TABLE OF CONTENTS INTRODUCTION CHAPTER 1 – Defining The Multiple West Coast Offense  Basic Offensive Philosophy  The Huddle

 The Snap Count  The Audible System CHAPTER 2 – The Run Game  Hole Numbering and Line Splits  Two-back Offense – 20 series  Two-back Offense – 30 & 40 series  One-back Offense – Single-digit & 30 series  Eighty-series  Teen-series  Run System Calls and Line Calls CHAPTER 3 – The Passing Game  Numbered Pass Routes for Wide Receivers  Individual Pass Routes versus Coverages  Called Pass Routes for Running Backs  Tight end / Inside Receiver Pass Routes CHAPTER 4 – Shifts and Motions  Shifts  Motions CHAPTER 5 – Formations  Two-back Sets  One-back Sets  Four Wide Receiver Sets  Five Wide Receiver Sets  Tight Sets CHAPTER 6 – Protections CHAPTER 7 – Play-call Mechanics  Run Game  Passing Game  Special Situations  How the Protection Call Affects the Back’s Responsibilities  The Use of Audibles 3 6 8 11 12 14 16 18 19 21 22 24 25 26 27 28 29 36 39 40 41 45 51

CHAPTER 8 – The No-huddle Attack 1
by Ron Jenkins, MS

CHAPTER 9 – Special Situations Offense  Two-minute Offense  Four-minute Offense  Overtime Offense CHAPTER 10 – The Play-call Sheet CHAPTER 11 – Run Plays CHAPTER 12 – Pass Plays CHAPTER 13 – Play-action Passing Attack CHAPTER 14 – Screen Plays

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by Ron Jenkins, MS

INTRODUCTION This is our offensive playbook that will allow us to install, in its entirety, the Multiple West Coast Offense.

This is a simple, logical, and complete offensive system. Once the language of the system is learned and installed, the possible play-calls and formations are virtually limitless. This system allows us to be as creative as our talent will allow – there are no limitations. This is because we ―paint a picture for the players‖ by telling each player specifically what to do within the play-call, in a very logical mannor. This system is easy for players to understand and learn, and can be installed in a short period of time. The offense is extremely flexible and hard for a defense to prepare for because it is so multifaceted. In addition, game time adjustments are extremely easy to implement, due to the descriptive language of the system.

There are over 80 basic offensive formations in our offense. However, to the defense, it will appear as though we have over 400 different formations, because we can easily interchange our personnel from one position to another. We can do this because we are telling every player exactly what to do in the play-call. For example; the play-call ―Split Right, 339, Up – Swing Queen‖ tells each player where to line up, it tells the linemen to slide protect to the quick (Queen) side, and it tells all five receivers what route to run. If we wanted to, we could put our FB at X, and he will now know to run the ―3 route‖. We could also put our X at the H position, and he knows to run the ―Up route‖, and will probably be covered by a linebacker, creating and obvious mismatch. This type of flexibility with regard to personnel gives us a great advantage over the defense as far as individual match-ups are concerned. 3
by Ron Jenkins, MS

This includes the hole numbering system. to an eightman maximum protection scheme. Hot routes are built into most every pass play.We also show you the simple and descriptive way that we set up and call the run game. We include the different pass protections. We include the ten basic quarterback reads that can be used in any passing situation. With regard to our pass system. that is. section that shows the strengths and weaknesses of specific defenses. any one of them could be the primary receiver in any given play.) 4 by Ron Jenkins. We will also detail how the passing game is set up. (A much more thorough approach to quarterback play can be found in our Quarterback Manual. master calls and line calls. which makes reading passing lanes very simple for the quarterback. MS . We go into some detail describing the different drops as well as the specific depths of those drops. and then how to go through a progression. there will always be at least one receiver breaking open on the quarterback’s first three steps in his drop. series numbers. We talk about choosing which side to read. we touch on the techniques involved in playing the position. In the quarterback section. and makes understanding defensive coverages much. much easier. there are several unique features. We also include a basic defensive coverage and fronts. which can range from a five-man protection – sending all five receivers out. This eliminates miscommunication between the receiver and quarterback in the event that the quarterback needs to throw hot. It also drives all of our receivers to run their routes at full speed because in reality.

We also give you a section that has well over three hundred different offensive plays. (The sample call sheet has been reduced to 8. MS . The pass patterns include the quarterback’s drops. we have included a sample call sheet and the directions for using the 1117-inch cards for calling games.) 5 by Ron Jenkins.511-inches. his progression and the built-in HOT routes. Finally.

The precision timed passing philosophy that stressed technique and execution was taken from Bill Walsh’s offense. MS . In today’s programs. In order to do this effectively. I took what I thought were the ―best of‖ both systems and combined them into one system that I think works best at the college and high school levels – although the St. This will allow him to get rid of the football the instant the receiver is breaking open. The quarterback will make pre-snap evaluations that will enable him to make throwing decisions as he is dropping back. the offensive system needs to be extremely easy to install by the coaches. I’ve borrowed the basic play-calling system from Sid Gillman’s offense. The language of the system also needs to be very descriptive and extremely flexible. and understand by the players. there by eliminating hesitation and indecision that can impede the effectiveness of the offense. In addition.DEFINING THE MULTIPLE WEST COAST OFFENSE The Multiple West Coast Offense is a derivative of two systems that I have studied and either played or coached with. the system must have HOT routes built into the system so that sight adjustments by the both a specific receiver and the quarterback at the same time are not necessary. Louis Rams also use the same system for their offense. 6 by Ron Jenkins. we must calibrate the quarterback’s drops to ―time out‖ with the receiver’s routes.

MS . As this offense has evolved over the last few years. 7 by Ron Jenkins. yet make it even more comprehensive. I have attempted to refine and simplify it. They had a system that was very easy to understand and implement in a short period of time.I borrowed the bulk of the language of the system from my college coaches Al Sandahl and Sonny Lubick. which again is very similar to the language Sid Gillman used in his offense.

and extensively in the offseason. This type of language also allows us to make adjustments to our offense as the game is progressing. We also teach basic game management such as the ―twominute offense‖ as well as ―four minute offense. we need to teach our players fundamentals and the proper techniques of this offense. Second. via our ―vertical passing attack‖. As a team. and ―curl – flat reads‖ as well as defensive coverages pertaining to the passing game. In uncomplicated terms. we need to teach the players basic offensive axioms such as ―attacking the bubbles‖ in the run game.BASIC OFFENSIVE PHILOSOPHY The basic philosophy of this offense is to ―take what the defense gives us‖ by calling an array of plays out of a variety of formations that attack the soft spots of the defense. we need a simple language to communicate with the players. To be effective. in order to take advantage of what the defense is attempting to do to stop us.‖ Third. we need to install a comprehensive offensive system that is both very descriptive and flexible. MS . 8 by Ron Jenkins. we need to pay attentions to detail – we need to do all the little things well. As an offensive staff. we need to accomplish five things. we work on specific fundamentals techniques every practice. First. which will allow us to communicate what we want each player specifically to do on any given play. when the defense comes up – we will push the ball down the field through the air. However. We do this with the use of a precision timed passing attack and a solid running game.

This also allows us to move players to different positions in the offense. and then communicate that exact play-call to the players in a very short period of time. Fourth. Having watched our players run this offense over the last several seasons. multi receiver offense. to a wide-open. We run a variety of patterns out of an extraordinary array of formations. because we teach each player what his specific assignment is with regard to what he is told in the play-call. We must make it very easy for the players to understand so they can immediately contribute to the offense without having to think about what their assignment is by having to memorize each play as a separate entity. MS . the individual calling the plays needs to be able to quickly assess the situation. we need to be able to install this comprehensive system in a very short period of time. However. descriptive. Our offense is extensive. Finally. and innovative. It is a fully dimensional offense. with very few missed assignments -9 by Ron Jenkins. and allows us tremendous diversity in our offense. The formations and specific intent of the offensive situation may change. especially in the passing game. but the language of the system stays consistent. which in turn gives us an advantage as far as individual match-ups are concerned. and extremely flexible.We believe the ―user friendly‖ language of this system allows us to operate within the framework of a variety of offenses ranging from a double tight. full house backfield. this can be done very easily. find the appropriate play-call and formation on the call sheet. it becomes apparent that this does in fact work extremely well. and then put all the assignments together in the play-call.

When the season starts. we do the primary teaching in the classroom and on the field.because the individual player is listening for. in each play-call. and then execute their assignment without having to necessarily think. In conclusion. there is minimal miscommunication. When we install the offense. We use a very diverse and innovative offense that is very simple to install and learn. while minimizing exposure to the aspects of our offensive unit that might not match up well against our opponents 10 by Ron Jenkins. We teach the players the language of the system. and few missed assignments. The diversity of the offense allows us to install and run a fully dimensional offense. or figure out what they have to do. we believe that the language of this system is as important as the techniques we try to instill in our players. which can fully utilize any specific talents our team might possess. The playbook then becomes a reference guide that players can go to when they have specific questions with regard to their assignments in any given play-call. and is told his specific assignment in each play-call. In short. We give each player a playbook only after we have installed the offense on the field. and then teach them what the words of the play-call tell them to do. MS . we tell each player specifically what to do. they know to listen for their specific assignment in the play-call.

When you do not hear what is said. A. MS . Motion (possible) C. 5. 2.Break‖ until the receivers have left the huddle. 11 by Ron Jenkins. say ―CHECK. Blocking (possible) F. Protection (possible) H.linemen turn to outside and go to LOS quickly.Break‖ is the signal to leave the huddle — clap hands . The Quarterback is responsible for the shape of the huddle. 8. Set up quickly.Do not call ―Ready . Shift (possible) B. 3. The Quarterback has complete control of the huddle. Formation D. ―Ready . Pass Pattern (possible) G. Line up quickly with hands on knees in position to see and hear the Quarterback. Center always sets up huddle eight yards from ball. Snap count: RED (on one) WHITE (on two) or BLUE (on three) 6. Play E. Quarterback .‖ 7.THE HUDDLE C G T Y H X Z F G T QB FORMING AND BREAKING THE HUDDLE 1. 4. Keep it that way so all can hear. The huddle is circular. You will receive the following information in the huddle.

When the QB calls the snap count on BLUE (three). he will try to draw the defense off-sides on the 2nd ―HUT‖ by accenting the count — pausing — and then calling the third ―HUT‖. MS . 12 by Ron Jenkins. To do this we have to get under center ASAP. once the offense is at the LOS. CALLING SNAP COUNT: 1. 2. WHITE means the count is on two. WHITE and BLUE to call the snap count. The team is alert for the ―staggered count‖ every time the QB calls the play ―on BLUE‖ (three). QB places his hands under center as quickly as possible.HUT ——— HUT 3. QB calls out ―GO‖. BLUE means the count is on three. ―Go‖ is said before ―set‖ to initiate all shifts and / or to pop the TE off the LOS before motioning. QB pauses and then continues the snap count as follows: RED WHITE ―SET‖ — GREEN 90 — GREEN 90 — BLUE HUT . EXAMPLE: RED means the count is on one. This is because we want to control what the defense does as far as ―stemming‖ is concenred.SNAP COUNT MECHANICS We will be using the colors RED.

Once he puts his hands under the center. Audibles may be called regardless of the snap count. and then puts his hands under center once the entire offense is set. the ball is snapped on the 1st thing the QB shouts. easy‖ which alerts the offense before he puts his hands under center.4. the QB audibles before he puts his hands under the center. He does this by saying ―easy. 13 by Ron Jenkins. If the count is on ―1st Sound‖. He then calls the audible. MS .

B. and the QB repeats the WHITE call after his SET command. Whenever an audible changes the original play. MS . 2. EXAMPLES: Huddle call: Line call: I Right. the next number called is a ―Live or New‖play. WHITE 25 — Live call. 24 Slam on WHITE GO -. 20 Lead on WHITE GO -.The Audible System 1. change play to 25 Lead WHITE 25 — Live call. RED 90 — (no audible) RED 90 — (no audible) HUT — HUT Huddle call: Line call: I Right. AUDIBLE MECHANICS: A. if the snap count is on WHITE (two). which has been repeated on the LOS. our snap will remain the same as called in the huddle. change play to 25 Slam HUT — HUT (ball snapped) 14 by Ron Jenkins.SET. Our audible system is based on the repeat of our snap count in the huddle by the QB. For example.SET.

MS .THE RUN GAME 15 by Ron Jenkins.

as well as the angle in which the back hits the hole. However. are given a ―series‖ number. we just go on first sound or on a quick count that has our linemen firing out at the defensive linemen while they are shifting and are off-balance. etc. in order to block effectively. The series numbers tell the offense the area the back will line up in to execute the play. Again. 3. we have to call plays that have universal blocking rules. such as ZONE plays. and 9). The backs. 5. 8. (0 / 1. 20. 2. (Lead. as well as the angles we have. we want to pay attention to detail. We attempt to call plays based on the number of people to block. even holes to the right of the center. 40 or a single digit for our deep ace back formations).). we like to ―Double-team‖ at the ―Point of Attack‖ and then come off to the Linebacker. This tactic usually takes them out of their maneuvering. We want to make sure the linemen and the backs use very good technique and proper fundamentals. 6. This is important due to the timing of the play. Statistics prove that teams that can run the ball consistently win championships. In this system. and do the little things well. Toss. 4. When we go against fronts that ―STEM‖ or shift a great deal. Power. odd holes to the left of the center. 30. when we do this. 16 by Ron Jenkins. Our philosophy is to set up the run game by passing the ball with the ―ball control‖ component of our passing attack. The Master Call blocking scheme is also given in the playcall.THE RUN GAME Our running game is an extremely important element in our offense. 7. (10. Calling a play for the running game is very easy and descriptive to the players. Slam. MS . with regard to their backfield positions. This tells the offense the basic blocking scheme that will be used in executing the play. Each hole is given a number. Sweep.

THE RUNNING GAME BASIC LINE SPLITS 3' 3' 2' QB 2' 3' 3' HOLE NUMBERING 9 7 5 3 10 2 QB 4 6 8 0 HOLE – OVER THE RIGHT HALF OF CENTER 1 HOLE – OVER LEFT HALF OF CENTER 2 HOLE – OVER THE RIGHT LEG OF CENTER 3 HOLE – OVER LEFT LEG OF CENTER 4 HOLE – OVER THE RIGHT LEG OF RIGHT GUARD 5 HOLE – OVER THE LEGT LEG OF LEFT GUARD 6 HOLE – OVER THE RIGHT LEG OF RIGHT TACKLE 7 HOLE – OVER THE LEFT LEG OF LEFT TACKLE 8 HOLE – WIDE PLAY OUTSIDE RIGHT 9 HOLE – WIDE PLAY OUTSIDE LEFT 17 by Ron Jenkins. MS .

These calls are made based on the defensive front that is presented. Slam it the basic blocking scheme of the play. the Linemen make a call such as ―DEN‖(Center and Guard making a COMBO block). The H Back is the ―20 series‖ back in the NEAR formation. At the Line of Scrimmage. 18 by Ron Jenkins. The Linemen and Fullback. MS . ―CUB‖ (Guard and Tackle making a COMBO block). He is told to run through the ―4‖ hole.5 yards behind the LOS) For example. or ―BEAR‖ (Tackle and Tight end making a COMBO block). FS C B B T B N DEN CALL T QB B SS C Our 20 series runs alert the linemen and the quarterback that the back getting the ball is lined up at 7 yards behind the line of scrimmage and that there are two backs in the backfield. the play 24 SLAM is called out of a NEAR formation.TWO-BACK OFFENSE (20 SERIES) IN A STRONG I / WEAK I SET (One Back @ 7 Yards behind the LOS – the other back @ 4. and Tight-end are told to block ―SLAM‖.

19 by Ron Jenkins. MS .TWO-BACK OFFENSE (30 SERIES) IN A STRONG I / WEAK I SET EXAMPLE: 32 BASE FS C B B T N QB B T B SS C Our thirty series runs alert the linemen and the quarterback that the back getting the ball is lined up at 4.5 yards behind the line of scrimmage.

5 Yards behind the LOS) QB 40 SERIES = H F = 30 SERIES EXAMPLE: 43 GUT FS C B B T N QB B T B SS C Our forty and thirty series runs alert the linemen and the quarterback that the back getting the ball is lined up at 4. Our 30 series tells the F he is getting the ball.TWO-BACK OFFENSE (40 & 30 SERIES) IN A STRONG / WEAK WEAK & STRONG BACKS = 30 & 40 SERIES SET (Both Backs @ 4.5 yards behind the line of scrimmage. EXAMPLE: 35 BLUNT FS C B B T N QB B T B SS C 20 by Ron Jenkins. In forty series tells the H he is getting the ball. MS .

ONE-BACK OFFENSE (30 & SINGLE-DIGIT SERIES) SINGLE BACKS = 30 SERIES & SINGLE DIGIT SERIES QB RB = 30 SERIES FROM THE SINGLE BACK POSITION @ 4. 21 by Ron Jenkins. EXAMPLE: 7 SPEED OPTION FS C W E T QB M T S E SS C Our single-digit series runs alert the linemen and the quarterback that the back getting the ball is lined up at 7 yards behind the line of scrimmage and that there is only one back in the backfield.5 yards behind the line of scrimmage. MS .5 YARDS FROM LOS RB= SINGLE DIGIT SERIES FROM THE SINGLE BACK POSITION @ 7 YARDS FROM LOS EXAMPLE: 32 BASE FS C B B T N QB B T B SS C Our thirty series runs alert the linemen and the quarterback that the back getting the ball is lined up at 4.

22 by Ron Jenkins.80 SERIES Z BACK = 80 SERIES QB Z = 80 SERIES FROM THE Z POSITION EXAMPLE: 89 Z REVERSE FS C B B T N QB B T B SS C Our eighty series runs alert the linemen and the quarterback that the back getting the ball is getting the hand-off late -. MS .and that the play is developing slowly.

This is usually used as an audible and on quarterback sneaks. MS .TEEN SERIES QB = (10) TEEN SERIES QB = (10) TEEN SERIES FROM THE QB POSITION EXAMPLE: ―11‖ FS C B B T N QB B T B SS C Our teen or 10 series alerts the linemen that the quarterback is getting the ball. 23 by Ron Jenkins.

RUN SYSTEM CALLS  Blocking Scheme Master Calls o ―Base‖ 34/35 o ―Lead‖ 20/21 o ―Slam‖ 24/25 o ―Power‖ 26/27 o ―Toss‖ 28/29 & 8/9 o ―Trap‖ 30/31 o ―Gut‖ 42/43 o ―Option‖ 6/7  Line Calls o ―Den‖  Center and Guard Combination o ―Cub‖  Guard and Tackle Combination o ―Bear‖  Tackle and Tight-end Combination 24 by Ron Jenkins. MS .

MS .THE PASSING GAME 25 by Ron Jenkins.

the deeper the route. 26 by Ron Jenkins. giving us a lot of "hot" 3-step drops that enhance our QB's confidence. NUMBERED PASS ROUTES FOR WIDE RECEIVERS 9 SLICE 7 BENCH 5 3 2 1 DART (MOTOR DOWN) DRIVE 6 (Square-in) 8 4 8 Skinny 6 (Dig) STAB 0 DRAG SPOT SMASH QB ODD NUMBERED ROUTES EVEN NUMBERED ROUTES GO TO THE OUTSIDE.The Passing Game The system is extremely flexible and diverse. THE LARGER THE NUMBER. As shown in the diagram "Numbered Pass Routes for Wide Receivers" each route is numbered odd to the outside and even to the inside. the pass route is given a name. It operates predominantly from a 5-to-7-step drop that varies slightly. THE DEEPER THE ROUTE. "Hot" routes are built into the system on every play. The call starts with the single-side receiver and follows across.. In some cases.. The pass patterns are made up of 3digit combinations that designate the route and the receiver.. GO TO THE INSIDE. MS . depending on the type of pattern called. Note: The larger the number. ALWAYS REMEMBER.. indicating the route each receiver should run. yet simple and very logical.

MS .C C -5- QB QB QB Vs Man-off Defenders Vs Man-off Defenders Vs Man-off Defenders Possible Convertion to Fade C QB -6- -7Possible Convertion to Fade C QB QB -5C Vs Bump & Run Defenders Vs Bump & Run Defenders Vs Bump & Run Defenders FS FS FS Convert to Fade QB will hit you in the hole C Convert to Fade QB will hit you in the hole C C QB QB QB Vs Cover-two Zone Vs Cover-two Zone Vs Cover-two Zone 27 by Ron Jenkins.Individual Pass Routes Versus Coverages 6-Yard Quick Hitch (4-steps) 7-Yard Quick Speed-out (4-steps) 5-Yard Quick Slant (3-steps) C C C -6- -7-5- QB QB QB Vs Three-deep Zone Vs Three-deep Zone Vs Three-deep Zone C -6- -7.

and come back down the stem C C QB QB C QB Vs Bump & Run Defenders Vs Bump & Run Defenders Vs Bump & Run Defenders -18- FS FS -12- Convert to Fade QB will hit you in the hole FS Possible Convertion to Bench C C C QB QB QB Vs Cover-two Zone Vs Cover-two Zone Vs Cover-two Zone 28 by Ron Jenkins. MS .12-Yard Speed-out (6-steps) C 12-Yard Curl (6-steps) 18-Yard Comeback -18- -12C C -12- QB QB QB Vs Three-deep Zone Vs Three-deep Zone Vs Three-deep Zone -18-12C -12C C QB QB Vs Man-off Defenders QB Vs Man-off Defenders Vs Man-off Defenders -Top Gun-12- -18-12- Turn to the inside.

MS .Possible Top Gun-16- Vs Man-off Defenders .Possible Top Gun-16- Vs Man-off Defenders -12- C TE QB QB C QB C Vs Bump & Run Defenders Vs Bump & Run Defenders Vs Bump & Run Defenders FS Possible "Post-stem" move -16- -16FS Get back out wide FS -12C C C TE QB QB QB Vs Cover-two Zone Vs Cover-two Zone Vs Cover-two Zone 29 by Ron Jenkins.16-Yard Dig 16-Yard Square-in 12-Yard Post-corner C -16C -16C -12- TE QB QB QB Vs Three-deep Zone .Possible Top Gun-16- Vs Three-deep Zone Vs Three-deep Zone -16C -12C C TE QB QB QB Vs Man-off Defenders .

MS .Possible Top Gun-18- -12- C QB QB C QB C Vs Bump & Run Defenders Vs Bump & Run Defenders Vs Bump & Run Defenders -18FS FS FS Chance to come under safety if he overplays C C C QB QB QB Vs Cover-two Zone Vs Cover-two Zone Vs Cover-two Zone 30 by Ron Jenkins.12-Yard Post Take-off C C 18-Yard Bench -18-12- C QB QB Vs Three-deep Zone QB Vs Three-deep Zone Vs Three-deep Zone -18-12- C C C QB QB QB Vs Man-off Defenders Vs Man-off Defenders Vs Man-off Defenders .

12-Yard Skinny-post (7-steps) C 6-Yard Spot 4-Yard Dart -12- C C -6-4QB QB QB Vs Three-deep Zone Vs Three-deep Zone Vs Three-deep Zone C -12- C -6- C -4QB QB QB Vs Man-off Defenders B Vs Man-off Defenders Vs Man-off Defenders -12-6C QB Vs Bump & Run Defenders C QB Vs Bump & Run Defenders QB C Vs Man-off Defenders FS FS FS C -6- C C -4QB QB QB Vs Cover-two Zone Vs Cover-two Zone Vs Cover-two Zone 31 by Ron Jenkins. MS .

MS .5-Yard Drag C 5-Yard Stab C 5-Yard Smash C -5-5-5- QB QB Vs Three-deep Zone Vs Three-deep Zone QB Vs Three-deep Zone C C C -5- -5-5- QB QB QB Vs Man-off Defenders Vs Man-off Defenders Vs Man-off Defenders -5C QB -5-5C QB QB C Vs Bump & Run Defenders Vs Bump & Run Defenders Vs Bump & Run Defenders FS FS FS -5- C -5- C Sit in hole -5- C QB QB QB Vs Cover-two Zone Vs Cover-two Zone Vs Cover-two Zone 32 by Ron Jenkins.

5-Yard "V" FS

15-Yard Drive FS

25-Yard Slice -25FS C C

-15-5C

QB

QB

QB

Vs Three-deep Zone

Vs Three-deep Zone

Vs Three-deep Zone

-25FS FS FS C C

-15-5C

QB

Vs Man-off Defenders

QB

Vs Man-off Defenders

QB

Vs Man-off Defenders

-25FS FS FS

-15-5C QB C QB Vs Bump & Run Defenders QB C

Vs Bump & Run Defenders

Vs Bump & Run Defenders -25-

SS

FS

SS

FS

SS

FS

-15B

Sit in hole -5C C QB

QB

QB

Vs Cover-two Zone

Vs Cover-two Zone

Vs Cover-two Zone

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by Ron Jenkins, MS

The "Routes for Running Backs" indicates the name of the routes and what we want our backs (H and F) to do. In the play-calls, the first-named route applies to the H back and the second-named route to our F back (unless designated otherwise).

CALLED PASS ROUTES FOR RUNNING BACKS

CORNER SEAM WHEEL POST STAB "M" CUT CREASE
QB

"V" SNEAK

STOP FLAT SHOOT

SWING

Swing:

Check your LB. Take-off laterally near full speed as you look back to the

QB. Look back for the ball right away. Let the QB release the ball before you head up field. Wheel: Check your LB. Take-off laterally near full speed as you look back to the

QB. When you get four yards from the tackle, break down the sideline at full speed and start to look for the ball at seven yards downfield. Flat: Check your LB. Release outside your offensive tackle at near full speed.

As you hit the line of scrimmage roll into the flat to catch the ball at about three yards beyond the line of scrimmage. Look back for the ball as soon as you break to the sideline. 34
by Ron Jenkins, MS

“V”:

Check your LB. Release outside your offensive tackle just as you would

on your flat route. Instead of rolling into the flat, plant your outside foot on or near the L.O.S. and break into the middle of the field at no more that three yards beyond the line of scrimmage. “M”: Check your LB. Release outside your offensive tackle just as you would

on your ―V‖ routes. Take two steps into the ―V‖ routes and then break out into the flat making eye contact with your quarterback. Stop: Check your LB. Release outside your offensive tackle. Run three yards

past the line of scrimmage and look for the hole. Break down as your turn to the outside and look for the football. Stab: Check your LB. Take your best release somewhere between ―B‖ and ―D‖

gaps and settle down in the hole at about four yards past the line of scrimmage as you turn to make eye contact with your quarterback. Don’t ―back into the route‖. Corner: Check your LB. Take your fastest release somewhere between ―C‖ and

―D‖ gaps and break towards the corner at about seven yards past the line of scrimmage. Accelerate as you come out of your break. Seam: Check your LB. Take your fastest release somewhere between ―C‖ and

―D‖ gaps and start to look for the ball at seven yards. Stay in the seam area unless the pass leads you elsewhere. Accelerate as you come out of your break. Post: Check your LB. Take your fastest release somewhere between ―C‖ and

―D‖ gaps. Break to the post at seven yards without crossing the center. Accelerate as you come out of your break. Crease: Check your LB. Use a one-count delay as you release outside the

defensive end’s rush. Get about 3 – 5 yards width outside the tackle as you catch the ball close to the line of scrimmage. 35
by Ron Jenkins, MS

Cut:

Check your LB. Take your fastest release somewhere between ―C‖ and

―D‖ gaps. Break across the middle at about two yards past the original line of scrimmage. Sneak: Check your LB. Take your fastest release somewhere between ―C‖ and

―D‖ gaps. Break to the outside at about two yards past the original line of scrimmage gaining ground slightly until you catch the ball. Shoot: Check your LB. Run to where the WR lined up (or would normally line

up) looking inside for the ball.

36

by Ron Jenkins, MS

TIGHT-END / INSIDE RECEIVER PASS ROUTES

7

9

8

DRIVE
5 6 3 4 2 1

SHAKE STAB STICK

POP
0

QB

CALLED PASS ROUTES FOR RUNNING BACKS FROM THE TRIPS AND TREY POSITIONS

CORNER POST SIDELINE DRIFT FLAT "V" STAB DRAG
QB

DRIVE

SEAM

CURL

FADE

POP

OUT

37

by Ron Jenkins, MS

MS .SHIFTS & MOTIONS 38 by Ron Jenkins.

be required to cross the formation from one wide receiver position to another. the tight end will line up in a left formation. by showing a particular offensive set. they will line up in the backfield. If the formation we want to end up in is a left formation.SHIFTING Shifting is a tactic used to either confuse the opposition. or close to the tackle on the other side of the center. If we want to end up in a right formation. and then radically changing that set before the snap of the ball. There are a few rules that are used in our shifting. the tight end will line up on the right side before the shift. the receivers will rarely. In most cases. if ever. First. the tight end will always cross the formation from one side to the other to change the strength of the formation when executing a shift. 39 by Ron Jenkins. MS . Second. this would take too much time. and then shift to their designated positions. or force them to run a ―base‖ defense.

We will call a predetermined shift by calling the formation that we want to shift from first. Y X Z QB H F X Y QB F H Z The primary goal is to show the defense our ―Tank Left‖ formation. However. the term ―Tank‖ would tell the players to line up in a ―Tank Left‖ formation. An example would be ―Tank. 40 by Ron Jenkins. second. MS . we don’t want the wide receivers to switch sides. and then shift to a ―Trey Right‖ formation when the QB yells ―Go‖. In this case. Trey Right‖. so they will most likely not line up where they normally would in a true Tank left formation. followed by the formation we will be shifting to.

41 by Ron Jenkins.Another example would be in the play-call ―Dance – Maui Right‖. In this case. the possible shift combinations are virtually endless. Once the players learn the language of calling our formation. the eligible receivers will line up in a ―Dance Left‖ formation. Many times the defense may not account for one of our receivers. One of the things we can do is shift from a base formation to an exotic five-receivers set to confuse our opponent giving us an obvious advantage at the snap of the ball. Y Z QB X F H X H Y QB F Z We will teach the mechanics of this technique at the beginning of practice in our formation recognition period(s). and then sprint to a ―Maui Right‖ formation when the QB yells ―Go‖. MS .

which will allow our players to recognize and exploit our opponent. 42 by Ron Jenkins. MS . We will then shift to our standard formation.Another strategy is to show the defense a formation they have not prepared for and force them to switch to a base defense.

MS .MOTIONING The use of motioning backs or receivers is a valuable tool in our offense. The ―tag‖ occurs at the beginning of the play-call to alert the specific player. In simple terms:    Every eligible receiver has a specific ―tag‖ call. Our motioning system is very easy to learn and specific to the call. 43 by Ron Jenkins. Second. it can show our offense whether the defense is in a man or zone concept. motioning can create matchups that are favorable to our attacking offense. We motion to the called formation. Motioning can do several things for us. Third. or even a blocking advantage. motioning can put another receiver to one side giving us a numbers advantage. First.

SPLIT RIGHT CLOSE‖ X Y QB H F Z ―ZIP. ZIP: “Z” goes in short motion into the formation. X Z Y QB H F ―ZOOM. SPLIT RIGHT CLOSE‖ 44 by Ron Jenkins.RECEIVER MOTIONS ZOOM: “Z” goes in motion across the formation. MS .

RECEIVER MOTIONS (CONT. BUNCH RIGHT‖ 45 by Ron Jenkins. MS . EASY: “X” goes in short motion into the formation.) EXIT: “X” goes in motion across the formation. BUNCH RIGHT‖ Z X H Y QB F ―EASY. Z H Y QB X F ―EXIT.

TIGHT END MOTIONS JET: “Y” goes in motion across the formation. X Y Z QB H F ―JET. JAM: “Y” goes in short motion into the formation. SPREAD RIGHT‖ X Z QB H F Y ―JAM. SPREAD RIGHT‖ 46 by Ron Jenkins. MS .

H BACK MOTIONS HOP: “H” goes in motion across the formation. QUADS RIGHT‖ X Y QB H F Z ―HIP. QUADS RIGHT‖ 47 by Ron Jenkins. MS . HIP: “H” goes in short motion into the formation. X Y QB H F Z ―HOP.

MS . FLEW: “F” goes in short motion into the formation.F BACK MOTIONS FLY: “F” goes in motion across the formation. NEAR RIGHT‖ 48 by Ron Jenkins. X Y QB F Z H ―FLY. NEAR RIGHT‖ X Y QB F Z H ―FLEW.

FORMATIONS 49 by Ron Jenkins. MS .

even in a four wide receiver formation. ―twin‖. The H back will align himself behind the inside leg of the strong side tackle in a ―Strong‖ call (while the F lines up behind the quarterback). ―trips‖. A left call will tell the tight end to line up on the left side and the X receiver will now line up on the right side. or in this case. ―slot‖. the left side. and ―deuce‖. ―bunch‖. In a ―Weak‖ call the H back will line up behind the inside leg of the quick side tackle while the F back will again line up 50 by Ron Jenkins. A right call tells our tight end to always line up on the right side. ―dual‖. while the H back is behind the quarterback at 7 yards. ―Far‖ will tell the F back to line up in ―Week I‖ formation away (or ―far‖) from the tight end side behind the inside leg of the quick tackle – 4. The H back in ―Split‖ backs will line up opposite the call side and the F back will line up on the call side while both backs are sitting at 4. our X receiver will always line up opposite the call. while the H back is still in an ―I‖ set at 7 yards from the line of scrimmage.FORMATIONS Our formations are multiple (over 80 total) and are fairly simple to understand. Our strong side will always be regarded as the call side. MS . where he will line up on the same side as the X receiver – who always lines up opposite the call. We will always give a right or a left call.5 yards from the line of scrimmage. The Z receiver will line up on the call side most every time except in.5 yards behind the line of scrimmage. A ―Near‖ set tells the F back to line up in a ―Strong I‖ formation on (or ―near‖) the tight end side behind the inside leg of the strong tackle – 4.5 yards behind the line of scrimmage.

5 yards from the line of scrimmage. In a weak or strong formation.behind the quarterback. both backs line up 4. MS . These are memorized sets for the H back (or the F back in some cases) and have been very easy for our backs to commit to memory. We have several one back sets where the H back (or the F back in some cases) will be asked to line up in various positions. 51 by Ron Jenkins.

Two-back sets  Split. Near and Far X QB Y Z Z Y QB X H SPLIT RIGHT F SPLIT LEFT F H X QB Y Z F H Z Y QB X F H I RIGHT I LEFT X QB Y Z F H Z Y F QB X H NEAR LEFT NEAR RIGHT X F QB Y Z Z Y QB X F H FAR RIGHT FAR LEFT H 52 by Ron Jenkins. MS . I.

Two Backs Sets (cont.)  Weak/strong X QB Y Z Z Y QB X H WEAK RIGHT F WEAK LEFT F H X QB Y Z Z Y QB X F STRONG RIGHT H STRONG LEFT H F 53 by Ron Jenkins. MS .

)  Slot. Twin. MS . Spread X Z H SPLIT RIGHT SLOT QB Y Y QB X Z F SPLIT LEFT SLOT F H Z X H SPLIT RIGHT TWINS QB Y Y QB Z X F F SPLIT LEFT TWINS H X QB Z Y Z Y F SPREAD LEFT QB X SPREAD RIGHT H F H 54 by Ron Jenkins.Two Backs Sets (cont.

One Back Sets  Bunch. Deuce Z X H QB Y Y QB Z H X F BUNCH RIGHT BUNCH LEFT F X Z QB Y H H Y QB X Z F F DUAL RIGHT DUAL LEFT Z X QB Y H H Y QB Z X F DEUCE RIGHT DEUCE LEFT F 55 by Ron Jenkins. Dual. MS .

MS .)  Gator. Husky X H QB Y Z Z Y QB X H F GATOR RIGHT GATOR LEFT F H X QB Y Z Z Y QB H X F HUSKY RIGHT HUSKY LEFT F 56 by Ron Jenkins.One Back Sets (cont.

Trick.)  Trey. Trips. Quads X QB Y H Z Z H Y QB X TREY RIGHT F TREY LEFT F X QB Y H Z Z H Y QB X TRICK RIGHT F F TRICK LEFT X Z H QB Y Y QB X H Z F TRIPS RIGHT TRIPS LEFT F H X QB Y Z Z Y QB H X F F FLANKERS RIGHT FLANKERS LEFT X H QB Y Z Z Y QB X H QUADS RIGHT F QUADS LEFT F 57 by Ron Jenkins.One Back Sets (cont. MS . Flankers.

One Back Sets (cont. MS .)  Far Trey. Near Trey. Strong Trey. Weak Trey X QB Y H Z Z H Y QB X F F FAR RIGHT TREY FAR LEFT TREY X QB Y H F Z Z H Y QB F NEAR RIGHT TREY NEAR LEFT TREY X QB Y F H Z Z F Y QB X H STRONG RIGHT TREY STRONG LEFT TREY X QB Y F Z Z Y F QB X H WEAK RIGHT TREY WEAK LEFT TREY H 58 by Ron Jenkins.

)  Far Trips.One Back Sets (cont. Weak Trips X Z H F QB Y Y QB X H F Z FAR RIGHT TRIPS FAR LEFT TRIPS X Z H QB Y Y F F QB X H Z NEAR RIGHT TRIPS NEAR LEFT TRIPS X Z F QB Y Y H H QB X F Z STRONG RIGHT TRIPS STRONG LEFT TRIPS X Z F H QB Y QB X F H Z WEAK RIGHT TRIPS WEAK LEFT TRIPS 59 by Ron Jenkins. Near Trips. MS . Strong Trips.

Houston X H QB Z Y RB Z Y QB X H DALLAS RIGHT DALLAS LEFT RB H X QB Y Z Z Y QB H X HOUSTON RIGHT RB HOUSTON LEFT RB 60 by Ron Jenkins. MS .Four Wide Receiver Sets (City Sets)  Dallas.

MS . Boston X QB Z H RB Y Z Y H QB X RB DENVER LEFT DENVER RIGHT X QB H Y Z Z RB Y RB TAMPA RIGHT H QB X TAMPA RIGHT X H F BOSTON RIGHT Y Z Y Z H F BOSTON LEFT X 61 by Ron Jenkins. Tampa.)  Denver.Four Wide Receiver Sets (cont.

Bali. MS . Baja H X QB F Y Z Z Y F QB H X FIJI LEFT FIJI RIGHT X H QB Y F Z Z Y F QB X H MAUI RIGHT MAUI LEFT X H QB Z F Y Z Y F QB X H BALI RIGHT BALI RIGHT X H QB Y F Z Z F Y QB X H BAJA RIGHT BAJA RIGHT 62 by Ron Jenkins.5 Wide Receiver Sets (Tropic Sets)  Fiji. Maui.

Tank. Near Tank X F H QB Y Z Z Y QB X F H I RIGHT TIGHT I LEFT TIGHT X QB Y F H Z Z Y QB F H X I RIGHT TANK I LEFT TANK X QB Y F H Z Z Y F H NEAR LEFT TANK QB X NEAR RIGHT TANK 63 by Ron Jenkins. MS .Tight Sets  Tight.

Open (Trick). MS .Special Sets  Close. Flex. Under NORMAL SET CLOSE SET X QB Y Z X QB Y Z H SPLIT RIGHT F H SPLIT RIGHT CLOSE F NORMAL SET FLEX SET X QB Y H Z X QB Y H Z TREY RIGHT F TREY RIGHT FLEX F OPEN SET UNDER SET X QB Y H Z X QB Y H Z F TRICK RIGHT OPEN TREY RIGHT UNDER F 64 by Ron Jenkins.

PLAY-CALL MECHANICS 65 by Ron Jenkins. MS .

and receivers. such as a back or receiver. Formation o Directed to all eleven players. Snap count o Red (on one). blue (on three)   66 by Ron Jenkins.PLAY-CALL MECHANICS The mechanics of the play-call are structured in a simple. tight end. MS . logical manner. Play-call o Series / hole number with blocking (master call in run game) o Pass pattern (in passing game) o Protection (in passing game)  The protection call also tells the backs if and how to release into the pattern.  This is especially important to the linemen and backs for pass protection responsibilities. HOW THE PLAY IS CALLED    Shift (possible) o The shift call is directed to the backs. Motion (possible) o The motion call is directed to a certain player. The only thing that the individual has to do is to listen to the play-call for his specific assignment. white (on two). That is to say that each section of the play call is directed to a certain player or group of players.

o Vs. MS . o ―24 slam‖ tells the H (2) he has a lead blocker and he should run through the 4 hole and that the blocking scheme is slam. Near Right. o ―Near right‖ would be the formation we want to end up in at the snap of the ball.” o ―Fly‖ would be the motion. on white – ready break.WHAT THE CALL WOULD SOUND LIKE IF IT WERE A RUN PLAY o “Fly – near right – 24 slam – on white. a 50 front. o ―On white‖ tells everyone the snap count is on two. the probable line call would be ―Den‖. FS C SS C Mg W X Mk N T E Y Z T QB F H Fly. 24 Slam 67 by Ron Jenkins. he would say ―check – check‖ and he would be told ―white‖. o If a player forgot the snap count at the line of scrimmage.

“ single-side receiver – across. "628"--tells the single-side receiver (split-end X) to run a "6" route.BREAKING DOWN THE PLAY-CALL IF A PASS PLAY WERE CALLED Let us break down a typical pass play-call. "Backs Flat"--backs run "Flat" routes. 6 8 2 Flat X Y Flat QB H F Z Remember. the next receiver across (tight end Y) to run a "2" route. 628 Backs Flat" (with no protection call). 68 by Ron Jenkins. and the last receiver across (flanker Z) to run the "8" route.” "Right"--tight end (Y) and flanker (Z) line up on right side of the formation and the split end (X) goes to the left side of the formation. MS . "Split Right. we call the routes.

would run the "8" route. while split-end X. Flanker Z.If we lined up in "Split Right Slot 628 Backs Flat" (with no protection call) the tight end Y would be the single-side receiver and would run the inside-receiver "6" route. the next receiver across. 8 6 2 Flat X Z Y Flat QB H F 69 by Ron Jenkins. would run the "2" route. the last receiver across. MS .

An example of this type of play-call would be ―Dallas Right. and not a thirty-series run play. The protection call ―Gone‖ tells the line to block away from the call side ―Right‖. four or five-receiver set such as Dallas. and we are running ―mirrored routes‖. MS .Dart. The protection call (King) will alert the linemen that the play called is a pass play. Stab King Protection X Z H 9 QB F Y 9 3 3 Another example would be ―Maui Right. 39 F Stab King‖. F Juke Gone‖. Gone Protection H X Y Rub QB F Rub Z Dart Juke Dart 70 by Ron Jenkins. or Maui. we will call the routes as if they are a strong-side route combination call (the inside receiver’s route will be called first. Houston. Rub .SPECIAL SITUATION: THROWING FROM A BALANCED FOUR OR FIVE-RECEIVER SET When we get into a balanced. followed by the outside receiver’s route).

and if he is going to block. if in fact he will be involved in the pass pattern. it tells him which side to block to. it tells him if he is staying in to block or not. the protection call tells the back(s) three things: First. The other back (the F) is lined up on the strong-side. it tells him if he has a free-release or a check release. and since the center is blocking to the quick-side. the protection call ―queen‖ tells the center to block to the quick side. W T QB F H S E Y M T W E M T QB T S E Y E H F “QUEEN” FROM A LEFT FORMATION ―QUEEN” FROM A RIGHT FORMATION 71 by Ron Jenkins. in a split backfield. Second. MS .HOW THE PROTECTION CALL AFFECTS THE RESPONSIBILITIES When the back’s routes are called in the play-call. and third. he knows he has to ―check‖ the strong-side before releasing. This lets the back on the quick side (the H) know that he has a free release because the center is blocking to his side. For example. it tells him which side of the line he will release to.

and the back on the quick-side would get a check release. and the H would block or check release to the quick-side. the center would block to the strong-side.If the protection call was ―King‖. that back would stay in and block if he did not get a route in the play-call. If there was a single-back set. depending upon whether it was a ―Queen‖ call or a ―King‖ call. so the back on the strong-side will get a free-release. the same rules that apply to a ―Split‖ formation would be used. W E T QB M T S E Y W E T M T QB S E Y F F A “QUEEN” CALL A “KING” CALL 72 by Ron Jenkins. MS . the F would block or check release to the strong-side. S E Y M T QB F W T E W E T M T QB S E Y H H F “KING” FROM A LEFT FORMATION “KING” FROM A RIGHT FORMATION If the backfield set was an ―I‖ formation.

We do this so we will always have three potential pass blockers to either side of the center. S E Y M T QB T W E W E T M T QB S E Y F F “QUEEN” FROM A LEFT FORMATION ―QUEEN” FROM A RIGHT FORMATION If the protection call was a ―King‖ call. if he got a ―Queen‖ call. he would check release to the strong-side because the line is blocking to the ―Queen‖ or quick-side. For example.However. the back would check release to the quick-side because the line is blocking to the ―King‖ or strong-side. he would check release to one side or the other based on the protection call. if he did get a route in the play-call. MS . S E Y M T QB T W E W E T M T QB S E Y F F “KING” FROM A LEFT FORMATION ―KING” FROM A RIGHT FORMATION 73 by Ron Jenkins.

MS .” o ―Zoom‖ tells the Z receiver to go in motion across the formation. o The remaining back on the strong side (or directly behind the quarterback) will check release into the pattern on the strong side. and the outside receiver on the two-receiver side to run a 12-yard curl route. an even front (or double reading guard vs. o Queen tells the double reading Center vs. o ―Swing / v‖ tells the H to run a swing route and the F to run a ―V‖ route. blue is now the live color since we called the count on blue. Swing – V Queen 74 by Ron Jenkins. an odd front) to block (read) to the quick side. o ―On blue‖ tells everyone the snap count is on three. the inside receiver on the two-receiver side (Y) to run a flat route. SS C C FS 1 2 S E Y Z M T T W E X QB F H 5-Big Hitch Split Left. o If we wanted to audible to a different play. o This will release the back on the quick side into the pattern right away. o ―Split left‖ means we want to end up in a split left formation.WHAT THE CALL WOULD SOUND LIKE IF IT WERE A PASS PLAY “Zoom – split left – 414 swing / v – queen – on blue. on blue – ready break. o 414 tells the single-side receiver (X) to run a 12-yard curl route. 414.

DRAGON 7. and run the play ot the opposite side of the line (25 Slam). Another example would be when we use the audible ―Okie‖ when we want to run Quick (the ―k‖ in Okie) outs (the ―o‖ in ―Okie‖). and the quarterback finds that that side of the line is overloaded with defenders. In addition. We will do this when a play is called to one side of the line (say 24 Slam). THUNDER QUICK ALL HITCHES QUICK 91 F STAY QUICK 12 F STAY QUICK FADES QUICK 1-STICK-9 FLAT DRAG-83 H DIG DRAG-PICK (6. we can also change a run play from one side of the center to the other by using the term ―Opposite‖. Hurricane starts with the letter ―H‖. TARGET 14. We will assign code names for a set of plays that will be analogous to the specific play. PANTHER 15. (AUDIBLE) CODE NAMES FOR PLAYS 1. BRANCH 6. 7. they are in our offense. COUGAR 9. For example. HURRICANE 2. we will use the audible ―Hurricane‖ when we want to throw quick hitches. for ―hitches‖. DINO 4. The backs will shift their position(s) if necessary. COBRA (6. CRAZY 11. 8. OR 9) 8. He will initiate the audible by repeating the color the play is on. OR 9) 70 43 F STAB 14 F STAB 628 FLAT 639 SWING 67-SPOT SWING 866 POST 989 DRAG 75 by Ron Jenkins.THE USE OF AUDIBLES Although we will not use audibles often. OSCAR 10. FALCON 5. 8. 7. MS . OKIE 3. and then yelling ―opposite‖. and we will utilize them when necessary. JAGUAR 12. YAHOO 13.

he is telling the offense the snap count. Plays can be called using wristbands with the plays numbered.NO HUDDLE OFFENSE The ―no huddle offense‖ does not need to be run quickly. Red. With regard to the snap count. The individual players will look to their wristbands to find what specific play is being called. The offensive terminology is simple. we have plenty of time to line up on the ball. It is a way to develop another facet of our offense. White or Blue. Our no huddle offense is called ―City‖ because our eight formations are named after major cities. if the QB says nothing. yet very descriptive. If the QB yells out a color. 76 by Ron Jenkins. get an idea of the defense and then call the play. so the linemen will have no problem learning the entire offense. The coach signals in the formation and the play number and the quarterback will repeat them to the offense. The linemen need to be very aware of what the play is. This is not a ―panic‖ mode to be going into. We will use it as a change up in our normal offense. MS . although it can be used as such when there is not much time on the clock near the end of the half or the end of a game. Because we will not necessarily be going to the huddle. the ball will be snapped on first sound once the players are set.

4. 13. 5. The numbers and formations are signaled in from the sideline to the players. 17. 15. (Thursday is our two-minute offense day for a Saturday game). 3. 16. 9. The coach will have the appropriate play signaled in to the players. It is color-coded so the linemen can easily differentiate the different blocking schemes. 17. 30 TRAP 30 DRAW F SCREEN WEAK F SCREEN STRONG QK ALL HITCHES QK 090 H UP QK 0-DRAG-9 H FLAT QK 119 H SLANT QK ALL SLANTS QK 101 H HITCH 070 H CORNER 070 H POST 339 H ―V‖ 414 H FLAT 6-DRAG-8 H FLAT 56-DRAG H POST 939 H SIDELINE 970 H POST 989 H DRAG 999 H UP ANY ANY ANY ANY HOUSTON HOUSTON BOSTON DENVER HOUSTON DALLAS HOUSTON HOUSTON DENVER HOUSTON DALLAS TAMPA DALLAS DENVER TAMPA BOSTON Below is a copy of the ―No Huddle‖ section on the coaches’ call sheet. RT RT RT RT RT RT RT RT RT RT RT RT RT RT RT RT RT RT RT RT 30 TRAP 30 DRAW F SCREEN WEAK F SCREEN STRONG QK ALL HITCHES QK 090 H UP QK 0-DRAG-9 H FLAT QK 119 H SLANT QK ALL SLANTS QK 101 H HITCH 070 H CORNER 070 H POST 339 H ―V‖ 414 H FLAT 6-DRAG-8 H FLAT 56-DRAG H POST 939 H SIDELINE 970 H POST 989 H DRAG 999 H UP ANY ANY ANY ANY HOUSTON HOUSTON BOSTON DENVER HOUSTON DALLAS HOUSTON HOUSTON DENVER HOUSTON DALLAS TAMPA DALLAS DENVER TAMPA BOSTON RUN DRAW SCREEN SCREEN QUICK QUICK QUICK QUICK QUICK QUICK SCAT SCAT SCAT SCAT SCAT SCAT SCAT SCAT SCAT SCAT LFT LFT LFT LFT RT RT LFT LFT RT RT RT LFT LFT LFT LFT LFT LFT LFT LFT LFT 77 by Ron Jenkins. 11. 18. 12. 16. 8. It is laminated and is slid into a wristband that can be purchased at many sporting goods stores. 5. 2. NO HUDDLE SECTION ON THE COACHES’ C ALL SHEET No Huddle / City Group 1. 18. 14. 12. 7.Below is a ―player wristband card‖ (actual size) that is given to all offensive players on Thursday before practice. 15. 3. 9. 4. PLAYER’S WRISTBAND 1. 8. 7. MS . 11. 10. The coaching staff will produce a revised card for each and every game. 10. 14. 6. 13. 2. 6. The players look on their wristbands to find the appropriate play.

the defenders have to line up within the same general area as their responsibilities dictate. The dashed lined area is generally what is considered the ―box‖. MS . For example. In order to cover those areas. although the weak-side outside linebacker is called ―Will‖ in our terminology. that same linebacker might be called ―Whip or perhaps ―Wanda‖ in someone else’s terminology. Although there are different ways to name these fronts. The important thing to remember is who is the weak-side linebacker. It is important to know that both the linemen as well as the linebackers usually have some type of ―gap‖ responsibility. This is an area covering roughly just outside where the tight end would line in width. and what probable responsibilities he might have.BASIC DEFENSIVE FRONTS & TERMINOLOGY The following are the most basic terms used when describing defensive fronts. I have tried to use the most generic terms possible in order to give some insight into how offenses see and label defensives. and about four to six yards from the line of scrimmage in depth. That means that the defenders ―in the box‖ are responsible for specific areas between the offensive linemen. FS C W E T QB M T S SS C E 78 by Ron Jenkins.

if the defender lined up in a “3” technique. MS . because a defender usually lines up relative to his area of responsibility. that means he lined up on the inside shade of the tight end. when it is said that the defender lined up in a “7” technique. SHADE AREAS 987 654 321 0 123 456 789 QB This is important. he is most likely responsible for the “B” gap. D C B A A B C D QB This is a graphic representation of the techniques (position relative to a specific lineman or area) that the defenders can line up in. For example. For example.Here is a graphic representation of the different “gaps” that are designated by letters. 79 by Ron Jenkins.

There are also two middle backers now – MEG (weak side) and MIKE (strong side) Mg W T N QB Mk T S 80 by Ron Jenkins. MS .ODD FRONTS ODD FRONT: THERE IS A DOWN LINEMAN OVER THE CENTER. The outside linebacker on the weak side usually drops into coverage on pass plays but acts as an end on running plays. N QB BASIC 50 FRONT: THERE ARE REALLY THREE TRUE DOWN LINEMEN (A NOSE AND TWO TACKLES) AND AN OUTSIDE LINEBACKER (AN END) on the strong side that will be in a three point stance and rush most all of the time.

THIS IS SOMETIMES CALLED A “DOUBLE EAGLE”. MEG adjusts to compensate. Mg W T N QB Mk T S 81 by Ron Jenkins. The linebackers have to compensate a bit as well. Mg W T N QB T Mk SS S EAGLE: An odd front term. MS . The weak side tackle and WILL backer (end) shift down.BEAR FRONT: WHEN BOTH GUARDS AND THE CENTER ARE COVERED BY DOWN LINEMEN AND THE STRONG SAFETY IS NOW “IN THE BOX” GIVING US EIGHT MEN “IN THE BOX”. Mg W T N QB T Mk S EAGLE WEAK: An odd front term. NOTE THAT THERE ARE SEVEN MEN “IN THE BOX”. WHEN THE CENTER AND WEAK SIDE GUARD ARE COVERED BY DOWN LINEMEN. WHEN BOTH GUARDS AND THE CENTER ARE COVERED BY DOWN LINEMEN.

and the MIKE linebacker will now compensate. Mg W T N QB Mk T S 82 by Ron Jenkins. MS . THE WEAK SIDE TACKLE (IN AN ODD FRONT) SLIDES DOWN FROM COVERING THE TACKLE. NOW COVERS THE GUARD. Mg W T N QB T Mk S REDUCED: (See also Eagle weak) An odd front term. The MEG backer will now adjusts to compensate. WHEN THE CENTER AND STRONG SIDE GUARD ARE COVERED BY DOWN LINEMEN.EAGLE STRONG: An odd front term. Now the weak side outside linebacker will come down and cover the tackle. The strong side tackle will shift down over the guard.

W E T M T QB S E OVER: An even front term. and SAM – the strong side outside linebacker. the SAM backer shifts. W E T T QB M E S 83 by Ron Jenkins. MIKE – the inside linebacker. WHEN THE WEAK SIDE TACKLE (IN AN EVEN FRONT) SHIFTS OVER THE CENTER. MS .EVEN FRONTS EVEN FRONT: THERE IS NO DOWN LINEMAN COVERING THE CENTER. and the SAM backer now comes up over the TE and the MIKE backer compensates. T QB T BASIC 43 FRONT: THERE ARE FOUR DOWN LINEMEN (TWO TACKLES AND TWO ENDS) AND THREE LINEBACKERS: WILL – the weak side outside linebacker. as do the MIKE and WILL backers to compensate. WHEN THE STRONG SIDE TACKLE AND END (IN AN EVEN FRONT) SHIFT TO THE WEAK SIDE OVER TO THE CENTER AND STRONG SIDE TACKLE. W E M T QB T E S UNDER: An even front term. the weak side end shifts down.

Every defensive coverage has own its strengths and weaknesses. A quarterback who is cognizant of this fact can immediately audible to the appropriate pass play that will take advantage of this concept and create a big play for his offense. However.DEFENSIVE COVERAGES It is very beneficial for an offense to know what various fronts and defensive coverages are designed to do. and finally man-to-man. MS . Coverages are designed to limit the productivity of certain offensive concepts. quarters – a coverage that is has either a man concept or a bracket concept depending on the release of the number two receiver. which can be exploited by the offense. 84 by Ron Jenkins. The quarterback who knows the concepts of defense can watch tape of an upcoming opponent and increase the probability of this kind of outcome. A wellrounded and diverse offense can take immediate advantage of the defense by knowing how to attack it in a sound and productive way. For example. this defense can be vulnerable to routes that break open further downfield as long as the corners are anchored to their respective zones by putting a receiver in the flat area. Although defensive coordinators have devised a number of relatively exotic defense in recent years. cover 2 zone or cover 2 man. most defenses involve the following base coverages: Cover 3 zone. cover 2 zone can hurt the productivity of an offense’s quick passing game.

Weakside curl / flat. This means that there areas on the field that an offense can take advantage of. Limited fronts. 2. However. Run support away from SS. it should be able to ―nickel and dime‖ it’s way down the field. Four verticals. a four receiver set with all four receivers running go routes with good spacing can create an immediate big play. 5. (Square-in routes) 7. WEAKNESSES 1.COVER 3 ZONE FS Zone 1/3 Zone 1/3 C Zone 1/3 M Hook Curl / flat C M Hook SSCurl / flat T S W T N QB STRENGTHS 1. Cover three zone is a fundamentally sound defense. Curl routes. 2. sideline routes. MS . Run support to SS. Flood routes. as long as the offense is patient. 3. Strong-side curl. Four man rush. 85 by Ron Jenkins. Although it is unlikely that an offense can throw deep attacking from a standard offensive set. 6. Dig routes. dig routes. 4. and double square-in patterns are all appropriate to call Vs this type of coverage. 3. Three-deep secondary. There are a lot of areas on the field that can be attacked provided the receivers run disciplined routes and the quarterback knows where to go with the football. The second-level coverage (the linebackers) has only four defenders available to cover the field horizontally.

Run support off-tackle. However. Deep coverages. 4. Ability to disrupt timing of outside receivers with 'jam'. 3. Cover two is another basic defense that has the capability to disrupt the timing of the quick passing game because there are not five-defenders at the second level defending the field horizontally to a depth of approximately twelve-yards from the line of scrimmage. a. the deep coverage can now be compromised down the sideline and deep down the middle of the field by an astute offense. Additionally. 3. WEAKNESSES 1. the outside receivers can have the route disrupted due to the fact that the cornerbacks are taught to jam the outside receiver as he passing by his zone. b. fade area. This is also a defense that teams at all levels are using more now. deep middle. Five underneath coverage. 2. 86 by Ron Jenkins. MS . Flat areas. Can rush four. 2. Strong-side curl.COVER 2 ZONE Zone 1/2 FS SS Zone 1/2 C Flat Flat Hash W Middle M Hash S C E T T E QB STRENGTHS 1.

another receiver deep down the middle.By sending one receiver deep to the outside. the defense has only two defenders to cover the three different areas that the receivers now occupy. and a third receiver in the flat. MS . This can be damaging to the defense in that these types of completions are usually big plays that gain substantial yards. 87 by Ron Jenkins.

Responsible for flat coverage. man-up # 2. 88 by Ron Jenkins. Double coverage on # 1 can be nullified by having # 2 attack the coverage of safety. Ability to double cover outside receivers. MS . Man # 1. if # 2 goes flat or drag. 3. Flat coverage. Quarters coverage is one of the more recent innovations in defenses today.QUARTERS COVERAGE Read # 2. 2. C M S E Wall off anything that comes T T underneath. Possible help from SS SS. If # 2 goes vertical. In addition. this type of defense has the ability to double cover an offense’s outside receivers on medium to deep pass routes. This is because the outside linebackers are responsible for covering that area of the field. 2. dbl #1. Allows corners to play aggresive technique on outside receivers because they have help over-the-top from safeties. Be aggressive on all out routes by # 1. Possible help from FS. Run support from safeties. dbl #1. 3. there is a way to nullify the safety help in covering the outside receivers by running inside receivers at the safeties. 4. This usually converts the coverage to a man-to-man type of defense as far as the defensive backfield is concerned. Furthermore. E QB STRENGTHS 1. This defense is susceptible in the flat areas of the field. WEAKNESSES 1. This type of coverage also allows the two safeties to become more a factor on run support. Four-deep coverage. FS C W Responsible for flat coverage. if # 2 goes flat or drag. Read # 2. play-action fakes directed at one of the safeties can make this coverage vulnerable to a throw over the top of that safety. Be aggressive on all out routes by # 1. If # 2 goes vertical. Safeties are very susceptible to play-action. Man # 1. Generally speaking. man-up # 2.

MS . breaking routes. 4. a. Versus Cover 1 Free. Good run support to SS. Out routes. 2. No underneath help. 2. WEAKNESSES 1. 89 by Ron Jenkins. crossing routes. b. fade routes run by the outside receivers or even four-vertical patterns run by the receivers can be big plays as long as you throw away from the free-safety. Can rush five. 3. Whenever a defense goes into any kind of man coverage. Play action passes. crossing routes can be very productive provided you have the extra rusher(s) blocked. In addition. Help in the deep middle. c. 3. you can expect some type of blitz. pick routes. Tight coverage.COVER 1 FREE FS Zone Deep Middle C M W T N QB M T S SS C STRENGTHS 1.

You can audible to a quick ―slide‖ protection to wash the extra defenders down. Versus cover zero-man. Good run support. Pass rush. Some offenses have built-in hot routes that should break open immediately and be very effective against this defense. 3. Nobody in the middle of the field deep post route. b. 4. pick routes. a. Although this is fundamentally unsound because they can’t have all your possible receivers accounted for.COVER 0 MAN C FS W T M N M T S SS C QB STRENGTHS 1. it can cause a big play defensively if you think you can drop back and wait for one of your receivers to break open down field. or change the protection to a maximum protection scheme. 90 by Ron Jenkins. crossing routes are effective as well as routes the are run vertically down the field as long as you can get the pass off before the rush gets to you. I have seen some teams bring seven and even eight defenders once in a while. breaking routes. Tight coverage. WEAKNESSES 1. expect more rushers than you can block with conventional pass protection. Again. 2. c. You have to have a play before the ball is even snapped. No underneath help. 2. crossing routes. MS . Can rush six.

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