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INSTITUTIONAL REPORT

Continuing Visit
Continuous Improvement Pathway

PRESBYTERIAN COLLEGE
503 South Broad Street
Clinton, SC 29325
February 9-11, 2014
Type of Visit:
Continuing visit - Initial Teacher Preparation
Institutional Report for a Continuing Visit (Continuous
Improvement Pathway)
Updated May 2013
OVERVIEW
This section sets the context for the visit. It should clearly state the mission of the institution.
It should also describe the characteristics of the unit and identify and describe any branch
campuses, off-campus sites, alternate route programs, and distance learning programs for
professional school personnel.
I. Overview and Conceptual Framework
I.1 Summarize the institution's mission, historical context, and unique characteristics (e.g., land
grant, HBCU or religious).
Presbyterian College is a church-related, liberal arts college located on a beautiful 240-acre campus
between Columbia and Greenville in South Carolina. With small classes and faculty holding the
terminal degree in their respective field, our supportive community provides more than an exceptional
liberal arts education. PC empowers students to be servant leaders in their communities through
challenging academics and a culture of honor and ethics. Since 1880, PC has been personally committed
to success. As a result, 90 percent of our students are in graduate programs or have secured jobs within
six months of graduation.
The compelling purpose of Presbyterian College, as a church-related college, is to develop within the
framework of Christian faith the mental, physical, moral, and spiritual capacities of each student in
preparation for a lifetime of personal and vocational fulfillment and responsible contribution to our
democratic society and the world community.
When Presbyterian College was established as Clinton College in 1880, the South was left in ruins from
the Civil War and Reconstruction. Dr. William Plumer Jacobs arrived in Clinton in 1864, when the town
was a struggling crossroads known for its bars. His work to establish Thornwell Orphanage in 1875 and
Presbyterian College in 1880 breathed fresh air into the community. The first facility built for PC was
Recitation Hall, erected in 1886 on four acres on the present-day Thornwell campus. Next came the land
for PC's present-day campus. Alumni Hall was built in 1891, followed by a small dining hall and kitchen
that provided food for $6 per month.
In 1906 construction began on PC's landmark building: Neville Hall. It took eight months to complete at
a cost of $35,000. Originally called the Administration Building, its name was later changed to honor
former president William G. Neville. Not a student has passed through PC's campus who does not
remember Neville Hall.
The Honor System was established at PC in 1915. In an article in the 1931 edition of PaC SaC, the
Honor System is described as "a consciousness on the part of the individual student of the relationship
he bears to the larger group, viz., the Student Body, and sensitiveness to the honor of the College of
which that Body is the living part."
These goals guide the College in its attempt to fulfill its mission:
To help students gain a basic knowledge of humanities, natural sciences, and social sciences; a special
competence in one or more particular areas of study; and an ability to see these studies as part of the
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larger search for truth
To develop in students the ability to think clearly and independently, to make critical judgments, and to
communicate effectively in both speech and writing
To foster in students an aesthetic appreciation of the arts and literature
To acquaint students with the teachings and values of the Christian faith
To help students develop moral and ethical commitments, including service to others
To help students attain a sense of dignity, self-worth, and appreciation of other persons of diverse
backgrounds
To encourage in students an appreciation for teamwork and for physical fitness and athletic skills that
will contribute to lifelong health
I.2 Summarize the professional education unit at your institution, its mission, and its
relationship to other units at the institution that are involved in the preparation of professional
educators.
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The professional education unit (PEU) at Presbyterian College is composed of the following programs
of study:
Early Childhood Education (pre-kindergarten-grade 3)
Elementary Education (grades 2-6)
Middle Level Education (grades 5-8)-Language Arts-Mathematics-Science-Social Studies
Secondary Education (grades 9-12)-English-Mathematics-Biology-Social Studies
Music Education (pre-kindergarten-grade 12)-Instrumental-Vocal/Choral (Accredited through NASM)
All programs in the PEU are undergraduate, initial licensure programs. In addition, all programs are
housed on the main campus of Presbyterian College with no distance learning or alternate route
programs represented within the unit.
This mission of the professional education unit at Presbyterian College adheres to the institutional
mission in several ways. These concepts are consistent with a liberal arts philosophy of learning:
Commitment to a view of education as a lifelong endeavor
Development of a cross-curricular view of learning in which well-rounded knowledge in a variety of
areas is valued
Encouraging teamwork and collaborative learning
Development of commitment to moral and ethical standards (i.e. service to others)
Developing critical thinking skills in our students, especially their ability to critically evaluate
information and make decisions based on reasoning and consideration of multiple viewpoints
Reflecting the liberal arts philosophy of Presbyterian College, all majors within the Education
department maintain a close relationship with other disciplines within the college. All students complete
a general education curriculum reflecting courses in the sciences, humanities, fine arts, modern
languages, mathematics, and the English language. In order to ensure our students' preparation in the
content areas, the Education department has an on-going dialogue with departments such as Biology,
Chemistry, Physics, and Mathematics.
I.3 Summarize programs offered at initial and advanced preparation levels (including off-
campus, distance learning, and alternate route programs), status of state approval, national
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recognition, and if applicable, findings of other national accreditation associations related to the
preparation of education professionals.
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The professional education unit at Presbyterian College offers five programs of study that are uniquely
dedicated to students' success in the education profession. All programs in the PEU are undergraduate,
initial licensure programs and are housed on the main campus of Presbyterian College; no distance
learning or alternate route programs represented within the unit. All programs are currently nationally
recognized by their associated SPA. The program areas (all initial certification) are as follows, with
South Carolina certification grades in parentheses:
Early Childhood Education (pre-kindergarten-grade 3)
Elementary Education (grades 2-6)
Middle Level Education (grades 5-8)-Language Arts-Mathematics-Science-Social Studies
Secondary Education (grades 9-12)-English-Mathematics-Biology-Social Studies
Music Education (pre-kindergarten-grade 12)-Instrumental-Vocal/Choral (Accredited through NASM)
Early Childhood Education
The major in Early Childhood Education (EDEC) is a field-oriented program designed to prepare
teacher candidates to teach children in preschool programs through the primary grades (pre-
kindergarten-grade 3).
Elementary Education
The Elementary Education program at PC is a field-based experience for students wishing to pursue
certification to teach grades 2-6. The program is designed to provide teacher candidates with exemplary
training in methods of instruction in mathematics, science, social studies, and language arts.
Middle Level Education
The major in Middle Level Education (EDMS) is a field-oriented program designed to prepare teacher
candidates to teach students in grades 5-8 in two different content areas.
Secondary Education
Secondary Education (EDSD) is a field-oriented program designed to prepare candidates to teach
students in grades 9-12. Students seeking teacher certification in high school teaching will minor in
Secondary Education and major in their content area.
I.4 Summarize the basic tenets of the conceptual framework, institutional standards, and
candidate proficiencies related to expected knowledge, skills, and professional dispositions.
Our candidates' performance in regards to the conceptual framework is assessed throughout their
programs, using multiple and varied measures. In 2010, the PEU began a revision to our conceptual
framework. Revisions to the conceptual framework were necessary in order to better align with our
departmental goals, as well as the mission of Presbyterian College. In addition, there were concerns that
the underlying pillars of our existing conceptual framework were not able to be reliably measured,
thereby requiring substantive revision. This process began in Fall 2010 with a re-examination of
departmental goals and identification of the primary, foundational tenets of our education programs.
Faculty undertook a comprehensive review of the conceptual framework and consulted supporting
bodies of research in teaching and learning to ground our revisions of this framework. From this
examination of the research as well as consultation with professional bodies, revised pillars were
identified and descriptors of these pillars were drafted. In addition, candidate proficiencies were drafted
in relation to the revised pillars. The revised conceptual framework was also presented to, discussed
with and finalized by members of our educational community, including the Laurens County Education
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Advisory Board, the Fieldwork Committee and the PC Education Advisory Committee.
The PEU's conceptual framework reflects our philosophy that becoming an educator means more than
learning in college classrooms, more than observing in local schools, more than teaching a few weeks in
a public school. Our conceptual framework is also tightly aligned to PC's goals and mission, as
demonstrated in the Conceptual Framework Alignment Chart. Becoming a PC educator means having an
in-depth knowledge of theory and practice. It means working with students from the candidates' first
education course to their last. It means acquiring in-depth knowledge and effective teaching strategies
from experienced faculty and classroom teachers. It means developing leadership skills so candidates
can make a difference in the lives of others. The following 4 pillars of the conceptual framework
describe attributes that guide the development and training of our teacher candidates from the beginning
to the completion of their teacher education programs:
1. Knowledgeable Practitioner possessing the knowledge and skills to provide appropriate instruction
in content specific disciplines
2. Reflective Educator - using knowledge of contextual and student factors to inform practice and
positively affect student learning
3. Culturally Responsive Educator demonstrating effective teaching of diverse student populations
4. Professional Educator collaborating and communicating effectively and exhibiting professional
demeanor and behavior.
Candidate proficiencies related to expected knowledge, skills, and professional dispositions are
articulated for each pillar of the conceptual framework. These proficiencies are located in the Conceptual
Framework Student Learning Outcomes. Each student learning outcome is measured through the PEU's
Assessment System, including a variety of assessments throughout a candidates' program. The Candidate
Proficiencies and Assessment System details the specific assessment of each student learning outcome
throughout a candidate's teacher education program.
I.5 Exhibits
I.5.a Pages from catalogs and other printed documents describing general education, specialty/content
studies, and professional studies
I.5.bExamples of syllabi for professional education courses
I.5.c Conceptual framework(s)
I.5.dFindings of other national accreditation associations related to the preparation of education
professionals (e.g., ASHA, NASM, APA, CACREP)
I.5.e Updated institutional, program, and faculty information under institutional work space in AIMS
I-5a_Early Childhood Major Card
I-5a_Early Childhood Course Sequence
I-5a_Education Department Student Handbook
I-5a_Elementary Education Course Sequence
I-5a_Elementary Education Major Card
I-5a_General Education Checklist
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I-5a_Middle Level Education Course Sequence
I-5a_Middle Level Language Arts Major Card
I-5a_Middle Level Math Major Card
I-5a_Middle Level Science Major Card
I-5a_Middle Level Social Studies Major Card
I-5a_Secondary Education Course Sequence
I-5a_Secondary Math Education Card
I-5a_Secondary Biology Education Card
I-5a_Secondary English Education Card
I-5a_Secondary History Education Card
I-5b_EDEC 303: Early Childhood Curriculum Syllabus
I-5b_EDEC 304: Methods and Materials in Early Childhood Syllabus
I-5b_EDEC 311: Reading Methods in Early Childhood Education Syllabus
I-5b_EDEL 305: Science Methods Syllabus
I-5b_EDEL 306: Social Studies Methods Syllabus
I-5b_EDEL 312: Math Methods Syllabus
I-5b_EDEL 313: Teaching of Reading in the Elementary School Syllabus
I-5b_EDMS 341: Middle School Philosophy and Organization Syllabus
I-5b_EDMS 342: Interdisciplinary Connections between Reading and Writing Syllabus
I-5b_EDSD 301: Principles and Philosophies of Secondary Education Syllabus
I-5b_EDSD 302/EDMS 400-403: Methods and Materials of High School Teaching/Methods and Materials of Middle
School Teaching Syllabus
I-5b_EDUC 201: Introduction to Education Syllabus
I-5b_EDUC 202: History of Education Syllabus
I-5b_EDUC 350: Literacy, Technology and Instruction Syllabus
I-5b_EDUC 371: Meeting the Needs of all Learners; Exceptional and Diverse Syllabus
I-5b_EDUC 391: Practicum I/Fieldwork Syllabus
I-5b_EDUC 392: Practicum II/Fieldwork Syllabus
I-5b_EDUC 393: Practicum III/Fieldwork Syllabus
I-5b_EDEC 394/EDEL 394/EDMS 394/EDSD 394: Practicum IV: Classroom Management and Organization Fieldwork
Syllabus
I-5b_EDUC 440: Capstone Seminar Syllabus
I-5c_Conceptual Framework Candidate Proficiencies and Assessment System
I-5c_Conceptual Framework Alignment Chart
I-5c_Conceptual Framework Student Learning Outcomes
I-5d_NASM Music Education Accreditation Letter
See Attachment panel below.
II. Unit Standards and Movement Toward Target
Movement Toward Target
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Please indicate the standard(s) on which the unit selected to demonstrate movement toward target:
Initial Advanced
Standard 1: Candidate Knowledge, Skills, and Professional Dispositions
Standard 2: Assessment System and Unit Evaluation
Standard 3: Field Experiences and Clinical Practice
Standard 4: Diversity
Standard 5: Faculty Qualifications, Performance, and Development
Standard 6: Governance and Resources
Standard 1: Candidate Knowledge, Skills, and Professional Dispositions
Candidates preparing to work in schools as teachers or other school professionals know and
demonstrate the content knowledge, pedagogical content knowledge and skills, pedagogical and
professional knowledge and skills, and professional dispositions necessary to help all students learn.
Assessments indicate that candidates meet professional, state, and institutional standards.
1.1 Candidate Knowledge, Skills, and Professional Dispositions
What do candidate assessment data tell the unit about candidates' meeting professional, state, and
institutional standards and their impact on P-12 student learning? For programs not
nationally/state reviewed, summarize data from key assessments and discuss these results.
Content
Teacher candidates demonstrate an in-depth knowledge and understanding of content. 100% of teacher
candidates pass content exams required in South Carolina for licensure.
In 2011-2012, all teacher candidates passed the Praxis II licensure exam in their area of certification.
Candidates averaged 4.42 out of a possible 5.0 in clinical practice evaluations of content knowledge.
Surveys of teacher candidates and graduates also indicated high confidence in their preparation in the
use of accurate, relevant and current content from multiple sources (3.86 out of possible 4.0). Teacher
candidates consistently meet expectations for structuring content to promote meaningful learning,
averaging 4.46 out of a possible 5.0 on clinical practice measures.
Pedagogical Content Knowledge and Skills
Teacher candidates demonstrate the ability to provide appropriate content during instruction and use
appropriate instructional strategies for the content area; candidates averaged 4.42-4.46 out of a possible
5.0 on indicators measuring this construct in clinical practice. Teacher candidates make connections
between content areas, as evidenced by high scores (2.84/3.0) on Design for Instruction within the
Teacher Work Study project. In addition, employer surveys indicated that PC graduates were well
prepared in their ability to implement a variety of instructional methods (3.72/4.0). ADEPT
observational data from clinical practice indicate that teacher candidates consistently meet expectations
for using a variety of instructional strategies and implementing these instructional strategies effectively
(4.32/5.0).
Teacher candidates demonstrate their ability to establish, communicate and maintain high expectations
for student achievement and participation and to structure content in order to promote meaningful
learning. Candidates average 4.36-4.41/5.0 on these ADEPT observational measures in clinical practice.
Teacher candidates also display their ability to plan a series of lessons in a specific content area with a
clearly defined structure based on pre-determined learning goals and objectives based on content-
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specific national and state standards as evidenced by high scores on Design for Instruction within the
TWS (2.84/3.0).
Teacher candidates effectively integrate technology into their instruction. Teacher candidates
demonstrate their knowledge of instructional technology in the required course EDUC 350, with course
grades averaging 3.6/4.0. Teacher candidates also demonstrate their ability to integrate appropriate
technology for teaching learning through the completion of a unit in a chosen content area during clinical
practice (TWS Design for Instruction: 2.84/3.0)
Professional and Pedagogical Knowledge and Skills
Teacher candidates reflect a thorough understanding of professional and pedagogical knowledge and
skills. 100% of teacher candidates scored Proficient or Above in the following ADEPT observational
measures during clinical practice: establish appropriate learning and developmental goals for all
students, use appropriate instructional strategies and implement them effectively, monitor student
learning during instruction, make appropriate adjustments to instruction based on formative data, create
a safe physical environment for learning, manage student behavior appropriately and manage
instructional and non-instructional routines effectively (Average scores on these measures ranged from
4.32-4.46/5.0).
ADEPT data on candidates' assessment proficiencies indicate that teacher candidates consistently meet
expectations for obtaining and analyzing student information to guide planning and instruction,
developing unit objectives, developing unit plans (content, strategies, materials, resources) and using
student performance data to guide planning (Average scores on these measures ranged from 4.41-
4.46/5.0). Data from the TWS Learning Goals and Objectives provide evidence that teacher candidates
create developmentally appropriate learning objectives that guide their planning for meaningful
instruction, consistently align these objectives with national and state standards, and demonstrate the
ability to develop and implement educationally appropriate and culturally responsive instruction
(2.82/3.0).
Teacher candidates demonstrate the ability to reflect on their practice and demonstrate their ability to
adjust instruction accordingly, supported by candidates' averages on the TWS Reflection and Self-
Evaluation (2.94/3.0). Teacher candidates also meet standards for making appropriate adjustments of
their instructional plan to address individual student needs which are informed by the analysis of student
learning/performance and are supported by clarifications of why the modifications would improve
student progress (Instructional Decision Making/TWS: 2.9/3.0). Employers indicated that PC graduates
were well prepared in their ability to reflect on their teaching practice (3.84/4.0).
Teacher candidates display comprehensive knowledge of the different ways children learn (e.g., learning
styles, learning modalities), supported by high averages on Contextual Factors of the TWS (2.80/3.0)
Teacher candidates also display a comprehensive understanding of the characteristics of the community,
family, school, and classroom and plan for instruction based on a thorough understanding of these
characteristics (Contextual Factors: 2.80/3.0).
Student Learning for Teacher Candidates
Teacher candidates consistently meet expectations for establishing, communicating and maintaining high
expectations for student achievement, as evidenced by proficiencies in the ADEPT observational data in
clinical practice (4.41/5.0). In addition, all teacher candidates demonstrate the ability to use student
performance data to guide instructional planning, monitor student learning frequently during instruction
and provide appropriate instructional feedback with the goal of enhancing student learning (ADEPT
data: 4.32/5.0).
Multiple measures indicate that teacher candidates meet and exceed proficiencies for developing
multiple and varied modes of assessments to evaluate student learning and give attention to validity and
reliability of assessments (TWS Assessment Plan: 2.85/3.0; Analysis of Student Learning: 2.85/3.0).
Through these TWS assessments, teacher candidates demonstrate their ability to conduct an analysis of
student data that is technically accurate and includes conclusions well-supported by data. Teacher
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candidates also demonstrate the ability to disaggregate student data. ADEPT observational data also
indicate that teacher candidates consistently meet expectations for developing appropriate processes of
evaluating and recording students' progress, selecting and administering appropriate assessments,
gathering and analyzing assessment data, and using student assessment data to reflect student progress
and achievement (4.36-4.44/5.0). Employer surveys also confirm that PC graduates are well-prepared in
their ability to use of a variety of assessment to measure student learning (3.76/4.0).
ADEPT data from clinical practice indicate that teacher candidates demonstrate the ability to frequently
monitor student learning during instruction and to use data on student learning to adjust their instruction
and planning (4.36-4.4/5.0). Teacher candidates also meet standards for making appropriate adjustments
of their instructional plan to address individual student needs as evidenced by TWS: Instructional
Decision-Making data (2.9/3.0). Exit surveys indicated that teacher candidates rated formative
assessment as one of the area in which they felt best prepared upon completing their clinical practice
(3.73/4.0). Graduates also indicated the greatest confidence in their preparation in the area of assessment,
specifically formative assessment (3.73/4.0).
Student data suggest that PC teacher candidates have a positive effect on student learning; data from
TWS Analysis of Student learning indicate that over 90% of teacher candidates documented an increase
in student performance based on an instructional intervention during clinical practice.
Professional Dispositions for All Candidates
ADEPT data indicate that teacher candidates demonstrate the ability to advocate for students, work to
achieve the goals of their work setting (school, district, college), communicate effectively, and exhibit
professional demeanor and behavior (4.46/5.0). In addition, Professional Dispositions data show that
teacher candidates meet standards for demonstrating leadership qualities in the classroom, interacting
appropriately with colleagues, showing initiative, and collaborating with appropriate groups (4.71/5.0).
Employer surveys also indicated that PC graduates were well-prepared in their professional interactions
and expectations (3.74/4.0).
Teacher candidates consistently meet expectations for creating a safe physical environment that is
conductive to learning, creating and maintaining a positive classroom climate, and creating and
maintaining a classroom culture of learning as evidenced by ADEPT clinical practice data (4.46/5.0). In
addition, Professional Dispositions data indicate that teacher candidates demonstrate high levels of
fairness and equity towards all students and hold students to higher levels of learning (4.71/5.0). Exit
surveys indicated that teacher candidates demonstrated high confidence in their ability to maintain high
expectations, fairness and equity for all students upon completing their clinical practice (3.92/4.0).
Graduates indicated very high confidence in their preparation in the area of professional expectations,
specifically their knowledge of treating all students with fairness and equity (4.0/4.0). Candidates
develop specific professional learning objectives reflecting ethical and professional standards of the
teaching profession and program-specific professional standards (TWS: Reflection and Self-Evaluation:
2.94/3.0).
1.2 Moving Toward Target or Continuous Improvement
Please respond to 1.2.a if this is the standard on which the unit is moving to the target level. If it is
not the standard on which you are moving to the target level, respond to 1.2.b.
1.2.a Standard on which the unit is moving to the target level
Describe areas of the standard at which the unit is currently performing at the target level for
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each element of the standard.
Summarize activities and their impact on candidate performance and program quality that have
led to target level performance.
Discuss plans and timelines for attaining and/or sustaining target level performance as
articulated in this standard.
1.a. Content Knowledge for Teacher Candidates:
"All program completers pass the content examinations in states that require examinations for
licensure."
100% of teacher candidates pass content exams required in South Carolina for licensure.
In 2011-2012, all teacher candidates passed the Praxis II licensure exam in their area of certification.
Overall, PC teacher candidates score an average of 21 points higher than the required state passing
score.
1.b. Pedagogical Content Knowledge and Skills for Teacher Candidates
"Teacher candidates reflect a thorough understanding of the relationship of content and content-specific
pedagogy. They have in-depth understanding of the content that they plan to teach and are able to
provide multiple explanations and instructional strategies so that all students learn."
Teacher candidates demonstrate the ability to provide appropriate content during instruction and use
appropriate instructional strategies for the content area; candidates averaged 4.42-4.46 out of a possible
5.0 on indicators measuring this construct in clinical practice. Teacher candidates can identify and
explain big ideas with the discipline and are able to make effective connections between content areas,
as evidenced by high scores (2.84/3.0) on Design for Instruction within the Teacher Work Study project.
In addition, employer surveys indicated that PC graduates were well prepared in their ability to
implement a variety of instructional methods (3.72/4.0). ADEPT observational data from clinical
practice indicate that teacher candidates consistently meet expectations for using a variety of
instructional strategies, including direct instruction and inquiry-based instruction, and implementing
these instructional strategies effectively (4.32/5.0).
1.c. Professional and Pedagogical Knowledge and Skills for Teacher Candidates "Candidates reflect on
their practice and make necessary adjustments to enhance student learning."
Teacher candidates demonstrate the ability to reflect on their practice to identify successful and
unsuccessful aspects of their instruction and are able to provide specific ideas for redesigning instruction
which clearly demonstrate in-depth understanding of and effective pedagogical practices. These
proficiencies are supported by candidate averages on the Reflection and Self-Evaluation components of
the TWS (2.94/3.0). Teacher candidates also meet standards for making appropriate adjustments of their
instructional plan to address individual student needs which are informed by the analysis of student
learning/performance and are supported by clarifications of why the modifications would improve
student progress (Instructional Decision Making/TWS: 2.9/3.0). In addition, ADEPT observational data
indicate that teacher candidates consistently meet expectations for using formative assessment to
monitor and adjust instruction based on student learning (Average 4.44/5.0) Employers also indicate that
PC graduates are well prepared in their ability to reflect on their teaching practice and make appropriate
adjustments to instruction based on data (3.84/4.0).
1.d. Student Learning for Teacher Candidates
"Teacher candidates focus on student learning and study the effects of their work. They assess and
analyze student learning, make appropriate adjustments to instruction, monitor student learning, and
have a positive effect on learning for all students."
Multiple measures indicate that teacher candidates meet and exceed proficiencies for assessing and
analyzing student learning and the studying the effects of their teaching on student achievement:
(1) Candidates develop multiple and varied modes of assessments to evaluate student learning and give
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attention to validity and reliability of assessments (TWS/Assessment Plan: 2.85/3.0).
(2) Teacher candidates demonstrate their ability to conduct an analysis of student data that is technically
accurate and includes conclusions well-supported by data. Teacher candidates also demonstrate the
ability to disaggregate student data by class, subgroups and by individual student characteristics
(TWS/Analysis of Student Learning: 2.85/3.0).
(3)ADEPT observational data indicate that teacher candidates consistently meet expectations for
developing appropriate processes of evaluating and recording students' progress, selecting and
administering appropriate assessments, gathering and analyzing assessment data, and using student
assessment data to reflect student progress and achievement (Averages on indicators ranging from 4.36-
4.44/5.0). ADEPT data also indicate that teacher candidates demonstrate the ability to frequently monitor
student learning during instruction and to use data on student learning to adjust their instruction and
planning (4.36-4.6/5.0).
(4) Employer surveys also indicate that PC graduates are well-prepared in their ability to use of a variety
of assessment to measure student learning and the effects of their practice (3.76/4.0).
(5) Teacher candidates also meet standards for making appropriate adjustments of their instructional plan
to address individual student needs as evidenced by TWS: Instructional Decision-Making data (2.9/3.0).
(6) Exit surveys indicated that teacher candidates rated formative assessment as one of the area in which
they felt best prepared upon completing their clinical practice (3.73/4.0). Graduates also indicated the
greatest confidence in their preparation in the area of assessment, specifically formative assessment
(3.73/4.0).
(7) Student data suggest that PC teacher candidates have a positive effect on student learning and
demonstrate the ability to examine student assessment data by class, subgroups and by individual student
characteristics. Data from Analysis of Student Learning (TWS) indicate that over 90% of teacher
candidates documented an increase in student performance based on an instructional intervention during
clinical practice.
1.g. Professional Dispositions for All Candidates
"Candidates demonstrate classroom behaviors that create caring and supportive learning environments
and encourage self-directed learning by all students."
Teacher candidates consistently meet expectations for creating a safe physical environment that is
conductive to learning, creating and maintaining a positive classroom climate, and creating and
maintaining a classroom culture of learning as evidenced by ADEPT clinical practice data (4.46/5.0). In
addition, Professional Dispositions data indicate that teacher candidates demonstrate high levels of
fairness and equity towards all students and hold students to higher levels of learning (4.71/5.0). Exit
surveys indicate that teacher candidates demonstrate high confidence in their ability to maintain high
expectations, fairness and equity for all students upon completing their clinical practice (3.92/4.0).
Graduates indicate very high confidence in their preparation in the area of professional expectations,
specifically their knowledge of treating all students with fairness and equity (4.0/4.0)
Summarize activities and their impact on candidate performance and program quality that have led to
target level performance and plans for attaining and/or sustaining target level performance.
In order to maintain the high pass rate of our teacher education graduates on the Praxis II exams, we will
continue to offer multiple study sessions for each program, explicitly align all courses with SPA
standards and Praxis II content objectives. We will also continue to meet with our educational liaisons in
the Sciences, History, English and Mathematics to discuss strategies to better prepare middle and
secondary teacher candidates to be successful on their Praxis II content exams.
One of the running themes across our varied assessments of clinical practice is a need to strengthen our
students' abilities in long-range planning and communicating with families. In order to strengthen our
students' skills in these areas, we will build in a special focus on long-range planning/curriculum pacing
and communicating with families in Practicum 4, in which students spend an intensive 2-week period in
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a classroom during the first weeks of the school year. The timing of this Practicum will allow our PC
teacher candidates to observe K-12 teachers as they meet in grade level teams to develop long-range
plans for the school year. They will also observe and participate in various strategies used to
communicate with families at the beginning of the year such as "Meet the Teacher Night" and creating
parent communication systems.
In addition, we will incorporate additional instruction on long-range planning and family communication
methods into method courses that students take during their Junior and Senior years. Finally, students
will examine teachers' long-range plans at the beginning of each Practicum, complete a thorough
examination of long-range plans at the beginning of clinical practice and in Practicum III and clinical
practice, observe and, when appropriate, participate in a parent-teacher conference. These developmental
structured experiences will give them further practice in the critical areas of long range planning and
communicating with families.
Clinical practice assessments also confirm that we should continue strengthening our students'
experiences in classroom management and the use of instructional technology; specifically the
Promethean Board. In 2011-12, we implemented a Practicum 4 field experience in which students focus
on classroom and behavior management during an intensive 2-week experiences during the first weeks
of school. This program has received excelled feedback from both students and school-based clinical
faculty, so we will continue requiring this Practicum at the beginning of each teacher candidate's Senior
Year. In addition, we will continue to integrate classroom and behavior management instruction into
methods courses. For example, early childhood and elementary majors learn effective management
techniques specific to inquiry-based instruction during their Science Methods course in their Junior year.
We will continue to provide opportunities for our teacher candidates to observe classroom and behavior
management practices of veteran teachers in K-12 classrooms. Lastly, a Promethean Board will be
installed in the Library learning classroom during Summer 2013 in order to give instructors and
candidates opportunities to demonstrate and apply best practices in instructional technologies.
We also plan to address an issue with reliability of student scores on ADEPT in the areas of
"maintaining high expectations for learners." We realized the need to provide a more concise operational
definition of "high expectations" for our teacher candidates and clinical faculty, as this wording can be
ambiguous and subjective in nature. We have held training sessions with clinical faculty in order to
explicitly discuss what it means to "maintain high expectations of learners" in order to increase the
reliability and validity of data gathered from our observational protocols, critical measures of our
candidates' pedagogical skills during clinical practice. In addition, we have provided concrete examples
of "maintaining high expectations for learners" within the context of our methods coursework and
clinical practice individual conferences and seminars.
1.2.b Continuous Improvement
Summarize activities and changes based on data that have led to continuous improvement of
candidate performance and program quality.
Discuss plans for sustaining and enhancing performance through continuous improvement as
articulated in this standard.
10000 character limit

1.3 Areas for Improvement Cited in the Action Report from the Previous Accreditation Review
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Summarize activities, processes, and outcomes in addressing each of the AFIs cited for the initial
and/or advanced program levels under this standard. 12,000 characters]
12000 character limit

1.4 Exhibits for Standard 1
1.4.a State program review documents and state findings (Some of these documents may be available in
AIMS.)
1.4.bTitle II reports submitted to the state for the previous three years
1.4.c Key assessments and scoring guides used for assessing candidate learning against professional and
state standards as well as proficiencies identified in the unit's conceptual framework (Some of this
information may be accessible for nationally recognized programs in AIMS. Cross reference as
appropriate.)
1.4.dAggregate data on key assessments, including proficiencies identified in the unit's conceptual
framework (Data should be disaggregated by program and level regardless of location or method of
delivery.)
1.4.e Key assessments and scoring guides used for assessing professional dispositions, including fairness
and the belief that all students can learn
1.4.f Aggregate data on key assessments of candidates' professional dispositions (Data should be
disaggregated by program and level regardless of location or method of delivery.)
1.4.gExamples of candidates' assessment and analysis of P-12 student learning
1.4.hExamples of candidates' work (e.g., portfolios at different proficiency levels) from programs across
the unit
1.4.i Aggregate data on follow-up studies of graduates
1.4.j Aggregate data on employer feedback on graduates
1.4.kData collected by state and/or national agencies on performance of educator preparation programs
and the effectiveness of their graduates in classrooms and schools, including student achievement
data, when available
1-4a_ADEPT Program Evaluation and Assurances_Presbyterian College
1-4b_Title II Report 2008-2009
1-4b_Title II Report 2009-2010
1-4b_Title II Report 2010-2011
1-4c_ADEPT Observational Protocol
1-4c_ADEPT Perfomance Level Descriptors
1-4c_Admission to Teacher Education_Essay Scoring Procedures and Rubric
1-4c_Analysis of Student Learning Assessment and Rubric
1-4c_Assessment Plan Assessment and Rubric
1-4c_Contextual Factors Assessment and Rubric
1-4c_Design for Instruction Assessment and Rubric
1-4c_Diversity Dispositions Survey
1-4c_Instructional Decision Making Assessment and Rubric
1-4c_Internal and External Protocols_Candidates-Graduates-Employers
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1-4c_Learning Goals and Objectives Assessment and Rubric
1-4c_Reflection and Self Evaluation Assessment and Rubric
1-4c_State Standards_ADEPT Summary and Documents
1-4c_State Standards_Assessment Plan Summary and Documents
1-4c_State Standards_Diversity Plan Summary
1-4c_State Standards_EEDA Summary
1-4c_State Standards_EEDA Sample 1
1-4c_State Standards_EEDA Sample 2
1-4c_State Standards_EEDA Sample 3
1-4c_State Standards_EEDA Sample 4
1-4c_State Standards_EEDA Sample 5
1-4c_State Standards Field and Clinical Experiences Summary
1-4c_State Standards_PreK-12 Academic Standards Summary and Documents
1-4c_State Standards_Program Admission Requirements Summary
1-4c_State Standards_Program Admission Requirements_Application for Admission to Teacher Education Program
1-4c_State Standards_South Carolina Safe School Climate Act Summary and Documents
1-4c_State Standards_Standards of Conduct Summary and Documents
1-4d_ADEPT Evaluations Unit Data
1-4d_Teacher Work Study Unit Data
1-4d_Internal and External Unit Data_Candidates-Graduates-Employers
1-4d_PRAXIS II Data
1-4d_Transition Points Data
1-4d_Diversity Dispositions Survey Data
1-4d_Disaggregated Assessment Data for All Conceptual Framework Proficiencies_Disaggregated by Program
1-4d_School Based Clinical Faculty Feedback Data
1-4e_Form 15_Professional Dispositions_Highlighted in document
1-4f_Professional Dispositions Unit Data
1-4f_Disaggregated Professional Dispositions Data_Disaggregated by Program
1-4g_Analysis of Student Learning Example 1
1-4g_Analysis of Student Learning Example 2
1-4g_Analysis of Student Learning Example 3
1-4g_Assessment Plan Example 1
1-4g_Assessment Plan Example 2
1-4g_Developing Teacher Work Sample with Rubric
1-4g_Proficient Teacher Work Sample with Rubric
1-4h_Elementary Capstone Research Paper_Proficient
1-4h_Capstone Research Paper Rubric
1-4h_Elementary Capstone Research Paper_Exemplary
1-4h_Elementary Math Lesson Plan Example 1
1-4h_Elementary Math Lesson Plan Example 2
1-4h_Early Childhood Capstone Research Paper_Exemplary
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1-4h_Early Childhood Capstone Research Paper_Proficient
1-4h_Early Childhood Math Lesson Plan Example 1
1-4h_Early Childhood Math Lesson Plan Example 2
1-4h_Middle Grades Capstone Presentation
1_4h_Secondary Teacher Work Sample Example 1
1-4h_Secondary Teacher Work Sample Example 2
1-4i_Follow up Survey Data on Graduates
1-4j_Employer Feedback on Graduates
1-4c_State Standards_Eligibility for Certification
1-4c_State Standards_ISTE Standards Summary and Alignment Chart
See Attachment panel below.
Standard 2. Assessment System and Unit Evaluation
The unit has an assessment system that collects and analyzes data on the applicant qualifications,
the candidate and graduate performance, and unit operations to evaluate and improve the unit and its
programs.
2.1 Assessment System and Unit Evaluation
How does the unit use its assessment system to improve candidate performance, program quality
and unit operations?
Assessment System
The Professional Education Unit (PEU) has a Unit Assessment System (UAS) that reflects the
conceptual framework and professional and state standards at key transition points and after graduation.
The Director of Assessment and Accreditation and Executive Director of Teacher Education oversee the
implementation of the UAS and evaluate the fidelity and effectiveness of the system. The Director of
Assessment and Accreditation is responsible for overseeing the system for data collection, analysis, and
evaluation and for the use of data to improve unit operations.
The UAS is regularly evaluated by and implemented in collaboration with the professional community.
Key assessments and data are presented to and evaluated by the Laurens County Education Advisory
Council which provides feedback and analysis from superintendents, principals and teachers from
surrounding school districts. The Fieldwork Committee, representing education faculty and
administrators from partner schools, also provides feedback on the efficacy of unit assessments related
to student performance in field and clinical experiences. In addition, the Teacher Education Committee,
comprised of PC faculty across content areas, provides feedback on student outcomes and their
implications for unit improvements in specific content areas.
The unit's assessment system includes comprehensive and integrated assessment and evaluation
measures to monitor candidate performance and manage and improve the unit's operations and
programs. The UAS includes assessment of: (a) candidate performance, (b) programs, and (c) the unit.
The Data Collection and Analysis Schedule provides a visual of key unit assessments and the protocols
for data collection, data analysis and data review.
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Decisions about candidate performance are based on multiple assessments at admission into programs,
appropriate transition points, and program completion. The UAS is comprised of the following
Transition Points: (1) Entry into Teacher Education Program (2) Entry into Practicum II (3) Entry into
Clinical Practice (4) Exit from Clinical Practice and (5) Program Completion. The exhibit "Transition
Points in Teacher Education" details assessments and criteria associated with each unit decision point as
well as data collection, decision makers and communication with applicants/candidates. The exhibit
"Transition Points Data" provides a summary of candidate data at all transition points.
The unit has taken effective steps to eliminate bias in assessments and is working to establish the
fairness, accuracy, and consistency of its assessment procedures and unit operations. Most importantly,
all programs in the PEU are nationally recognized. All PEU programs have developed assessment
matrices that demonstrate alignment with SPA standards and the unit conceptual frameworks. In
addition, the Conceptual Framework Assessment Plan demonstrates the alignment of all unit
assessments with candidate proficiencies of the conceptual framework.
Procedures are in place to bolster interrater reliability for observational protocols used to evaluate
candidate performance in field and clinical experience. Training sessions are held to orient all college
clinical supervisors to the ADEPT observation protocol and to clarify terminology and scoring
procedures for the instrument. During this training, college clinical supervisors view videos of classroom
instruction, complete an individual candidate rating, and then compare ratings with the training group in
order to discuss points of divergence in ratings and improve consistency in scoring instructional
components. In addition, all school-based clinical faculty are trained in ADEPT performance standards
and the ADEPT observational protocol and associated scoring procedures are discussed in detail at
introductory orientation meetings. In order to further bolster interrater reliability for the ADEPT
observational instrument, midterm conferences are held among each teacher candidate, their school-
based clinical supervisor and their college supervisor. Each team member completes an individual
ADEPT form prior to the conference and then scores are compared and discussed during the meeting.
This procedure contributes to overall reliability of the ADEPT protocol which is a key assessment for
teacher candidate performance in clinical experience.
Data Collection, Analysis and Evaluation
The Data Collection and Analysis Schedule provides a visual of key transition points and unit
assessments and the protocols for data collection, data analysis and data review. Candidate proficiencies
are defined by student outcomes of the unit's Conceptual Framework (Conceptual Framework
Assessment Plan); these proficiencies are assessed throughout candidates' core professional education
coursework, field experiences and clinical experience. Graduate effectiveness is evaluated through
follow-up Graduate Surveys, Employer Surveys, and performance on the SC second year teaching
assessment, ADEPT.
Data on program effectiveness is collected and analyzed annually by program coordinators. In addition,
program coordinators work with the Director of Assessment of Accreditation and Director of Teacher
Education in order to reflect on program assessment data for the purpose of program improvements.
Program coordinators are responsible for staying current with their specific SPA requirements and for
submitting program reports.
Unit Effectiveness is evaluated annually by the Provost and Director of Institutional Research upon
submission of Annual Department Reports. These reports detail key unit assessments, report student
data, define department goals, and detail the unit's formative use of student data to improve programs.
The Provost and Director of Institutional Research provide the unit with written and verbal feedback on
Annual Department Reports.
Unit operations are also evaluated by analyzing student evaluations of courses and instruction,
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10000 character limit
evaluations by teacher candidates of college and school-based supervisors, school-based clinical practice
supervisors' and college supervisors' evaluations of each other, undergraduate enrollment and graduation
rates and faculty professional activities reports.
PEU faculty attend an annual Assessment Retreat in May to review all internal and external data
collected on applicants, candidates, program completers, and recent graduates. This Assessment Retreat
is organized and conducted by the Director of Assessment and Accreditation and feedback from
attending faculty is recorded and collated to provide additional evidence for unit and program
improvements. As previously discussed, candidate and unit data are also presented to and evaluated by
the Laurens County Education Advisory Council and the Fieldwork Committee.
The unit maintains records of formal candidate complaints and documentation of their resolution.
Candidate complaints are collected via correspondence in the following forms: emails to advisors,
department chair, program coordinators; student evaluations of field and clinical faculty (See exhibit:
Student Complaint Documentation); notes from individual conferences between PEU faculty and
candidates. PEU document all candidate complaints and discuss each individual situation with the
Department Chair. Due to the small size of our department, all PEU faculty maintain close
communication regarding any candidate complaints and discuss plans of action at department meetings.
The unit maintains its assessment system through the use of Microsoft Access. Program coordinators
ensure that all key assessments are collected from their candidates and this data is delivered to the Chief
Data Officer who them inputs this data into the Access system. While only the Chief Data Officer has
administrative controls to edit data and student information in the system, faculty have access to
candidate assessment data and the Access data system. Faculty view student data on Access via their
office computers which are linked to the campus network. In addition, in-depth queries or special
requests for student institutional data can be requested from the Director of Institutional Data or Director
of Institutional Research. This request system is very efficient, with responses generally received within
one working day.
Use of Data for Program Improvement
The unit regularly and systematically uses data, including candidate and graduate performance
information, to evaluate the efficacy of its courses, programs, and clinical experiences. Due to the small
size of the Education Department at PC, informal discussions related to student data occur frequently
among program coordinators, who interact almost daily and meet regularly to discuss departmental
business. Discussions of student data at department meetings are documented by meeting minutes. In a
more formal sense, the Education faculty attend an annual Assessment Retreat to systematically review
all internal and external data collected on applicants, candidates, program completers, and recent
graduates. This Assessment Retreat is organized and conducted by the Director of Assessment and
Accreditation and provides a venue to examine unit candidate data as a team and to propose strategies
for making program and unit improvements. Since the Assessment Retreat is held in June following each
academic year, the timing of the retreat provides ample time to propose, coordinate and implement
changes for the succeeding academic year. The unit also collaborates with the professional community
(detailed previously) in order to evaluate student data and program/unit effectiveness. These processes
allow the PEU to regularly and systematically analyze program evaluation and performance assessment
data to initiate changes in programs and unit operations. Candidate assessment data are regularly shared
with candidates and faculty to help them reflect on and improve their performance and programs.
2.2 Moving Toward Target or Continuous Improvement
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Please respond to 2.2.a if this is the standard on which the unit is moving to the target level. If it is
not the standard on which you are moving to the target level, respond to 2.2.b.
2.2.a Standard on which the unit is moving to the target level
Describe areas of the standard at which the unit is currently performing at the target level for
each element of the standard.
Summarize activities and their impact on candidate performance and program quality that have
led to target level performance.
Discuss plans and timelines for attaining and/or sustaining target level performance as
articulated in this standard.
15000 character limit

2.2.b Continuous Improvement
Summarize activities and changes based on data that have led to continuous improvement of
candidate performance and program quality.
Discuss plans for sustaining and enhancing performance through continuous improvement as
articulated in this standard.
Recent Revisions to Conceptual Framework and Assessment System
In 2010, our department began a revision to our conceptual framework, thus necessitating a redesign of
our Assessment System. Revisions to the conceptual framework were necessary in order to better align
with our departmental goals, as well as the mission of Presbyterian College. In addition, there were
concerns that the underlying pillars of our existing conceptual framework were not being measured
reliably, thereby requiring substantive revision. This process began in Fall 2010 with a re-examination
of departmental goals and identification of the primary, foundational tenets of our education programs.
Faculty undertook a comprehensive review of the conceptual framework and consulted supporting
bodies of research in teaching and learning to ground our revisions of this framework. From this
examination of the research as well as consultation with professional bodies, revised pillars were
identified and descriptors of these pillars were drafted. In addition, candidate proficiencies for teacher
candidates were constructed for each pillar of the revised conceptual framework. These proposed
revisions were discussed by all members of the education department and iterative changes were made
to align with the overall mission of the department, as interpreted by all program coordinators and
supporting faculty. A revised Assessment Plan was developed around the candidate proficiencies of the
revised Conceptual Framework. The revised conceptual framework was also proposed to and approved
by members of our educational community, including the Laurens County Advisory Board, the
Fieldwork Advisory Board and the PC Education Committee.
Recent Developments in Review of Assessment Data for Program and Unit Improvement
The faculty continues to review, analyze, and utilize unit assessment data to make informed decisions
concerning the unit's operations, programs and candidates. In Spring 2011, the unit also established an
annual assessment retreat; Spring 2013 will mark the 3rd annual assessment retreat for the PEU. At this
one-day retreat, education faculty review all assessment data from the previous year and analyze this
data in light of the conceptual framework and related student learning outcomes. This Spring assessment
retreat allows faculty sufficient time to make formative changes to Fall courses based on data from the
previous year. Also in the Spring, unit faculty meet with the Laurens County Education Advisory
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10000 character limit
Council in order to share student data and collaborate on formative changes at both program and unit
level. This feedback includes input from area teachers, principals, superintendents and college content
specialists. The following are specific examples of curricular changes that have resulted from analysis of
key candidate and unit data:
(1) ADEPT Data: In 2011-2012 ADEPT observational data from clinical practice showed a decrease in
scores in the following areas, compared with ADEPT evaluations from 2009-2010 and 2010-2011:
Performance Standard 1: Long-Range Planning and Performance Standard 4: Expectations for Learners.
In order to strengthen our students' skills in these areas, we will build in a special focus on long-range
planning/curriculum pacing in Practicum 4, in which students spend an intensive 2-week period in a
classroom during the first weeks of the school year. The timing of this Practicum will allow our PC
teacher candidates to observe K-12 teachers as they meet in grade level teams to develop long-range
plans for the school year. They will also observe and participate in various strategies used to
communicate with families at the beginning of the year such as "Meet the Teacher Night" and creating
parent communication systems.
In addition, we will incorporate additional instruction on long-range planning and family communication
methods into method courses that students take during their Junior and Senior years. Finally, students
will examine teachers' long-range plans at the beginning of each Practicum and complete a thorough
examination of long-range plans at the beginning of clinical practice.
(2) School-based clinical faculty feedback: Feedback from cooperating teachers indicated that more
specific details regarding the timeline of transitions within the clinical practice program would be
beneficial (secondary education) and that instruction in the use of Promethean Board technology would
be very beneficial. In response to this data, we revised our "Semester at a Glance" for middle level and
secondary education students in the Clinical Practice Handbook in order to clarify transition points and
timelines for school-based clinical faculty. Clinical faculty also held pre-conferences with school-based
faculty in order to verbally clarify these expectations for transitions within clinical practice as students
take over more teaching and planning responsibilities in the classroom. In order to address cooperating
teachers' concerns about our candidates' preparation in classroom technology the unit worked with the
library coordinator to secure additional technology resources in our Library learning classroom. As a
result, a Promethean Board will be installed in the Library learning classroom during Summer 2013 in
order to give instructors and candidates opportunities to demonstrate and apply best practices in
instructional technologies.
(3) External Surveys: On surveys completed by PC graduates' employers, graduates were rated lowest in
their skills in effective communication with families. This data resulted in the development of more
intentional, focused experiences with family communication during field experiences. For example,
candidates now focus on specific strategies used to communicate with families at the beginning of the
year such as "Meet the Teacher Night" and creating parent communication systems during Practicum 4,
an intensive 2-week field immersion experience focused on the beginning of the school year. During
Practicum 3 and clinical practice, candidates are now required to observe and, when appropriate,
participate in a parent-teacher conference. In addition, Early Childhood and Elementary candidates are
required to complete a comprehensive Student Case Study during clinical practice with a focus on
communicating with family to learn about the student's background and to communicate with the family
regarding the student's progress on specific academic and developmental goals.
2.3 Areas for Improvement Cited in the Action Report from the Previous Accreditation Review
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Summarize activities, processes, and outcomes in addressing each of the AFIs cited for the initial
and/or advanced program levels under this standard.
The Professional Education Unit (PEU) has a Unit Assessment System (UAS) that reflects the
conceptual framework and professional and state standards at key transition points and after graduation.
The UAS supports the assessment requirements of professional organizations and the Conceptual
Framework. In addition, the UAS provides comprehensive information for program and unit continuous
improvement.
The Director of Assessment and Accreditation and Executive Director of Teacher Education oversee the
implementation of the Unit Assessment System and evaluate the fidelity and effectiveness of the system.
The Director of Assessment and Accreditation is responsible for overseeing the system for data
collection, analysis, and evaluation and for the use of data to improve unit operations.
The UAS is regularly evaluated by and implemented in collaboration with the professional community.
The unit's system includes comprehensive and integrated assessment and evaluation measures to
monitor candidate performance and manage and improve the unit's operations and programs. The UAS
includes assessment of: (a) candidate performance, (b) programs, and (c) the unit. The Data Collection
and Analysis Schedule provides a visual of key unit assessments and the protocols for data collection,
data analysis and data review.
Decisions about candidate performance are based on multiple assessments at admission into programs,
appropriate transition points, and program completion. The PEU regularly disaggregates and examines
data by program.
The unit has taken effective steps to eliminate bias in assessments and is working to establish the
fairness, accuracy, and consistency of its assessment procedures and unit operations. Most importantly,
all programs in the PEU are fully accredited. As part of the process for Specialized Professional
Association accreditation, programs must undergo rigorous alignment review. All PEU programs have
developed assessment matrices that demonstrate alignment with professional association standards and
the conceptual frameworks. In addition, the Conceptual Framework Assessment Plan demonstrates the
alignment of all unit
assessments with candidate proficiencies. (See Conceptual Framework Assessment System).
Procedures are in place to bolster interrater reliability for observational protocols used to evaluate
candidate performance in field and clinical experience. Training sessions are held to orient all college
clinical supervisors to the ADEPT observation protocol. During this training, college clinical
supervisors view videos of classroom instruction, complete an individual rating, and then compare
ratings with the training group in order to discuss points of divergence in ratings and improve
consistency in scoring instructional components. In addition, all school-based clinical faculty are trained
in ADEPT performance standards.
The faculty continues to review, analyze, and utilize unit assessment data to make informed decisions
concerning the unit's operations, programs and candidates. Throughout the fall, assessment data such as
candidate application data, Praxis I, II and PLT scores, course evaluations and fieldwork feedback are
shared and discussed. In February, the unit faculty meet on a more formal basis to discuss Unit and
Program data and make changes based on this evidence. Course evaluations also indicate that candidates
benefit from a common lesson plan framework across all programs. Thus, the faculty revise the lesson
plan template and rubric so that it incorporates planning for diverse learners and can be used in all
programs.
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The unit also holds an annual spring assessment retreat. At this one-day retreat, education faculty review
all assessment data from the previous year and analyze that data in light of the conceptual framework
and related student learning outcomes. This spring assessment retreat allows faculty sufficient time to
make formative changes to Fall courses based on data from the previous year.
Also in spring, unit faculty meet with the Laurens County Education Advisory Council in order to share
student data and collaborate on formative changes at both program and unit level. This feedback includes
input from area teachers, principals, superintendents and college content specialists.
2.4 Exhibits for Standard 2
2.4.a Description of the unit's assessment system including the requirements and key assessments used at
transition points
2.4.bAdmission criteria and data from key assessments used for entry to programs
2.4.c Policies, procedures, and practices for ensuring that key assessments of candidate performance and
evaluations of program quality and unit operations are fair, accurate, consistent, and free of bias
2.4.dPolicies, procedures, and practices for ensuring that data are regularly collected, compiled,
aggregated, summarized, analyzed, and used for continuous improvement
2.4.e Policies, procedures and practices for managing candidate complaints
2.4.f File of candidate complaints and the unit's responses and resolutions (This information should be
available during the onsite visit)
2.4.gExamples of significant changes made to courses, programs, and the unit in response to data
gathered from the assessment system
2-4a_Candidate Proficiencies and Assessment System
2-4a_Transition Points in Teacher Education
2-4b_Application for Admission to Teacher Education Program
2-4b_Transition Points Data
2-4c_Framework for Fairness Accuracy Consistency and Elimination of Bias and Unit Assessment System
2-4d_Data Collection and Analysis Schedule
2-4e_Candidate Complaint Procedure Example 1
2-4e_Candidate Complaint Procedure Example 2
2-4e_Notification of Concern_Student
2-4f_Candidate Complaint Documentation
2-4g_Data-based Changes_Development of Practicum IV Field Experience in Classroom Management
2-4g_Data-based Changes_Revision to EDUC 371
2-4g_Data-based Changes_Revision to Practicum I-III to include additional observations
See Attachment panel below.
Standard 3. Field Experiences and Clinical Practice
The unit and its school partners design, implement, and evaluate field experiences and clinical
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practice so that teacher candidates and other school professionals develop and demonstrate the
knowledge, skills, and professional dispositions necessary to help all students learn.
3.1 Field Experiences and Clinical Practice
How does the unit work with the school partners to deliver field experiences and clinical practice to
enable candidates to develop the knowledge, skills, and professional dispositions to help all students
learn?
Collaboration between unit and school partners
The unit, its school partners, and other members of the professional community design, deliver, and
evaluate field experiences and clinical practice to help candidates develop their knowledge, skills, and
professional dispositions. The conceptual framework guides the unit's design and development of field-
based experiences and clinical practice for all programs within the context of a variety of placements. In
collaboration with cooperating teachers, university facilitators and their peers, candidates incrementally
connect university coursework with field-based experiences.
Courses are designed to support a developmental model of field experiences. Candidates participate in
four field-based experiences resulting in 130 hours of observation and participation in a variety of
contexts before clinical practice. The exhibit "Summary of Field and Experiences" details the
progression, specific foci and assessment of Practicum courses 1-4. Clinical practice throughout the unit
is a full semester experience resulting in approximately 500 hours.
Throughout the design, implementation and evaluation of field experiences and clinical practice, partner
schools and Unit faculty collaborate to increase the effectiveness of preparing teachers and positively
impacting student learning. The Fieldwork Committee, made up of partner school principals, teachers
and Unit faculty, discuss all aspects of field collaboration. Recent collaboration has resulted in a
refinement of observation and clearer communication with partner schools regarding expectations for
candidates in field and clinical experiences.
In addition, the Laurens County Education Advisory Council offers feedback about the effectiveness of
components of the PC clinical practice program. This group is composed of administrators and teachers
from Laurens Districts 55 and 56, PC education faculty, and members of the PC Teacher Education
Committee. During its annual meeting, the LCEAC receives a report from PC faculty about yearly
clinical practice statistics, offers feedback about aspects of the field and clinical practice program
informed by their observations in the field, and participates in focus groups on critical issues in teacher
education, particularly field experience.
The unit and its school partners jointly determine the specific placement of student teachers. In
collaboration with teachers, school administrators and Unit faculty, placement of candidates go through
multiple cycles. Beginning with grade-level, certification-area and specific school requests to districts,
district personnel then collaborate with school administrators and teachers. Upon approval from district
and campus administrators, collaboration then begins between campus administrators and Unit faculty
through the Director of Field Experiences. Throughout this process, all field placements are attuned to
the personalities, dispositions, strengths and challenges of teachers, students and candidates. Attention is
also given to the developmental level of the candidates within their programmatic trajectory.
Additionally, varied placements are critical so as to provide multiple models for success in P-12
classrooms, and in order to prepare candidates for the myriad of contexts in our area schools.
The school and unit share expertise to support candidates' learning in field experiences and clinical
practice. As Unit faculty work closely with cooperating teachers and candidates, pedagogical content
knowledge, management strategies, assessment techniques and planning strategies are shared in the
following ways: candidates refer to strategies, techniques, materials and assessments they have
experienced with their cooperating teachers within Unit classes that inform Unit faculty; projects in
methods classes are utilized in demonstration teaching by candidates that inform cooperating teachers;
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co-teaching between Unit faculty and candidates leads to fruitful collaboration between the Unit and
partner schools; and three-way conferences to discuss observations leads to collaborative sharing that
benefits candidates and ultimately P-12 students. In addition, teachers and school administrators from
partner schools give guest lectures to Practicum and Methods courses on topics such as professionalism,
diversity and classroom management.
Design, implementation and evaluation of field experiences and clinical practice
Throughout implementation of the Unit's developmental fieldwork model, all facets of field experiences
and clinical practice are continuously evaluated and revised based on multiple forms of data. Candidates,
cooperating teachers and Unit faculty assess each other through multiple surveys; this data is utilized in a
continual loop to provide ongoing information about placements, effectiveness of all parties, as well as
programmatic alterations that may be needed. Candidates are well informed throughout the process, and
entrance and exit criteria are clearly delineated and followed.
Within the four practicum courses candidates are afforded opportunities to observe and participate in a
wide array of educational endeavors. In all practica, candidates teach a variety of lessons, are immersed
in the community, and interact with parents, teachers and administrators. Practicum 4 "early experience"
has been key in providing the time and opportunity for deep engagement before clinical practice.
Candidates are involved in parent orientation night, professional development, staff development and
room preparation before the students arrive. This has proved invaluable to our candidates as they take on
more responsibilities leading up to clinical practice, and serves as a bridge in the Unit's developmental
model of preparation for student success.
Fieldwork and clinical practice allow our candidates to put the Unit's conceptual framework into
meaningful practice. The conceptual framework is put into action as they teach in area schools and
develop the capacity to be knowledgeable, reflective, culturally responsive, and professional educators.
During clinical practice, candidates apply technology strategies learned in their coursework and are
assessed on their ability to implement these effectively. Candidates are evaluated using the ADEPT
assessment tool which measured their ability to effectively use instructional technology.
During their 15 weeks of clinical practice, candidates gradually assume greater responsibility for
planning, pedagogy, assessment and classroom management; this results in 3 weeks of full-time
teaching. Candidates have the opportunity to complete multiple cycles of planning, teaching, assessment,
reteach and reflection.
The selection of cooperating teachers and supervisors is of paramount importance. The exhibit "Clinical
Practice Handbook" details the required qualifications for field and clinical faculty, both in partner
schools and within the PEU. Supervisors within the unit work closely with candidates during clinical
practice and offer invaluable mentoring support. The unit's developmental model hinges upon close
collaboration between cooperating teachers, candidates, supervisors and other school-based personnel to
assure P-12 student success.
College supervisors observe and conference with candidates weekly and provide specific individualized
instruction based on candidates' specific strengths and challenges in clinical practice. Weekly
conversations and continuous communication with school-based clinical faculty also facilitate a team
approach to our clinical practice model. Supervisors employ a formal observation form four times
throughout the semester with informal open-ended observational instruments used weekly to provide
ongoing feedback. The cooperating teacher also utilizes this form four times during the semester with
conferences afterwards. Approximately midway through the semester, an extended ADEPT form is
completed by each of the participants. A three-way conference is then held to determine strengths,
challenges and expectations for the second half of the semester. This same assessment is utilized at the
end of the semester as well as a final three-way conference to provide summative feedback to the
candidate. In addition, weekly clinical practice seminars allow for candidates to interact with their peers,
focus on specific pedagogical skills, and learn from guest lectures from area partner schools.
Practicum students are also evaluated by written lesson plans, topic papers and one formal observation
by the supervisor and cooperating teacher. All of these measures are integral to the Unit's developmental
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model in which candidates are supported throughout their field experiences and clinical practice.
Candidates' development and demonstration of knowledge, skills and professional dispositions to help
all students
The Unit utilizes the ADEPT protocol, Teacher Work Sample (TWS) and Special Program Area (SPA)
assessments in order to asses candidates' content knowledge, pedagogical skills, dispositions and the
belief that all students can learn. Standard 1 exhibits provide descriptions of each unit assessment,
rubrics for clinical and field assessments and candidate data.
Laurens County allows our candidates to teach in classrooms with diverse ethnic/racial, linguistic,
religion, gender and SES groups, as well as exceptionalities. The majority of schools in Laurens County
are rural, Title I schools and also include a fast-growing Latino population. This provides a strong
context for our candidates to develop skills in teaching a diverse student population. Additionally, many
of our partner schools utilize an inclusion model when appropriate, providing candidates experiences
working with students with special learning needs. The Unit strives to offer placements that provide rich
experiences with the diverse student populations represented in our area.
3.2 Moving Toward Target or Continuous Improvement
Please respond to 3.2.a if this is the standard on which the unit is moving to the target level. If it is
not the standard on which you are moving to the target level, respond to 3.2.b.
3.2.a Standard on which the unit is moving to the target level
Describe areas of the standard at which the unit is currently performing at the target level for
each element of the standard.
Summarize activities and their impact on candidate performance and program quality that have
led to target level performance.
Discuss plans and timelines for attaining and/or sustaining target level performance as
articulated in this standard.
15000 character limit

3.2.b Continuous Improvement
Summarize activities and changes based on data that have led to continuous improvement of
candidate performance and program quality.
Discuss plans for sustaining and enhancing performance through continuous improvement as
articulated in this standard.
In order to provide the most effective clinical practice placements, a pilot program has been instituted
with an area school in which administrators and teachers interview candidates before clinical placements
to determine the best possible match between pre-service and cooperating teachers. This has increased
the collaboration to include specific strengths and challenges of particular candidates, and the Unit is
considering extending this program to other area schools.
Discussion at the LCEAC annual meetings revealed several primary themes that have driven changes
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within our field experience: (1) PC teacher educators should have be exposed to field experiences "early
and often" and would benefit from parallel feedback forms from both PC clinical faculty and school-
based clinical faculty. (2)Laurens County administrators and teachers suggested that we expand our
definition of teaching to include co-teaching and modeling lessons after teacher examples. (3) PC
students need to increase their abilities in long-range planning.
In addition, feedback from the school-based clinical faculty has been utilized to guide revisions to field
experience. Overall, feedback from school-based clinical faculty has been very positive and indicated the
strengths of our clinical practice program; comments were particularly positive about the consistent
presence and support of PC faculty in the classroom with student teachers. Several teachers indicated
that more details regarding the timeline of transitions within the clinical practice program would be
beneficial (secondary education). Several teachers also indicated that they felt the workload for our
student teachers was excessive; students complete a Teacher Work Study project and a Student Study
during their clinical practice. Finally, several teachers stated that instruction in the use of Promethean
Board technology would be very beneficial.
Results of these varied forms of feedback from partner schools indicate that our program is overall very
strong and is doing an excellent job of preparing PC teacher educators in the areas of content knowledge,
pedagogical knowledge, pedagogical content knowledge and professional dispositions. Based on data
collected from assessments of field and clinical practice and ongoing collaboration with partner schools,
we have made the following adjustments in our field and clinical practice program:
1. We have revise our "Semester at a Glance" for middle level and secondary education students in the
Clinical Practice Handbook in order to clarify transition points and timelines for school-based clinical
faculty. We have also made sure to verbally clarify these expectations for transitions within clinical
practice as students take over more teaching and planning responsibilities in the classroom.
2. In order to allow student teachers more time to focus on planning and instruction within their clinical
practice placement, we have revised the Student Study to make this project less time-intensive. We have
removed a segment of the project that requires students to develop and implement activities with
students based on their assessment of a variety of developmental and environmental factors. Students
will continue to complete the portion of the project that requires them to analyze data about student
achievement, development and environmental context; this adjustment will preserve the essence of the
project without compromising the critical learning objectives of the Student Study.
3. One of the running themes across our varied assessments of clinical practice is a deficit in our
students' abilities in long-range planning and communicating with families. In order to strengthen our
students' skills in these areas, we will build in a special focus on long-range planning/curriculum pacing
and communicating with families in Practicum 4, in which students spend an intensive 2-week period in
a classroom during the first weeks of the school year. The timing of this Practicum allows our PC
teacher candidates to observe K-12 teachers as they meet in grade level teams to develop long-range
plans for the school year. They also observe and participate in various strategies used to communicate
with families at the beginning of the year. In addition, we will incorporate additional instruction on long-
range planning and family communication methods into methods courses that students take during their
Junior and Senior years. Finally, students will examine teachers' long-range plans at the beginning of
each Practicum, complete a thorough examination of long-range plans at the beginning of clinical
practice and in Practicum III and clinical practice, observe and, when appropriate, participate in a parent-
teacher conference. These developmentally structured experiences will give them further practice in the
critical areas of long range planning and communicating with families.
4. Clinical practice assessments also confirm that we should continue strengthening our students'
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experiences in the use of instructional technology, specifically the Promethean Board. While we have
focused on SMART board technology, surrounding districts have recently upgraded to Promethean
Boards, necessitating a change in our technology training as well. Over the Summer of 2013, a
Promethean Board will be installed into the curriculum classroom where many of our methods courses
are taught in order to provide our candidates training in implementing Promethean Board technology in
their instruction.
5. In 2011-12, we implemented a Practicum 4 field experience in which students focus on classroom and
behavior management during an intensive 2-week experiences during the first weeks of school. This
program has received excellent feedback from both students and school-based clinical faculty, so we will
continue requiring this Practicum at the beginning of each teacher candidate's Senior Year. In addition,
we will continue to integrate classroom and behavior management instruction into methods courses. For
example, early childhood and elementary majors learn effective management techniques specific to
inquiry-based instruction during their Science Methods course in their Junior year. We will continue to
provide opportunities for our teacher candidates to observe classroom and behavior management
practices of veteran teachers in K-12 classrooms
5. We also plan to address low student scores on ADEPT in the areas of "maintaining high expectations
for learners." We realized the need to provide a more concise operational definition of "high
expectations" for our teacher candidates and clinical faculty, as this wording can be ambiguous and
subjective in nature. We have held training sessions with clinical faculty in order to explicitly discuss
what it means to "maintain high expectations of learners" in order to increase the reliability and validity
of data gathered from our observational protocols, critical measures of our candidates' pedagogical skills
during clinical practice. In addition, we have provided concrete examples of "maintaining high
expectations for learners" within the context of our methods coursework and clinical practice individual
conferences and seminars.
3.3 Areas for Improvement Cited in the Action Report from the Previous Accreditation Review
Summarize activities, processes, and outcomes in addressing each of the AFIs cited for the initial
and/or advanced program levels under this standard.
12000 character limit

3.4 Exhibits for Standard 3
3.4.a Examples across programs of collaborative activities between unit and P-12 schools to support the
design, implementation, and evaluation of field experiences and clinical practice, including
memoranda of understanding
3.4.bAggregate data on candidate placement in field experiences and clinical practice (Data should be
disaggregated by program and level regardless of location or method of delivery)
3.4.c Criteria for the selection of clinical faculty, which includes both higher education and P12 school
faculty
3.4.dExamples of support and evaluation of clinical faculty across programs
3.4.e Guidelines/ handbooks on field experiences and clinical practice for candidates, and clinical faculty,
including support provided by the unit and opportunities for feedback and reflection
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3.4.f Assessment instruments and scoring guides used for and data collected from field experiences and
clinical practice for all programs, including use of technology for teaching and learning (These
assessments may be included in program review documents or the exhibits for Standard 1. Cross
reference as appropriate.)
3.4.gAggregate data on candidates entering and exiting from clinical practice for all programs (These
assessments may be included in program review documents or the exhibits for Standard 1. Cross
reference as appropriate.)
3-4a_Laurens County Education Advisory Council Presentation_Unit Data Presentation
3-4a_Fieldwork Committee Meeting Minutes
3-4a_Laurens County Education Advisory Council Meeting Agenda 2013
3-4a_Laurens County Education Advisory Council Meeting Minutes
3-4a_Guest Lecture Handout_Partner School Administration Presentation to Candidates on Classroom Management
3-4a_Memorandum of Understanding with Partner School Districts
3-4b_Clinical Field Placements
3-4b_Field Placements Log
3-4c_Criteria for Selection of Clinical Faculty
3-4d_Evaluations of School Based and PC Clinical Faculty
3-4d_Clarification of Roles and Responsibilities for Field and Clinical Practice
3-4e_Clinical Practice Handbook
3-4e_Clinical Practice Weekly Pacing Guide
3-4e_EDEL 305: Science Methods_Practicum Communication to Teacher
3-4e_EDEL 306: Social Studies Methods_Practicum Communication to Teacher
3-4e_EDEL 312: Math Methods_Practicum Communication to Teacher
3-4e_Practicum Experiences Log for Teachers
3-4e_Practicum Folder Cover Sheet
3-4e_Letter to Classroom Teacher Practicum I
3-4e_Letter to Classroom Teacher Practicum II
3-4e_Letter to Classroom Teacher Practicum III
3-4e_Practicum Student Information to Classroom Teacher Form
3-4f_ADEPT Clinical Practice Evaluation Form
3-4f_Clinical Practice Candidate Grade Sheet
3-4f_Early Childhood Pedagogical and Professional Content Knowledge and Skills Assessment
3-4f_Middle Level Mathematics Pedagogical and Professional Content Knowledge and Skills Assessment
3-4f_Form 14 Lesson Observational Protocal
3-4f_Lesson Plan Rubric for Clinical Practice
3-4f_Practicum and Clinical Practice Written Lesson Plan Format
3-4f_Practicum Portfolio Rubric
3-4f_Practicum Teacher Observation Form
3-4f_Practicum IV Reflective Assessment
3-4g_Data on Candidates Entering and Exiting Clinical Practice
See Attachment panel below.
Standard 4. Diversity
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The unit designs, implements, and evaluates curriculum and provides experiences for candidates to
acquire and demonstrate the knowledge, skills, and professional dispositions necessary to help all
students learn. Assessments indicate that candidates can demonstrate and apply proficiencies related
to diversity. Experiences provided for candidates include working with diverse populations, including
higher education and P-12 school faculty; candidates; and students in P-12 schools.
4.1 Diversity
How does the unit prepare candidates to work effectively with all students, including individuals of
different ethnicity, race, socioeconomic status, gender, exceptionalities, language, religion, sexual
orientation, and/or geographical area?
Design, Implementation and Evaluation of Curriculum and Experiences
The unit clearly articulates proficiencies related to diversity identified in unit's conceptual framework
that candidates are expected to develop during their professional programs. Within the PEU' Conceptual
Framework, the pillar Culturally Responsive Educator defines the following department goal: To
prepare teacher candidates who demonstrate effective teaching of diverse student populations. The
Conceptual Framework Assessment Plan details specific student learning outcomes and unit assessments
that are collected throughout a candidate's program in order to measure progress on each of these
diversity proficiencies.
Curriculum experiences provide a well-grounded framework for understanding diversity, including
English language learners and students with exceptionalities. All teacher candidates are required to take
EDUC 371: Meeting the Needs of All Learners, Exceptional and Diverse. This course covers the
following areas of diversity, as guided by NCATE's official definition of diversity: ethnicity, race,
socioeconomic status, gender, exceptionalities, language, religion, sexual orientation, and geographical
area. 100% of our candidates complete this course with a C or higher, providing evidence of their
content knowledge in a wide array of diversities. In addition, teacher methods courses provide an
emphasis on planning and implementing instruction for students with diverse needs. These student
outcomes are reflected in PEU syllabi (See Syllabi; Standard 1). 100% of teacher candidates scored at
the Proficient level for diversity dispositions (relating to the belief that all students can learn) at the
completion of clinical practice (Average 3.56 on a 4.0 scale). Multiple unit assessments in clinical
practice indicate that candidates demonstrate proficient skills in planning and implementing instruction
for a diverse range of students (ADEPT and TWS Data; Standard 1). Employer surveys also indicate PC
graduates use a variety of appropriate instructional strategies that effectively meet the needs of diverse
student populations (3.78/4.0).
Field experiences provide a well-grounded framework for understanding diversity, including English
language learners and students with exceptionalities. Laurens County allows our candidates to teach in
classrooms with diverse ethnic/racial, linguistic, gender and SES groups, as well as exceptionalities.
(See School Demographics chart) Our students complete their Practicum and Clinical Practice
experiences primarily in Title I settings and work with the fast-growing Latino population in our area.
Additionally, many of our partner schools utilize an inclusion model when appropriate, and thus our
candidates become familiar with the affordances of diverse classrooms.
Candidates are aware of different learning styles and adapt instruction or services appropriately for all
students, including linguistically and culturally diverse students and students with exceptionalities.
Clinical practice evaluations suggest that our teacher candidates are proficient in the following areas:
uses appropriate instructional strategies that meet diverse learning needs, Adapts instruction to diverse
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learners so that all can learn, Provides appropriate instructional feedback to all students, and uses a
variety of instructional strategies that meet diverse learning needs (See ADEPT data; Standard 1)
Professional dispositions data also support that students possess the ability to effectively instruct diverse
students and display positive dispositions toward diverse students. Candidates connect lessons,
instruction, or services to students' experiences and cultures. In addition, candidate and graduate surveys
indicate that teacher candidates and program completers are confident in their knowledge and skills in
instructing diverse students in their classrooms; employer surveys also support these findings (See
Survey Data; Standard 1)
Clinical practice observational data also confirm that our teacher candidates demonstrate classroom
behaviors that are consistent with ideas of fairness and the belief that students can learn (See ADEPT
data). Teacher candidates also have ample opportunities to communicate with students and families,
including a Student Case Study which requires students to develop a line of communication with a
family from a diverse student group and develop a series of learning interventions for the student; these
learning experiences include a home component that requires additional communication with the family.
Experiences Working with Diverse Faculty
Candidates in conventional and distance learning programs interact with professional education faculty,
faculty from other units, and/or school faculty, both male and female, from at least two ethnic/racial
groups. Due to the liberal arts nature of Presbyterian College, teacher candidates spend the majority of
their Freshman and Sophomore year completing coursework with our diverse general education faculty.
Faculty vitae (See Standard 5) provide evidence that PEU have K-12 teaching experience in diverse
educational settings as well as non-traditional experiences working with initiatives targeting minority
populations. Affirmation of the value of diversity is shown through good-faith efforts to increase or
maintain faculty diversity. Faculty positions are advertised widely and distributed to a diverse audience
in the following publications/sites: Chronicle of Higher Education, American Educational Research
Association job postings, International Reading Association job postings, South Carolina Association of
Teacher Educators job board. In addition, specific efforts are made to keep open dialogue with
Historically Black colleges in SC to increase awareness of specific faculty openings at Presbyterian
College.
Experiences Working with Diverse Candidates
Candidates engage in professional education experiences with male and female candidates from different
socioeconomic groups, and at least two ethnic/racial groups. Teacher candidates attend an annual state
Diversity Conference which is hosted by Benedict College, a member of a select group of Historically
Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU). By attending this conference, candidates have the opportunity
to interact with and learn from a variety of presenters and facilitators in areas relating to educating
diverse student populations. In addition, our students complete written reflections on their experiences at
this conference. Analysis of these student reflections revealed a heightened level of awareness and
understanding of issues of diversity in education as a result of the conference experience. In addition, the
PEU has worked to increase student interaction with diverse peers through their participation in the Big
South Undergraduate Research Symposium. In March 2012, PC undergraduates presented their research
alongside peers from 7 regional colleges and attended sessions and lectures intended to increase dialogue
among students from diverse racial, ethnic and geographical groups. PC has also developed an increased
focus on international collaborations and student exchanges in the past years; in 2014 we will graduate
our first international education major in Elementary Education.
While the demographics of our PEU mirror the overall demographics of Presbyterian College, the
college has been focusing its efforts on increasing the diversity of our campus-wide student body. One
recent development that has affected minority recruitment, enrollment and retention has been the PC's
recent move to NCAA Division I athletics in 2011. This move has resulted in an increase in minority
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students within the student body as a whole. Our PEU has worked to maintain dialogue and connections
with all incoming Freshmen in order to recruit additional minority teacher candidates; these efforts have
been manifested through our work at Accepted Students events for the college, holding multiple Teacher
Education information sessions for Freshmen and Sophomores and maintaining dialogue with the
general education faculty and coaches. This upward trend in admission and retention of African-
American students will likely affect the demographics of the PEU in the coming 2-3 years, as we do not
admit students into the Teacher Education program until Spring of their Sophomore year.
Experiences Working with Diverse Students in P-12 Schools
Field experiences and clinical practice provide experiences with male and female P12 students from
different socioeconomic groups and at least two ethnic/racial groups. PC is located in Laurens County,
which allows for our students to experience a wide array of racial, socioeconomic, ethnic, and cultural
diversity. The diversity of surrounding partner schools provides our candidates with the opportunity to
teach in classrooms with diverse ethnic/racial, linguistic, gender and SES groups, as well as
exceptionalities.
Our students complete their Practicum and Clinical Practice experiences primarily in Title I settings and
work with the fast-growing Latino population in our area. In the past 3 years, our PEU has worked to
develop relationships with Ford Elementary School with a student body that is largely Hispanic, thereby
speaking English as a Second Language. Additionally, many of our partner schools utilize an inclusion
model when appropriate, and thus our candidates become familiar with the affordances of diverse
classrooms. The Unit utilizes a Field Placements Log (Standard 3 exhibits) in order to track each
candidate's field placements and ensure that they are placed in field settings that provide experiences
with a wide array of ethnicities, SES, exceptionalities and English Language Learners.
4.2 Moving Toward Target or Continuous Improvement
Please respond to 4.2.a if this is the standard on which the unit is moving to the target level. If it is
not the standard on which you are moving to the target level, respond to 4.2.b.
4.2.a Standard on which the unit is moving to the target level
Describe areas of the standard at which the unit is currently performing at the target level for
each element of the standard.
Summarize activities and their impact on candidate performance and program quality that have
led to target level performance.
Discuss plans and timelines for attaining and/or sustaining target level performance as
articulated in this standard.
15000 character limit

4.2.b Continuous Improvement
Summarize activities and changes based on data that have led to continuous improvement of
candidate performance and program quality.
Discuss plans for sustaining and enhancing performance through continuous improvement as
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articulated in this standard.
Analysis of student learning outcome data continues to show high scores in all areas relating to teaching
diverse student populations. For example, 100% of teacher candidates scored at the Proficient level for
diversity dispositions (relating to the belief that all students can learn) at the completion of clinical
practice (Average 3.56 on a 4.0 scale). However, several recent data-driven changes that have been
taken in order to deepen candidate knowledge, pedagogy, and experiences working with diverse student
populations.
Increasing Candidate Content Knowledge in Diversity
In the area of content knowledge, our department has revised the course EDUC 371: Meeting the Needs
of All Learners: Exceptional and Diverse. Previously, this course primarily covered introductory
material related to special education with its primary focus on differentiating instruction for students in
the regular classroom receiving special education services under the Individuals with Disabilities
Education Act or accommodations under Section 504. Revisions to this course occurred in light of a
revised NCATE definition of diversity which includes a broader focus on differentiating instruction in
response to a variety of categorical differences. The revised course includes a study of the following
areas: learning disabilities, communication disorders, emotional and behavioral disorders, attention
deficit hyperactivity disorder, autism spectrum disorders, developmental disorders, cultural diversity,
ethnic and racial diversity, gender, linguistic diversity, socioeconomic status, sexual orientation, and
regional diversity. This course will increase the content knowledge of our teacher candidates in all of
these aforementioned areas of student diversity. In addition, this course will also prepare students to
communicate effectively with administration, support staff, parents, and peers regarding the education of
a diverse student population.
Increasing Candidates' Interaction with Diverse Peers
Due to the low minority percentages on PC's campus, we have sought to increase our candidates'
interactions with diverse peers. Since 2010, students have attended a Diversity Conference in the state of
South Carolina which was hosted by Benedict College, a member of a select group of Historically Black
Colleges and Universities (HBCU). By attending this conference, our students had the opportunity to
interact with and learn from a variety of presenters and facilitators in areas relating to educating diverse
student populations. In addition, our students completed written reflections on their experiences at this
conference. Analysis of these student reflections revealed a heightened level of awareness and
understanding of issues of diversity in education as a result of the conference experience. Because of
this positive student response, plans are underway to continue student participation in this conference
annually and to help students make explicit connections between their learning from conference sessions
and their classroom practice in field experiences.
In addition, the PEU has worked to increase student interaction with diverse peers through their
participation in the Big South Undergraduate Research Symposium. In March 2012, PC undergraduates
presented their research alongside peers from seven regional colleges and attended sessions and lectures
intended to increase dialogue among students from diverse racial, ethnic and geographical groups. PC
has also developed an increased focus on international collaborations and student exchanges in the past
years; in 2014 we will graduate our first international education major in Elementary Education. This
student transferred to PC from her institution in Spain and her enrollment in our Elementary cohort has
offered a valuable international perspective that has served to widen the ethnic diversity of our
discussions.
Increasing Candidates' Interaction with P-12 English Language Learners
In order to provide additional opportunities for our candidates to work with English Language Learners
(ELL), the PEU has worked to develop a strong relationship with Ford Elementary, a partner school
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with a Hispanic population of 35% of the total school population. This percentage is also projected to
rise in the coming years. This partnership has allowed our Early Childhood and Elementary majors to
work closely with ELL students and to observe teachers employ effective strategies for working with
ELL students. In addition, candidates' placements at Ford Elementary have provided valuable
experiences in working with culturally diverse families; candidates have had the opportunity to observe
parent-teacher conferences requiring the presence of a translator and to observe teachers strategies for
daily ELL parent communication.
4.3 Areas for Improvement Cited in the Action Report from the Previous Accreditation Review
Summarize activities, processes, and outcomes in addressing each of the AFIs cited for the initial
and/or advanced program levels under this standard.
12000 characterl limit

4.4 Exhibits for Standard 4
4.4.a Aggregate data on proficiencies related to diversity that candidates are expected to demonstrate
through working with students from diverse groups in classrooms and schools, including impact on
student learning
4.4.bCurriculum components and experiences that address diversity proficiencies (This might be a
matrix that shows diversity components in required courses.)
4.4.c Assessment instruments and scoring guides related to candidates meeting diversity proficiencies,
including impact on student learning (These assessments may be included in program review
documents or the exhibits for Standard 1. Cross reference as appropriate.)
4.4.dData table on faculty demographics (see Appendix A for an example)
4.4.e Data table on candidates demographics (see Appendix B for an example)
4.4.f Data table on demographics of P-12 students in schools used for clinical practice (see Appendix C
for an example)
4.4.gPolicies and practices, including good faith efforts, for recruiting and retaining diverse faculty
4.4.hPolicies and practices, including good faith efforts, for recruiting and retaining diverse candidates
4.4.i Policies, procedures, and practices that support candidates working with P-12 students from diverse
groups
4-4a_Conceptual Framework Diversity Proficiencies
4-4a_ Diversity Dispositions Survey
4-4a_Diversity Dispositions Survey Results
4-4b_Curriculum Components and Field Experiences Addressing Diversity Proficiencies
4-4c_Assessments of Diversity Proficiencies
4-4d_Faculty Demographics
4-4e_Candidate Demographics
4-4f_Field Placement Demographics
4-4g_Presbyterian College Faculty Handboook Non-Discrimination Policy and Grievance Procedures_See Pages 30-
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33
4-4g_Presbyterian College Multicultural Affairs and Concerns Committee
4-4h_Presbyterian College Faculty Handbook Student Grievance Procedures_See Pages 30-31
4-4h_Presbyterian College Diversity Aspirational Statement
4-4h_Presbyterian College Diversity Council
4-4h_Presbyterian College Multicultural Student Union
4-4i_Diversity Plan_Policies and Practices Supporting Candidates' Work with Diverse P-12 Students
See Attachment panel below.
Standard 5. Faculty Qualifications, Performance, and Development
Faculty are qualified and model best professional practices in scholarship, service, and teaching,
including the assessment of their own effectiveness as related to candidate performance; they also
collaborate with colleagues in the disciplines and schools. The unit systematically evaluates faculty
performance and facilitates professional development.
5.1 Faculty Qualifications, Performance, and Development
How does the unit ensure that its professional education faculty contributes to the preparation of
effective educators through scholarship, service, teaching, collaboration and assessment of their
performance?
Qualified Faculty
The PEU consists of faculty who are highly qualified for their assignments. All fulltime faculty
have earned doctorates, teaching certification, researching experiences and expertise in their field
of study. One hundred percent are or have been licensed in their area of supervision, teach in
their area of expertise and have 4-13 years of teaching PreK-grade 12 (5-3a). All fulltime faculty
supervise clinical practice, collaborate with school-based faculty and administration and have
contemporary professional experiences in school settings. In addition, each faculty coordinates the
program in their area of expertise. One tenured faculty member, a former elementary school principal,
serves as chair and director of teacher education of the PEU.
Adjunct faculty and school-based clinical faculty are highly qualified for their positions. Adjunct
faculty average 16 years of teaching; 50% hold terminal degrees and the remaining 50% hold masters
degrees. All have degrees in their subject areas and are or have been
licensed in the appropriate content/grade level. School-based clinical faculty average 14 years of
teaching; 70% hold masters degrees and 23% are Nationally Board Certified. 100% have degrees in their
subject areas, are licensed in the appropriate content/grade
level and have been identified as a mentor teacher by their principal.(5-3b1, 5-3b2).
Selection of school-based clinical faculty is a collaborative process involving the chair, the PEU faculty
and school administrators. The PEU chair verifies that all adjunct, clinical faculty and school-based
clinical faculty meet the required qualifications. (5-3c1 p.5). To provide program coherence each adjunct
and clinical faculty meet with the chair or specific faculty for orientation and then throughout the
teaching assignment.(5-3c2) All clinical supervisors have contemporary classroom experiences.
Modeling Best Professional Practices in Teaching
Faculty content knowledge and pedagogical content knowledge are critical to both faculty and
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candidate success. Sixty percent of merit rating is the teaching/service to students dimension. All PEF
rank high in this dimension (5-3f1, 5-3f2 p. 2,4,6, confidential merit data are available through the
Provost). Data from varied assessments provide evidence of this. Candidates rank faculty high (4.9 or
higher out of 5) on the following course evaluation indicators: enthusiasm/commitment to subject, has an
authoritative command of the course, gives clear lectures, returns meaningful answers, challenges one,
and achieves goals of the course as stated in the instructor's syllabus.(5-3f3, 5-3f4). Classroom
observations by the chair also indicate faculty use of best practices and appropriate content knowledge.
PC candidates' have consistently high pass rates on Praxis II and PLT licensure exams. Externally,
teaching excellence is illustrated by the selection of a PEU faculty member as Presbyterian College's
Outstanding Professor for 2012 and the recipient of South Carolina's Independent College and
Universities Excellence in Teaching Award.
Content knowledge is also shown in faculty contributions to their professional communities
through research, presentations and service. Involvement at the local, state and national level
provides a current context and understanding of the knowledge, skills and dispositions essential for
future candidates. (5-3e1, 5-3g4) Faculty are also committed to candidate research and collaborative
presentations as well as involvement in the college's Teaching Excellence committee and School
Improvement Councils. (5-3e1, 5-3g4)
PEU faculty members in-depth understanding of professional, state, and national standards and
the alignment of these standards with the unit's conceptual framework provides the framework
for course content, requirements, and assessments. This is evidenced in the standards-based
learning outcomes as well as in candidates' assignments and teaching (e.g. lesson plans, action
research projects). In so doing, the professional education faculty ensure that candidates develop not
only a deep understanding of content, research and theory but also the necessary proficiencies to apply
these in meaningful practice.
In order to assist candidates in developing these proficiencies, professional education faculty use
a variety of instructional strategies and assessments that reflect an understanding of different learning
styles and pedagogies. (5-3h) Throughout the program, faculty encourage candidates' development of
reflective and critical thinking, problem solving, and professional attributes. Professional coursework
routinely encompasses analysis of data or research. Reflective essays are used in all courses. Reflection
and critical thinking are considered important facets of professional growth and culminate during clinical
practice as candidates self-assess their teaching and develop professional improvement plans.(5-3h1)
Modeling Best Professional Practices in Scholarship
While teaching is the focus at Presbyterian College, scholarly work that contributes to faculty
teaching and area of expertise is also important. (5-3d1, 5-3d2 p.7) In order to be at the
"competitive level" of scholarship, faculty provide evidence that they "attend national or
regional conferences; occasionally contribute to the discipline by leading or participating in a
panel discussion; some evidence of professional publications; on-campus creative exhibits and
recitals; on-campus presentations; contribute to faculty/ student research and creative projects."
This results in 20% of a faculty member's merit rating. PEF meet this expectation and are active in their
professional organizations, in research with colleagues and with candidates. They attend state and
national conferences and present scholarly work. Additional scholarship activities include writing and
reviewing articles, proposals and grant applications.(5-3d3, 5-3d4, 5-3d5)
Modeling Best Professional Practices in Service
Service to department, college and community is evaluated through the merit rubric and provides
20% of a faculty member's merit ranking (5-3e1). Faculty members are expected to "share the
responsibilities of self-governance, be willing to take on committee work, and to contribute creatively to
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the development of new ideas and initiatives. Faculty members are also recognized for serving their
department and the larger community." (5-3e2 p.7) The PEF reflect Presbyterian College's servant-
leadership model and serve all constituents including the college, the unit, the community and P-12
schools. For example, faculty serve as advisors to student organizations, are actively involved in local
schools, assist with recruitment efforts, serve on the Board of Trustees and are members of standing
committees of the faculty, search committees (both departmental and institutional), community boards
and the Honor Council.(5-3e3)
Evaluation of Professional Education Performance
A systematic and comprehensive evaluation of faculty is conducted annually in accordance with
the faculty performance policy in the faculty handbook. (5-3f5) Additionally, the PEU chair observes all
non-tenured tenure-track faculty members' teaching and writes an annual review letter. At mid-tenure
and tenure/or promotion application, there is a review of faculty progress through the professional
portfolio and 3-way conference. Tenured PEU faculty undergo a similar post-tenure review once every
four years. All data are reviewed in a 3-way conference with the chair, faculty member and provost to
determine faculty progress, set merit ranking and establish goals. The provost then provides a summary
evaluation letter. Part-time faculty are evaluated via student course evaluations and these results are
communicated to them by the department chair.
Professional education faculty also critically evaluate their own effectiveness through processes
such as the Professional Activities Report (PAR). This report provides a summary of faculty
teaching, scholarship and service, a reflection on progress in each area and goal setting. Faculty use data
from semester course evaluations, surveys from all constituents, candidate achievement of learning
objectives, course grades and Praxis II and PLT results to analyze their own effectiveness, including the
positive effects they have on candidates' learning and performance. Questions such as "What are your
goals for students learning? What are you doing to help
students achieve them? What improvements in student learning are you currently working on?" provide
a framework for this self-assessment. When an area for growth is indicated, the chair and faculty discuss
the data, set goals and create a plan for improvement. (5-3f6, 5-3f7, 5-3f8)
Professional Development
Based on needs identified in faculty evaluations and self-assessments (5-3f6, 5-3f7, 5-3f8) professional
development is expected at both the college and individual level (5-3g1, 5-3g3 p.7). Funds to meet these
needs are allocated annually to each faculty member ($500) and through a college-wide Faculty
Development Committee (FDC) process to support professional growth and development. The budgeted
amount allocated to college faculty through this committee for 2011-2012 was $64,412.04 (5-3g2) In
addition, grants are available for professional development. A PEF member was chosen to receive The
Kyle Spencer Professional Development Grant; a fully funded three week study at Oxford. Presbyterian
College also offers a sabbatical leave program for faculty professional development and research
pursuits. Sabbaticals are granted with full salary for one semester or half salary for the academic year.
New faculty participate in a mentoring program that pairs new faculty with faculty outside of their
discipline and provides semi-monthly meetings to address induction topics. The college also provides an
opportunity for faculty to share research and learn from each other through faculty led forums and
discussions. (5-3g4, 5-3g5)
5.2 Moving Toward Target or Continuous Improvement
Please respond to 5.2.a if this is the standard on which the unit is moving to the target level. If it is
not the standard on which you are moving to the target level, respond to 5.2.b.
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5.2.a Standard on which the unit is moving to the target level
Describe areas of the standard at which the unit is currently performing at the target level for
each element of the standard.
Summarize activities and their impact on candidate performance and program quality that have
led to target level performance.
Discuss plans and timelines for attaining and/or sustaining target level performance as
articulated in this standard.
15000 character limit

5.2.b Continuous Improvement
Summarize activities and changes based on data that have led to continuous improvement of
candidate performance and program quality.
Discuss plans for sustaining and enhancing performance through continuous improvement as
articulated in this standard.
Program quality and candidate performance have been enhanced by the emphasis on analyzing program
and candidate data. As a result, the PEF have identified three main areas for continuous improvement in
this standard: hiring highly qualified faculty, providing professional development and increasing
opportunities for candidate mentoring.
The unit is committed to identify and hire highly qualified professional education faculty and adjunct
faculty that meet program and candidate needs. Current unit faculty hold terminal degrees, teaching
certification, have research experience and expertise in their field; resulting in knowledgeable and
effective instruction for candidates and outstanding candidate performance. When faculty positions are
available, the PEF analyze present and future program needs and current faculty backgrounds. They then
identify expertise which will support curricular goals and enhance candidate outcomes. The position is
then designed based on that data. For example, in 2009, the faculty determined a need for an elementary
program based on student interest, an environmental scan and a highly successful program in the past.
There was also a need for math and science expertise at the early childhood level. A search was then
conducted for a faculty member who could develop an elementary program and who had expertise in
science and math pedagogies. When the next position became available, it was determined that specific
expertise in social studies at the middle and secondary social studies was needed and became the focus
for the posting. Finally, the PEF identified the need for a more consistent and systematic approach to
field and clinical practice. In place of having different faculty teach these courses each semester, the
PEF decided to search for a faculty member with expertise in field experiences who would coordinate
the entire field component.
Thus the last three faculty positions not only required terminal degrees, teaching certification, research
experience and expertise in their field but were specific to an identified need. These searches were
successfully filled by faculty who now enhance candidate understanding of best practices in math and
science, in social studies and in field and clinical practice as well as strengthen the unit as a whole. In
addition, an adjunct faculty with current expertise in instructional technology has also been hired. The
PEF plans to continue requiring these faculty qualifications and following this process for any future
faculty positions in order to ensure and sustain these expectations.
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The next area for continual improvement focuses on professional development opportunities.
Professional development is offered at both the unit and college level. With this support, the
PEF have participated in many opportunities to increase and improve candidate performance and
program quality. Plans to sustain and enhance these opportunities are evidenced by the increase in
college funds available for professional development (faculty development grants), the establishment of
a Teaching Excellence Committee, the PEF increased leadership and participation in local, state and
national professional organizations, continuing involvement in candidate research and international
study, systematic examination of program, unit and candidate data and PEF participation in opportunities
to share expertise with on campus colleagues.
Examples of these include:
Participating in SPA workshops and conferences in order to deepen understanding of specific programs
and better align program curriculum with national standards. Each of the program coordinators have
attended multiple workshops which has strengthened program excellence.
Involvement and leadership in state and national organizations. One faculty member presents annually
at AERA and is now an AERA manuscript reviewer and session chair. Another faculty sits on the
editorial board for the South Carolina International Reading Association and presents at its annual
conference.
Increased emphasis on candidate-faculty research. Faculty have researched and co-authored
publications with candidates as well as co-presented at conferences such as the South Carolina
Association Education for Young Children and the Big South Undergraduate Research Symposium.
Faculty also assist candidates in their design, research and presentation of a culminating action research
senior capstone.
Maymester International Study Trips for candidates. For the past 5 years, PEF faculty have offered
international study trips designed to increase candidates' understanding of global contexts and culture.
The PEF will continue to offer these study trips each year, on a faculty rotation. The development of
these courses has also provided faculty with exciting opportunities for their own professional
development and growth. Funds for the course development are provided through both the college and
department professional development budget.
NCATE State Board of Examiners. Two faculty have been trained as BOE members and have
participated in NCATE accreditation visits to other colleges.
Continuous and purposeful examination of data. The PEF faculty collects, analyzes, summarizes and
makes data-based changes throughout the year. These changes are then reported to the Provost in an
annual department report. In order to enhance and sustain this critical process, resources identified by the
PEF (e.g. time, personnel, technology and funding) will continue to be requested at both the department
and college level.
Collaboration with other college faculty. PEF worked with the Arts and Sciences science faculty in
writing a Howard Hughes Medical Institute grant. PEF also are working with the PC Pharmacy school
faculty on a grant to promote child nutrition.
Involvement and leadership in on campus professional development. PEF faculty are involved in the
professional development opportunities offered on campus. One serves on the Teaching Excellence
Committee which focuses on assisting and supporting faculty in developing new knowledge and skills in
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teaching. One presented at the faculty forum series, presentations designed to introduce faculty to new
and engaging topics. And one presented at the college annual assessment workshop, focusing on student
learning outcomes.
The third area for continual improvement focuses on increasing opportunities for consistent candidate
coaching and mentoring from the first practicum experience through clinical practice. In the PC clinical
practice model, candidates are observed by both college and classroom supervisors once a week for 15
weeks. Weekly conferences are also held to discuss the candidate's performance and growth. However in
the field work model, candidates were observed by the classroom teacher during the first two practica
and then by the classroom teacher and college supervisor during the last practicum. Conferences were
also held after the observation.
However, due to feedback from candidates and clinical faculty, PEF faculty determined there was a need
for additional instructional coaching and feedback to candidates; particularly in the beginning fieldwork
experiences. Thus, the faculty redesigned the field work courses and provided more opportunities for
lesson observations and conferences between the PEF and candidates in all practica.
What has resulted is a more developmental, coaching approach to supervision; where the candidate's
strengths and areas for improvement can be identified, monitored and assessed over time. This ongoing
feedback and support system better prepares the candidate for the full-time teaching experience. It also
has had a second major impact. PEF are now seeing how course content and pedagogical content are
being applied in practice and can immediately relate this to course discussions and revised course
curriculum.
These positive outcomes have also demonstrated the importance of and need for a faculty member to
coordinate all fieldwork and clinical experiences. Thus, in order to sustain and enhance these
experiences, the unit has now hired a full-time faculty member who will assume these duties.
5.3 Areas for Improvement Cited in the Action Report from the Previous Accreditation Review
Summarize activities, processes, and outcomes in addressing each of the AFIs cited for the initial
and/or advanced program levels under this standard.
12000 character limit

5.4 Exhibits for Standard 5
5.4.a Data table on qualifications of professional education faculty (This table can be compiled in the
online template from data submitted for national program reviews or compiled in Excel, Word, or
another format and uploaded as an exhibit. See Appendix D for an example.)
5.4.bData table on qualifications of clinical faculty (i.e., P12 school professionals and professional
education faculty responsible for instruction, supervision, and/or assessment of candidates during
field experiences and clinical practice)
5.4.c Policies and practices to assure clinical faculty meet unit expectations
5.4.dPolicies, expectations, and samples of faculty scholarly activities
5.4.e Summary of faculty service and collaborative activities in schools (e.g., collaborative project with
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school faculty, teacher professional development, and addressing the needs of low performing
schools) and with the professional community (e.g., grants, evaluations, task force participation,
provision of professional development, offering courses, etc.)
5.4.f Policies, procedures, and practices for faculty evaluation (including promotion and tenure) and
summaries of the results in areas of teaching, scholarship and service
5.4.gPolicies, procedures, and practices for professional development and summaries of the results
5-3a_Professional Faculty Qualifications Summary Chart
5-3b1_School-based Faculty Qualification Chart 2011-2012
5-3b2_Clinical Faculty PEF Qualification Chart
5-3c1_Clinical Practice Handbook_Clinical Faculty Qualifications Page 5
5-3c2_Clinical Supervisor Orientation_Agenda
5-3d1_Policies and Expectations for Scholarly Activities
5-3d2_Faculty Handbook
5-3d3_Scholarly Activity Summaries
5-3d4_Smart Scholarly Work Sample
5-3d5_Lee Scholarly Work Sample
5-3e1_Policies and Expectations for Service to College and Community
5-3e2_Faculty Handbook
5-3e3_Faculty Service and Collaboration Summary
5-3f1_Policies and Expectations for Teaching and Service to Students
5-3f2_Faculty Handbook
5-3f3_Course Evaluation Forms
5-3f4_Course Evaluation Data 2011-2012
5-3f5_Policies Procedures and Practices for Faculty Evaluation_Faculty Handbook Pages 6-17
5-3f6_Professional Activities Report_Smart
5-3f7_Professional Activities Report_Lee
5-3f8_Professional Activities Report_Wacker
5-3g1_Policies Procedures and Practices for Professional Development
5-3g2_Faculty Development Practices_Grant Summary
5-3g3_Faculty Handbook_Professional Development
5-3g4_Professional Development Summaries
5-3g5_PEF Vitae
5-3h_Sample Syllabus_EDEL 305
5-3h1_Inquiry and Advocacy Project Description Rubrics and Data Chart
5-3b_Faculty Service and Collaboration Worksheet_Smart
See Attachment panel below.
Standard 6. Unit Governance and Resources
The unit has the leadership, authority, budget, personnel, facilities, and resources, including
information technology resources, for the preparation of candidates to meet professional, state, and
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institutional standards.
6.1 Unit Governance and Resources
How do the unit's governance system and resources contribute to adequately preparing candidates
to meet professional, state, and institutional standards?
Unit Leadership and Authority
The PEU is composed of four professional education programs (Early Childhood, Elementary, Middle
and Secondary Level) leading to initial certification; the unit head is the department chair. Music
education is accredited through NASM and is a collaboration between the music department and the
education department.
The chief academic officer (provost) is directly responsible to the president for the educational program
of the college. (6-3a1, 6-3b1) Department chairs report to the provost and have the authority and
responsibility for overseeing all curricular and program policies for the department. (6-3a1, 6-3b1) This
position also involves teaching. The PEU chair serves as the director of teacher education and
certification and is responsible for ensuring that candidates are prepared to meet national, state and
institutional standards and requirements. (6-3a2, 6-3b2). The department chair also regularly
communicates with chairs in other departments on campus.
The unit consists of four full time faculty members (including the chair) and two to six adjunct faculty
members. Each PEF serves as a coordinator for a specific program and reports directly to the chair. Each
has the authority and responsibility for determining curriculum in collaboration with program teaching
faculty. (6-3a3, 6-3b2) The unit faculty serve as the governance body for the unit and collaboratively
make decisions that impact the unit. (6-3b3, 6-3b3a, 6-3b3b) The PEU also has sufficient staff support to
maintain high quality programs. The staff includes a half-time data management/administrative assistant
and a half-time building secretary.
Due to the size of the college, procedures for instituting data-driven curricular changes are efficient and
clear. Program coordinators present proposed changes to the PEF. If approved, the proposal is presented
to the Academic Affairs Council (AAC). (6-3a4 p. 41) If approved by the AAC, the change is made in
all publications and implemented the following year.
A system of shared governance involves members of the professional community and provides for the
design, implementation, and evaluation of the unit and its programs. (6-3b2) The Teacher Education
Committee (TEC) is comprised of PEF and college faculty who work closely with teacher education
candidates. Members are responsible for reviewing and analyzing candidate data and its curricular
impact, providing feedback and making indicated changes.
The TEC committee also participates in a larger advisory body, the Laurens County Education Advisory
Council (LCEAC). The LCEAC is comprised of preK-12 teachers and administrators from the local
school districts, the PEF, the provost and teacher education candidates. Its role is to review, analyze, and
provide input focused at the unit level. (6-3b4, 6-3b4a)
A third committee, the Fieldwork Committee, is comprised of local district preK-12 teachers who work
with candidates and faculty during practicum and clinical practice. This committee reviews and analyzes
data and makes curricular suggestions on clinical and fieldwork components. (6-3b5)
Admissions policies are established by the Board of Trustees and are clearly and consistently
communicated in catalogues and handbooks (6-3d1 pp. 5,26-27,38-39). The unit's recruiting is
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coordinated with Admissions and is represented at events such as academic fairs, faculty panels and
individual meetings with recruits. (6-3d2) The PEU's admission policy for the Teacher Education
Program is described in the PEU Student Handbook, posted on the department website (6-3d3, 6-3d4, 6-
3d5). Two information sessions are conducted each year by the PEF in order to provide information
concerning the education department, its programs, admission requirements and requirements for
continuation in teacher education. (6-3d6, 6-3d7).
Academic calendars, course schedules, grading policies, student and faculty forms, and other
publications are available online on the registrar's website. Print and online materials are written and
reviewed at faculty, department and college levels on a consistent basis to ensure that they are accurate
and up-to-date. (www.presby.edu/registrar, 6-3d1)
Counseling services are provided through Campus Life, administered by the Director of Counseling
Services. The college also offers educational support services to candidates. The Writing Center
provides one-on-one writing assistance, Academic Services offers services such as workshops on
effective study skills and matching peer tutors with students and Career Services oversees faculty-
advised internships, career planning and placement. (6-3c1, 6-3c2).
Advising is done within departments by faculty. In the PEU, candidates are advised by their specific
program coordinator, a full-time faculty member. Formal advising occurs at least once a semester when
candidates and advisors meet to review progress and discuss plans.
Unit Budget and Personnel
Identified by the College President as one of the top five programs on campus, the PEU receives a
budget necessary for its programs and operations in order to prepare candidates to meet standards. The
budget is comparable and, in many cases, higher than other social science and pre-professional program
budgets (6-3f1, 6-3g). Additional department resources come from faculty development grants, state
funding and library funding. (6-3f2, 6-3f3)
The PEU has sufficient personnel to support candidate success and program integrity. While the entire
college faces challenging budget times, funds for the PEU have been allocated to fill vacated positions
and employ four full-time faculty members. Funds have also been provided to hire adjunct instructors in
order to provide specialized instruction (e.g. Instructional Technology Literacy) and/or to maintain the
clinical practice-supervisor ratio.(6-3h2)
Workload policies, including class-size, allow faculty members to be effectively engaged in teaching,
scholarship, assessment, advisement, collaborative work in P12 schools, and service. Full-time faculty
teach seven 3 credit hour courses per year, usually resulting in a 4-3 load. The director of teacher
education and the director of accreditation/assessment each receive one course release for their work.
Average class size ranges from 5 to 25 students; three student teachers equal one 3 hour course credit.
(6.3h1 pp. 19-20, 6-3h2)
Sufficient resources and opportunities for faculty professional development are provided to all PEU
faculty, including training in the use of technology. Faculty are allocated travel monies through the
department budget as well as funding opportunities through the Faculty Development Committee (6-
3f2). On-campus faculty development is provided through weekly faculty forum, new faculty mentoring
sessions and workshops provided by the provost's office. Ongoing support and training in technology is
available through the instructional technology (ITC) department. In addition, the ITC staff provides
individual technology support when needed.
Unit Facilities and Technology Resources
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The college and PEU have adequate facilities to support candidate success. The PEU is located in the
Harrington Peachtree Academic Center. The Center contains an auditorium, a computer lab, and state-of-
the-art-teaching technology classrooms. In addition to faculty offices, the fourth floor houses office
space for NCATE documents, a meeting room, an office for the education data
management/administrative assistant, a file room, and adjunct offices.
Thomason Library provides services and resources in support of the scholarly and informational needs of
the college community. Reference librarians are available during daytime and evening hours, until 10:30
pm, to assist with information and research needs. Through THOMCAT, the Thomason Library online
catalog, candidates can search for items in the collection. Books from academic libraries throughout
South Carolina can requested directly via the PASCAL catalog. In addition, candidate and faculty
research is enhanced by subscriptions to thousands of eJournals and eBooks. (6-3i1, 6-3i2)
Computers are available throughout the library and a library instruction classroom serves as an evening
computer lab. Presbyterian College offers a fiber backbone that links the major academic and
administrative buildings. Wireless access is available in the Library, Springs Campus Center, Greenville
Dining Hall, Templeton Physical Education Center, all community hall lobbies and most academic
buildings.
The PEU also utilizes teaching space in the library. This building houses the Learning Center, which
contains the education collections as well as children's literature. The Learning Center classroom has
been renovated to include Promethean technology, a document camera, overhead projector, desktop
computer and microphone system, wireless access and storage cabinets for instructional supplies. In
addition, the Learning Center is immediately adjacent to the computer lab and media center. The media
center provides resources for candidates such as copiers, laminators, an Ellison machine and cameras to
check out. The center also offers assistance with video and audio production, photography, computer
resources, various printing formats, materials preparation etc. All of the above resources are available to
all candidates.
College resources include the academic computing services coordinator, the assistant director for
software and management systems and the director of institutional research. The assistant director for
software and management systems works with the director of accreditation and assessment and the unit
data management/administrative assistant in providing support with the assessment system. The director
of institutional research is available to faculty as a resource for data, data analysis and construction of
assessment instruments.
6.2 Moving Toward Target or Continuous Improvement
Please respond to 6.2.a if this is the standard on which the unit is moving to the target level. If it is
not the standard on which you are moving to the target level, respond to 6.2.b.
6.2.a Standard on which the unit is moving to the target level
Describe areas of the standard at which the unit is currently performing at the target level for
each element of the standard.
Summarize activities and their impact on candidate performance and program quality that have
led to target level performance.
Discuss plans and timelines for attaining and/or sustaining target level performance as
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articulated in this standard.
15000 character limit

6.2.b Continuous Improvement
Summarize activities and changes based on data that have led to continuous improvement of
candidate performance and program quality.
Discuss plans for sustaining and enhancing performance through continuous improvement as
articulated in this standard.
Since the last NCATE review in 2006, a number of changes in governance have occurred that have
increased transparency as well as faculty and school partner collaboration and participation. With a new
unit chair named in 2007, program coordinators for each unit program were identified. Roles and
responsibilities were then articulated. Program coordinators, in collaboration with program teaching
faculty, now determine curriculum and courses. They also determine, in collaboration with other
program coordinators and the department chair, the necessary resources to achieve program goals. This
shared governance ensures that faculty who have the responsibility for candidate performance also are
included in the decision making process for curriculum and resources. In addition, faculty are
responsible for determining the necessary resources to meet the unit's goals that are set each year.
A second change in governance is the appointment of the Director of Teacher Education and the
Director of Assessment and Accreditation. In the past, these duties were assumed by differing unit
faculty or staff which often created confusion and inconsistency. Thus, a listing of the various roles,
responsibilities and expertise was created for each position. The unit chair now identifies faculty to
fulfill these roles and the provost provides one course release for each position.
In addition, in fall 2013, the first coordinator of fieldwork and clinical practice will begin. She is a new
full-time faculty member and will have this role as part of her workload. She will work with PEF to
integrate course content and applied practice, ensure that all local, state and national standards are met,
collaborate with schools in making placements, observe and conference with candidates and enhance
and extend our school partnerships. This will provide the necessary leadership and stability needed and
ensure continued improvement in this critical area.
The unit utilizes shared governance not only with the professional education faculty but with advisory
boards comprised of college faculty and local school district colleagues. However, with the addition of a
third advisory board, it became evident that there needed to be a clarification of each board's
membership and roles. The Teacher Education Committee (TEC) is comprised of PEF and college
faculty who work closely with teacher education candidates and focus on candidate data and program
curricular changes. The Laurens County Education Advisory Council (LCEAC) is comprised of preK-12
teachers and administrators from the local school districts, the PEF, the provost and teacher education
candidates and focus on data and changes at the unit level. The third committee, the Fieldwork
Committee, is a new committee and is comprised of local district preK-12 teachers who work with
candidates and faculty during practicum and clinical practice. This committee reviews and analyzes data
and makes curricular suggestions on clinical and fieldwork components. Having delineations as to the
duties of the differing boards has provided a clear governance structure that involves all constituents and
ensures continuous improvement at the candidate, program, and unit level.
Collaboration with our school partners has also been enhanced. We now work collaboratively with our
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school partners in deciding placements for field experiences and clinical practice. For example, in place
of sending names and requested grade levels/subject areas for clinical practice, the Director of Teacher
Education and the various administrators now discuss the needs of each candidate in order to make the
best possible placement. We also contact our school partners when a part-time faculty position becomes
available, as well as posting the position online. This input provides an additional pool of experienced
and well recognized experts in their fields for the faculty to interview.
Funding for the unit has remained constant over the past year. However, funds within the departmental
budget have been reallocated to provide opportunity for additional professional development in
accreditation and professional practices, to support faculty-candidate research presentations and to
enhance student organizations. As a result, faculty and candidates are increasing and deepening their
content and pedagogical knowledge and skill as well as their professional involvements. Faculty are also
attending regional conferences and state training sessions and professional organization conferences in
order to remain current and knowledgeable. As a part of this, the unit's budget continues to support
membership and participation in all professional organizations.
Each full time faculty member now has an office desktop or laptop computer, color monitor, and as
requested, a printer in his/her designated office. Flip cameras have also recently been purchased at the
request of faculty. These cameras are being used during field and clinical experiences to video
candidates' teaching and provide opportunities for meaningful reflection, specific examples and
immediate feedback. In addition, the budget supports instructional supplies, such as DVDs, math,
science and literacy manipulative, software, and geography materials, as identified by the PEF.
Library funds are also budgeted by the PEU faculty. Funds are appropriated through the library to the
program coordinators who then budget according to specific needs for their programs. Unit needs are
also addressed. The PEF works closely with the Director of the Library to ensure that current and
appropriate technology is available to all candidates. For example, feedback from school partners
indicated that candidates are lacking expertise in Promethean technology as opposed to Smart Board.
Working with the Library Director and the Provost, the Library Learning Center next year will house a
Promethean Board and have a site license for our candidates' laptop use.
Finally, expenditures related to accreditation have been funded through a separate allocation in order to
ensure that those expenses did not encroach upon the regular instructional and operational needs of the
program. The unit continues to receive sustained support from the administration level; the budget has
not been reduced and meets needs of unit.
Most importantly, the unit, through its leadership, authority, budget, governance, personnel, facilities
and resources continues to be committed to preparing outstanding candidates who exceed professional,
state and national standards. The PEU core value is always candidate-centric. Governance and resource
decisions are made by the PEF according to that focus. For example, even though candidate numbers
have increased since 2006, clinical practice ratios remain 3-1 or 4-1 (depending on placements). This
provides for weekly observations and conferences with each candidate and school-based clinical faculty.
Personnel and budgets have continued to support that core value. In addition, this low candidate-faculty
ratio provides opportunities for faculty involvement in schools and has greatly increased school-college
collaborations and communication.
6.3 Areas for Improvement Cited in the Action Report from the Previous Accreditation Review
Summarize activities, processes, and outcomes in addressing each of the AFIs cited for the initial
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and/or advanced program levels under this standard.
12000 character limit

6.4 Exhibits for Standard 6
6.4.a Policies, procedures, and practices for governance and operations of the unit
6.4.bOrganizational chart and/or description of the unit governance structure and its relationship to
institutional governance structure
6.4.c Policies, procedures, and practices for candidate services such as counseling and advising
6.4.dPolicies, procedures, and practices for candidate recruitment and admission, and accessibility to
candidates and the education community
6.4.e Academic calendars, catalogs, unit publications, grading policies, and unit advertising
6.4.f Unit budget, with provisions for assessment, technology, professional development, and support for
off-campus, distance learning, and alternative route programs when applicable
6.4.gBudgets of comparable units with clinical components on campus or similar units at other campuses
6.4.hPolicies, procedures, and practices for faculty workload and summary of faculty workload
6.4.i Policies, procedures, and practices to ensure that all candidates have access to physical and/or
virtual classrooms, computer labs, curriculum resources, and library resources that support teaching
and learning
6.4.j Policies, procedures, and practices to ensure that all candidates access have to distance learning
including support services and resources, if applicable
6-3a1_Policies Procedures and Practices for Governments and Operations of the Unit
6-3a2_Department Chair, Executive Director of Teacher Education, and Director of Assessment and Accreditation
Duties
6-3a3_Unit Governments_Program Coordinator Duties
6-3a4_Faculty Handbook
6-3b1_Organizational Chart PC
6-3b2_Organizational Chart PC Education
6-3b3_Sample Department Meeting Agendas and Minutes
6-3b3a_Handouts Department Meeting 10.16.12
6-3b3b_Department Meeting Agenda and Handouts 11.13.12
6-3b4_Laurens County Education Advisory Council Meeting 4.14.12
6-3b4a_Laurens County Education Advisory Council Round Table Minutes
6-3b5_Fieldwork Committee Minutes
6-3c1_Policies, Procedures, and Practices for Candidate Services_Counseling and Advising
6-3c2_Policies, Procedures, and Practices for Candidates_General Services
6-3d1_Policies, Procedures, and Practices for Recruitment and Admissions_Catalog
6-3d2_Recruitment and Admission Brochure
6-3d3_Admission to Teacher Education
6-3d4_Teacher Education Student Handbook
6-3d5_Admission to Teacher Education Essay Scoring Procedures and Rubric
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6-3d6_Information Session Agenda for Faculty
6-3d7_Teacher Education Information Meeting
6-3e_Presbyterian College Fall Academic Calendar
6-3e_Presbyterian College Spring Academic Calendar
6-3e_Presbyterian College Academic Catalog
6-3e_Teacher Education Student Handbook
6-3f1_Unit Budget 2011-2012
6-3f2_Faculty Development Grant Summary
6-3f3_Library Budget All Departments
6-3g_Comparable Departmental Budgets
6-3h1_Faculty Handbook_Faculty Workload
6-3h2_Faculty Workload Chart 2012-2013
6-3i1_Policies, Procedures, and Practices for Candidates_General Services
6-3i2_Library Resources
See Attachment panel below.
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