka. Robin was an elementary
school teacher, a loving mother, and had long reaching ties to the
town. Robin was an eighth generation resident of the town. Tragically
last April Robin passed away. To honor her long-standing tradition of
creating and displaying the hand-carved pumpkins, various members
of the community, friends, neighbors and Girl Scouts showed their
respect by bringing their own jack-o-lanterns to add to the collection.
Amy Rossi, a Litchfield resident whose children often enjoyed the
Mosnicka’s Halloween themed house held a pumpkin carving event
this past weekend to show her support for the family.
A grand total of 327 carved pumpkins now lay on the grounds in
front of this family’s beautiful home. This community, as well as the
surrounding communities of Salem and Pelham, has shown so much
support for this family that Mark Mosnicka found it hard to find the
words to describe his appreciation. “I don’t know the right words for
it but it’s just the most amazing thing,” he said, trying his best to hold
back tears. Mark ended his interview by simply saying, “She was an
amazing woman who touched a lot of lives.”
Although Robin Mosnicka is greatly missed, she will never be
forgotten as her jack-o-lantern tradition lives on.
Late Litchfeld Resident’s
Halloween Hobby Lives On
by Lynne Ober
U.S. Senator Kelly Ayotte met with New
Hampshire residents at Hudson Memorial
School last week. When she arrived, she was
wearing a Boston Red Sox hat, which she joked
she had put on for the first game, which the Sox
won, “and now I’m not taking it off until the Sox
win the World Series.”
There were nearly 100 residents gathered
to hear her speak and then participate in the
question and answer period after her talk.
Prior to the schedule beginning time for the
Town Meeting, Ayotte posed for pictures with
attendees.
When the program started, Ayotte pointed
to one of the large screens at the front of the
room. “That is my debt calculator,” she said.
“The federal government spends $10 million
a day and has to borrow $2 million every day.
You can watch the debt calculator and see our
country’s debt go up and up.”
Ayotte painted a bleak fiscal picture.
Beginning with the current year’s budget, she
said, “This is one milestone we never wanted
to meet,” stating that in the current fiscal year
alone there’s an anticipated budget deficit of
$759 billion.
She wanted to help the audience understand
the magnitude of our country’s debt. “The
2013 deficit alone could pay all of the 2013
salaries of every Major League Baseball player
for the next 248 years,” but that wasn’t all, “It
could purchase the newest iPhone for half of
the world’s population or buy a cup of Dunkin’
Donuts coffee for every American every day for
four years.”
Although the economy is recovering from a
recession, Ayotte pointed out the loss of jobs.
“Our labor force participation rate is at its
lowest since 1978. We still have 21.5 million
Americans that are either unemployed or
underemployed right now.”
The future doesn’t offer much hope according
to Ayotte, “If we stay on the path we’re headed,
our debt will reach $25 trillion in the next
decade. In Washington, we’ve done a very good
job at kicking the can down the road.”
According to Ayotte just over 60 percent of
government spending is on mandatory programs
such as Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid,
which she characterized as promises that the
government was made and “that we need to
keep.”
The recent 16-day government shutdown cost
an estimated $2.2 billion, according to Ayotte,
who said that every shutdown always cost more
than keeping government open and that’s why
she worked to bring an end to the shutdown.
At the end of her prepared remarks, she
opened the floor to questions. State Senator
Sharon Carson, using cards filled out by
audience members, called people to speak.
Questions revolved around a number of items
from veteran support for those who have been
hurt during serving, to Bengazi and to concern
about the future of the country for the generation
of American children growing up now.
In response, Ayotte provided thoughtful
answers. She said that in the 1970s that 6
percent of our country’s debt was owned by
foreign countries, but in 2012, China alone held
48 percent of our debt. This was a great concern
to Ayotte, who commented that the federally
Ayotte Speaks
Frankly at
Hudson Town
Meeting
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After school on Tursday, October 24, there was a group
of protesters outside Hudson Memorial School. One of
the protesters was asked what it [protest] was about and
they said they were promoting background checks for
guns. Tey assembled in light of Ayotte being in town.
Senator Ayotte with Hudson police staf.
P
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F
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-continued page 15 - Ayotte Speaks
S
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A
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Carly, Alec, Amelia and Mark Mosnicka.
Lit Jack-o-Lanterns dot the Mosnicka house at the corner of Hillcrest and
Albuquerque Avenue. Te pumpkins were placed in memory of Robin Mosnicka,
who passed away unexpectedly this year.
2 - November 1, 2013 | Hudson - Litchfield News
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• Half & Full Day Pre-K Classes
• Before & After School Programs
• Art, Computer, Foreign Language,
Library, Music & Physical
Education Instruction
• NEW EE Math Enrichment Program WW
• Reading Enrichment Program
• Automated Media Center
with SMART MAR MAR Board
• Computer Lab
• Outdoor Classroom
• Hot Lunch Program
• Extracurricular Activities:
— Band, Chorus & Strings
— Boys & Girls Basketball
— Cheerleading
— Cross Country
— Drama Club
— FIRST Lego League
— Garden & Visual Arts Club
— Math Olympiads
— Outreach Programs
— Ski Program
— STEM For Fun and more!
Infant Jesus School
At Infant Jesus School, we believe the foundation of successful
learning begins in a structured and nurturing environment
while reinforcing mutual respect and moral responsibility.
Fall Open Houses:
Wed., Nov. 6th
9:30-11:00 a.m. AND
6:30-8:00 p.m.
Strong Faith Strong Foundation Strong Future
Pre-K through Grade 6
Come see what we're all about!
3 Crown Street, Nashua, NH • 603-889-2649 • www.ijschool.org
Local Travel Agency Raises $7,500
to Assist Boston Bomb Victims
A Special Treat
for Hudson
Seniors
by Lori A. Bowen, Hudson Senior Services Coordinator
Autumn is such a beautiful time of year with the leaves changing and the frost on
the ground in the mornings. There is never a better time than now to take a walk
and smell the season changing, pick up a leaf that catches your eye, and enjoy the
moment.
What a great turn out at coffee club this week, over 20 people came down to
enjoy a cup and have some conversation. Wonderful coffee this week as usual
Mary, it is always good when made with a smile.
The new Senior Center at Benson Park is moving along. Stop by to enjoy the park
and take a moment to see the progress of the new facility.
Our Police Chief, Jay Lavoie stopped by this week. Thank you Chief for taking
time out of your schedule to say hello.
“I cannot endure to waste anything so precious as autumnal sunshine by staying
in the house.” Nathaniel Hawthorne, The American Notebooks
Put it on your calendar that the Fairview Healthcare Fair is on the 9th and the
Hudson Senior Council on Aging is the recipients of the proceeds to benefit the new
Senior Center at Benson Park. Please go out and visit the fair with a friend.
Thank you Sandi for bringing in your beautiful black Mahjong set for Mahjong
Tuesday
It is Craft Fair season so get out and support your local artisans, take a friend and
make a day of it.
Happy Birthday to all with November Birthdays!
If you would like to mention a Seniors Birthday please let Lori know.
When you are cooking this week add an autumn spice, a little cinnamon or
nutmeg to make it just right.
If you would like to submit a recipe or a comment for our article
contact Lori Bowen at lbowen@hudsonnh.gov or stop by and see her at
the Community Center Tuesdays through Thursdays.
submitted by Cruise Travel Outlet
With the help of Norwegian Cruise Lines
and Viking River Cruises, Cruise Travel Outlet
of Salem recently donated $7,500 to assist the
Boston Bombing victims. The donation was made
to The One Fund Boston which was formed to
assist victims and families affected by the tragic
events at the Boston Marathon on April 15, 2013
and in the days that followed.
Norwegian Cruise Lines and Viking River
Cruises donated cruises that were given away
to two donors who made donations through
BostonFundraiser.org, a site set up by Cruise
Travel Outlet. “We were deeply affected, as was
everyone by this tragic event, we knew we had to
do something” said Bill Walsh, president of Cruise
Travel Outlet. “Our hearts and prayers go out to
all those who were affected and continue to be
affected by this senseless tragedy.”
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For the Kitchen
Butterscotch Squares
1/4 cup vegetable oil
1/2 teaspoon vanilla
1/4 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon baking powder
1 egg
1 cup flour
1 cup chopped walnuts or pecans
1 cup packed brown sugar
1 cup chocolate or butterscotch chips (optional)
Pre-heat oven to 350 degrees grease 8 x 8 pan
Stir dry ingredients together
Mix vanilla and egg and oil together add to dry mixture
Stir in nuts and chocolate
Bake for 30 minutes, enjoy with cider for a nice treat.
Hudson - Litchfield News | November 1, 2013 - 3
The Word Around Town...
Letters to our Editor
Pub: Hudson-Li t chf i el d/ Pel ham-Wi ndham
Si ze: 4 x 10. 5” ( 7. 7” x 10. 5” )
Sect i on: FF, RHP
I nser t i on: 11/ 01/ 2013
Pl ease di r ect al l quest i ons about ar t wor k/ f i l es t o:
Squar e Spot Desi gn- Li sa Lei dy- 603-625-6003
l i sa@squar espot st udi o. com
Sout her n NH Medi cal Cent er
Ti t l e: PCP-Shoppi ng
Make your primary care provider
a regular part of your life.
Need a doctor? Call HEALTHMATCH at 603-577-CALL (2255).
Year in and year out, your primary care provider sees the changes that happen in
you. There’s value in that consistency: a strong relationship with a primary care
provider can act as a foundation for treatment should you develop a health-related
issue. See your primary care provider regularly and enjoy greater support for a
healthy life. Foundation Medical Partners has primary care practices in Amherst,
Hudson, Merrimack, Milford, Nashua, Pelham and Pepperell, MA.
Proudly affiliated with Southern NewHampshire Medical Center
While Vivian Paskowski, APRN, with Foundation Internal Medicine in Nashua (in photo),
may not actually help you with your shopping, she will make getting to know you a priority.
She knows
what’s on
your list.
Local Resident Strongly Opposed
to Circumferential Highway
In another recent Opinion Ofering I began with
explaining that I never really set out to ofend anyone, I
always have it in mind to try to inform someone about
something of importance; which is the purpose of this
Opinion Ofering on this Circumferential Highway.
I believe, and it is my opinion that other Hudsonites
might share, that this Circumferential Highway idea is
a combination of Special Interests and a very misguided
local political leadership. Te Special Interests have
no real regard for anything else but what they want to
have done and the misguided local political leadership
dances around with this kind of foolishness; when
they should instead be addressing the far greater needs
of the Hudson community. Another example of
Special Interests and misguided political leaders is that
hundreds of millions of dollars wasted on widening
I-93, when in this contrived economic disaster;
hundreds of people in our own area have lost jobs
and homes. Tere are more people living in poverty
or in shelters now than before and food pantries are
constantly searching for more sources of foods supports.
It’s as if these Special Interests and misguided political
leaders read the newspaper with all of this misery
blacked-out so they don’t read it and only look for news
coverage on their foolish endeavors of multi-millions
of dollars on highways that aren’t needed; so they can
pump themselves up. It is irresponsible for any political
leader or elected ofcial or town employees to waste
time and resources on this decades old Circumferential
Highway. It’s just like the wasteful and destructive
Broad Street Parkway across the river, where the
Special Interests hammer away at it for decades until
they manipulate things to go their way eventually and
that’s what it’s all about. I do not have any respect
for any Hudson Political Leader or town employee
for propping up and supporting this Circumferential
Highway foolishness but I would surely have respect
for them if they addressed the greater needs of the
Hudson Community instead; that they would not be
able to grandstand about, but hopefully and quietly take
more pride in doing. Tere is a simple solution to the
passing-through trafc and that’s to strongly restrict that
passing-through trafc with high cost fnes, just like it’s
done with restricting truck trafc through residential
areas. Force the passing-through trafc to go though
Hudson on highways that are built for that purpose.
Wake up folks to the manipulation that’s going
on again and stand frm against this foolishness of a
Circumferential Highway. And a fnal closing thought,
that with every highway that’s built, it costs more and
more to maintain it but look around at all of the area
highways and interstates; at the deplorable condition
they’re always in with weeds and poorly maintained
road surfaces. Stop this madness.
Jerry Gutekunst, Hudson
A Busy November
for Litchfeld Recreation
Litchfeld Recreation has several events planned
for the month of November. On the 23rd we will be
holding a sports and recreation equipment swap at
Talent Hall. Tis will be a great opportunity to get all
of that no-longer-needed recreation equipment out of
your garage and put some money in your pocket. Or, if
you are in need of any equipment, stop by for a pair of
skis, skates, baseball bat, bicycle, etc. Christmas is just
around the corner!
On Tanksgiving day, at 9:30 a.m., we will play
our frst ever Litchfeld Turkey Bowl! It’ll be North
vs. South with Pinecrest being the dividing line. Tis
is a friendly fag football game which will be played at
Roy Memorial Park. Tere is no cost to play and there
will be games available for all ages. We only ask for a
donation of one canned good or non-perishable item
to beneft the Litchfeld Food Pantry. Tis is open to
any resident of Litchfeld and their relatives. Sign up
on the Litchfeld Recreation Facebook page or at www.
LitchfeldRec.com to be a player, referee or fan.
Also, in November we will construct the ice skating
rink at Roy Memorial Park. Te rink will be open for
skating throughout the winter and will be used again
in February for the upcoming Litchfeld WinterFest.
We are always looking for volunteers to help with the
rink construction. Please keep an eye on the Litchfeld
Recreation Facebook page for more information on the
date for volunteers to help.
We recently had our frst meeting for the planning of
the second annual WinterFest. We are planning a larger
event this year and we can use all the volunteers we can
get. Anyone interested in volunteering to help with
WinterFest or with the ice rink construction can contact
Keith Buxton at LRC.Buxton@comcast.net.
Please check the website or Facebook for more
information on any of these events.
Keith Buxton, Litchfeld Recreation, Litchfeld
In My Opinion...
In My Opinion... In My Opinion...
by Daniel M. Dellinger
Let’s Serve Veterans as Well as They Have Served Us
by Daniel M. Dellinger
During the recent government shutdown many numbers were
thrown around. But there is one
number that stands out and it has
nothing to do with the debate over the
federal budget.
More than one a day. That is how
many members of our active-duty
military, National Guard and Reserve
forces have committed suicide over
the last year. Simply put, we are losing
more service members by their own
hands than we are by the enemy in
Afghanistan.
Only those who experienced firsthand the horrors of combat
can understand why most of these young men and women feel
compelled to take such drastic and permanent measures.
As Veterans Day ceremonies and parades occur throughout the
country, it is important that we commit ourselves to do everything
possible to prevent these needless and tragic deaths.
We are their friends, their family, their co-workers and their
neighbors. It is up to us to ensure that every veteran feels that his or
her service to this country is appreciated by their fellow Americans.
There are many tangible ways that we can acknowledge their
sacrifice, but the easiest is to simply say, “Thank you for what you
have done for our country.”
If he is showing signs of unhappiness or depression, encourage
him to seek help through the VA immediately. If she has had
difficulty obtaining the benefits that she is entitled to, let her know
that The American Legion has thousands of trained service officers
nationwide that will help her navigate the bureaucracy free of
charge.
And if that veteran has made the Supreme Sacrifice, remember the
price that has been paid for our freedom and offer your support to
the loved ones left behind.
But Veterans Day is a time to honor not just those who have fought
for us in battle, but in fact, all of the outstanding men and women
who served in our nation’s Armed Forces since our founding more
than 237 years ago.
Not all veterans have seen war, but a common bond that they
share is an oath in which they expressed their willingness to die
defending this nation.
Perhaps most significant in preserving our way of life are the
battles that America does not have to fight because those who wish
us harm slink away in fear of the Navy aircraft carrier, the Coast
Guard cutter, the Air Force fighter squadron or the Army soldier on
patrol. Or they have heard the words that recently retired General
James Mattis shared with his Marines: “Be polite. Be professional.
But have a plan to kill everybody you meet.”
While we should all be grateful for the remarkable advancements
made in military medicine and prosthetics, the fighting spirit and
inspirational stories of our veterans are not due to technology.
These traits come from the heart.
And many of these veterans are women, such as Army Chief
Warrant Officer Lori Hill. While piloting her helicopter over Iraq
in 2006, she maneuvered her chopper to draw enemy gunfire away
from another helicopter and provide suppressive fire for troops on
the ground. Despite flying a damaged aircraft and suffering injuries,
she landed the helicopter safely, saving her crew. For her actions,
she became the first woman to receive the Distinguished Flying
Cross.
Women are major contributors to our military presence in
Afghanistan and many have given their lives in the War on Terrorism.
The American Legion recently issued a report calling upon VA to
improve its response to the unique needs of women veterans. The
VA and military health systems need to adequately treat breast
and cervical cancer as well as trauma that resulted from domestic
violence, sexual harassment and assault. America is home to more
than 1.2 million women veterans and they deserve our support.
In the poem “Tommy,” the great writer Rudyard Kipling lamented
over the rude treatment a British soldier received at a pub. Writing
in classical old English, Kipling compared the abuse with the more
favorable treatment that “Tommy” receives by the public during war.
“For it’s Tommy this, an ‘Tommy that, an’ ‘Chuck him out, the
brute!’
But it’s ‘Savior of ‘is country’ when the guns begin to shoot;
An’ it’s Tommy this, an’ Tommy that, an’ anything you please;
An’ Tommy ain’t a bloomin’ fool – you bet that Tommy sees!”
Let us always treat our 23 million veterans as the saviors of our
country that they are. Even when the guns are no longer shooting.
Area Boy Scouts
Gather Food
In southern New Hampshire, local food pantries feel the economic
strain as they receive more calls and visitors each month. The area
Cub Scout Packs and Boy Scout Troops are helping again this year to
meet that need.
On Saturday, November 2, Cub Scouts, Boy Scouts, Venture Scouts
and Explorers will hit the streets to deliver tens of thousands of door
hangers to residences across the Nashua area.
One week later, on Saturday, November 9, Scouts will retrieve the
bags filled with non-perishable goods for distribution to local pantries.
“This time of year, pantries often see their lowest food reserves,
yet an increase in need,” said Gaylord. “One of many Scout service
projects, Scouting for Food brings youth an awareness of their
communities’ needs, but also demonstrates the astounding support
our neighbors provide one another. Some pantries tell us this single
food drive keeps their shelves stocked for over four months. To think
that one-third of the food helping local families comes through the
hands of Scouts is a remarkable testament to Scouting’s importance.”
The perfect bag
With so many varieties of canned foods in today’s supermarkets,
choosing what to donate can be a difficult decision.
Dieticians suggest the following items to be good contributions in
the “perfect” Scouting for Food bag: 2 cans hearty soup, stew or chili
1 can fruit and 1 can 100% fruit juice 2 cans tuna, chicken or salmon
1 can vegetables 1 can tomato or pasta sauce 1 canned meal 1 can
beans 1 box of pasta
The Scouts want to remind those donating to put their bags out
Friday night, or before 8 a.m. on Saturday the 9th. The little Cub
Scouts get really excited when they see a bag of food on the porch or
front steps of a house. If you can make sure the bags are out, we’ll do
our part to get them to those that need them.
For more information, visit the Web site of the Daniel Webster
Council, Boy Scouts of America at www.nhscouting.org.
About Boy Scouts of America: Boy Scouts of America has dedicated
the last century to providing youth with an opportunity to find their
place in the outdoors, community, nation, church and school. Adult
leaders strive to develop leadership, moral strength, and mental
awareness in every youth of our program.
Cub Scout Packs work with boys in first grade through fifth grade.
Boy Scout Troops are built around the youth leadership of boys 11
to 17 years old. Venture Crews offer a unique youth leadership
environment for young men and women from 14 to 20 years old.
Exploring Posts are groups for young men and women ages 14-20
focusing on specific career interests. Go to www.BeAScout.org or
Contact Jack Gaylord at jgaylord@bsamail.org for more information.
4 - November 1, 2013 | Hudson - Litchfield News
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Litchfeld Fire
Reminds You ...
submitted by Steve Dube
Each year fire claims the lives of 3,400
Americans, injures 17,500, and causes billions of
dollars worth of damage. People living in rural
areas are more than twice as likely to die in a fire as
those living in mid-sized cities or suburban areas.
The misuse of wood stoves, portable space heaters
and kerosene heaters are especially common risks
in rural areas.
All heating equipment needs space. Keep
anything that can burn at least three feet away.
Supervise children whenever a wood stove or space
heater is being used. Have a three-foot “kid-free”
zone around open fires and space heaters.
Portable Heater Fire Safety
o Wood Stoves
Wood stoves cause over 4,000 residential fires
every year. Carefully follow the manufacturer’s
installation and maintenance instructions. Look for
solid construction, such as plate steel or cast iron
metal. Check for cracks and inspect legs, hinges
and door seals for smooth joints and seams. Use
only seasoned wood for fuel, not green wood,
artificial logs, or trash. In pellet stoves, burn only
dry, seasoned wood pellets. Inspect and clean your
pipes and chimneys annually and check monthly
for damage or obstructions.
o Electric Space Heaters
Buy only heaters evaluated by a nationally
recognized laboratory, such as Underwriters
Laboratories (UL). Check to make sure it has a
thermostat control mechanism, and will switch
off automatically if the heater falls over. Heaters
are not dryers or tables; don’t dry clothes or
store objects on top of your heater. Plug space
heaters directly into wall outlets and never into an
extension cord or power strip. Always unplug your
electric space heater when not in use.
o Kerosene Heaters
Buy only heaters evaluated by a nationally
recognized laboratory, such as Underwriters
Laboratories (UL), and check with your local fire
department on the legality of kerosene heater
use in your community. Never fill your heater
with gasoline or camp stove fuel; both flare-up
easily. Only use crystal clear K-1 kerosene. When
refueling, allow the appliance to cool first and then
refuel outside. Never overfill any portable heater.
Use the kerosene heater in a well ventilated room.
o Fireplaces
Fireplaces regularly build up creosote in their
chimneys. They need to be cleaned out frequently
and chimneys should be inspected for obstructions
and cracks to prevent deadly chimney and roof
fires. Check to make sure the damper is open
before starting any fire. Never burn trash, paper
or green wood in your fireplace. These materials
cause heavy creosote buildup and are difficult to
control. Use a screen heavy enough to stop rolling
logs and big enough to cover the entire opening
of the fireplace to catch flying sparks. Don’t wear
loose-fitting clothes near any open flame. Make
sure the fire is completely out before leaving the
house or going to bed. Allow ashes to cool before
disposing of them. Place ashes in a tightly covered
metal container and keep the ash container at least
10 feet away from your home and any other nearby
buildings. Never empty the ash directly into a trash
can. Douse and saturate the ashes with water.
Finally, having a working smoke alarm
dramatically increases your chances of surviving a
fire. And remember to practice a home escape plan
frequently with your family. For more information
please contact part-time fire inspector Steve Dube
at sdube@litchfieldfd.com for more info.
by Lynne Ober
Sunday saw a gathering of Hudson’s
most adorable Horribles at Benson
Park. A Halloween parade sponsored
by Hudson Recreation Department
brought many costumed youngsters
and adults to the park. Gathering
at the A-Frame slightly before noon
there was much excitement in the
air. Led by a gorgeous angel carrying
a boom box playing “The Monster
Mash,” the Horribles lined up and
then walked around the green. Adults
were stationed along the route with
pumpkins filled with candy which
was given to the trick or treaters. At
the end, everyone gathered into a
group and costume prizes were given
out. Recreation Director, Dave Yates,
channeled one of the great Red Sox
Bearded Ones, but he wasn’t the only
adult festively dressed for the season.
Hudson’s Adorable Horribles
Kyron Woods, 2, was an adorable
blue monster
Dana Scion giving out candy
Kayleigh Arnold, 9, Alex Landry, 9
and Connor Peterson, 9
Lined up to start the parade
Kendall Chinappi, 4,
was Super Girl
Emma Peterson, 3, came as Tinkerbell Staff photos by Lynne Ober
Some Unexpected
Outcomes from The
Default Budget
by Kristen Hoffman
Hudson School district programs are feeling the pinch due to
purchasing restrictions put in place by the District’s default budget.
There has been a hold placed on new purchases for the duration of
the budget cycle.
The affects are being felt district wide, and has imposed new
restrictions on instructors. Instructors now need to get permission
from either Superintendent Bryan Lane or Burnell prior to purchasing
new equipment. “It’s not to say that we can’t buy new textbooks,”
Burnell said. But oversight needed to be added to the purchasing
process to keep in line with the default budget.
“There have been major over expenditures,” Business
Administrator Karen Burnell said. Burnell said that as a result of the
School District operating on a default budget, programs have been
affected, and there hasn’t been any leeway for recouping losses
within other sectors of the district.
Currently, Special Education Program has a $384,000 default.
This default is due to federal mandates, I.E.Ps and state mandated
student placements. Burnell said that under normal budget cycles,
departments are able to pull from other areas in order to curb budget
defaults, but this year that was not the case.
This year, the school district’s budget was set at $47,231,604,
down from the district’s suggested budget of $48,026,049. This
caused the budget to be $794,445 less than anticipated, causing
the district to scramble to find ways to pay for mandates and new
supplies. The purchasing hold has been one way for the district to
keep a look out on rising costs, and found that it has helped.
LMS Annual Veteran’s Day
Breakfast and Ceremony
submitted by Carolyn J Leite, Litchfield Middle School
The Litchfield Middle School is happy to announce that we will be hosting
our annual Veteran’s Day Ceremony and Breakfast on Friday, November 8. The
ceremony will take place in the LMS Gymnasium starting at 7:45 a.m. All students
are encouraged to invite any relative who is a veteran to join us. The Unified Arts
Department will host breakfast in the cafeteria following the ceremony from 8:45 to
9:30 for the veterans and the student who invited them. If your relative is able to join
us, RSVP to Melissa Masson in the office (424-2133) with your name and the number
of people attending by Wednesday, November 6.
If you have any photos of family members who have served or are currently
serving in the armed services we would love to display them in a slide show as part
of our ceremony. E-mail any photos to rcorbeil@litchfieldsd.org. Students are also
encouraged to participate in a writing contest honoring our veterans. Specific writing
topics have been announced and outstanding student work will be included in the
ceremony. We are thankful that we can take this opportunity to honor the men and
women who have demonstrated patriotism and courage by joining the armed forces
of the United States of America.
We Are
Hometown
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Hudson Lions Names Corey Morin as Fire
Department Employee of the Year
submitted by Gary J. Rodgers,
Hudson Lions Club
The Hudson Lions Fire Department
Employee of the year award’s 2013 recipient
was Firefighter Corey Morin. Corey
was nominated for his dedication to the
department since he was born. Corey is
following in his dad’s footsteps in many ways.
His dad is Captain Dave Morin. Corey was
with his dad whenever dad wasn’t working.
He joined the explorer post when he turned
14. He joined the call force when he turned
18. Corey is presently a full-time Firefighter
in Portland, ME and remains an active call
firefighter here in Hudson.
Corey comes back to Hudson often, and
helps out the current explorers so they learn
what a firefighter is all about. He will take
the explorers completely through what the on
duty firefighters each day. This includes daily
choirs, training, responding to call and even
cooking the meal for the shift, to name a few
things.
Corey was also very involved with the 9/11
Memorial at Benson’s Park and helping out
during hurricane Sandy. He even helped put
on the Award Dinner to name a very few of
his roles as a member of HFD.
For his efforts and dedication, he was
nominated and received the Fire Department
Employee of the Year Award, given by the
Hudson Lions Club. The award consists of an
engraved plaque and a check to spend as he
wishes.
Congratulations Corey and keep up the
Great work!
Firefghter Corey Morin
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Hudson Resident’s ‘Small Gesture’
Makes Many Grateful
submitted by Alexys Gilcreast
Two years ago, I began collecting clothes
for a clothing giveaway. I didn’t have a goal
for how much to collect or a solid plan of how
to give it away, but I did know that I wanted
to see the impact that the giveaway would
make first-hand. I never imagined that the
community would join and support me as they
did. It was truly amazing.
After gathering 45 boxes of clean clothes,
organized by gender and size, distributing
flyers in Spanish and English to the Nashua
Soup Kitchen and other local non-profit
agencies, working with Corpus Christi for use
of their parking lot, and borrowing foldable
tables from friends, the two day event began.
With the help of a few volunteers, we were
giving away the clothes on Tuesday and
Thursday afternoons.
On Tuesday I brought a large bag of stuffed
animals, thinking that if some kids showed up,
maybe they would like one. It was amazing
to see the smiles on their faces. I told one
little girl that the stuffed sea turtle she picked
came all the way from the Bahamas and that
it probably tells great stories. She snatched it
up and hugged it the entire way home, with
a smile stretched ear to ear. One toddler
in particular stood out. He needed a little
cheering up and a stuffed monkey was just the
tool for the job. His dad asked if we had size
13 shoes, pointing at the sandals on his feet
and saying, “This is all I have.” Heartbroken,
we found someone to donate size 13 shoes
directly to him. That family had just been
offered a small apartment after renting a single
bedroom in an apartment with twelve other
people, but had nothing to put in the new
place. Thinking of all of the things we take
for granted, a mattress, dishes, silverware,
microwave, and shoes, we told them we had
some extra things. The next day, we brought
them a full sized mattress, some dishes, a
couch, and a table. After reaching out to a few
friends, we furnished their entire apartment,
except for a washing machine. We’re still
looking for a donated washing machine. But
now they have silverware, a few decorations
on the walls, a dresser to get their clothes out
of trash bags, microwave, pots and cooking
utensils, and all the other basics for an
apartment. They were ecstatic. The mom said
“This has been a great week. Kasper just got
a job that starts tomorrow, we were offered an
apartment, and now this.” How little it took
from us to make a massive impact and help
get this family back on their feet. And to think
that if it wasn’t for the stuffed monkey, we may
have never known how much we could help
them.
By the end of Tuesday, we gave away 35
boxes of clothes, and I worried that we would
not have enough for Thursday. The hardest
part was the realizing that although the clothes
were great, people were in desperate need
of warm blankets and jackets with the cold
weather quickly approaching. We put the
word out as fast as we could. Mr. Beals, my
principal at Alvirne High School, emailed
his staff and told them what I was trying to
do for the community. We put a message
on Facebook and Twitter looking for more
donations of specific needs. In a mere 48
hours, the community donated heaping piles
of clothes, jackets, shoes, and blankets. We
entered the Thursday giveaway with more
boxes than what we started with on Tuesday.
On Thursday, one little boy was so excited
to pick out a shirt, that he never checked the
sizes. He just picked up the top one and
never stopped smiling. We helped him get the
right size and asked if he liked the Patriots. “I
love the Patriots!” he said as we handed him
a Patriots blanket. He was so appreciative of
what we had given him that he ran to give my
Grandmother a hug. It made me realize that
all of the hard work was well worth it.
A woman named Cathy saw the article in
the newspaper and had come to volunteer on
Tuesday. After seeing what the giveaway
was all about, she not only came back on
Thursday, but she dug deep herself, bringing
baskets of clothes and blankets to donate as
well.
It is very important to me that
everyone who helped knows how
thankful my family and I are.
Thank you to all of the non-profits,
Attitudes by Amanda, Mr. Beals
and the Alvirne community, as
well as all of my friends and family
for their support. Also, I would
like to especially thank Cathy for
her help and friendly smile, and
Corpus Christi for hosting the
event.
This event was a real eye opener
to me. There truly is nothing in this
world that makes me happier than
seeing how grateful people are for
what is such a small gesture to me
and my family. Never underestimate
what you, as one person, can do.
Anyone can give back. There is
nothing better.
Alexys is a senior at Alvirne High
School
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Hudson Mall Trick Or Treat
by AJ Dickinson
The Hudson Mall sponsored a “trick or treat”
on Sunday, October 27. The fun community
event involved every store in the plaza. Most of
the stores’ employees could be seen in various
costumes handing out candy to the little ones.
Some of the fun activates that were enjoyed that
day were horse and buggy rides as well as a
petting zoo provided by Charmingfare Farm. The
event was held from 1 to 3 p.m. and was a fun fall
activity for the whole family to enjoy.
Bayleigh Crouthamel is seen posing
by the petting zoo Sunday
3 year old Derek
Schiller is seen
receiving candy with
his sister 4 year old
Samantha
3 year old Cullen Correale is seen
enjoying the petting zoo
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6 - November 1, 2013 | Hudson - Litchfield News
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Food Pantry Gets a Boost from Kiwanis
Hudson Kiwanis President
Mike Falzone, and incoming
President Rob Streed presented
Pauline Boisvert of St. Vincent de
Paul Food Pantry a $2,500 check
for current and holiday food
needs. So far this year, 118,000
meals have been served this year,
and 154 families received food
this week. There are over 200
families in Hudson seeking help
for Thanksgiving and Christmas at
this date.
Courtesy photo
Incoming President Rob Streed and
President Mike Falzone present Pauline
Boisvert of the St. Vincent de Paul food
pantry with a $2,500 donation.
State Grange Honors Local Teacher
HFD Keeps Trick or
Treaters in the ‘Glow’
Brownie 12607 Troop Earns Patch
submitted by Claire Gagnon
At the annual session of the New Hampshire
State Grange, the banquet held in Concord on
October 26, awards were presented to deserving
individuals who excel in many specific categories.
Among them was a nominee from Hudson Grange
as a dedicated educator.
Karyn Misenheimer is the Physical Education
teacher at Hills Garrison School in Hudson. Every
child in the school will readily answer “PE” when
asked what the best part of their week is. Karyn
says PE is not a competitive sport; it’s a process
where children challenge themselves to do their
personal best. She teaches them the importance
of movement and regular physical activity to
maintain one’s wellness.
Karyn also supports
the staff by providing
assistance with using
technology with students
during her prep periods. She has also hosted a
boot camp for staff after school with individual
exercise coaching. Karyn is a person who offers
assistance at every turn, wherever there is a need.
She cares deeply for her profession. In addition
to all her school activities she is “Mom” to three
young children and is very into her community
issues like the PTO, Recreation Commission
and co-editor of the NH Alliance for Health, PE,
Recreation & Dance newsletter and a facilitator
for the Lego Club.
Karyn is very deserving of the “Teacher of the
Year” award from the NH State Grange.
Karyn Misenheimer
(center) received
congratulations from
Hudson Grange Of ce
Clair Gagnon (left) the
Community Service chair
and Jerry Leclerc, Master as
well as Marilyn Martinelli
(right), Principal of Hills
Garrison School.
Courtesy photo
Hudson Firefghters passing out glow
necklaces in preparation for Halloween
Firefghters passing out
glow necklaces in a Hudson
neighborhood. Tese little guys
are sure to be seen!
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submitted by Laura West, Troop Leader
Litchfield Brownie Troop 12607 recently
visited Apple Acres in Windham. The troop
discovered the importance of locally grown food
and connected with local farmer Sam. The girls
will earn a patch for participating in the apple
picking trip as part of the “make it, eat it, try it”
experience.
Courtesy photos
CHS Students Study
Beach Samples
submitted by Campbell High School
On Tuesday, Campbell High School students
from Mr. Orban’s Honors Biology classes and
Ms. Manley’s Environmental Science class took
a field trip to Plum Island, MA. Students and
teachers had a beautiful day to be out there,
and it was a great time collecting samples for
testing. The students got to explore the beaches
along the island, a few salt marshes, and the
tide pool at Sand Point Reservation at the end of
the Island.
Courtesy photos
Hudson - Litchfield News | November 1, 2013 - 7
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Event Introduced Students to Interesting Careers
by Marc Ayotte
As part of the Campbell High
School curriculum, students were
able to experience lectures and
presentations from approximately
30 guest speakers; some
involved in local businesses and
ranging from venture capitalists
to environmental scientists to
regulatory affairs for medical
devices. The three 30 minute
sessions were conducted during
morning classes as students rotated
their way to designated classrooms
from where the speakers
conducted their presentation.
According to Campbell’s
Director of Guidance, Jodi
Callinan, the event is part of a
‘comprehensive guidance plan’
that addresses academics, career
opportunities as well as social/
emotional issues. “This helps fulfill the career piece of it,” cited
Callinan. Getting first dibs on sitting in on the lecturers of their
choice were NH Scholar Students along with upperclassmen.
One of the featured speakers was Ryan Leach, who is group
sales and education coordinator for the Manchester Monarchs
ice hockey team. Leach addressed the students in the confines of
English teacher Erin Long’s classroom and discussed a wide range
of job related responsibilities. A
Manchester Central High School
and UNH graduate, Leach spoke
of his travels to Los Angeles
where he was involved in several
sports marketing positions for
both collegiate and professional
organizations.
The main theme conveyed by
Leach to students that are interested
in pursuing a career in his aspect
of the sports world is to be willing
to accept a job in any city and
for any team. He mentioned the
willingness to relocate away from
the New England area is even more
imperative due to the success of the
Boston based professional sports
teams; a simple lesson in supply
and demand. “Jobs are available
if you are willing to go somewhere
else,” noted Leach, adding that
“you are sort of pigeon-holing yourself” if you insist on working
for Boston teams.
After the NHL lockout forced Leach out of season ticket sales
for the L.A. Kings, he returned to Manchester
to work with the Monarchs organization. “I’m
fortunate to work in the industry I went to school for
in the town where I live,” cited Leach
Another speaker on the day was Dawn Miller,
who many know as the assistant to the CHS Athletic
Director, but is also a hair stylist for Shear Class
Beauty Salon located in Hudson. Miller along with
fellow stylist Liane Wells addressed the class, noting
the logging of many hours before ever being able
to ‘touch a customer’s hair. Saying that there was a
lot to learn and it’s not as simple as one might think,
Miller also touched upon the importance and length
of time of establishing a positive reputation; a key
element for establishing clientele and becoming
successful.
For those interested in pursuing a career in this
profession, Wells revealed three principle ways
one can become a hair stylist; cosmetology courses
in high school, work at a salon as an apprentice
or attend a school such as the Hudson based Continental Hair
Academy. “You just don’t go in and start cutting someone’s hair,”
joked Miller. Lions Plan Psychic Fair
submitted by Jeri Maynard, Hudson Lions Club
The Hudson Lions Club will once again host its semi-annual
Psychic Fair on Saturday, November 2, at the Hudson Community
Center (formerly Lions Hall), 2 Lions Avenue in Hudson. Readings are
scheduled in 15- 20 minute intervals with eight psychics just waiting to
help you with your questions or wishes for the future.
Scheduled psychics include Jacki Joy, Angie Danjou, Modern Day
Medium, Irine Chiu, Kathryne Samuelson, Rita Overhulser, Ramona
Garcia and Shannon Shedd. Each psychic specializes in one or more
psychic techniques; information about their individual skills will be
available at the appointment table. Appointments will be made from 10:
a.m. to 4 p.m.
Start your holiday shopping early by visiting the vendors that will be
on site. A small snack bar will also be available for the hungry amongst
us.
All proceeds from the Psychic Fair will go to the Hudson Lions Clubs
charitable causes. Currently, we are focusing on the Food Bank at St.
Vincent de Paul and the Anna Marie House, both located in Hudson.
The Lions are also a new but proud supporter of “Moore-Mart,” the
program started by Judge Paul Moore of Nashua which provides “care
packages” to the military troops in the Middle East.
For more information about the Psychic Fair call Ida: 883-1091; Jeri:
883-8565 or E-mail: Lionjeri@comcast.net.
Information about the Hudson Lions Club, www.HudsonLions.com or
by calling Scott Wilson, Membership Chair at 880-1838.
Staff photos by Marc Ayotte
Manchester Monarch’s Group Sales & Education Coordinator Ryan Leach
(center) with Jonathan Donaghey and Gia Cataldo during Career Day
Dawn Miller (left) and Liane Wells, both stylists at Shear Class in Hudson,
appeared as guest speakers for Campbell High’s Career Fair
Prizes So Good, They’re “Frightening”
On Friday, October 25,
the Hudson CHIPS hosted
their annual “Fright Night,”
at the Community Center.
Fright Night is a chance
for local children to get
together in a safe and wel-
coming environment prior
to Halloween. According
to Hudson Police Detective
Joe Hoebeke, the annual
event has been held since
the early 1990s.
Left: Te winner of the
Life is Good Gift Basket
poses with Det. Joe Hoebeke
Right: Det. Hoebeke with
the winner of two tickets to an
upcoming Bruins game
8 - November 1, 2013 | Hudson - Litchfield News
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Turkey Raffle
and Silent Auction

Turkey Raffle
and Silent Auction

Turkey Raffle
and Silent Auction
Alvirne Booster’s 8th Annual
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For more information contact Dave Melanson at dmelanson@gidynamics.com or 603-566-5356
Come and Gobble Up a Good Time
and Support AHS Athletics
Hudson Fire Log
Sunday, October 20: 7:50 a.m. Difficulty
breathing, Chagnon Lane. 8:42 a.m. Chest pain,
Louise Drive (L). 12:07 p.m. Lift assist, Kris Court.
2:36 p.m. Arcing wires, Cutler Road (L). 4:33 p.m.
Smoke investigation, Central Street. 5:34 p.m.
Illegal burn, Central Street.
Monday, October 21: 6:58 a.m. Difficulty
breathing, Mockingbird Lane. 8:04 a.m. Fainting,
Glen Drive. 8:51 a.m. Unknown medical, Pearson
Street (L). 10:32 a.m. Back injury, Belknap Road.
11:53 a.m. Motor vehicle accident, Lowell Road.
2:08 p.m. General illness, Ferry Street. 2:50 p.m.
Service call, Pilgrim Drive (L). 3:28 p.m. Motor
vehicle accident, Bush Hill Road. 6:25 p.m. Illegal
burn, Heritage Circle.
Tuesday, October 22: 1:03 a.m. Laceration, Burns
Hill Road. 1:04 a.m. Unknown medical, Amanda
Drive. 8:26 a.m. Service call, Pine Road. 12:25
p.m. Chest pain, Derry Road. 1:15 p.m. Service
call, Highlander Court (L). 1:43 p.m. Difficulty
breathing, Abbott Farm Lane. 4:09 p.m. Illegal
burn, Boyd Road. 6:40 p.m. Seizure, Greenfield
Drive. 7:54 p.m. Service call, Kimball Hill Road.
8:09 p.m. Odor of gas, Paradise Lane. 9:45 p.m.
Motor vehicle accident, Clement Road.
Wednesday, October 23: 12:03 a.m. Fainting,
Eayrs Pond Road. 1:25 a.m. Hemorrhaging, Henry
Drive. 7:22 a.m. Difficulty breathing, Lowell Road.
7:27 a.m. Odor of gas, Derry Road. 8:05 a.m.
Chest pain, Baker Street. 8:11 a.m. Unconscious
person, Telolian Drive. 8:16 a.m. Stroke, Trolley
Road (L). 9:37 a.m. System trouble, Ferry Street.
1:25 p.m. Service call, Constitution Drive. 2:32
p.m. Service call, Executive Drive. 3:02 p.m.
General illness, Hedgerow Drive. 3:39 p.m.
Unknown medical, Highland Street. 4:58 p.pm
Brush fire, Old Derry Road. 6:29 p.m. Smoke
in a building, River Road. 7:37 p.m. Fire alarm,
Kimball Hill Road. 8:20 p.m. Motor vehicle
accident, Derry Street.
Thursday, October 24: 5:02 a.m. General illness,
Melendy Road. 6:45 a.m. Laceration, Dana Drive.
9:43 a.m. Head injury, Parkhurst Drive. 12:09 p.m.
Abdominal pain, Highlander Court (L). 1:18 p.m.
Box alarm, Glen Drive. 6:30 .m. Motor vehicle
accident, Central Street. 8:26 p.m. Fire alarm,
Chandler Court. 9:13 p.m. Back injury, Charles
Bancroft Highway (L). 10:10 p.m. Seizure, Burns
Hill Road. 10:41 p.m. Hip pain, Lowell Road.
Friday, October 25: 8:59 a.m. Service call, Marsh
Road. 9:39 a.m. Stroke, Berkeley Drive. 12:11
p.m. Unknown medical, Kimball Hill Road. 12:51
p.m. Service call, Kimball Hill Road. 2:29 p.m.
Back pain, Vernon Street. 7:06 p.m. Elbow injury,
Highlander Court (L). 4:08 a.m. Laceration, Old
Derry Road.
Saturday, October 26: 12:06 p.m. Fainting,
Adelaide Street. 12:41 p.m. Mutual aid, Spit Brook
Road (N). 1:54 p.m. Electrical problem, Sullivan
Road. 2:49 p.m. Abdominal pain, Reflection Drive.
3:36 p.m. Mutual aid, Kinsley Street (N). 4:42 p.m.
Illegal burn, Hurley Street. 8:03 p.m. Multiple
injuries, Pelham Road. 8:07 p.m. Fire alarm, Rebel
Road.
Brush Fires Kept Firefghters Busy Over the Weekend
Hudson Fire Department frefghters Sean Mamone and Captain Todd Hansen
assist in battling a weekend brush fre at Mines Falls in Nashua.
Above, Captain Todd Hansen
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Hudson frefghters put out a brush fre on Glenview Drive this weekend.
Dry conditions proved to be ripe grounds for fres
A night time brush fre sparked on Oliver Drive in Hudson.
No one was injured or displaced by any of the blazes.
Realtor
nanciejacobson
@masiello.com
Nancie
Jacobson
Two Family for Owner Occupied 
or Investment
11 English Range Rd Derry NH 
New price
$245,000
Let Your Tenants Pay Your Mortgage in this
Updated Two Family in A Residential Neighborhood
Each unit has 2 bedrooms, full bath, w/d hookups, large
LR & kitchen, full basement, private entrance and deck.
Tenants pay own utilities. Low maintenance costs.
Make an appointment to see this home TODAY!
Call Nancie at 603-889-7600 X 2001 or direct 603-689-2001
MLS 4254778
Hudson - Litchfield News | November 1, 2013 - 9
Does Your Best Friend
Need A New Look?
Flea Control, De-skunking, Dematting, Skin Treatments
Located near the Nashua Rail Trail, 112 Gilson Rd Open Tues – Sat
www.dogpatchgrooming.com
883-4020
Dogs Cuts Starting at $40- includes trim, bath, ears, and nails
Kitty Cuts Starting at $50 - also includes trim, bath, ears, and nails
Nail trims $10
Litchfeld
Police Log
Wednesday, October 16: 10:22 a.m. Suspicious
vehicle, Heron Drive. 1:49 p.m. Shawn Power,
25, Manchester, arrested for Driving After
Suspension and Suspended Registration. 3:05
p.m. Motor vehicle complaint, Albuquerque
Avenue. 5:18 p.m. Suspicious vehicle, Route 3A.
7:00 p.m. Kurt Lessage, 32, Pembroke, arrested
for Bail Jumping. 7:20 p.m. Pedestrian struck by
a motor vehicle, fatality, Route 3A.
Thursday, October 17: 4:27 p.m. Suspicious
person, Center Street. 6:40 p.m. Welfare check,
Dixon Drive. 8:25 p.m. Disorderly conduct,
Route 3A.
Friday, October 18: 12:18 a.m. David Sanborn,
28, Goldsboro, NC, arrested for Driving After
Suspension, Unregistered Vehicle, and Possession
of Drugs. 9:23 a.m. Alarm activation, Moose
Hollow Road. 2:07 p.m. Medical emergency,
Woodburn Drive. 2:13 p.m. Alarm activation,
Locke Mill Drive. 5:10 p.m. Kevin Buclais,
42, Brockton, MA, arrested for Driving After
Suspension and Unregistered Vehicle.
Saturday, October 19: 1:15 a.m. Angeleena
Hall, 29, Lowell, MA, arrested for Disobeying
a Police Officer and Operating Without a Valid
License. 6:50 p.m. Bicyclist hit by a motor
vehicle, Albuquerque Avenue. 8:09 p.m.
Suspicious activity, Route 3A.
Sunday, October 20: 12:42 a.m. Noise
complaint, Winter Circle. 1:39 a.m. Noise
complaint, Josiah Drive. 3:13 a.m. Alarm
activation, Talent Road. 12:40 p.m. Unwanted
subject, Route 3A. 2:27 p.m. Wires down, Cutler
Road. 8:46 p.m. Theft from a motor vehicle,
Route 3A.
Monday, October 21: 1:27 a.m. Suspicious
person, Derry Road. 7:21 a.m. Two car motor
vehicle accident, Greenwich Road.
Tuesday, October 22: 12:10 p.m. Suspicious
vehicle, Ronisa Avenue. 2:01 p.m. Suspicious
vehicle, Ronisa Avenue. 8:42 p.m. Car hit a deer,
Route 3A.
Car Strikes
Utility Pole,
Causes Power
Outage
submitted by Hudson Police Department
On October 27, at 12:08 a.m., members of
the Hudson Police and Hudson Fire Departments
responded to Barretts Hill Road for a reported
one car accident. Upon the officer’s arrival she
learned that a 2003 Mitsubishi Lancer, driven by
Kylee Boucher, 22, of Hudson, went off the road
while traveling east on Barretts Hill Road and
stuck a utility pole. The impact caused the utility
pole to break off at the base resulting in a power
outage in the area.
Boucher was evaluated by Hudson Fire
Department EMS on scene, and no injuries were
reported. Boucher was the lone occupant in the
motor vehicle, she was wearing her seatbelt and
there was airbag deployment.
Portions of Barretts Hill Road were briefly
closed during the accident investigation and to
evaluate damage to the utility pole. This accident
remains under investigation by the Hudson Police
Department Patrol Division.
Power Lost, Traffc Detoured
due to Motor Vehicle Accident
submitted by Hudson Police Department
On October 27, at about 12:59 p.m., the Hudson Police and the Hudson
Fire Departments responded to the area of Derry Street at Derry Lane for a
report of a single vehicle collision with a utility pole.
It was determined a Dodge Avenger was traveling south on Derry Street
and struck a utility pole off the right shoulder of the road. The Dodge was
operated by William Gaillardertz, 21, of Hudson. There was also a 21 year
old female passenger. Both occupants were seatbelted at the time of the
crash. There was no airbag deployment. Neither were injured.
The utility pole sustained damage causing power outages in the north end
of town; the traffic lights at Derry Street and Robinson Road were without
power and not working. Temporary stop signs were placed at the intersection
of Derry and Robinson Road. The road at Derry Street and Derry Lane was
closed with a detour.
Hudson Men Seriously Injured
in Thorning Road Crash; Driver Charged
submitted by Hudson Police Department
On Sunday, October 13, at approximately 2:08
a.m., the Hudson Police and Fire Departments
responded to the area of Thorning Road by
Memorial Drive for a report of a single vehicle
crash into a tree with entrapment. Once officers
arrived they found that a white Toyota pickup
truck had crashed into a tree. The driver was
identified as Derek Wisnosky, 18, of Hudson.
Wisnosky was trapped inside the vehicle and
had to be extricated from the vehicle by Hudson
Fire Department personnel using the Jaws of Life.
A single passenger in the vehicle was identified
as Dylan Conroy, 18, also of Hudson. Conroy
had gotten out of the vehicle prior to the arrival of
emergency personnel. Both driver and passenger
were transported to the Southern New Hampshire
Medical Center with serious but non-life
threatening injuries. Speed and alcohol appear
to be contributing factors in the crash. The crash
remains under investigation by the Hudson Police
Crash Investigation and Reconstruction Team.
Wisnosky is charged with Felony Aggravated
DWI and was released on $15,000 personal
recognizance bail. He will be arraigned on
October 31 in the 9th Circuit Court, Nashua.
Police Blotter
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Excitement at Alvirne High School Wednesday Morning
Multiple Towns Join in Search
New England has it all
New England
has it all
November 3: The Kennedy Assassination: 50
Years Later, Nashua, NH. Join historian Chris
Daley for his multimedia presentation. Relive
the events of November 22, 1963, in vivid detail
through witness statements, photos, diagrams, and
videos. Daley will examine the question whether
Lee Harvey Oswald acted alone, by scrutinizing
his life as well as testimony, ballistics, and autopsy
reports. He’ll weigh the evidence for and against
the claims that the FBI, CIA, Mafia, Soviet Union,
Fidel Castro, and even Lyndon B. Johnson were
somehow involved in a conspiracy to commit this
tragic crime. Free. 2 p.m. Nashua Public Library,
2 Court St. (603) 589-4610; www.nashualibrary.
org.
November 3: Irish Tenor Ronan Tynan, Lowell,
MA. Lowell, MA. Ronan Tynan has built a
tradition of spectacular
performances at Lowell
Auditorium. Whether it be his
debut concert on American
soil at the auditorium in
1999, his string of sold out
performances with The Irish
Tenors, or his intimate solo
performances, Ronan has
made a home for himself
in Lowell. Ronan is truly a
modern day “Renaissance
Man.” Faced with numerous
challenges throughout his
well-documented life, he has
persevered with enormous
passion and determination.
He attributes his success to his
faith and the knowledge that
the Man Above guides him
through every door he opens.
Introduced to international
audiences as a member of the
Irish Tenors, Tynan quickly
became known for his unique
voice and irresistible appeal.
Following his mother’s advice
to always follow your dreams,
Tynan decided to launch a
solo career, and has achieved
the fame and adoration that
could have existed only in the
farthest reaches of his dreams.
Admission fee. 2 p.m.
Lowell Memorial Auditorium.
(866) 722-8881, www.
lowellauditorium.com.
November 3: Synagogue
Celebrates “Thanksgivukkah,”
Derry, NH. This year, for the
first time ever, Thanksgiving
and Hanukkah fall on the same day. Etz Hayim
Synagogue invites the community to celebrate the
occasion with food and games at a free, family-
oriented, “Thanksgivukkah” party. Guests may
bring a meat-free dish with a “Thanksgivukkah”
theme to share. 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Etz Hayim
Synagogue, 1 1/2 Hood Rd. (603) 432-0004;
www.etzhayim.org.
November 5: A Conversation with John Marshall,
Exeter, NH. The year is 1835 and John Marshall
has been Chief Justice of the U.S. Supreme
Court since 1801. He had fought, literally
and figuratively, to establish a strong national
government, opposed in that effort by powerful
politicians including Thomas Jefferson, James
Madison, James Monroe, and Andrew Jackson.
Although his opponents controlled Congress
and the White House for all but four years of
Marshall’s tenure on the Court, Marshall prevailed
in advancing his views on the law and the
Constitution. Richard Hesse portrays Marshall
as he reflects on his life and explains his views
and his fears for the future of our country in this
living history
program.
7:30 p.m.
Exeter
Historical
Society, 47
Front St.
(603) 778-
2335.
Hudson Police conducted a canine drug sweep at Alvirne High School on Wednesday, October 30. Students were evacuated from the school and prohibited from leaving campus. Tere will
be follow up seminars with the students that show the issues drugs may create now and later in their adult lives. Tis is being done in conjunction with the Hudson School Board.
10 - November 1, 2013 | Hudson - Litchfield News
Gatherings
Good for the Community
Your Hometown Community Calendar
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Your Hometown Community Calendar
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Are you looking for a church home?
Visit us and feel the warm welcome.
"Best kept secret
that is right
in plain sight."
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH OF HUDSON
236 Central St., Hudson, NH 882-6116
www.firstbaptisthudson.com
See us on Comcast Cable ch. 20 Sundays at 9AM and 6PM
The first Sunday of the month at 11am is a combined
Communion Service (No 9:00am service)
Sunday Worship Services-
9:00am - Contemporary Service •11:00 am - Traditional Service
Sunday School for all ages at 10am
Generated by http://www.opensky.ca/~jdhildeb/software/sudokugen/
Puzzle 17 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.41)
2 8 3 5 7 4 1 6 9
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5 1 9 2 6 3 8 4 7
8 2 5 7 3 9 4 1 6
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1 5 2 3 9 7 6 8 4
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Saturday, November 2
“Scouting for Food.” Girl and Boy
Scouts in Hudson will be putting out door
hangers asking folks to place a bag of
food out on November 9 before 8 a.m. for
pickup. Don’t be surprised if you see Scouts in
your neighborhood!
Final Household Hazardous Waste &
Electronics Collection of 2013, from 8 a.m.
to 12 p.m., Nashua Public Works Garage, 9
Stadium Dr., Nashua. For residents of Hudson
and Litchfield. Cost: $10 user fee per vehicle,
additional charges for quantities exceeding 10
gallons or 20 pounds, additional charges for
electronics recycling. For more information and
a complete list of accepted items, visit: www.
nashuarpc.org/hhw or call 424-2240.
Semi-annual Psychic Fair sponsored by the
Hudson Lions Club from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., at
the Hudson Community Center, Lions Avenue in
Hudson. Related vendors and snack bar will be
on site. For more information contact Ida at 883-
1091, Jeri at 883-8565 or E: Lionjeri@comcast.net.
All proceeds benefit our local charitable causes.
Saturday, November 2
There will be a meeting of the Litchfield
Historical Society on at 2:00 PM at the Historical
Society Building, 168 Charles Bancroft Hwy. New
members are welcome.
“Reasons for Seasons” Watercolors by Susan
Peterson – Exhibit and Reception. Susan Peterson
will be this month’s featured artist at the Rodgers
Memorial Library in Hudson. See her work
on display in the library Community Room
throughout the month of November. There will
be an opening reception for the exhibit from 1-3
p.m. Meet the artist, prints and cards will be
available for sale, refreshments will be served.
The environment is Susan’s inspiration and she
depicts everyday elements with a hint of fun and
fantasy. Her style is realistic and often includes
flowers, organic produce and animals
Wednesday, November 6
The GFWC Hudson Community Club
will meet at 7 p.m. in Checkers Restaurant
at Alvirne High School. Members will be
stuffing Christmas stockings for MooreMart.
The stockings may go to NH soldiers stationed
abroad or to local veterans in veterans’ hospitals
or homes. The Public Issues Department, which
includes support of our troops, is one of the areas
of community service of the General Federation of
Women’s Clubs. Deborah Luszey of Moore Mart
will help us to organize the stockings. Updates
on the butterfly garden at Benson’s, part of the
Conservation Department, will be reported.
Women who are interested in these or other
areas of community service are invited to visit the
meeting of the GFWC Hudson Community Club
on Wednesday night.
Weight Management 101 with Life Coach
Diane MacKinnon. Weight issues can stem from
thoughts and feelings about ourselves and our
bodies. Learn about managing your thinking
to help you get to your natural weight and stay
there. Diane MacKinnon, Master Life Coach, will
offer many tips, tools, strategies, and resources
for living at your natural weight. 7 p.m. at the
Rodgers Memorial Library. Pre-registration
requested but not required. Register at rmlnh.org/
events or call 886-6030.
Thursday, November 7
Paper Techniques Workshop: Holiday
Cards with Shrinky Dinks. Make holiday
cards and decorate them with Shrinky
Dinks at the Rodgers Memorial Library.
Paper Techniques meets the first Thursday of each
month at 6:30 p.m. and is open to teens and
adults. There is a different project each month.
Check the website, rodgerslibrary.org, or call for
upcoming projects. Pre-register at rmlnh.org/
events or call the library at 886-6030.
Saturday, November 9
“Scouting for Food - Pickup.” Boy and
Girl Scouts in Hudson will be picking up
food donations for area food banks and
agencies. Put non-perishable, non-glass
bottled food on your front porch before 8 a.m.
today for pickup. Don’t be concerned if you see
Scouts in your neighborhood picking up bags of
food!
Saturday, November 9
The Litchfield Women’s Club will partner with
the American Red Cross to once again host its
annual blood drive. The drive will be held at
Griffin Memorial School, located at 229 Charles
Bancroft Highway in Litchfield, from 9 a.m. to 2
p.m.
Amber Jewelry Workshop. From 9:30-11:30
a.m., amber artist Rasa Dooling will show a film
about amber and discuss its history. The film
will be followed by a hands-on workshop during
which attendees will make a piece of amber
jewelry. Anyone who has old amber jewelry and
would like suggestions for modernizing the piece
is welcome to take it to the class. This workshop
is sponsored in part by a grant from the Zylonis
Fund of Hudson. There is a materials fee for this
workshop and pre-registration is required. Sign
up as soon as possible as there is a minimum
number of participants needed to hold this
workshop. Go to rmlnh.org/events or call 886-
6030 to register. Special thanks to the Lithuanian
Brothers and Sisters (LABAS) for helping to make
this event possible.
Monday, November 11
Veterans Day - no
school for Hudson and
Litchfield School Districts;
no postal delivery
Wednesday, November 13
The Hudson Junior
Woman’s Club invites
women, 18-plus and older to
participate in our community
service project for the month, The
Blanket Project. We are making no
sew lap blankets for resident veterans
at the VA Hospital. We have the
materials; all we need is your time
and talent from 7-8 p.m.at the Rodgers
Memorial Library. Any questions,
contact Sandra at vsr8954@gmail.com.
Saturday November 16
The Litchfield Community
Church will be holding their
annual Craft Fair on from 9 a.m.
to 3 p.m. There will be a bakery table,
vendors, raffle basket table, Silent Auction, raffle
for a personalized park bench and, of course,
the Kitchen will have breakfast and lunch, items
available for purchase. Santa Clause will arrive
at 11 a.m. and will be available to have pictures
taken from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Silent Auction
bidding will begin on Monday, November 4, on
our website www.litchfieldchurch.org. All Raffle
drawings will take place at 3 p.m.
Thursday, November 21
The Litchfield Seniors will be meeting
at 12 p.m. at the Community Church on
Charles Bancroft Highway. Members will
make their own Thanksgiving sandwiches
with turkey and all the fixings. They will be
entertained by local bellringers. All those
attending are asked to bring donations for the
Litchfield Food Pantry. Items needed include:
spaghettiOs, tuna, canned meats, canned corn
and peas, spaghetti sauce, flour, sugar, cake
mixes, frosting, small bags of potato chips, paper
towels, toilet paper, mayonnaise, and ketchup.
Thursday, November 21 and Friday, November 22
The Hudson Police Department is sponsoring
the AARP Driving Safety Program. The class will
be held in the Anne Seabury Community Room,
Hudson Police Department, 1 Constitution Dr.,
Hudson. The class consists of two, four hour
blocks of instruction spanning two consecutive
days. Classes will be held from 8 a.m. to 12
p.m. The cost for the course is a reasonable. This
course is designed especially for drivers age 50
and older. Participating individuals will learn how
to avoid traffic hazards and may be eligible for
auto insurance discounts (for more information,
contact your insurance agent). Class size will be
limited to 25 individuals; contact Detective Joseph
Hoebeke at 816-2245 for additional information
and to reserve your seat today!
Saturday, November 23
Litchfield Recreation will hold a sports
and recreation equipment swap at Talent
Hall. This will be a great opportunity to
get all of that no-longer-needed recreation
equipment out of your garage and put some
money in your pocket. Or, if you are in need
of any equipment, stop by for a pair of skis,
skates, baseball bat, bicycle, etc. Christmas
is just around the corner! Check the website,
www.LitchfieldRec.com, or Facebook for more
information.
Wednesday, November 27 thru Friday,
November 29
Thanksgiving Recess, Hudson and
Litchfield School Districts
Thursday, November 28
Today, Thanksgiving Day, at 9:30 a.m.,
Litchfield Recreation will play its first ever
Litchfield Turkey Bowl! It’ll be North vs.
South with Pinecrest being the dividing
line. This is a friendly flag football game which
will be played at Roy Memorial Park. There is
no cost to play and there will be games available
for all ages. We only ask for a donation of one
canned good or non-perishable item to benefit the
Litchfield Food Pantry. This is open to any resident
of Litchfield and their relatives. Sign up on the
Litchfield Recreation Facebook page or at www.
LitchfieldRec.com to be a player, referee or fan.
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Henry ‘Red’ Fournier
Every lifetime has a story
Obituaries
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Every lifetime has a story
Every lifetime has a story
Obituaries
Every lifetime has a story
Obituaries
Every lifetime has a story
Henry “Red” Fournier,
91, a resident of the NH
Veterans Home in Tilton,
and formerly a longtime
resident of Hudson, died on October 23,
2013.
Henry was born on January 7, 1922 in
Lowell, MA, son of the late Eugene and
Yvonne (Daunais) Fournier.
Henry was predeceased by his wife, Rita
(Michaud) Fournier in 2011 after 65 years of
marriage. He was also predeceased by six sisters, Rita Klaver, Doris
Pereira, Cecile Gauthier, Lucy
Ninteau, Irene Caron and Therese
Hebert and two brothers, Roland
and Emile Fournier.
Henry served his country
honorably during World War
II in the U.S. Army where he
achieved the rank of Sergeant and
was awarded the Purple Heart.
After his honorable discharge
he was employed by the U.S.
Government/Civil Service, where
he worked at both Fort Devens
and Hanscom Field until he retired in 1969. After retiring, he
explored several career changes and returned to work full time at
Sanders Associates (BAE Systems) as a material handler where he
worked until 1984. In his retired years, he enjoyed vacationing
with his wife, relatives and close friends. He most enjoyed
spending time with his children and grandchildren.
Henry was a member of VFW Post 5791, American Legion Post
48, Knights of Columbus and DAV Chapter 7 in Nashua. He was
one of the founders of the South Pacific Buddies Association.
Henry is survived by three sons, Robert Fournier and his
wife Terry of Hudson, Ronald Fournier and his wife Michele of
Pembroke, and Roger Fournier and his fiancée Rebecca Adams
of Burton, MI; a daughter, Rachel Guill and her husband John of
Hudson; eight grandchildren; seven great-grandchildren; one sister,
Pauline Beaulieu and her husband Alphonse of Dracut, MA; and
several nieces, nephews and many dear friends.
A Funeral Mass was celebrated on October 29 at Blessed John
the XXIII Parish, 27 Library St., Hudson followed by burial in St.
Patrick’s Cemetery, Hudson.
The family has requested that in lieu of flowers, donations be
made to the NH Veterans Home, 139 Winter St., Tilton, NH 03276.
To leave an online message of condolence, please visit www.
dumontsullivan.com. The Dumont-Sullivan Funeral Home in
Hudson is in charge of arrangements.
Correction
In last week’s article titled “Alvirne’s Juliete Miller Wins
National Spanish Exam Scholarship” the correct spelling of Ms.
Miller’s first name is Juliette.
Hudson - Litchfield News | November 1, 2013 - 11
First times,
for any
experience,
are full of
uncertainty.
This is what
a child
faces when
the first visit
to a dentist
lies ahead. As a parent, you
can do a lot to ease your child's
entry into the unknown land of
the dentist's office.
It's all a matter of
preparation. Most of your efforts
will be preventative. First, don't
talk up the visit ahead of time;
this only gives your child an
opportunity to hear about the
experiences of friends. Usually
they will be exaggerated,
alarming accounts that can
only cause uncertainty and
fear.
You can avoid this by not
mentioning the dental visit until
the night before, that way
there's no time for a lively
imagination to go to work on a
routine subject.
Don't make a special event out of
the visit. Don't promise rewards; they
only tell your child that something
unusual is going to happen. That's a
sure way to trigger anxiety.
Your best attitude is to have no
attitude. You want to convey that
the dentist is another friend, like
those who come to your home and
show they care about your child.
You want to make the visit to the
dentist seem like one more typical
childhood experience.
Be prepared for questions,
children are full of them. Be factual
in answering them. The dentist
wants to know what's happening in
your mouth. He'll shine lights and has
a tiny mirror. He'll let you become
acquainted with the instruments he
uses in your mouth.
Most difficult rule to follow: Stay
out of the treatment room. In your
child's eyes you're the protector, the
guardian. Your presence signals
danger. There is none. Your trust
becomes a model for your child.
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Fundraiser for Campbell High
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Saturday November 23rd 9am–5pm
Space Cost $25 plus donation of $25
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Litchfield Craft Fair
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Cougars Compete at D-3
Cross Country States
by Marc Ayotte
Grabbing the headlines once again on October 26 was Sean
Munnely when the Campbell X-C teams competed at the 2013
divisional championships at Derryfield. Munnely’s gravitation to
greatness continued this time in 5K competition as he posted a
time of 17:44 to finish 15th in the field of 195 runners. As a result,
Munnely is the sole CHS representative to qualify to compete at
the Meet of Champions to be held at Mines Falls in Nashua on
Saturday, November 2.
Also having a solid showing in this year’s states for Coach Kelly
Fraser’s squad despite not moving on to compete along the banks
of the Nashua River, was Ryan Perigny, who finished 47th overall
with a time of 19:02. As a senior and after competing in his last
X-C event as a Cougar, Perigny shared his thoughts about the road
to the D-3 championships; “I had a rocky start to the season with
one of my slowest times in my high school career in our first race
but I was able to make quick adjustments and get back on my
feet to eventually record my fastest time of my high school career
the week before states.” With momentum on his side, he added;
“I had never felt more confident going into a race than I did on
Saturday.”
With respect to the
one on one battle with
the tough Derryfield
course, as well as the
sport of cross country
racing, Perigny became
philosophical; “I’ve heard
people say they’d rather
shoot themselves in the
foot rather than run at
Derryfield because of the
challenging hills and the
pressure of the crowd. I
love that course. The
hardest battle a runner has
to overcome is the mental
game, which I conquer
with no hesitation.” The
CHS runner who had
number ‘694’ pinned
to his jersey continued by expounding upon his
efforts and expectations; “If you can defeat the
course mentally than you’ve done all the hard
work. Knowing I was never going to qualify at
that race, my one goal was to overcome my final
attempt at this course both mentally and physically,
and I believe I accomplished my goal by recording
a time that I am proud of and has shown all the
work that I have put in through my four years of
running.”
Completing the top five finishers for Campbell
who contributed to the overall team score were:
Marcus Rothaker (3rd, 88th overall, 19:53),
Michael Gray (4th, 94th overall, 20:02) and Sam
Munnelly (5th, 116th overall, 20:41).
For the girls, there unfortunately was not a
lot of vital statistics to write home about on the
individual front, though they did match the boys’
team performance by finishing a respectable 13th
in a field of 28 teams. Leading the Lady Cougars
around the 3.1 mile course, and finishing 44th
overall was sophomore Jaime Minervini. The next
four spots which contributed to the team score
were compressed into a 65 second window, and
recorded as follows: Erin Frost (2nd, 87th overall,
26:19), Sarah Nolan (3rd, 95th overall, 26:47),
Samantha Molinari (4th, 96th overall, 26:48) and
Ashley Rollend (5th, 106th overall, 27:24).

HGSL Week Eight Update
submitted by Greg Chase
The 12U Hudson Fire wrapped up there fall
schedule with a double header versus the 12U
girls from Merrimack. The first game was played
by most of Hudson’s second and third year girls
and the Fire started the first inning off with a
2-0 lead. From there they dominated with great
pitching from the starter Sarah Linnehan and
reliever Kiara Chase matched up with a 10 hit
attack on offense with multi hit performances from
Savannah Emerson, Victoria Atherton and Kiara
Chase. When the game was over the Hudson Fire
defeated the Merrimack squad 15-5
In the second game Merrimack jumped out
to a 9-3 lead after three innings. But the Fire’s
offense got going and only trailed by one run after
four innings thanks to Sara Hey’s two hits and
great pitching. Kiara Chase came in the game
late to provide relief help. But the Fire had some
problems on defense in the final inning and lost a
close one 14-13 .
Now the Fall Ball Season is over for this year
and the Hudson Fire would like to thank the
teams from Merrimack, Litchfield, Windham and
Souhegan for the great competitive games they
had and we look forward to playing them again
next season.
CHS Boys Soccer Players Honored at Last Game
submitted by
Kelly and Jeff Douglas
Six Campbell High
School Boys Soccer
players celebrated their
last regular season
game on home turf as
seniors. Graduating
players are Cody
Jackson, Captain Conor
Douglas, Andrew
Picard, Captain
Ben Billings, Kian
Fuertes, and Captain
Keegan Tanguay.
The game against
Raymond ended as
win 2-1 in overtime.
Congratulations for a
season well played.
Courtesy photo
Sam Munnelly,
who fnished ffth
for the Cougars
at the D-3
states, glances to
his right before
heading up the
slight incline to
the fnish line at
Derryfeld
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Ryan Perigny (CHS) is in the middle of a pack making its way past
the iconic gazebo located in the frst mile of the Derryfeld course.
Members and coaching staf of the CHS cross country teams who participated in the 2013
state tournament held in Manchester on October 26
12 - November 1, 2013 | Hudson - Litchfield News
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Lady Broncos Pummel
Pinkerton on Senior Night
Campbell Cougars Subdue Wilton-
Lyndeborough Warriors in the Den
Campbell Cougars Squeezed by Pelham Pythons
by Phillip Nichols
Over 1,500 fans were on hand to honor seniors and watch a
great football game at Campbell High School on Friday night,
October 25, when the Campbell Cougars played the undefeated
Pelham Pythons. Both teams came into the game hoping
to keep their win streaks alive. This game was especially
important to Campbell, because they are fighting for a playoff
spot.
Before the game, the seniors: Christian McKenna, Cody
Alward, Connor Perry, Trevor Duquette, Jacob Parzych, Vinny
Bucci, Sam Harvey, Steven Amadio, Jake Bumbaca, Patric
O’Mara, Tevor Famisan, Jacob McQuesten, and Lee Nordyke
were all recognized, along with their parents. Coach Gush
greeted each player and their parents, thanking them for the
opportunity to coach them. The parents received hugs and
flowers from the players as a token of their appreciation for their
parents and the support that is given to them.
The Cougars led by senior quarterback, Christian McKenna,
were poised to make their homecoming a game to be
remembered. McKenna completed 15 passes for 158 yard, with
two touchdown passes, and only one interception. McKenna
also ran for 85 yards on just 8 carries.
However, the undefeated Pelham Pythons had something to
say, led by Christopher Medeiros, RB, the Pythons were able to
put up a total of 48 points against Campbell, ending Campbell’s
winning streak.
Despite only scoring 13 points in the game, the Cougars
demonstrated that they were not going to just roll over and play
dead. All of their players played hard. Junior running back,
Kevin Moreau, had 17 carries for 95 yards, three receptions
for 50 yards and one touchdown in the game. The other score
came from a pass thrown by McKenna to junior wide out, Kyle
Kopaczynski (eight receptions for 81 yards and a touchdown on
the day). Cody Alward had three receptions of his own for 50
yards.
As for Campbell’s defense, they too refused to quit and
played hard. Senior Sam Harvey, made the Pelham Pythons
earn every yard. He led his team in tackles, with six individual
and was in on several other big plays. He recovered a fumble
and caused another.
Harvey and his teammates put pressure on the
Pelham’s quarterback as well. Trevor Duquette
was the benefactor of a pass thrown in his
direction, which resulted in one of three turnovers
suffered by the Pythons. Conor Gannon and
Connor Perry each had four tackles. Christian
Kamach and Vinny Bucci added another three
tackles each.
With all the effort, though the Cougars came up
short and was defeated by the Pythons by a final
score of 48-13.
Coach Gush said after the game, “I am proud of
the way our team played tonight. Disappointed
by the score, but we didn’t just roll over. A lot
of teams would have. Pelham is undefeated
and a great football team. We cannot take that
away from them. But our team showed their real
character tonight by not quitting and continuing to
fight. I couldn’t be prouder.”
The Cougars (7-2) are still waiting to see if they
will make it into the playoffs.
by Marc Ayotte
The Alvirne girls’ volleyball team wrapped up
its regular season in relative ease with a 3-0 home
win over Pinkerton Academy (25-17, 25-23, 25-
20) to finish the year with a five game win streak
that landed them at 15-3 and in a three way tie for
second place in the D-I standings. However, due
to tie-breaker rules, the Broncos officially finished
as the number 4 seed for the state tournament
and will host 13th seeded Exeter in first round
action on October 31 at 6 p.m. Dover captured
the regular season title with a pristine 18-0 mark
while the other two teams that tied Alvirne at 15
up and 3 down were Merrimack (number 2) and
Salem, who was awarded the third seed.
The Lady Bronco’s senior night sweep of the
Astros (11-7) was preceded by a brief ceremony
recognizing the seven seniors on the team.
When play got underway, the AHS offensive
surge was led by Marisa Coronis with 16 kills
(one ace, one block, four digs) while sister
Malory Coronis along with Kayla Gendreau
(one ace, two blocks) contributed nicely with
seven kills apiece. Evelyn Susko once again led
the teams in assist, posting 24 to go along with
three digs. Other contributions to the Bronco
win came from Sandi Purcell (10 digs, one kill),
Jasmine Hamilton (two kills, four digs), Vanessa
Hedstrom (one ace, four digs) and Danielle
Lefebvre with an ace and a kill.
Earlier in the week, Alvirne headed to
Merrimack where they recorded an impressive
3 games to 1 win; ending the second seeded
Tomahawk’s eight game win streak. Marisa
Coronis dominated net play for the Broncos with
20 kills to add to her 11 digs on the defensive end.
Kayla Gendreau (two blocks) also aided in the
offensive cause, chipping in with five kills. Evelyn
Susko had another monster game with a team-
high 28 assists to go along with one ace and one
dig. Other notables for Alvirne were Sandi Purcell
with a team leading four aces along with 10 digs,
while Vanessa Hedstrom registered four digs.
by Phillip Nichols
The 16th ranked Wilton-Lyndeborough Warriors
entered the den of the 4th ranked Campbell
Cougars, hoping to catch them napping on
Campbell’s senior night. Coach Walker was on
guard and saw them coming.
The seniors, Rebecca Landreau, Sophie Scafidi,
and Brianna Hardy were honored prior to the start
of the game. There was even a slide presentation
by the team for Coach Walker, which was shown
to the near capacity crowd.
When the game started, Coach Walker quickly
called a time out to alert his team that there
were Warriors in the “Den,” who would love to
win this game. He told them to wake up and
communicate with each other, if they cared about
winning the game.
The Lady Cougars got the message. Offensively,
Val Boucher stepped up and provided 16 service
points, and six aces. While Rebecca Landreau
added nine services points, two aces and six
assists, for the Lady Cougars.
The defense was outstanding as well. Senior,
Brianna Hardy led the way with 10 kills and
12 digs, while both Olivia Martinage and Alex
Trevains added seven kills each.
Senior setter, Sophie Scafidi contributed a game
high 14 assists, and the Campbell Cougars went
on to defend its den in straight sets, 25-14, 25-16
and 25-16). The Lady Cougars finish the season
with a 14-2 record, while the Warriors end with a
6-10 record.
After the
game, Coach
Walker said,
“depending on
the outcome
of the other
games, we hope
to be either
the 4th or 5th
seed going into the tournament.” Coach Walker
indicated that he had to call the immediate
timeout to get his team focused, given the
other festivities that were going on. It worked.
Congratulations Lady Cougars and your 14-2
season.
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Conor Gannon sacks Pelham’s quarterback.
Senior members of the AHS girls’ volleyball team with their respective family members; (players from L-R): Kayla
Gendreau, Vanessa Hedstrom, Sandra Purcell, Danielle Lefebrve, Evelyn Susko, Jasmine Hamilton, Marisa Coronis.
Malory Coronis (9) elevates for one of her seven kills as Alvirne
defeated Pinkerton in senior night action, 3 games to zip
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Staff photos by
Phillip Nichols
Cougars Rebecca
Landrau and Alex
Trevains attempt
to kill a shot by
Warriors Amber
Goodwin, in their
3-0 victory.
Campbell Senior Night. Seniors leading the way!
Hudson - Litchfield News | November 1, 2013 - 13
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Alvirne Scalps Merrimack on Senior Night
by Marc Ayotte
The Alvirne boys’ soccer team culminated its regular season with an
impressive 4-1 senior night chop-down of the Tomahawks on October 25. This
year’s senior-laden Bronco ensemble is arguably the most prolific team to take
to the field since the Kevin Savage and Jeff Cyr led squad that captured the 1973
State and New England Championships. The 11 players who will be bidding
adieu to Bronco Nation next June, enjoyed pre-game festivities by celebrating
the occasion with family, friends and fans.
The maroon and gold concluded its season, statistically, as the hottest team
in Division I, winning its last 11 games; yes even more sizzling than undefeated
and first place Hanover (15-0-1). The Marauders incurred their sole blemish
on an otherwise perfect season with a 0-0 tie against Concord with just three
games left on their schedule. With their torrid finish, the Broncos finished alone
in second place after spending much of the latter part of the season in lock-step
with two time-defending Division I state champ Manchester Central (13-2-1),
who suffered a 0-0 tie of their own to Bedford in the season’s final game, thus
slipping into third.
The 14-2 Bronco’s domination of Merrimack (7-8-1) was a microcosm of the
regular season where they outscored their opponents 47-16 over the 16-game
schedule. From the outset, Alvirne’s assault on Merrimack keeper Michael
Guest was not very ‘hospitable’ although several excellent scoring chances from
Raul Stedile, Kyle Salucco, Brett Richardson and PJ Busnach went unanswered.
Then with 27:08 showing on the clock, it was Stedile who finally entered the
scoring column when he drove a shot past a diving Guest for a 1-0 lead. The
Broncos never looked back; doubling its lead just 62 seconds later when Josh
Bellomo scored from just inside midfield when his long range missile deflected
sequentially off of Guest’s mitts and then the crossbar, crossing the goal line for
a two goal advantage.
Richardson produced a ‘threes-wild’ scoreboard when the he put his team
up 3-0 with 3:33 remaining in the first half. The Bronco striker, positioned just
inside the ‘eighteen’ adeptly handled a precision feed off the left foot of Matt
O’Brien and proceeded to beat Guest to his left for a three goal cushion heading
into the intermission.
The Tomahawks dented the scoreboard at the five minute mark of the second
40 when junior Chase Bantham beat Bronco keep Liam Regan, as the ball
trickled inside the right post to make the score 3-1. Alvirne, survived another
Merrimack scoring opportunity moments later, but the Broncos proved to be too
much for their outmatched opponents and put the game away when Salucco’s
brilliantly
executed, far-side
header off the
indirect kick of
Stedile found its
way to the back
of the net.
As the likes of
Savage and Cyr,
Mike Bolton and
Pete Lee along
with Paul Trocki,
Pete Psareas and
many others
celebrate the
40th Anniversary
of the Bronco’s
1-1, two OT (7-5
corner kicks) win
over Kearsarge
for the state title,
the 2013 squad
has its own cast
of potential
difference makers. With the play of Richardson, Salucco, Stedile, Bellomo,
Busnach, and Lubinski just to name a few, along with a 1-2 punch between
the posts provided by keepers Regan and Jake Schofield, this determined and
cohesive Broncos unit is once again in the rarefied air of division I boys’ soccer
and very much poised to make another run at that elusive title.
The playoffs begin on October 31 at 4 p.m. when they host 15th ranked
Nashua South. With a win against the Panthers, the Broncos will advance to the
quarter finals which will also be a home affair on November 3, with a scheduled
2 p.m. start.
Matt O’Brien picks up an assist on Alvirne’s third goal
of the game as he delivers a perfect pass to
Brett Richardson in front of the Merrimack net

Senior Night Success for Lady Broncos
by Sue LaRoche
The Alvirne Lady Broncos played their final regular season
game of the season and capped it off with a celebration for the
graduating seniors. It was the first frigid night of the season, but
the Broncos’ Tori LaRoche was on fire as she scored all three of
the goals for the Broncos to give them a 3-2 victory over visiting
Milford High School.
Prior to the start of the game, recognition of the seven seniors
and their families took place. The graduating seniors are: Heather
Barkley, Sabrina Carter, Morgan Knight, Shantelle Lacasse, Brittney
Lambert, Tori LaRoche, and Marie Morrier. All of the seniors
played well and made significant contributions throughout the
contest.
The Broncos scored first at 31:38 when Tori LaRoche took a feed
from Heather Barkley and headed it past the Milford goalkeeper
for the 1-0 lead. Ten minutes later, the Lady Broncos continued to
use their heads as Tana Tufts headed a ball into the air and LaRoche
picked the ball off and again headed it past the goalie for the 2-0
lead. Milford fought back striking a ball off one of the Bronco
defenders to narrow the lead to 2-1 which is how the half ended.
Alvirne continued to dominate play in the second half, but it was
Milford that picked up a lucky goal to tie the score at 2 all with 20
minutes to play in the contest. The play in the center of the field
by Tana Tufts, Brittney Lambert, Kayla Juliano and Heather Barkley
along with the hustle of LaRoche kept the ball in the Bronco end
of the field of play for the majority of the second half. With just
under two minutes to play, LaRoche fired a shot from just outside
the left side of the box which curved just outside of the reach of the
Milford goalie giving LaRoche the hat trick and the Alvirne Broncos
the 3-2 victory in front of an appreciative senior night crowd of
friends and relatives.
The Lady Broncos finished the season with a record of 11-
4-1, good enough for a fourth place finish in NHIAA Division
2 girls soccer. This seed earned them a home playoff game on
Wednesday, October 30 against St. Thomas Aquinas of Dover,
a team that they had lost to earlier in the year. With a victory
on Wednesday, the Broncos could potentially host a second
playoff game at home on Saturday, November 2 at 2 p.m. The
semifinal round of the playoffs will be held in Bill Ball Stadium
on Wednesday, November 6 at 6 p.m., with the finals at Southern
New Hampshire University on Saturday November 9 at 4 p.m.
Senior girls: L to R Morgan Knight, Sabrina Carter, Brittney Lambert, Tori
LaRoche, Shantelle Lacasse, Marie Morrier, Heather Barkley
P
h
o
t
o
s

c
o
u
r
t
e
s
y

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f

M
a
u
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e
e
n

G
i
l
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Te Alvirne boys’ soccer team and their respective family members
(players L-R): Matt O’Brien, Liam Regan, Ethan Beals,
Jeremy Longchamp, Billy Perry, Josh Bellomo, Raul Stedile,
Kyle Salucco, PJ Busnach, Jacob Nazarian, RJ Younghusband
S
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y

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e
Thumbs Up? Thumbs Down? Thumbs Up? Thumbs Down?
“Thumbs up to the Alvirne
football program this year.
No one expected you to do
well in Division 1, but you’re
playing better than ever, you’re
competing in every game, and
the other teams are saying this
is the first time they’ve played
against a hard Alvirne football
team. Hold your heads high
for what you have done this
year.”
“Thumbs up! I find there
is so much focus on negative
comments in this section of
our local paper. I am going to
do my part in changing that a
little bit with some kindness
and focus on the good things
in my community. Every
week I am going to give a
thumbs up to someone in my
community who is always
doing something nice. I think
everyone should know! This
week I want to say Thumbs Up
to Nancy Boomhower. She
is a lady who is always ready
to step up and help out. She
gives so much back to her
community. Thank you Nancy
Boomhower for all you do!”
“Thumbs up to the Alvirne
Football Parents for not
stooping to the same level
as the Alvirne Band Parents
by anonymously insulting
the Football Coaches/Band
Director and the hard working
football players and Band
Students on this ridiculously
childish ‘bully forum’ that
we call Thumbs Up/Thumbs
Down.”
“Thumbs up to the Alvirne
Football Team. You are ‘award
winning’ in my eyes for the
character and class you show
each week by playing your
hearts out on the football field.
Character is not measured
by moments of success; it
is measured by the grace in which you move
through adversity.”
“Thumbs down to the person who stole my
son’s motorized bike from the Lockwood Estates
on Barbara Lane. The bike is over $1,000, please
drop it off at the Hudson PD if you have it, or
notice that your kid has a new motorized bike, we
will not press charges, we just want the bike back.
If anyone sees someone riding a motorized black
bike with blue detailing flash out bike that they
never noticed the person owning before please
call the Hudson PD. It is not a very common
bike, so it will be obvious.”
“Thumbs down to the ‘Hilary
until 2024’ weekly. Talk about
relentless. Every week the same
‘rant’ and ‘rave’ about Hilary.
We all get your message loud
and clear. Trust me please.
You continue to crucify the
Republican and Tea Party. Again
and again, every week. Last
week you blamed George
W. Bush for the government
shutdown. Wrong! Why haven’t
you crucified each and every
Republican for the government
shutdown since the beginning of
our government? Clearly you are
a diehard Democrat. And that’s
your opinion and ‘right’ (ha!), but
clearly you are on the ‘left.’ And
here is my opinion. Democrats
equal tax and tax and raise taxes all the time and
spend and spend. Republicans equal lowering
taxes, for everybody. And not just for themselves,
but for everyone who actually pay taxes.”
“Thumbs down to employers blaming, and
employees believing, that the Affordable Care
Act banned a Cadillac insurance plan! There
are minimum requirements for insurance plans,
but not maximum limits. And
an extra fee? This employer is
making changes to the health
plan offerings and using the
Affordable Health Care Act as an
excuse. The employer is making
your health insurance offerings
more affordable for the business
by charging you more, but this
is not because of the new law.
Do some research and ask your
employer to show you where
in the law these changes are
required.”
“Thumbs down to a raw, supposedly cooked
burger. Tan on the outside, bloody, bloody drippy
and ice cold inside and outside and for long hair
in it and it was clearly dropped on your icky un-
cleaned floor with what looked to me like pet hair
(short hair) or someone gave a buzz cut on the
floor at the grill. So very gross! I ordered it very
well done, or ‘hockey puck burnt.’
As soon I ordered, it took me 6
minutes to get there, and it was
ready. Clearly incompetence on
the ‘cook.’ For such an extremely
and inflated price, I should have
eaten cat or dog food instead. At
least those are not bloody or raw.
And it’s so cheap. Isn’t there a
‘Consumer Advisory’ on ordering
raw meat? I absolutely did not
order it ‘raw.’”
“Thumbs down to the BOS/
HSB for proposing tax increases
for the budget and benefits/
salary increases. Residents are
underemployed, unemployed or
have their income on hold due
to veteran/GI bill payment holds.
Now is not the time to Increase
taxes. Many homes are still-being
foreclosed on and residents are
making tough choices between
household necessities. The town
Proposes to increase the tax-rate
by 0.17-0.25% not including 2.0-
3.0 salary/benefit increases and
the health insurance rate increase
that is yet to be determined. HSB
4.0% budget increase and 2.36%
salary increases. Vote this down
or Hudson-residents will be paying
$500-1,000 increase every-year.”
“Thumbs down to the HSB and
BOS, for not decreasing the student
dropout rate with better quality
education, teaching students on
demand job skills and preparing
them for college and to compete
with surrounding towns and
Massachusetts. Our children
deserve better you our HSB should
provide better not ask for increases
with a 45 m general fund. Our
BOS should bring acceptable
jobs and businesses to the area
and attract growth in our town
. Not vote in every tax increase
Remember they are Selectman, Not
Yes-men. Do what is right this year,
represent the resident!”
“Thumbs down to my Lefty
friend who still blames Bush for everything from
unemployment to the weather. Remember,
Bush had a Democratic Congress, gas was half
the price, unemployment was less, hundreds of
thousands less people on food stamps, he spent
more time in DC than the current resident of the
White House ... should I go on? Take a little time
to go back and check the actual facts of the time,
you will find that our debt was trillions less. In
spite of your views, you are more
than welcome to attend my Tea
Party. It’s free and abides by the
Constitution.”
Thumbs up to K. for one year
not smoking
“Thumbs down to the HLN
for lowering its standards by
publishing Jason’s Guerrette’s
jumbled words. Ironically his last
sentence mentions harm coming
to our children if the union gets
its way. However, we all know
that if Jason gets a mere fraction of his way our
children would be profoundly harmed.”
“Thumbs up to Campbell High School’s Football
Team’s performance at the Homecoming Game
last week. You guys played great and held tough.
It was obvious to all that you left it all on the field.
Great Game Continue to Fight for the Win Next
Week!”
“Thumbs down. Jason Guerrette: We know,
Teachers are awful, You’re smarter than them,
You’re smarter than us, You’re better than us, We
know, We Know.”
“Thumbs down to the Town
Crier, Jason Guerrette. Nobody
cares what you think about
anything. And whatever office
you will be running for this year
you will lose. The residents in
Litchfield are tired of your act.”
“Thumbs down to HLN for
giving a platform to someone
with no credibility like ex school
board member, malcontent, Jason
Guerrette. If he needs to spew
his garbage let him write a letter to the editor. He
deserves no special treatment.”
“Thumbs up to all the folks in the town of
Hudson who are pleasant and do a fantastic job
while going unnoticed.” Thumbs down, way
down to those who approved the Rec Director
getting an increase in pay. He isn’t pleasant and
he hasn’t increased what he does. Of all the
positions to reward during these hard times ...
really? Teachers are going without an increase but
their work load has increased. The Town Clerk
and her staff weren’t given a raise and they are
very pleasant while working harder. What were
you people thinking? This is a slap in the face of
so many who deserve it more. Shame on those
who approved it.”
“Thumbs up to the pink house on Albuquerque
Ave. What a tribute you have made to your wife/
mom/aunt/sister. I am sure she is looking down
on you with a big smile since you continued the
Halloween decorating tradition. Thank you for the
wonderful display!”
“Thumbs up. Thumbs way up to Sierra Reinitzer
for doing such a great job singing the National
Anthem at Campbell High School’s homecoming
football game. You sounded awesome!”
“Thumbs down to cutting open the newly paved
Flagstone Drive. It was smooth for the first time
since the Executive Park was built. Andy why
couldn’t you pack the trough smoothly?”
“Thumbs up/Thumbs down. Somebody quoted
Vladimir Lenon last time, then proceeded to say
‘Semper Fi’ after calling liberals idiots. I can just
imagine the tea party marching in leather boots. I
can picture their matching shirts with armbands
to show their union. The party that informs on
their own family members to their leaders, leaders
that want to change America. They have a list
of Republicans that must go in order to control
or form their own party. But now they caused a
government shutdown at the cost of $24 billion.
Only conservatives can get caught up with others
that do things for self-gain without listening to
all the people. Liberals are idiots because their
leaders listen to the people ...”
“Thumbs up/Thumbs down. I would like
everybody reading this: read the Communist
Manifesto by Marks and Engels. You will see
how the left thinks. When they campaign, they
insult, berate, never the facts, make men feminine,
nobody is to succeed, dumbed down the society
as a whole, get them interested in sports, take
away religion. I could go on and on, and you will
see what’s going on in this country. Buzz words:
progressive, coexist. Listen, socialism doesn’t
work because it destroys human nature. Semper
Fi, guy.”
Tank you for your submissions. All comments, thumbs
up or down, are anonymous and not written by the
Hudson~Litchfeld News staf. Tumbs comments
can be sent via telephone, 880-1516 or emailed to us at
thumbs@areanewsgroup.com. When submitting a Tumbs
comment, please specify that you would like it printed
in the Hudson~Litchfeld News. During the election
campaign, no comments will be allowed that are direct
endorsements or censure of candidates on the thumbs page.
No names are necessary. Please keep negative comments to
the issue. Comments should be kept to 100 words or less.
14 - November 1, 2013 | Hudson - Litchfield News
Comments expressed in this column are the sole views of those callers and do not reflect the views of the Hudson~Litchfield News or its advertisers. Town and school officials encourage
readers to seek out assistance directly to resolve any problems or issues. The Hudson~Litchfield News editorial staff holds the right to refuse any comment deemed inappropriate.
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PUBLIC MEETING
TOWN OF HUDSON, NH
November 13, 2013
The Town of Hudson Planning Board will hold a regularly scheduled
meeting on Wednesday, November 13, 2013 at 7:00 p.m. in the “Buxton
Community Development Conference Room” at Town Hall. The following
items will be on the agenda:
I. CALL TO ORDER BY CHAIRPERSON AT 7:00 P.M.
II. PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE
III. ROLL CALL
IV. SEATING OF ALTERNATES
V. MINUTES OF PREVIOUS MEETING(S)
A. 03-13-13 Minutes
B. 06-26-13 Minutes
C. 08-14-13 Minutes
D. 09-11-13 Minutes
E. 09-25-13 Minutes
VI. CASES REQUESTED FOR DEFERRAL
VII. CORRESPONDENCE
VIII. PERFORMANCE SURETIES
IX. ZBA INPUT ONLY
X. PUBLIC HEARINGS
XI. OLD BUSINESS/PUBLIC HEARINGS
A. Retail Center Site Plan 201 Lowell Road
SP# 06-13 Map 216/Lot 011
Purpose of plan: proposed development calling for the con-
struction of a 10,465 SF commercial/retail building. Hearing.
Deferred Date Specific from the 10-23-13 Meeting.
XII. DESIGN REVIEW PHASE
XIII. CONCEPTUAL REVIEW ONLY
A. Review Concept Plan to Subdivide Land 90 Gowing Ro
ad Map 231/Lot 053
Purpose of plan: to present a Conceptual Open Space Devel-
opment (OSD) Subdivision Plan for the 32 acre parcel, having
a street address of 90 Gowing Road, Map 231/Lot 053. Con-
ceptual Review Only.
XIV. NEW BUSINESS/PUBLIC HEARINGS
A. Aquatime Pools Map 251/Lot 002
SP# 07-13 89 River Road
Purpose of Plan: to convert 1,600 sf of existing light industrial
space to accessory retail sales with associated office mezza-
nine space above. No change to existing building footprint or
site layout proposed. Application Acceptance and Hearing.
XV. OTHER BUSINESS
A. Presentation on the Cost Allocation Procedure (CAP) Fee
Assessment Update Report, prepared by VHB, Inc., Presenter,
Martin Kennedy, P.E.
XVI. ADJOURNMENT
All plans and applications are available for review in the Planning
Office. Comments may be submitted in writing until 10:00 a.m.
on the Tuesday prior to the day of the meeting.
The public is invited to attend.

John M. Cashell, Town Planner
POSTED: Town Hall, Library, Post Office – 11-01-13.

90 Gowing Road
Conceptual Review Only.
Public Meeting Notice
Monday, November 18, 2013, 6:00 pm
Hudson Town Offices – Lower Level
Board of Selectmen’s Meeting Room
12 School Street
Hudson, New Hampshire
Bridge Replacement Project
Pelham Road over Second Brook
State Project No. 16175
This project includes the replacement of the existing Pelham Road Bridge
over Second Brook and approximately 540 feet of approach roadway
reconstruction.
The Town of Hudson will hold a public meeting for the above-noted
project. CLD Consulting Engineers, Inc., consultant to the Town, has
prepared preliminary plans to show the limits of work. In addition, a
flood impact plan for the downstream reach of Second Brook was
prepared and will be presented at the meeting. Representatives from the
Town and CLD will be present to explain the proposal, listen to concerns,
receive comments, and answer questions regarding the proposed work.
The project is being funded by the Town and through the New Hampshire
Department of Transportation’s State Aid Bridge Program.
PUBLIC NOTICES




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Mixed, $240. Pickup truck
load, $100. Delivered.
Call 603-882-2193.
11/1, 11/8, 11/15/13
SEASONED CORDWOOD
- 16” oaks and maples, cut,
split, delivered.
Bradley Tree and Landscape,
603-886-1550.
10/18-11/8/13
FOR RENT
SUMMERVIEW R.E.
OFFICE SPACE RENT.
Starting at $250 mo.
Includes all utilities.
Retail Space $695 mo.
Warehouse $1295 mo.
603-432-5453. 10/25-11/22/13
FOR SALE
2002 BUICK LESABRE.
4 door sedan. 131,000 miles.
$2,900 or best ofer.
603-231-1854.
11/1/13
TWIN BED, cherry
headboard, full bedding,
$275. Solid oak entertainment
center with glass doors and
26-inch TV, $250.
Contact 603-493-9309.
11/1/13
HELP WANTED
ELDERLY COUPLE wants
house companion for driving,
shopping, cooking, and light
housework. Companion
will receive moderate
compensation of $8/hour,
time and a half on Saturdays,
and double time for Sunday
and holidays. Windham, NH.
881-4225. 10/25-11/1/13
KIDS-N-CRIBS CHILD
CARE of Dracut has current
positions available for p.t.
afternoon toddler teachers.
Applicant must have a min.
of 6 ECE credits and 1 yr.
working experience. Please call
Heather @ 1-978-452-7022
for more info. 10/25, 11/1/13
LONDONDERRY
BUSINESS seeks Warehouse/
Inventory Manager.
Experience desired but not
necessary. Must be able to lift
50 plus lbs regularly. Neat
appearance, good personality,
computer skills required.
Hours are M-F 8am-5pm or
possibly 11-3:30. Hourly pay
with benefts. Send resume to
mountchicora@yahoo.com.
10/25, 11/1/13
HOME
IMPROVEMENT
1 A11 IN ONE PAINTING.
25+ years experience, Interior/
Exterior painting, Power
washing, All work guaranteed,
Free estimates. Fully Insured.
www.allinonepainting.net,
603-305-4974. 10/25-11/15/13
1 COLLINS Bros
PAINTING: Interior &
Exterior; Top quality work;
Afordable; Fully insured;
Free estimates; Excellent refs.
603-886-0668. 10/11-11/1/13
DAVE’S HANDYMAN
SERVICES: Interior painting,
windows, doors, decks,
basements, and general home
repairs. Licensed and insured.
Free estimates. References
available. 603-486-1310.
10/11-11/1/13
ELECTRICAL WIRING,
Insured Master Electrician.
Fair prices, Fast response and
Free estimates.
Call Dana at 603-880-3768/
603-759-9876. 10/18-11/8/13
FULL SERVICE
REMODELING: Licensed,
insured, registered. Repairs/
additions. Roofng/Siding.
30 years experience. Formerly
with Tis Old House.
Competitive pricing.
Walter, 603-661-6527.
10/18-11/8/13
*JACOBS
CONSTRUCTION*
Additions, decks, screened
porches, basements, interior
trim work, etc. Licensed
and insured. Over 25 years
experience. We accept MC,
Visa, Discover.
Call Joe 603-635-9953.
www.jacobsconstructionllc.com
10/18-11/8/13
JOE’S Handyman Service/
CONSTRUCTION –
I do what he won’t. No job
too small. Fully insured.
All around home repair and
maintenance. Bathroom
remodeling, decks, doors,
windows, light plumbing,
electrical, indoor and outdoor
painting.
Call (cell) 603-670-8151,
603-893-8337.
9/13-11/1/13
KME PAINTING LLC. Why
Remodel? Painting is quicker,
cleaner and better bang for the
buck. Interior, exterior, home
improvement. Quality work at
a fair price. Fully insured, call
for a free estimate.
603-759-5680. 10/18-11/8/13
SULLIVAN & SONS
FENCE: Installation of all
styles of fence. Also retainer
walls and stone walls. Free
estimates, reasonable rates.
Call Art, 603-557-4682.
10/11-11/1/13
JUNK REMOVAL
JUNK REMOVAL. Call us
for all your Junk Removal
needs. Small or big, we take it
all. Removal of TV’s and PC
Monitors, $20.
Call John, 603-889-7173,
978-758-8371.
www.junkoutnh.com.
10/11-11/1/13
LANDSCAPING
ALL ABOUT CLEAN-UPS:
Now scheduling fall
clean-ups. We ofer free
estimates, are fully insured
and also ofer Senior and
vereran discounts. We also do
curbside pick-up of leaves.
For a free estimate, call John,
603-889-7173,
978-758-8371. 10/25-11/1/13
GAGNON’S
IRRIGATION
Irrigation Blowout: $60
www.gagnonsirrigation.com
Installations, repairs, add-ons,
maintenance, and hydroseeding.
Call Jason at 603-635-8030.
11/1/13

FALL CLEAN UPS!
Lawn Maintenance, New Lawns,
Landscape Construction,
Hardscaping,
Bobcat & Excavation Services,
Free Estimates, Insured.
603-305-6845

11/1-11/22/13
www.performancelandscapingnh.com
Call PerformanceLandscaping
for afreeest.
603-889-4370 or check us out at:
Performance
Landscaping
Performance
Landscaping
Affordable
Fall
clean-ups
10/18-11/15/13
LOST/FOUND
FOUND VIDEO CAMERA
on Wason Road next to the
entrance of Matket Basket.
Contact for details and
verifcation. 603-883-8250.
11/1/13
SERVICES
GUTTER CLEANING:
Average home, $100.
Get them cleaned out before
the snow comes.
Call Dan, 603-966-7870.
11/1-11/22/13
IN-TUNE PIANO Services,
Certifed Piano Technician.
Tuning, Repair, Regulation,
Appraisals, Rebuilding.
603-429-6368.
randy@in-tunepiano.com,
www.in-tunepiano.com.
9/13-11/1/13
SWEEP IT CLEAN. Of ce
and residential cleaning done
right. References, bonded,
insured. No job too small.
Weekly and bi-weekly
available. 603-402-0345.
11/1/13
SNOWPLOWING
DAVE’S PLOWING
SERVICE. Free estimates.
Fully insured. 603-820-2759.
10/25-12/20/13
SNOW PLOWING.
Commercial/Residential.
Sanding and salting available.
Hudson area, free estimates,
insured.
Call Scott 603-493-5339.
10/25-11/15/13
TREE SERVICES
BOUTIN TREE REMOVAL.
Specializing in hazardous tree
removal. Fully insured. Free
estimates and frewood for
sale.
Call Daryl at 603-321-8768.
www.boutintreeremoval.com.
10/25-12/13/13
YARD/MOVING
SALES
YARD SALE Saturday,
11/2/13. 9am-1pm.
3 Maureen Lane, Hudson.
Clothes, books, toys, misc.
items. Rain cancels. 11/1/13
elected officials should have a balanced budget law much as the
one in New Hampshire. “We cannot continue in this fashion.”
Ayotte also pointed out that the proposed Republican budget
which did not pass was not balanced either. She said that it
called for a much lower amount of borrowing to pay bills, but
still required additional borrowing. “There was a $5 trillion
difference between the House passed budget and the Senate
passed budget.”
By 2026 Medicare will be insolvent. By 2016, the Social
Security Disability fund will be insolvent and by 2033, Social
Security will be insolvent. “In 1950 there were 16.5 workers to
one recipient, but in 2010, there were only 2.5 workers for every
social security recipient.”
Ayotte also discussed Obamacare and highlighted the more
than 25 current pieces of legislation she has for changing it. She
expressed concern that individual people would be fined for not
signing up when the problem was that the computer system was
not adequate to allow everyone to sign up. “We worked for over
an hour in my office one day and could not get one person signed
up. I have asked the president to give individuals the same year
delay as he has given businesses. I don’t want to see individuals
fined because they didn’t sign up.”
Ayotte thanked everyone for coming, urged people with issues
to contact her office. “We help with individual issues as well as
work on national legislation,” she smiled.
Ayotte Speaks-
continued from front page
Advertise weekly
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Hudson • Litchfeld • Salem
Pelham • Windham
Give us a call, today
880-1516
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16 - November 1, 2013
Interior & Exterior • Top Quality Work
Affordable • Fully Insured
Free Estimates • Excellent References
603-886-0668
Lead Certified
COLLINS BROS.
PAINTING
ASE and Toyota Master Techs
“Providing the Old Time Service
You Deserve with the Technical Training
and Background You Expect”
507 Charles Bancroft Hwy., Litchfield (beside Warren's)
FREE
Junk Car
Removal
FREE
Junk Car
Removal
FREE
Junk Car
Removal
425-2562
We Will Pay Up To $500
For Some Cars and Trucks!
Murray’s Auto
Recycling
55 Hall Rd. Londonderry, NH
Hours:
Monday - Saturday 8 am - 5 pm
We Sell Parts
Please mention Area News Group Ad
290 Derry Rd, Hudson, NH • www.snapfitness.com/hudsonnh

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Bradley Tree & Landscape
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Campbell Cougars Pound Pelham Pythons on Senior Night
by Phillip Nichols
On Tuesday, October 22,
Campbell Cougars seniors,
Heather Baron, Savannah
Cavanaugh, Sydney Crema,
Stephanie LeBatt, Mandie
Miller, Caitlin Heaton, Holly
Lesperance and Angela
Valenti were recognized
before the start of the game
against the Pelham Pythons as
part of the week long senior
days in front of a large crowd.
All of the seniors presented
their parents with flowers and
a hug.
During the game, Sydney
Crema was determined to
show her leadership by netting two goals in the first half and added
an assist to Angela Valenti as the Cougars pound the Pythons 8 to 1.
Sydney Crema scored her first goal after receiving a pass from
Stephanie LaBatt, (7:00). Sydney got her next goal with the
assistance of teammate, Nikki Golden (15:00). Syndey’s younger
sister, Olivia Crema, got into the action by netting two goals of her
own.
Hanna Neild helped Olivia net her first goal at the 23:00 mark,
bringing the score to 3-0. Olivia proved that she is not one
dimensional by assisting Nikki Golden in netting a goal, making the
score 4-0.
Three minutes later, Angela Valenti found Olivia in just the right
spot and was able to pass her the ball, allowing her to score her
second goal of the day. The half would end with the Lady Cougars
up 5-0.
The Cougars kept the Pythons on the defensive most of the first
half and the same held true in the second. The Cougars came out in
the second half with Sydney Crema almost immediately finding her
teammate, Angela Valenti, who put the ball in the net for Campbell.
The Lady Cougars’ Alyssa Ferraras also contributed by make a
great pass to Natasha Abelson who scored her first goal of the night,
making the score 7-0. The five minutes later, the Pythons got called
for a penalty which allowed Natasha Abelson a penalty kick.
Natasha was given instructions, by Coach Gannon, on where
to place the kick. Natasha was able to make the kick, giving the
Cougars an 8-0 lead.
The Pythons were determined and did not give up. Pelham’s
Paradis scored a goal at 73:00.
Final score 8-1. In goal for Campbell was Jessica Manning (9
saves on 10 shots by Pelham) and Foulds for Pelham (9 saves on 17
shots).
Pelham finishes its season, 2-13 and Campbell finishes with a
record of 11-4-1 and also advances to the playoffs as the number 7
seed.
Games and locations to be announced.
Alvirne’s Demers, Bellomo Advance to X-C Meet of Champions
Shaylyn Saunders fnished frst for the Lady Broncos at this
year’s D-I states with a time of 20:42
by Marc Ayotte
Outstanding performances from Bronco’s cross
country runners Phil Demers and Noah Bellomo
have earned berths for each of them in the 2013
Meet of Champions being held at Mines Falls in
Nashua on Saturday, November 3. At the Division
I State Meet held at the Derryfield layout in
Manchester, Demers turned in a strong showing,
finishing the grueling course in 8th position (131
entries) with a time of 16:38. Bellomo had an
impressive event as well, crossing the finish line a
mere 7 seconds behind his teammate, good for a
13th place finish.
Before the race, Bronco Coach Tom Daigle
indicated that his boys’ team was heading into
the states ranked in the top eight, also stating that
“today will determine our ranking for the year in
Division I.” The significance of that observation
was that the top 8 teams in Division I would be
eligible to advance to the MoCs. On the heels of
his top two performers during the regular season,
the Broncos were able to move up a couple of
notches to finish 6th for the tournament, thus
advancing to the woods of Mines Falls.
After his arduous trek across the 5K course, a
humble Demers shared his thoughts on his top 10
finish; “I just wanted to do it for our team.” As the
results revealed, Demers finished just 32 seconds
behind D-I champion Tristam Winship (16:06) of
Bedford; “I felt like I was peeking,” admitted the
Bronco junior of his progression throughout the
season; “I felt strong – a little quick and anxious
at the beginning but I was able to stay strong.”
With respect to the upcoming MoC’s, Demers
directed the attention away from his own talent
and competitive nature, saying; “I’m just going to
have fun at this point and run hard.”
In turning in a fabulous freshman debut
appearance at the states, Bellomo earned praise
from Coach Daigle; “no matter how hard he runs,
he always has a sprint.” Bellomo used that sprint
to his advantage down the stretch, earning the
thirteenth place finish; just a handful of seconds
out of the top ten.
In just his first year of noteworthy competition
in the 5K distance, Bellomo said that he thought
he ran pretty well but admitted he
was looking for a finish time in the range of 16:30
to 16:37. He also acknowledged that “my first
mile was a little faster than I would have liked,
but I was able to recover from that.” And after
recounting the difficult aspects of the hilly terrain,
he offered “my overall performance was right
where I wanted.”
As the post-race results filtered in with respect
to both team and individual qualifiers for the
MoCs, Coach Daigle succinctly summed up the
season of hard work after hearing confirmation
that his Broncos would indeed move on to
Saturday’s event; “Lovin’ it.” Daigle went on
to say that “this is a big deal,” referencing the
fact that it had been 19 years since the Broncos
participated in the MoCs as a team. In addressing
the importance of the accomplishment, Daigle
noted; “it was a real high for the kids. We’ve
spent several years trying to change the culture
to become a winning team and this year we did
that.”
While enjoying the moment, Daigle couldn’t
resist the temptation of parlaying the day’s success
with future expectations; “we have a great base.
We’re losing one senior in the top seven. I’m
excited about next year.”
Rounding out the top five finishers for Alvirne
(top 5 finishers contribute to the team score) were:
Kendall Westhoff (3rd, 51st overall, 17:38), Kyle
Saunders (4th, 57th overall, 17:45) and Noah Cote
(5th, 70th overall, 17:58).
Meanwhile on the Lady Bronco front, Coach
Jen Cahill’s crew did not enjoy as meritorious an
event as their running brethren. Pleased with the
overall regular season, Cahill did point out that
“this is the youngest team I’ve ever had.” And that
may have led to some pre-states apprehension
in regards to potential individual and team
performances. Although she noted that “I have
kids who could score well,” when all was said and
done, Cahill’s squad produced a lukewarm 14th
place finish in the 17 team field while the best
individual race came from Shaylyn Saunders who
finished 37th overall with a time of 20:42.
Completing the top five finishers for the girls’
team in a field of 120 runners, were: Lydia Lyman
(2nd, 46th overall, 21:02), Marie Morrier (3rd,
73rd overall, 21:52), Katie Bellomo (4th, 77th
overall, 22:03) and Emily Barry (5th, 87th overall,
22:35).
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Campbell senior, Sydney Crema wins ball from Pelham Player
Campbell High Soccer Seniors and Family Members
PMA Cross
Country Closes
Year with
Invitational Meet
PMA Cross country team, grades 2-8, before their fnal
race at their home invitational meet.
by Tom Tollefson
The frost covered the ground didn’t cool down
the excitement of the runners in Presentation of
Mary’s 10th annual Catholic School Invitational
Cross Country meet on Saturday October 26.
Students grades 2-8 ran in the race, but only
grades 4-8 were scored. The racers were divided
up into both boys and girls for grades 5 and under
and grades 6-8. This race marked an end to the
cross country season for all the participating
schools. The 1.8 mile course went around the
athletic field and through the woods behind PMA,
on the school’s cross country course.
“It’s a fun way to wrap up the year and just race
with our Catholic School compadres and share
our faith,” said PMA Athletic Director Ed Goss.
“I really wanted to do good since it’s my last
race [as a PMA student],” Meehan said.
The following schools also competed at
the invitational: St. Catherine of Siena, St.
Christopher’s School, Villa Augustina, St. Joe’s,
Thomas Aquinas, Joseph Regional Catholic, and
Infant Jesus School.
All students and coaches expressed their
excitement for the annual race this year.
“We had a hiatus for the last two years because
of snow and trail conditions. My phone was
ringing off the hook this year with people asking if
we were going to have it,” Goss said.
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Alvirne’s Phil Demers qualifed to compete at the Meet of
Champions with an impressive 8th place (16:38) fnish at
this year’s Division I state championships
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RIVERSTONE REMODELING
AND HANDYMAN SERVICES
Hudson
New Hampshire
Steve Blanchette
Owner
(603) 216-7425

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