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Free Preview: 500 Things To Eat Before It's Too Late: and the Very Best Places To Eat Them by Jane Stern and Michael Stern

Free Preview: 500 Things To Eat Before It's Too Late: and the Very Best Places To Eat Them by Jane Stern and Michael Stern

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What are the all-time best dishes America has to offer, the ones you must taste before they vanish, so delicious they deserve to be a Holy Grail for travelers? Where’s the most vibrant Key lime pie in Florida? The most sensational chiles rellenos in New Mexico? The most succulent fried clams on the Eastern Seaboard? The most memorable whoopie pies, gumbos, tacos, cheese steaks, crab feasts? In 500 Things to Eat Before It’s Too Late, "America’s leading authorities on the culinary delights to be found while driving" (Newsweek) return to their favorite subject with a colorful, bursting-at-the-seams life list of America’s must-eats.

Illustrated throughout with mouth-watering color photos and road maps, this indispensable guide is organized by region, then by state. Each entry captures the food in luscious detail and gives the lowdown on the café, roadside stand, or street cart where it’s served. When "bests" abound—hot dogs, hamburgers, pizza, apple pie, doughnuts—the Sterns rank their offerings. Sidebars feature profiles of idiosyncratic creators, recipes, and local attractions.
What are the all-time best dishes America has to offer, the ones you must taste before they vanish, so delicious they deserve to be a Holy Grail for travelers? Where’s the most vibrant Key lime pie in Florida? The most sensational chiles rellenos in New Mexico? The most succulent fried clams on the Eastern Seaboard? The most memorable whoopie pies, gumbos, tacos, cheese steaks, crab feasts? In 500 Things to Eat Before It’s Too Late, "America’s leading authorities on the culinary delights to be found while driving" (Newsweek) return to their favorite subject with a colorful, bursting-at-the-seams life list of America’s must-eats.

Illustrated throughout with mouth-watering color photos and road maps, this indispensable guide is organized by region, then by state. Each entry captures the food in luscious detail and gives the lowdown on the café, roadside stand, or street cart where it’s served. When "bests" abound—hot dogs, hamburgers, pizza, apple pie, doughnuts—the Sterns rank their offerings. Sidebars feature profiles of idiosyncratic creators, recipes, and local attractions.

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Published by: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt on Aug 04, 2009
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reserved

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12/03/2014

Stuffie: Galilee, Middletown, and
Newport, 65

VERMONT

Barbecue Ribs: Putney, 124
Boiled Dinner: Montpelier, 6
Crackers and Milk: Weston, 13
Doughnut: Waterbury Center, 19
Indian Pudding: Bennington, 35
Jonnycakes: Weston, 36
Maple Dessert: Berlin, 43
Pancakes: Bridgewater Corners and
Wilmington, 402

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Blackstone Valley Chicken Dinner ] NEW ENGLAND 5

BLACKSTONE VALLEY
CHICKEN DINNER

Rhode Island

Here is a feast virtually unknown
outside the Blackstone River Valley
in Rhode Island — one of the nation’s
premier big feeds, notable not only
because the chicken is so succulent
and vividly seasoned, but because it
is always served family-style in eat-
ing halls that bubble over with good
cheer.

The tradition goes back to the
1930s, when Italian immigrants in
Woonsocket used to gather to play
bocce at the home of the Pavoni
family. Mama Pavoni made roasted
chicken and pasta, and when her step-
daughter decided to open a restaurant
in the basement of the family home,
the Bocce Club, that was the meal
she served. It became hugely popular
among locals because it reflected their
culinary heritage and also because

the family-style service offered such
a sense of community. Today’s Bocce
Club is huge and has a full menu, but
roast chicken, its meat saturated with
butter and olive oil and seasoned with
rosemary, accompanied by an anti-
pasto and olive oil–roasted potatoes
as well as French fries and tomato-
sauced pasta, is the meal that nearly
everybody comes to eat.
Bocce Club chickens were origi-
nally sourced from a place called
Wright’s Farm, which began as
a backyard barbecue and chicken
ranch and has now become the big-
gest of the area’s chicken dinner halls,
with seats for 1,023 eaters at a time.
Despite its cavernous accommoda-
tions, Wright’s Farm is so popular
that it’s not uncommon to wait an
hour before you dig into a quickly
served meal of hot rolls, cool salad,
macaroni shells with red sauce, thick-
cut French fries, and big bowls full
of roast chicken followed by a slice
of ice cream roll. It’s not intimate or

WRIGHT’S FARM
GIFT SHOP

As a general rule of Roadfood, great
eateries do not boast big gift shops.
Call us purists, but we tend to prefer
places that focus all their attention
on serving delicious food; a really
big inventory of souvenirs does not
set our appetite aglow. But there is a
point at which the profusion of knick-
knacks grows so large that it takes on
a life of its own, and as the authors
of The Encyclopedia of Bad Taste, we
cannot help but pay attention. Such

a place is the 4,000-square-foot gift
shop at Wright’s Farm in Harrisville,
Rhode Island. Of course the shop of-
fers Wright’s good salad dressing and
its signature pasta sauce, but here
you also can purchase Bearington
Bear collectibles, Faerie Glen fairies,
a wall tile that says “Because I’m the
Mom, That’s Why,” sea monkeys and
their aquaria, and an item called Poo-
pourri, an air freshener made espe-
cially for bathrooms, available in a gift
pack with a roll of toilet paper.

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