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11/07/2013

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Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
Thursday • Nov. 7, 2013 • Vol XII, Edition 70
HEALTH PITCH
NATION PAGE 7
BARWARE GETS
A BETTER LOOK
SUBURBAN LIVING PAGE 19
IN TEXAS, OBAMA OFFERS HEALTH CARE PEP
TALK
By Angela Swartz
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
San Mateo-Foster City Elementary
School District officials are working on
options to address overcrowding after the
failure of Measure P, a $130 million bond
proposal that would have added capacity.
The district plans to implement four
strategies, in the following order: take up
all empty rooms avail-
able in schools, overflow
students to schools
where there is space,
implement a.m./p.m.
kindergarten districtwide
and increase class sizes
in grades 4-8 dis-
trictwide, according to a
statement by district
Superintendent Cynthia Simms.
“I am disappointed by the vote, but I
respect that the majority of our voters want
a different solution to the increasing stu-
dent enrollment facing our schools and to
the funding of the classroom technology
required to ensure student access to 21st cen-
tury learning strategies,” Cynthia Simms,
superintendent of the San Mateo-Foster
City Elementary School District, said in an
official statement. “Following a review of
the final voting results, and consultation
with key school district and community
leaders, I will present a plan for our Board of
Trustees’ consideration on next steps to
engage the varied constituencies of the dis-
trict and ways to address these challenges
together. ”
District looks to other options after Measure P failure
San Mateo-Foster City Elementary School District class sizes may increase, kindergarten may go a.m./p.m.
Cynthia Simms
City: Pull
FlightCar’s
use permit
Millbrae officials say startup car
service plagued with violations
By Angela Swartz
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
FlightCar, a unique airport business that allows people to
rent out their personal cars, could lose its ability to do busi-
ness in Millbrae over a sloppy setup and several code viola-
tions.
The Planning Commission voted unanimously at its
meeting Monday night to recommend to the City Council
revocation of FlightCar’s conditional use permit. Basic
code violations the city noted included lack of response to
issues such as lack of background checks of its renters,
unwarranted electrical generators, poor maintenance of
shrubs, fire code violations and other issues. The permit was
approved on April 15.
The space, run by teens who launched the company in
February 2012, has been overcrowded as well, said Emily
Apartment fire lawsuits piling up
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Former tenants of the Hallmark House Apartments contin-
ue suing owners of the Redwood City complex ravaged by a
six-alarm blaze in July alleging they failed to prevent the
fire with proper maintenance, sprinklers and smoke detec-
tors.
Five more negligence lawsuits against KDF Hallmark
were filed Tuesday in San Mateo County Superior Court,
bringing the total to more than two dozen lodged since the
July 7 fire killed one, sent 21 people to the hospital and left
nearly 100 residents homeless when the building was
deemed uninhabitable. All are represented by attorney Ara
Jabagchourian with the Cotchett, Pitre & McCarthy firm and
KENNY MARTIN/DAILY JOURNAL
Above: From left to right: Joy Rudkin, Diane Christensen and Coreen Gutierrez evaluate a piece of jewelry for insurance
purposes. Below: Rudkin, a registered jeweler at Christensen and Rafferty, examines a diamond through a microscope.
By Kenny Martin
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT
A jewelry store in San Mateo has
recently added to its collection of wed-
ding rings which offer unique represen-
tations of love’s bond. The new line of
jewelry is designed with same-sex cou-
ples in mind, a demographic that up to
this point hasn’t been represented
through jewelry.
This month, Christensen and
Rafferty Fine Jewelry, located at 181
Second Ave., added a line of wedding
rings by Rony Tennenbaum to its col-
lection. Tennenbaum, based in New
York, has been designing jewelry
A new way of expressing love
San Mateo store offering jewelry designed for same-sex couples
See FIRE, Page 18
See PERMIT, Page 23
See LOVE Page 18
See OPTIONS, Page 18
CRABTREE, MANNINGHAM
MAKE STRIDES TO RETURN
SPORTS PAGE 11
Man glad stolen motorcycle
found after 46 years
OMAHA, Neb. — Donald DeVault
wonders what kind of memories his
Triumph motorcycle helped make in
the 46 years since it was stolen, and
he’s looking forward to making more
of his own when it’s returned.
The 73-year-old Omaha man learned
last week that California authorities
had recovered his 1953 Triumph Tiger
100 at the Port of Los Angeles. The
bike was about to be shipped to Japan
when U.S. Customs & Border
Protection agents who checked the
vehicle identification number discov-
ered the motorcycle had been reported
stolen in February 1967.
DeVault said he is eager to get the
bike back, but he thinks investigators
may be even more excited than him
about the motorcycle’s recovery.
DeVault had had the bike for only a
year or two when it was taken from his
fenced backyard.
“I really want to protect it this
time,” DeVault said. “I’m sure there’s
people out there that would want to
take it away. ”
The bike was valued at $300 when in
1967. The shipping documents listed
its value today at $9,000.
DeVault already has a Harley-
Davidson and a Kawasaki motorcycle
in his garage, so he plans to reserve
the Triumph for special rides.
DeVault said he’s talked about the
motorcycle over the years whenever
he was around bikers. It had a couple
features unusual for Triumphs made in
the early 1950s, such as its hardtail
frame.
DeVault recalls Marlon Brando rid-
ing a similar Triumph bike in the
movie “The Wild One,” and after that it
seemed like everyone wanted to ride a
motorcycle.
But DeVault said he was already rid-
ing motorcycles by the time the
movie came out, and continued riding
for much of his life.
What sold him on the Triumph was
the blue color and the name “Li’l Blue
Bitch” airbrushed on the side of the
gas tank.
Afriend with a trucking company is
helping DeVault arrange to ship the
motorcycle home from California.
Once he gets it back in a couple
weeks, DeVault plans to have someone
restore the bike’s name and paint “46
Years Later” on the gas tank.
Homeless man found
in hotel presidential suite
PITTSBURGH — A homeless man
has gone from the proverbial pent-
house to the big house after he was
found sleeping in the presidential
suite at one of Pittsburgh’s swankiest
hotels.
Jeffrey Lennon Watson, 48, told
police he was from Los Angeles and
was passing through the city to return
to California when he was nabbed by
security at the Omni William Penn
Hotel on Tuesday night, police
spokeswoman Diane Richard said
Wednesday.
Hotel guests were checking into the
suite about 7:30 p.m. when they saw
Watson sleeping on a couch and noti-
fied hotel staff, police said. Hotel
security officers woke him up, took
him to their office and called police,
Richard said.
Hotel general manager Eric
DeStefano issued a short statement
explaining what occurred.
The parlor area of the Presidential
suite is “a general-use area for recep-
tions and small events. The door had
been programmed to remain unlocked
for an event earlier that day. As soon
as the occupant was discovered, he was
escorted off the property,” DeStefano
said.
Watson told police “he has been in
Pittsburgh for over a month and sleeps
wherever he can locate somewhere
comfortable to rest his head,” Richard
said.
There aren’t too many places more
comfortable than Watson’s chosen
location. The 16th-floor suite features
a 1,300-square-foot parlor plus three
bedrooms, and includes crystal chan-
deliers, a dining room, grand piano, a
full kitchenette, wet bar and sitting
room, according to the hotel’s web-
site. The site doesn’t make clear how
much the room costs.
FOR THE RECORD 2 Thursday • Nov. 7, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
800 S. Claremont St., Suite 210, San Mateo, CA 94402
Publisher: Jerry Lee Editor in Chief: Jon Mays
jerry@smdailyjournal.com jon@smdailyjournal.com
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As a public service, the Daily Journal prints obituaries of approximately 200 words or less with a photo one time on the date of the family’s choosing.To submit obituaries, email
information along with a jpeg photo to news@smdailyjournal.com.Free obituaries are edited for style, clarity, length and grammar. If you would like to have an obituary printed
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Actor Christopher
Knight is 56.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1972
President Richard Nixon was re-elect-
ed in a landslide over Democrat
George McGovern.
“Remember always that you not
only have the right to be an individual,
you have an obligation to be one.”
— Eleanor Roosevelt (1884-1962)
Evangelist Billy
Graham is 95.
Rapper Tinie
Tempah is 25.
Birthdays
REUTERS
Super Boat class boats approach the start line during the first of three race days at the Key West World Championships in
Key West, Fla.
Thursday: Partly cloudy. Highs in the
lower 60s. South winds around 5
mph...Becoming west in the afternoon.
Thursday night: Partly cloudy. Lows in
the upper 40s. Northwest winds 5 to 10
mph.
Friday: Partly cloudy in the morning
then becoming sunny. Highs in the upper
50s. Northwest winds 5 to 10 mph.
Friday night: Mostly clear. Lows in the upper 40s. West
winds 10 to 20 mph.
Saturday: Partly cloudy. Highs in the upper 50s.
Saturday night: Partly cloudy. Lows in the upper 40s.
Sunday and Sunday night: Mostly cloudy. Highs in the
upper 50s. Lows in the upper 40s.
Veterans Day: Mostly cloudy.
Local Weather Forecast
In 1811, U.S. forces led by Indiana Territory Gov. William
Henry Harrison defeated warriors from Tecumseh’s
Confederacy in the Battle of Tippecanoe.
I n 1861, former U.S. President John Tyler was elected to
the Confederate House of Representatives (however, Tyler
died before he could take his seat).
I n 1862, during the Civil War, President Abraham Lincoln
replaced replace Maj. Gen. George B. McClellan as com-
mander of the Army of the Potomac with Maj. Gen. Ambrose
Burnside.
I n 1912, black boxing champion Jack Johnson was
indicted in Chicago for allegedly violating the Mann Act
with a white woman, Belle Schreiber. (Johnson was con-
victed and sentenced to a year in prison; he fled the U.S.,
later returning to serve his term.)
I n 1916, Republican Jeannette Rankin of Montana
became the first woman elected to Congress.
I n 1917, Russia’s Bolshevik Revolution took place as
forces led by Vladimir Ilyich Lenin overthrew the provi-
sional government of Alexander Kerensky.
I n 1940, Washington state’s original Tacoma Narrows
Bridge, nicknamed “Galloping Gertie,” collapsed into Puget
Sound during a windstorm.
I n 1944, President Franklin D. Roosevelt won an unprece-
dented fourth term in office, defeating Thomas E. Dewey.
I n 1962, Republican Richard Nixon, having lost
California’s gubernatorial race, held what he called his “last
press conference,” telling reporters, “You won’t have Nixon
to kick around anymore.” Former first lady Eleanor
Roosevelt, 78, died in New York City.
I n 1963, the all-star comedy “It’s a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad
World” had its world premiere in Hollywood.
I n 1973, Congress overrode President Richard Nixon’s
veto of the War Powers Act, which limits a chief executive’s
power to wage war without congressional approval.
I n 1980, actor Steve McQueen died in Ciudad Juarez,
Chihuahua, Mexico, at age 50.
Actor Barry Newman is 75. Singer Johnny Rivers is 71.
Singer-songwriter Joni Mitchell is 70. Former CIA Director
David Petraeus is 61. Rock musician Tommy Thayer (KISS) is
53. Actress Julie Pinson is 46. Rock musician Greg Tribbett
(Mudvayne) is 45. Actor Christopher Daniel Barnes is 41.
Actors Jeremy and Jason London are 41. Actress Yunjin Kim is
40. Rock musician Zach Myers (Shinedown) is 30. Actor
Lucas Neff is 28. Rock singer Lorde is 17.
In other news ...
(Answers tomorrow)
CLIFF ONION REVERT ACCUSE
Yesterday’s
Jumbles:
Answer: The farmer worked in his —
CORN-ER OFFICE
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
NOUGY
RIWEP
DORSUH
PUTBAR
©2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
All Rights Reserved.
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Answer
here:
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are Gold Rush,No.
1, in first place; Winning Spirit, No. 9, in second
place;and Whirl Win,No.6,in third place.The race
time was clocked at 1:42.02.
9 1 5
2 15 23 32 39 12
Mega number
Nov. 5 Mega Millions
1 5 10 15 49 22
Powerball
Nov. 6 Powerball
14 18 24 28 39
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
3 6 3 1
Daily Four
9 5 9
Daily three evening
3 4 8 13 43 6
Mega number
Nov. 6 Super Lotto Plus
3
Thursday • Nov. 7, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal,
a locally owned, award-winning daily newspaper on the
Peninsula has an opening for a Account Executive.
The position is responsible for developing new business
opportunities and maintaining those customers within the
San Mateo County and Santa Clara County area.
The candidate will develop new business through a
combination of cold calling, outdoor canvassing, net-
working and any other technique necessary to achieve
his or her goals
º The candidate will effectively, professionally and
accurately represent the Daily Journal’s wide range of
products and services which include print advertising,
inserts, internet advertising, social media advertising,
graphic design services, event marketing, and more.
º The candidate will manage their clients in a heavily
customer-focused manner, understanding that real
account management begins after the sale has been
closed.
º A strong work ethic and desire to succeed responsibly
also required.
Work for the best local paper in the Bay Area.
To apply, send a resume and follow up to
ads @ smdailyjournal.com
Immediate
Opening
for
Account
Executive
Job Requirements:
º 8ell print, digital and other mar-
keting solutions
º B2B sales experience is preferred
º hewspaper and other media
sales experience desired but not
required
º Work well with others
º Excellent communication, pre-
sentation, organizational skills are
required
º A strong work ethic and desire to
succeed responsibly also required.
Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
REDWOOD CITY
Vandalism. A vehicle’s window was bro-
ken on Barron Avenue before 11:22 p.m.
Tuesday, Nov. 5.
Reckl ess dri vers. A person driving a
Lexus with one light out was reported driv-
ing recklessly at the intersection of
Woodside Road and El Camino Real before
8:16 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 5.
Pet t y t hef t . A six-gear bicycle with
orange tires, black handlebars and the word
“Thruster” on the side was stolen from
Middlefield Road before 8:10 p.m. Tuesday,
Nov. 5.
Vandalism. All four tires on a vehicle were
slashed at the intersection of Chestnut and
Spring streets before 6:28 p.m. Tuesday,
Nov. 5.
Disturbance. A person said his landlord
threatened to shoot him on Gordon Street
before 6 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 5.
Reckl ess dri vers. A white pickup truck
crossed over traffic and almost hit some
children on Red Oak Way before 3:08 p.m.
Tuesday, Nov. 5.
SAN BRUNO
Petty theft. Two suitcases, medications,
an airport ID and a badge were stolen on the
1100 block of El Camino Real before 11:04
p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 5.
Disturbance. Two males were in a physical
altercation on the 1100 block of El Camino
Real before 9:49 p.m Tuesday, Nov. 5.
St ol en vehi cl e. A green Toyota Camry
was stolen on the first block of Linden
Avenue before 3:28 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 5.
St ol en vehi cl e. Ablack Jetta was stolen
on the 2200 block of Fleetwood Drive
before 3:18 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 5.
Petty theft. Reporting person left his
bicycle unattended outside a store and it was
gone upon his return on the 300 block of El
Camino Real before 2:46 p.m. Tuesday,
Nov. 5.
Grand theft. One-hundred square feet of
artificial turf was taken on the 1000 block of
Admiral Court before 12:15 p.m. Tuesday,
Nov. 5.
Police reports
Steal, lather, rinse, repeat
A man was arrested for stealing hair
products from a store on El Camino Real
in Redwood City before 2:53 p.m.
Tuesday, Nov. 5.
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Slightly more than one-fifth of San Mateo
County’s registered voters turned in ballots
as of the final Election Night tallies
although that number is expected to rise to
nearly a quarter as outstanding ballots
remain uncounted.
As of the 11:30 p.m. final precinct
reports, 20.31 percent — or 73,026 — of
the county’s 359,535 registered voters were
counted. Of those, 15.24 percent were
absentee, .11 percent were cast at a voting
center and 4.96 percent of voters headed to a
precinct on Nov. 5.
Although the preliminary numbers are
sure to rise, the off-year turnout so far falls
short of last year’s presidential election
showing of 56.5 percent of 361,486 voters.
The final total of just less than 80 percent of
registered voters was a 20-year high for the
county. In comparison, the June primary
had 36.5 percent turnout.
The office still has some ballots to
process: an estimated 1,267 paper, 11, 401
absentee and 2,056 provisional, according
to Chief Elections Officer Mark Church.
Assuming all remaining ballots qualify,
the revised voter turnout projection is 24
percent, Church said.
Updates will be posted at 4:30 p.m. Friday
and Tuesday on www.shapethefuture.org .
Once the votes are counted, the Elections
Office will begin its 1 percent manual tally
in anticipation of certifying the results in
early December. The tally confirms that the
election was properly conducted.
Voter turnout just past 20 percent
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
A would-be bank robber who allegedly
told a teller he had a bomb before helping
himself to a cup of coffee and walking out of
the building is incompetent to stand trial for
second-degree burglary, according to a pair
of court-appointed doctors.
Aaron Brandon Justin, 35, previously
pleaded not guilty to that charge along with
attempted robbery and making a false
explosives claim but the doctors’ conclu-
sions mean he will be sent to a state mental
facility for treatment rather than stand trial.
Competency is a defendant’s ability to aid
in his or her own defense as opposed to san-
ity which is a person’s mental state at the
time of an alleged crime.
Justin is accused of
entering a Chase Bank in
San Mateo on Sept. 4 and
handing a teller a note
that read “I have a bomb,
give me the money.”
After the teller pan-
icked and froze, she
regained herself and
pushed the alarm button
but by that time Justin
had already poured himself some coffee and
left the bank. He was apprehended nearby
and identified by witnesses, according to
prosecutors.
Justin, who remains in custody on
$50,000 bail, returns to court Dec. 17 for
formal placement at the hospital.
Would-be bank robber incompetent
Aaron Justin
4
Thursday • Nov. 7, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
5
Thursday • Nov. 7, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
Community college
accreditation forum today
U.S. Rep. Jackie Speier, D-San Mateo, U.S.
Rep. Anna Eshoo, D-Palo Alto, state Sen. Jim
Beall, D-San Jose, and community college
leaders will discuss the effect that the
Accrediting Commission for Community and
Junior Colleges has had on schools, faculty
and students and ways to improve the
process.
In July, it put City College of San
Francisco on notice that it may revoke its
accreditation next summer due to alleged vio-
lations of the accreditation standards. Two
additional colleges, College of the Sequoias
in Visalia and Northern Marianas College in
Saipan, have also been placed on “show
cause,” the most severe sanction. Solano
Community College is “on warning,” the
least severe sanction. At the same time,
agency is currently subject to a state audit and
a U.S. Department of Education review of its
practices. The event takes place 1 p.m.-2:30
p.m. today at City College of San Francisco’s
Diego Rivera Theatre, 50 Phelan Ave. in San
Francisco.
Man set on fire on
bus faces long recovery
The mother of a Northern California man
set on fire while riding on a bus says her son
has a long road to recovery ahead of him.
Debbie Fleischman said on Tuesday her son
will require massive skin grafting as she is
torn about whether he was targeted because of
his attire. Police say 18-year-old Luke
“Sasha” Fleischman was asleep and wearing a
kilt-like piece of clothing when it was set
ablaze by another passenger on an AC Transit
bus Monday in Oakland.
Luke Fleischman was listed in stable condi-
tion at a San Francisco hospital after suffer-
ing second- and third-degree burns on his
legs. Police have arrested a 16-year-old boy
on suspicion of assault with a deadly weapon
and mayhem. His name has not been released.
One-month old boy
found, father arrested
A 1-month old Northern California boy
who authorities say was kidnapped has been
recovered, and his father has been arrested by
Mexican authorities.
Henry Guler-Romero of Sunnyvale was
allegedly abducted by his father, 22-year-old
Mesut Guler, around 4:15 p.m. Tuesday, and
an Amber Alert was issued.
Local briefs
BAY CITY NEWS SERVICE
The Menlo Park Police Department
announced Wednesday that it is seeking a
specific witness who may have watched a
grisly fatal drunken driving accident last
month that claimed the lives of a Menlo
Park couple out walking their dog.
Menlo Park Traffic Sgt. Sharon Kaufman is
seeking the cooperation of a white male that
was driving a white Ford Explorer on Oct. 24
around 6:50 p.m. near the intersection of the
crash on Chilco Street. It is believed that
this individual may have witnessed the
entire event, according to Kaufman.
Marjorie Reitzell, 54, of Redwood City,
has been arrested in connection with the
accident.
San Mateo County prosecutors said that
after a day of heavy drinking, Reitzell
veered her car onto a paved shoulder of the
road, where her vehicle plowed into Kamal
Singh, 45, and Balbir Singh, 50, who were
out walking their Chihuahua. The couple
leaves behind three teenage children.
Prosecutors say Reitzell then ran her
vehicle into a car occupied by four
teenagers, causing them minor injuries,
before striking a tree.
She has been charged with two counts of
gross vehicular manslaughter and two
felony counts of driving while under the
influence causing injury, according to the
San Mateo County District Attorney’s
Office. Reitzell will be in court Thursday to
enter a plea.
In the meantime, she is being held on the
San Mateo County Jail on $2 million bail.
Anyone who might have witnessed this
incident is asked to contact Sgt. Kaufman
with the Menlo Park Police Department at
(650) 330-6343.
Police search for specific witness in double fatal DUI crash
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
A Daly City bank teller who stole
$119,600 from a 91-year-old customer both
before and after his death and, with her
boyfriend, spent nearly $25,000 of the
funds, pleaded guilty to felony counts of
elder theft and identity theft.
In return, Priscilla Banh, 24, faces up to
three years in prison when sentenced Jan. 6.
Her boyfriend, Jabriel Scott, 23, pleaded
no contest to misdemeanor grand theft in
return for credit of time served. He was
immediately sentenced to 90 days jail with
the credit and placed on
two years court proba-
tion. He must also repay
the victim’s estate
$1,723.
Banh worked as a teller
at Wells Fargo Bank and
occasionally helped the
elderly man with his
financial transactions.
Beginning on July 13,
Banh opened three accounts in his name and
linked them to her debit card, according to
the District Attorney’s Office.
Over the next month,
she allegedly transferred
nearly $120,000 from
his account and the cou-
ple made $24,620 in pur-
chases. What they spent
the money on or how
they were caught was not
immediately known.
The man died July 17.
Banh and Scott, both
of San Francisco, were arrested in August.
Banh remains in custody on $250,000
bail.
Pair take deal for elder theft, identity theft
By Martha Mendoza
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Internet giant Google says it is exploring
using two large barges on the East and West
coasts as interactive learning centers.
A statement released Wednesday from
Google’s press center helps end weeks of
speculation about the purpose of structures on
two barges, one being built in the San
Francisco Bay, another now floating off
Portland, Maine.
“Google Barge ... Afloating data center? A
wild party boat? A barge housing the last
remaining dinosaur? Sadly, none of the
above,” says the statement. “Although it’s
still early days and things may change, we’re
exploring using the barge as an interactive
space where people can learn about new tech-
nology.”
In a follow up, a Google spokeswoman said
the company was referring to both barges.
Google has been building a four-story
structure in the heart of the San Francisco Bay
for several weeks, but managed to conceal its
purpose by constructing it on docked barges
instead of on land, where city building per-
mits and public plans are mandatory.
Until now, San Francisco city officials
responsible for land use and state officials
responsible for the bay have said they didn’t
know what was being built there. Coast Guard
inspectors who visited the construction sites
could not discuss what they saw. Lt. Anna
Dixon said non-disclosure agreements were
signed, but that those were not necessary, and
that the Coast Guard, as a practice, doesn’t
share proprietary information it sees during
inspections.
If Google wants to operate an on-barge
interactive learning center in the San
Francisco Bay, the firm will eventually need
to get permission from the San Francisco Bay
Conservation and Development
Commission.
The East Coast barge, built in a New
London, Conn., harbor in July was recently
towed to Maine.
Last year Google proposed building a land-
based “Google Experience Center” which
would operate as a private museum and demo
space as part of new $120 billion Googleplex
headquarters it is building in Mountain View
where it is headquartered.
Google: Barges will be interactive learning space
Priscilla Banh Jabriel Scott
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or share this story at
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Thursday • Nov. 7, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Disgraced former journalist
fights for state law license
SAN FRANCISCO — Several California
Supreme Court justices expressed skepti-
cism Wednesday that a disgraced former
journalist who fabricated dozens of articles
for well-known publications is morally fit
to practice law.
Stephen Glass applied to practice law in
California after passing the state’s bar exam
in 2007. But State Bar officials have been
grappling with his application since, final-
ly appealing to the California Supreme
Court to decide.
Every member of the
seven-person court had
tough questions for
Glass’ attorney during an
hourlong hearing in
Sacramento.
The court has 90 days to
decide whether Glass
should be allowed to
practice law in
California.
Around the state
Stephen Glass
By Gosia Wozniacka
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
PORTLAND, Ore. — With federal and state
online health care marketplaces experienc-
ing glitches a month into implementation,
concern is mounting for a vulnerable group
of people who were supposed to be among
the health law’s earliest beneficiaries.
Hundreds of thousands of people across
the country with pre-existing chronic condi-
tions such as cancer, heart failure or kidney
disease who are covered through high risk-
insurance pools will see their coverage dis-
solve by year’s end.
They are supposed to gain regular cover-
age under the Affordable Care Act, which
requires insurers to cover those with severe
medical problems. But many of them have
had trouble signing up for health insurance
through the exchanges and could find them-
selves without coverage in January if they
don’t meet a Dec. 15 deadline to enroll.
Administration officials say the federal
exchange, which covers more than half the
states, won’t be working probably until the
end of November, leaving people just two
weeks to sign up if they want coverage by
Jan. 1.
“These individuals can’t be without cover-
age for even a month,” said Tanya Case, the
chairwoman of the National Association of
State Comprehensive Health Insurance
Plans, which represents the nation’s high-
risk pools. “It’s a matter of life or death.”
High-risk pools were created by state leg-
islatures to provide a safety net for people
who have been denied or priced out of cover-
age. While the Affordable Care Act will for-
bid insurers from turning away people in
poor health, those who qualify for a subsidy
must enroll through the state or federal mar-
ketplace.
More than a dozen of the 35 states that run
insurance pools for people with serious
medical issues will permanently close their
pools within a month and half. Other states
will keep their pools running for a few more
months.
The federal pool covers about 100,000
people and was created in 2010 by the
Affordable Care Act as a temporary bridge
until the law fully kicks in. It will cease to
exist at the end of December.
“I’m scared. I’m in the middle of my cancer
treatment, and if my insurance ends, I’m
going to have to cancel the rest of my treat-
ment,” said Kelly Bachi, an Oklahoma boat
repair business owner who has breast cancer
and is covered through a pool.
Cancer treatment without insurance would
cost her about $500,000, she said.
Bachi has not been able to enroll via the
healthcare.gov federal website, although
not for lack of trying. She attempted to
sign up half a dozen times, was eventually
able to create an account, but was later
blocked from accessing the account.
Others — including Jill Morin of Raleigh,
N.C., who has a severe heart condition and
is covered by her state’s pool — have not
attempted to enroll.
“It’s the unknown, the uncertainty that
gets to me,” Morin, 42, said. “I don’t know
what my cost will be at the end of the day. I
don’t know if my two cardiologists and my
procedures are going to be covered under the
plan. There just isn’t enough information
on that website.”
But, she said, she has no choice. She must
pick a plan soon because she can’t afford to
go without. She plans to go to an insurance
broker for advice, then contact the federal
call center to bypass the online marketplace
altogether.
State officials throughout the nation have
been scrambling to figure out how to help
people like Bachi and Morin.
Last week, the board of the Oregon
Medical Insurance Pool — which covers
about 11,000 people — ordered the state to
create a contingency plan for its members
because the state’s online exchange still has
not enrolled a single person.
Health law clock is ticking for sickest patients
“I’m scared. I’m in the middle of
my cancer treatment, and if my insurance ends,
I’m going to have to cancel the rest of my treatment.”
— Kelly Bachi, an Oklahoma boat repair business owner
By Sam Hananel
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — The Obama administra-
tion appears ready to give some labor unions
a break from costly fees under the new health
care law, a move that drew criticism from
Republicans who say it unfairly favors a key
White House ally.
In regulations published last week, the
administration said it intends to propose
rules that would exempt “certain self-insured,
self-administered plans” from the require-
ment to pay the fees in 2015 and 2016.
Health care experts say that could apply to
some union-sponsored health plans, though
it’s unclear how many. Labor officials down-
played any impact as miniscule, saying the
language would not include most of their
plans and doesn’t address the wider changes
they have requested.
Labor unions have spent months com-
plaining the new law will drive up the costs
of certain health plans that are jointly
administered by unions and smaller employ-
ers. The White House has rejected a broader
request that union members in those plans be
eligible for federal subsidies.
Unions and many businesses groups also
have been complaining about the so-called
reinsurance fees, which start next year at $63
per person for everyone who has coverage.
The fee drops to about $40 a person in 2015
and even less the following year.
The temporary fee is designed to raise $25
billion over the next three years. The money
collected is intended to provide a cushion for
insurers from the initial hard-to-predict costs
of covering previously uninsured people
with medical problems. But unions and large
employers argue that they shouldn’t have to
pay the fee because they won’t benefit from
the fund.
The Department of Health and Human
Services said in a statement that once the
rule is proposed the agency would consider
comments from interested parties before
moving forward. A White House spokes-
woman did not respond to a request for com-
ment.
Ed Fensholt, an attorney specializing in
health insurance compliance, said unions
might benefit most from plans for an exemp-
tion since some of their multiemployer
plans are processed in-house, though he was
not certain of how many. By contrast, he
said, virtually all other employers contract
with a third party to administer their insur-
ance plans.
Some unions could get break from health care fees
NATION 7
Thursday • Nov. 7, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Nedra Pickler
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Senators from
President Barack Obama’s own party
pressed him in person on Wednesday to
extend the enrollment deadline for
Americans to sign up for health insur-
ance because of the malfunctioning
website.
Obama invited Senate Democrats fac-
ing re-election next year to the White
House to discuss the problem-plagued
health care rollout that could affect
their races. The White House confirmed
Obama and Vice President Joe Biden
met with 16 senators to describe fixes
that are being made to the website for
Americans to sign up for insurance
under his signature health care law.
“The rollout of HealthCare.gov has
not been smooth — to say the least —
and I shared the concerns of Coloradans
directly with the president,” Sen. Mark
Udall of Colorado said in a statement.
“Consumers should have the time they
need to shop for a plan and enroll after
the widespread problems with the web-
site are fixed.”
But White House press secretary Jay
Carney rejected the idea of an exten-
sion of the March 31 deadline for
Americans to get insurance or face a
fine. “We still believe that there is time
available to make the necessary
improvements to the website and to use
all the other means that we can to get
the information to the American peo-
ple who want to enroll in time for them
to do it,” Carney told reporters.
Another Democrat, Sen. Mark Pryor,
said he told Obama and Biden to “fix the
website immediately,” address prob-
lems with the law and hold accountable
those at fault for the mistakes.
“I won’t let up until these problems
are fixed,” said Pryor, who faces a diffi-
cult re-election next year in conserva-
tive-leaning Arkansas.
The meeting with Democratic sena-
tors, which was not listed on the presi-
dent’s public schedule, lasted about two
hours and also included White House
chief of staff Denis McDonough and
Jeff Zients, the president’s trou-
bleshooter for the website. Such a ded-
ication of time by so many top-level
officials reflects concern for the politi-
cal fallout the problems could inflict.
Obama meets with Senate
Democrats on health care
By Jim Kuhnhenn
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
DALLAS — Beset by hard-to-keep
promises and a massive website fail-
ure, President Barack Obama traveled
to the heart of the “Obamacare” oppo-
sition Wednesday to give a pep talk to
the law’s supporters.
Ad-libbing at a synagogue in
Dallas, Obama said he was the first to
admit he was unhappy with the rocky
first month since new insurance
exchanges went live. He implored vol-
unteers and guides who are working to
help consumers to stick with it, cast-
ing it as an effort that would, eventual-
l y, be well worth the trouble.
“As challenging as this may seem
sometimes, as frustrating as health-
care.gov may be sometimes, we are
going to get his done,” Obama said.
“And when we do — when we do, not
if — when we do, you’re going to have
families all across this great state of
Texas who are going to have the secu-
rity and the wellbeing of high-quality,
affordable health insurance,” he added.
The trip to Texas comes as his
administration seeks to mitigate the
damage from the website glitches and
from a public outcry over a promise he
repeatedly made — if you like your
insurance, you can keep it — that
turned out to be incorrect for millions
of Americans.
Before leaving Washington on
Wednesday, Obama tried to soothe the
concerns of 16 Senate Democrats fac-
ing re-election next year during a two-
hour White House meeting. Many of
those lawmakers are worried that the
problem-plagued rollout could nega-
tively affect their races.
Highlighting the law’s benefits at
Dallas Temple Emanu-El, Obama
encouraged participation in the mar-
ketplaces set up by the law. He said
nothing drives him crazier than know-
ing there’s good insurance available
— if only the website would work
properly.
“This is like having a really good
product in a store, and the cash regis-
ters don’t work, and there aren’t
enough parking spots,” Obama said.
In Texas, Obama offers health pep talk
REUTERS
Barack Obama speaks about Affordable Health Care to volunteers at the Temple
Emanu-El in Dallas,Texas.
Russian fireball shows
meteor risk may be big
By Seth Borenstein
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Scientists studying the terrifying meteor
that exploded without warning over a Russian city last winter
say the threat of space rocks smashing into Earth is bigger
than they thought.
Meteors about the size of the one that streaked through the
sky at 42,000 mph and burst over Chelyabinsk in February
— and ones even larger and more dangerous — are probably
four, five or even seven times more likely to hit the planet
than scientists believed before the fireball, according to three
studies published Wednesday in the journals Nature and
Science.
That means about 20 million space rocks the size of the
Chelyabinsk one may be zipping around the solar system,
instead of 3 million, NASA scientist Paul Chodas said at a
news conference.
Until Chelyabinsk, NASAhad looked only for space rocks
about 100 feet wide and bigger, figuring there was little dan-
ger below that.
This meteor was only 62 feet across but burst with the force
of 40 Hiroshima-type atom bombs, scientists say. Its shock
wave shattered thousands of windows, and its flash temporar-
ily blinded 70 people and caused dozens of skin-peeling sun-
burns just after dawn in icy Russia. More than 1,600 people
in all were injured.
Up until then, scientists had figured a meteor causing an air-
burst like that was a once-in-150-years event, based on how
many space rocks have been identified in orbit. But one of the
studies now says it is likely to happen once every 30 years or
so, based on how often these things are actually hitting.
By readjusting how often these rocks strike and how dam-
aging even small ones can be, “those two things together can
increase the risk by an order of magnitude,” said Mark
Boslough, a Sandia National Lab physicist, co-author of one
of the studies.
NASA this fall reactivated a dormant orbiting telescope called
WISE specifically to hunt for asteroids, Johnson said. And the
agency is expanding ground-based sky searches.
NATION/WORLD 8
Thursday • Nov. 7, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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San Mateo Times
By Christopher S. Rugaber
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — The jobs report for
October due out Friday may be bleak. It
might even be scary. The unemploy-
ment rate could jump by the most in
three years. Hiring may slow from an
already weak pace.
Don’t panic.
The ugly figures will reflect the gov-
ernment’s partial shutdown, which
coincided with 16 days in October. The
trends for the job market will likely
reverse themselves in coming months.
“It’s going to be a very messy
report, and I don’t think we think
should take it at face value,” said
Jennifer Lee, an economist at BMO
Capital Markets.
Economists warn that the unemploy-
ment rate could surge as high as 7.5
percent from 7.2 percent in
September. That would be the steepest
one-month rise since 2010.
The number of jobs added in October
could slow to roughly 120,000 from
the 148,000 added in September. That
isn’t healthy. In the first nine months
of this year, the average job gain was
180,000.
The shutdown will be mostly to
blame. But its effect on the data won’t
be easy to tease out. Economists have
all but thrown up their hands trying to
forecast Friday’s figures or to suggest
what they might mean. However the
numbers turn out, the distortions mean
the monthly jobs data will be less use-
ful in gauging the economy’s health
than they normally are.
“We have much less confidence in
these numbers than usual,” economists
at Bank of America Merrill Lynch
wrote in a note for clients.
Why the confusion?
Consider how the jobs report is com-
piled: It’s derived from two separate
surveys. Each survey will be affected
differently by the shutdown.
One is a household survey.
Government workers ask adults in a
household whether they have a job.
Those who don’t but are looking for
one are counted as unemployed.
Why an unemployment spike
in October may not be so bad
U.S. trashes, sells its
unwanted gear in Afghanistan
KANDAHAR, Afghanistan — The withdrawing U.S. mili-
tary is destroying most of the equipment it is leaving
behind in Afghanistan after 13 years of war, selling the
scrap for millions of dollars to those willing to buy it.
The policy stands in stark contrast to the Americans’
withdrawal from Iraq, when they donated or sold still-usable
items worth about $100 million.
The equipment is being trashed, U.S. officials say,
because of fears that anything left behind in Afghanistan
could fall into the hands of insurgents and used to make
bombs. Leaving it behind also saves the U.S. billions of
dollars in transportation costs.
Afghans are angry at the policy, arguing that even furni-
ture and appliances that could improve their lives is being
turned into useless junk.
Bombings kill 16 in Syria
BEIRUT — Bombs targeting the entrance of a landmark
Ottoman railway building in Damascus and a feared security
agency in Syria’s southeast killed at least 16 people on
Wednesday, activists reported.
There was no immediate claim of responsibility for the
attacks, but rebels tied to al-Qaida have previously claimed
bombings of security institutions and have also targeted the
center of the capital, trying to take the war to the heart of
President Bashar Assad’s power.
Eight died and at least 50 more people were wounded in the
blast at the country’s railways authority, housed in a centu-
ry-old structure that was once the main Damascus train sta-
tion, reported state news agency SANAand activists.
Around the world
By Hope Yen
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — The number of
poor people in America is 3 million
higher than the official count, encom-
passing 1 in 6 residents due to out-of-
pocket medical costs and work-related
expenses, according to a revised cen-
sus measure released Wednesday.
The new measure is aimed at providing
a fuller picture of poverty but does not
replace the official government num-
bers. Put in place two years ago by the
Obama administration, it generally is
considered more reliable by social scien-
tists because it factors in living expens-
es as well as the effects of government
aid, such as food stamps and tax credits.
Administration officials have
declined to say whether the new meas-
ure eventually could replace the official
poverty formula, which is used to allo-
cate federal dollars to states and locali-
ties and to determine eligibility for
safety-net programs such as Medicaid.
Congress would have to agree to
adopt the new measure, which general-
ly would result in a higher poverty rate
from year to year and thus higher gov-
ernment payouts for aid programs.
Based on the revised formula, the num-
ber of poor people in 2012 was 49.7
million, or 16 percent. That exceeds the
record 46.5 million, or 15 percent, that
was officially reported in September.
The latest numbers come as more
working-age adults picked up low-
wage jobs in the slowly improving
economy but still struggled to pay liv-
ing expenses. Americans 65 and older
had the largest increases in poverty
under the revised formula, from 9.1
percent to 14.8 percent, because of
medical expenses such as Medicare
premiums, deductibles and other costs
not accounted for in the official rate.
There also were increases for
Hispanics and Asian-Americans, part-
ly due to lower participation among
immigrants and non-English speakers
in government aid programs such as
housing aid and food stamps.
African-Americans and children,
helped by government benefits, had
declines in poverty compared with the
official rate.
“This is a real incongruity, when 1
in 6 people face economic insecurity
here in the richest country in the
world,” said Joseph Stiglitz, a
Columbia University economist and
former chairman of the White House
Council of Economic Advisers who
has argued for more government action
to alleviate income inequality.
Nation’s poor at 49.7M, higher than official rate
REUTERS
A sign advertising jobs is posted along a street in the New York.
OPINION 9
Thursday • Nov. 7, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Defeat of Measure P
Editor,
Alayperson reading the presenta-
tion of Measure P before the election
could readily see that the measure was
poorly written. There was not enough
specificity as to how and when the
funds would be expended. Though
some flexibility must be allowed the
staff for administration of the funds,
voters are leery of any ill-defined
projects requesting huge funds.
The standard cry for support of edu-
cation by the voters no longer carries
as much impact. Already supporting
some of the highest sales taxes in the
state and enormous bonded indebted-
ness, voters are questioning each
measure for many reasons.
Perhaps the responsibility for the
poorly written measure lies with the
Board of Trustees, more so than the
elementary school district adminis-
tration. Voters, remembering how
Measure P failed, will certainly look
more carefully at the candidates for
the Board of Trustees when that elec-
tion next rolls around.
Tom Elliott
San Mateo
Trust is a two-way street
Editor,
This past month, an email written
by a PG&E contractor back in 2012
touched off a “State of Emergency” in
San Carlos. As the former head of
pipeline safety for the federal govern-
ment, I was intrigued to hear the dis-
cussions at a transparency hearing
arranged by state Sen. Jerry Hill last
week (“Hill comes down on PG&E,
CPUC” in the Oct. 29 edition of the
Daily Journal).
At the hearing, I learned that PG&E
had voluntarily disclosed the infa-
mous email to the city; in fact, the
company showed it as an example of
an open safety culture. Sort of a speak
up and you’ll be heard.
This email was undoubtedly recog-
nized, but PG&E’s explanations were
not. San Carlos didn’t recognize sen-
ior leadership acted upon the email.
They also did not know that the pre-
eminent pipeline-engineering firm in
the country analyzed the pipe in ques-
tion.
That’s not to say everything PG&E
says should be blindly accepted, but
trust is also a two-way street. The
calls for additional transparency by
PG&E and oversight by the
California Public Utilities
Commission have some merit. We
should learn from the past and learn
from this tragedy. Moving forward
requires every stakeholder to be
invested in safety, but it also requires
us all to have faith in the system and
in the oversight of that system by
federal and state regulators.
Brigham McCown
Southlake, Texas
McCown was the former pipeline
safety chief at Pipeline and Hazardous
Materials Safety Administration. He
served under both terms of President
George W. Bush.
The importance of Israel
Editor,
I just finished reading Ms. Gray’s
latest polemic against Israel (letter to
the editor, “Israel and food stamps” in
the Nov. 5 edition of the Daily
Journal). Her use of the term
“apartheid” in referring to the state of
Israel demonstrates her anti-Israel
feelings. Israel is not an apartheid
state, there are even Palestinian mem-
bers of the Knesset, Israel’s parlia-
ment. All Arab citizens of Israel have
all the rights and benefits of citizen-
ry, rights that are not available to
non-Muslim citizens of many of the
surrounding states bordering on
Israel.
The fact is that because of the
dependability of Israel as an ally, the
United States has been able to with-
draw much of the naval task force that
was positioned in the eastern
Mediterranean as “police presence”
for any trouble in that area of the
world.
In a real sense, Israel acts as a sta-
ble “aircraft carrier,” readily able to
be used by the United States as a stag-
ing area and supply conduit if there is
a need.
Not having to have ships and per-
sonnel in the area is a tremendous
saving economically as well as risk
to our brave servicemen.
Jon Levinson
San Carlos
Letters to the editor
The Fresno Bee
L
egislators of both parties
have enabled Sen. Ron
Calderon, D-Montebello,
while he has carried water for Indian
casinos, for-profit colleges and other
big-money interests.
Now that Calderon is the subject of
an FBI investigation, lawmakers are
trying to put space between them-
selves and the Calderon family, hop-
ing the public will forget.
They won’t. If lawmakers really
want to distance themselves from the
Calderon legacy, they should take a
hard look at reversing some of its
most egregious giveaways. One place
is the payday-loan industry.
Calderon and his brother, former
Assembly member and state Sen.
Charles Calderon, are two of the
largest recipients of campaign contri-
butions from payday-loan outfit s,
receiving more than $81,000 from
the industry between 2003 and 2011,
according to the National Institute on
Money in State Politics. The
Calderons also have been the biggest
impediments to effective regulation
of this industry, which preys on low-
income residents. As of 2011, some
17 states and the U.S. military had
effectively banned the practice.
According to the Center for
Responsible Lending, a consumer
group that opposes payday loans, 82
percent of payday loan fees — $474
million — come from borrowers tak-
ing out a new loan within two weeks
of paying off their last loan. How can
cash-strapped families get out of this
debt spiral? They can’t, thanks to the
likes of the Calderons.
Charles Calderon effectively legal-
ized payday lending in California
when he served in the Legislature
more than a decade ago, with the max-
imum amount of each loan set at
$300. He and Ron Calderon then
attempted to push the cap to $500 in
2011.
In the most recent session, Sens.
Hannah-Beth Jackson, D-Santa
Barbara, and Jim Beall, D-San Jose,
tried to limit payday loans to four per
year, with required underwriting and a
longer minimum repayment period.
Yet the bill got watered down and
ultimately defeated when it reached
the Senate Banking and Financial
Institutions Committee, where Ron
Calderon has been a longtime com-
mittee member.
If lawmakers want to cleanse them-
selves of the Calderon taint, cracking
down on payday lending would be a
good place to start.
Calderons’ taint extends to payday-loan industry
Riddle me this
T
aking a cue from Churchill, life is but a riddle
wrapped in a mystery inside an enigma, or some
such thing.
If true, this means Kenny will be the only person who
may be able to figure the whole thing out. The rest of
us? Not looking so good.
Kenny, you see, is a puzzle
master (in addition to being
one of the Daily Journal’s
much-appreciated interns). The
word “logic” was crafted in his
honor. The descriptives
“thoughtful” and “rationale”
don’t do justice.
This is why Kenny invokes
fear in my heart, not really of
him but of what he brings — a
weekly puzzle along with very
sincere encouragement as my
brow furrows and mouth purses at each reading and
exasperated “I just don’t get it!”
You’re overthinking it, he’ll tell me. Read each word
carefully, is another. Sometimes it is the dreaded, this
is one easier than last week so you’re sure to get this
answer.
That does nothing but make my utter failure cut that
much more keenly.
Last week, Kenny presented the Holy Grail of puz-
zles. Apuzzle, he said, that he had yet to solve.
Wait, what? Such a thing exists? This puzzle must be
some sort of Excalibur, serving to anoint the true king
as everybody else’s attempts to take the proverbial
word weapon from the stone prove them unworthy
weaklings.
Without reprinting the entire multi-paragraph conun-
drum, I’ll sum up the blue-eyed island puzzle in this
haphazard way: An island of logicians — 100 blue-
eyed, 100 brown — do not know the color of their own
eyes and cannot communicate with each other. If one
figures out their own color, they can leave on the mid-
night ferry. One day, a green-eyed guru who lives
among the logicians uses her one lifetime chance to
speak by telling the group “I can see someone who has
blue eyes.” Question: Who leaves the island and on
what night? And the answer is not “no one leaves.”
Where is Spock when a befuddled girl needs a cheat
partner?
One coworker was smart, refusing to even read the
puzzle once she saw the length and heard Kenny’s con-
fession of his own difficulty. I and another news scribe
took turns putting his puzzle through illogical paces
before throwing in the towel. Example: what is the
likelihood one of the logicians has red eyes? Does the
guru know her own eye color?
Journalists weren’t made for logic. We were made for
the man bites dog, the “yeah, but what about this?”
possibilities, the truth being stranger than fiction.
But the copy editor took the cake for puzzle commit-
ment, announcing on Election Night that he’d been
thinking about the puzzle all week. The puzzle drove
him so batty (tinges of John Nash, anybody?) and by
extension the loved ones he clobbered with it, too, he
finally looked the answer up on the Internet. Now, the
conversation moved beyond discerning an answer to
parsing out and dissecting every aspect of that conclu-
si on.
Frankly, I’m not so much interested in the logical
answer to the departees as I am to the other questions
the puzzle raises. Like, if the guru only has one oppor-
tunity to speak, why in the heck would she waste her
breath on announcing eye color? And why are these
people even on the island? Or on an island at all?
Why not a town?, someone across the newsroom
asked. Because then they could leave, I replied. You can
leave an island, he retorted. What island can’t you
leave?
How about Alcatraz? I said. There are ferries, he coun-
tered. That one in “Castaway!” was my verbal volley,
But Tom Hanks eventually got off that island, he said
— guess Kenny isn’t the only logician in the room.
Sure he did, I said, after years of hanging out with a
volleyball and slowly going stir crazy. On second
thought, the loneliness isn’t what probably got to his
character. More likely, among those FedEx boxes
stranded with him, Hanks found a book of unanswered
puzzles. Must have been on its way to Kenny.
Michelle Durand’s column “Off the Beat” runs every
Tuesday and Thursday. She can be reached by email:
michelle@smdailyjournal.com or by phone (650) 344-
5200 ext. 102. What do you think of this column? Send a
letter to the editor: letters@smdailyjournal.com.
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BUSINESS 10
Thursday • Nov. 7, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
by
Dow 15,746.88 +128.66 10-Yr Bond 2.64 -0.022
Nasdaq 3,931.95 -7.92 Oil (per barrel) 94.91
S&P 500 1,770.49 +7.52 Gold 1,317.30
Stocks that moved substantially or traded heavily Wednesday on the
New York Stock Exchange and the Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
Abercrombie & Fitch Co., down $5.18 to $33.13
The retailer lowered its full-year outlook, saying spending by younger
people has slowed because of the weak jobs market.
Chesapeake Energy Corp., down $1.91 to $26.23
Shares of the natural gas company were trading near two-year highs
and investors moved to take profits despite a very strong third quarter.
Ralph Lauren Corp., up $9.33 to $180.52
The high-end retailer raised the lower end of its outlook for the year and
predicted strong sales during the holiday season.
LeapFrog Enterprises Inc., down 25 cents to $7.73
The children’s educational-products maker expects a weak holiday season
and lowered its earnings forecast for the year.
Nasdaq
Tesla Motors Inc., down $25.65 to $151.16
The electric car maker’s third-quarter results fell short of expectations
despite selling a record number of Model S sedans.
Vivus Inc., down $1.17 to $8.23
A year after the drugmaker brought the obesity treatment Qsymia to
market, sales have not measured up to most expectations.
Microsoft Corp., up $1.54 to $38.18
Nomura analysts say investors are focused too much on what can go
wrong at the software maker and raised its price target.
Curis Inc., down $1.03 cents to $2.86
Regulators put a partial hold on trials for the cancer treatment company’s
tumor drug after a patient died of liver failure.
Big movers
By Steve Rothwell
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — There weren’t any
major economic developments or
blockbuster earnings. But that didn’t
stop investors from pushing the Dow
Jones industrial average to another
record Wednesday.
Instead, investors focused on the big
economic news yet to come this week
— third-quarter U.S. economic growth
on Thursday and the October jobs
report Friday. Both reports could sig-
nal how much longer the Federal
Reserve will continue its $85 billion a
month in bond purchases. That pro-
gram has held down interest rates, kept
bond yields low and made stocks more
attractive for investors.
The Dow notched its 33rd record
close for the year, rising to 15,746.88
with some help from Microsoft, which
rose after analysts at Nomura said
investors should focus on how the
company’s fortunes could improve
once it picks a replacement for CEO
Steve Ballmer.
Microsoft shares gained $1.54, or
4.2 percent, to close at $38.18 after
the report from Nomura, which also
raised its price target for the company.
Other indexes also gained, but not as
much.
The Standard & Poor’s 500 index
also went up, but not quite enough to
set another record. The Nasdaq com-
posite and the Russell 2000, an index
of small-company stocks, edged
lower. The patchy performance of the
overall market suggests that investors
may be getting wary of stocks after
this year’s strong gains, said Sam
Stovall, chief equity strategist at S&P
Capital IQ.
Stovall said he did not think the mar-
ket’s advance was in danger of being
derailed, but said “investors are still a
little bit nervous.”
The Dow climbed 128.66 points, or
0.8 percent. The S&P 500 index rose
7.52, or 0.4 percent, to 1,770.49, just
one point below its all-time high set
Oct. 29. It’s up 24 percent so far this
year.
The Nasdaq composite fell 7.92
points, or 0.2 percent, to 3,931.95.
The index reached a 13-year high at the
end of last month.
The Dow record came a day before
one of Wall Street’s most anticipated
events of 2013, Twitter’s initial public
offering. The stock was expected to
debut on the New York Stock Exchange
under the symbol “TWTR.”
If this week’s growth and employ-
ment reports offer weak signals on the
economy, they could foretell a longer
period of Fed stimulus.
Economists expect that the U.S.
economy grew at an annualized pace of
2 percent in the July-to-September
period, down from 2.5 percent the pre-
vious quarter, according to FactSet, a
financial data provider. They also fore-
cast that U.S. employers added
122,000 jobs in October, down from
148,000 the month before.
In other news Wednesday, Ralph
Lauren was among the biggest gainers
in the S&P 500.
The luxury retailer rose $9.33, or 5.5
percent, to $180.52 after raising its
sales forecast for the year in anticipa-
tion of a strong holiday season. Ralph
Lauren also increased its quarterly div-
idend by 12.5 percent to 45 cents.
Tesla Motors was among the biggest
decliners in the Nasdaq. The electric
carmaker’s stock sank $25.65, or 14.5
percent, to $151.16 after it reported a
loss. Analysts had been expecting a
profit. The stock is still up almost 350
percent this year after the company
turned a profit and won raves for its
Model S sedan, which starts at
$70,000.
The drop in Tesla’s stock was so
steep that it triggered a “circuit break-
er” on the Nasdaq exchange.
The rule, introduced by the Securities
and Exchange Commission to prevent
big stock declines from snowballing,
puts restrictions on short-selling a
stock that has dropped 10 percent or
more from the previous day’s closing
price. When traders sell stocks short,
they borrow the stock and immediately
sell it in the hope of being able to buy
the shares back later at a lower price.
Investors lift Dow Jones to another record close
Twitter sets IPO price at $26, set to raise $1.8B
NEWYORK — Twitter has set a price of $26 for its initial
public offering of stock, which means the company’s
shares can begin trading Thursday on the New York Stock
Exchange.
The price values Twitter at more than $18 billion based on
its outstanding stock, options and restricted stock that’ll
be available after the IPO. That’s more than Macy’s, which
has a market capitalization of $17 billion, and Bed Bath &
Beyond, which is around $16 billion.
The pricing means the short messaging service will raise
$1.8 billion in the offering, before expenses.
Twitter, which has never turned a profit in its 7 years in
existence, had originally set a price range of $17 to $20 per
share for the IPO, but that was an obvious lowball designed
to temper expectations. It was widely expected that the
price range would go higher. Back in August, for example,
the company priced some of its employee stock options at
$20.62, based on an appraisal by an investment firm and
it’s unlikely to have lost value since.
Wells Fargo to pay $335M to settle FHFA dispute
Wells Fargo & Co. will pay $335 million to resolve
claims that it allegedly misled Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac
about risky mortgage securities that it sold them prior to
the housing collapse.
The San Francisco-based bank disclosed in a regulatory
filing Wednesday that it settled the claims with Fannie Mae
in its first quarter and Freddie Mac in its third quarter.
According to the filing, the settlement with the organiza-
tions, which fall under the Federal Housing Finance
Agency, totaled approximately $335 million.
Wells Fargo and FHFAdeclined to comment further. Wells
Fargo shares added 15 cents to $42.48 in afternoon trading.
Fannie and Freddie don’t directly make loans to borrow-
ers. They buy mortgages from lenders, package them as
bonds, guarantee them against default and sell them to
investors. That helps make loans available and gives
Fannie and Freddie a huge role in the housing market.
The two were rescued in a taxpayer bailout in 2008 as they
sank under the weight of mortgage losses.
The FHFA sued 18 financial institutions in September
2011 over their sales of mortgage securities to Fannie and
Freddie, which own or guarantee about half of all U.S. mort-
gages. These types of securities soured after the housing
bubble burst in 2007, losing billions in value.
Tesla falls most in two years on battery shortage
Electric car maker Tesla Motors has a battery problem. It
doesn’t have enough of them.
That’s one reason the high-flying company’s shares fell
14.5 percent Wednesday, their sharpest drop in almost two
years.
CEO Elon Musk on Tuesday blamed a shortage of lithium-
ion battery cells for trouble meeting demand for Tesla’s lone
vehicle, the Model S. Some cars that could have been sold
in North America were diverted to Europe to satisfy waiting
customers, Musk said on a conference call after Tesla
released third-quarter earnings.
There won’t be any relief until next year, when a deal to
get more batteries from supplier Panasonic kicks in, he
said.
Shares of the Palo Alto company dropped $25.65 to
$151.16.
Being
there
is why
I’mhere.
Business briefs
<< Page 12, PAL girls’ tennis
finals are set today at Burlingame Thursday, Nov. 7, 2013
AT HOME ON THE ROAD: THE WARRIORS WIN THEIR SECOND STRAIGHT AWAY FROM HOME, BEAT MINNESOTA >> PAGE 12
REUTERS
Stanford quarterback Kevin Hogan is mobbed by teammates after scoring a touchdown during the
Cardinal’s 17-14 win over Oregon last season. Stanford will need a repeat performance to be in the
running for a BCS bowl game in January.
By Janie McCauley
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SANTA CLARA — At last, Mario
Manningham is back in game-week mode.
And that has a far better ring to it than rehab
mode given the countless hours he has spent
for much of the last year
nursing himself back to
health following major
knee surgery.
Manningham walked
through the locker room
Wednesday, binder in hand
and headed for meetings
with the expectation that
he will play for the San
Francisco 49ers (6-2) in
Sunday’s game against
Carolina (5-3), even if
coach Jim Harbaugh has yet to formally say
so.
“Mario, he’s a receiver who’s easy to throw
to, so it’s not going to take much time for him
to get back up to speed,” quarterback Colin
Kaepernick said.
Manningham is on the
active roster again nearly
11 months after a knee
injury derailed his season
and forced him to the side-
lines long before the Super
Bowl run. Michael
Crabtree is back on the
practice field six months
after he suffered a torn
right Achilles tendon that
also sent him to surgery.
Kaepernick credits both of his star wideouts
for returning to their former explosive selves
so soon. Such compliments go a long way.
“It’s important when it comes from your
teammates,” Manningham said. “I know I can
get better, everybody can always get better.
I’m trying to take it step by step and do what I
can do to make my team look better. I’m prac-
ticing like I’m playing, just trying to make
plays and come out with a ‘W.”’
Crabtree, Manningham
make strides to return
By Joseph Hoyt
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT
Ayear removed from Stanford’s
17-14 overtime victory over
Oregon last year, it’s safe to say
not much as changed.
Oregon is undefeated, yet
again, and still possesses an up-
tempo offense that ranks second
in the nation in scoring output.
Stanford, with one loss, wants to
run the ball, control the clock, and
outlast their opponents in a phys-
ical grudge match.
The most important similarity
between the two teams, however,
resides with the two players in
charge of kicking duties, a facet of
the game that ultimately decided
the victor in last year’s meeting in
Eugene, Ore.
In overtime with the two teams
tied at 14, Oregon kicker
Alejandro Maldonado jogged onto
the field to attempt a 42-yard field
goal. With the national spotlight
shining bright on him,
Maldonado failed to deliver.
Maldonado hooked a kick left that
banged off the left post causing
the entire fan base at Autzen
Stadium to drop their jaws in dis-
belief.
Eventually, Stanford place kick-
er Jordan Williamson came on and
successfully nailed a 37-yard field
goal to give the Cardinal the vic-
tory.
Coincidentally, Williamson’s
been in the same boat as
Maldonado and has shown that
moving on from such a traumatic
gridiron experience is in fact pos-
sible.
A year prior to Williamson’s
game winning field goal against
Oregon, Stanford lost in overtime
41-38 to Oklahoma State in the
2011 Fiesta Bowl. Again, all eyes
were on the kicker from Stanford,
but this time there was a slightly
different result in the way the
game finished. Williamson missed
Not much has changed
Mario
Manningham
Michael
Crabtree
See 49ERS, Page 16
Y
ou hear it on an almost daily
basis and nearly everyone
involved with professional
sports agree, “sports is a business.” I’m
definitely starting to question that.
Because in what “business” is it accept-
able for employees to harass, bully and
intimidate other employees based on
their amount of service time? Or, for
management to not only condone it, but
encourage it?
Yet this appears to be the case in the
Miami Dolphins
scandal involving
a modern-day cave-
man (offensive
lineman Richie
Incognito) and a
teammate
(Jonathan Martin,
a former two-time
All American
offensive lineman
out of Stanford).
And it’s time for
the NFL to put an
end to it, or have
someone else step
in and do it for them, because if these
“organizations” are unwilling to rid these
deplorable actions from their “cultures”
there needs to be some major repercus-
sions.
First off, Incognito, based on research,
is just a bad guy and if another NFL team
gives this guy a job, given his back-
ground, there is something wrong with
that organization.
Secondly, Miami owner Stephen Ross
should also fire his entire coaching staff
and general manager for not only doing
nothing to stop this, but allegedly
encouraging it. The latest twist is
Incognito was told to, basically, light a
fire under Martin to get him to participate
in the team’s “voluntary” off-season
workout program. As radio host and
sports journalist Bomani Jones said on
By Josh Dubow
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ALAMEDA — As soon as D.J. Hayden
woke up, he flashed back one year to the day
he almost died in a practice collision.
Hayden got an encouraging text message
from his mother Wednesday morning and he
said he just felt blessed to be living after
undergoing emergency heart surgery last
Nov. 6.
After battling his way back from a near-
death experience, Hayden’s growing pains
as a rookie cornerback in the NFL for the
Oakland Raiders appear like minor impedi-
ments rather than shaking his confidence
after a rough outing last week against
Philadelphia.
“I’m just truly blessed,” he said. “Truly
blessed to be living right now. Truly
blessed to be in the NFL right now. I’m just
truly blessed.”
Hayden collided with a teammate in prac-
tice at Houston one year ago, tearing a
blood vessel off the back of his heart. He
was rushed into immedi-
ate surgery for a tear of
the inferior vena cava,
the large vein that carries
blood from the lower half
of the body to the heart.
The injury is 95 per-
cent fatal in the field,
according to doctors, and
is most commonly asso-
ciated with high-speed
motor vehicle accidents.
Hayden didn’t know if he’d ever be able to
walk again, much less play football. But he
eventually recovered and worked his way
back to get drafted 12th overall in April by
the Raiders. After a setback in May when he
had to undergo surgery to repair an abdomi-
nal scar, Hayden was finally cleared for con-
tact midway through training camp and has
played all eight games so far this season.
“Nothing in football can compare to what
he had to go through and the type of mental
Raiders’ DB feels blessed
year after near-fatal injury
See STANFORD, Page 16
Time for NFL
to act like a
real business
D.J. Hayden
See RAIDERS, Page 16
See LOUNGE, Page 14
12
Thursday • Nov. 7, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SPORTS
Girls’ tennis
The top two seeds in the singles and dou-
bles draws will face off in the finals of the
Peninsula Athletic League girls’ tennis
championships today at Burlingame begin-
ning at 3 p.m.
In the singles tournament, top-seeded
Cindy Liu of Hillsdale will face No. 2-seed
Cori Sidell of Carlmont in the champi-
onship match. Liu beat Menlo-Atherton’s
Amelia Tiemann and Burlingame’s Natalie
Somers in the quarterfinals and semifinals,
respectively. Liu won both matches in
straight sets and, in three tournament
matches, Liu has lost a total of two games
over six sets of play.
Sidell has been equally impressive. In her
three matches, Sidell has lost four games.
She beat Hillsdale’s Bella Mercardo in the
quarterfinals and followed that with a victo-
ry over No. 3 Lizzie Siegle of San Mateo in
the semifinals.
The Liu-Sidell championship match is the
rubber match between the top two players in
the PAL as they split their season series. In
their first meeting, Liu rallied from a set
down to top Sidell 2-6, 6-4, 6-2. Two weeks
later, Sidell beat an ailing Liu in straight
sets, 6-3, 6-4.
In the third-place singles match, Siegle
will face Somers.
The doubles finals also features the top
two teams facing off, with No. 1 Mariko
Iinuma and Natalie Spievack of Hillsdale
taking on Aragon’s Kaede Ishikawa and
Victoria Sun, the No. 2 seed.
Iinuma and Spievack, who were the
Knights’ No. 3 and No. 2 singles players,
respectively, during the regular season,
punched their ticket to the finals by beating
Burlingame’s Haley Shaffer and Madeline
Somers in the quarterfinals in straight sets
and then beating No. 4 seed Sammy Andrew
and Lindy LaPlante.
Through three matches, Iinuma and
Spievack have yet to lose a set and have
dropped only seven games.
They will get their stiffest test to date
against Ishikawa and Sun. The Aragon duo
cruised to a straight set win in the quarterfi-
nals, but needed to rally in the semifinals to
beat the Burlingame team of Alex Harrigan
and Lisa Patel. The Burlingame duo won the
first set 6-4 before Ishikawa and Sun won the
second set 6-0 and closed out the match with
a 6-2 win in set No. 3.
The third-place doubles match pits Andrew
and LaPlante against Harrigan and Patel.
Water polo
The Menlo School boys’ beat Sequoia 20-6
Wednesday to complete a perfect 10-0 run
through PALBay Division play.
Nick Bisconti paced the Knights with six
goals and Chris Xi followed up with four. Wells
Costello added three for Menlo.
Sequoia was led by George Archibold, who
finished with three goals. Robert Vogel added a
pair of goals for the Cherokees.
Menlo finishes the regular season with a 21-3
record, the fourth time in school history the
Knights have finished a season with three or
fewer losses. Menlo was 28-1 in 2006, 32-3 in
2005 and 32-3 in 2001.
In other PAL action, the Central Coast
Section play-in games are set. The Ocean
Division champion plays the fourth-place fin-
isher from the Bay Division for the PAL’s final
automatic CCS berth.
On the boys’ side, Ocean champion Hillsdale
(13-1) takes on Sequoia (4-6), which finished a
game ahead of Burlingame in the Bay Division
standings.
On the girls’ side, Woodside (15-1) plays at
Carlmont (5-5).
Both matches begin at 3 p.m. Friday.
BILL SMITH
Hillsdale’s Cindy Liu, the No. 1 seed, faces No.
2 Cori Sidell of Carlmont in the finals of the
PAL singles tournament. The two split their
regular-season matches this season.
Local sports roundup
By Jon Krawczynski
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Klay Thompson scored 19 of his 30
points in the fourth quarter and Harrison
Barnes scored 14 points in his season debut
to help the Golden State Warriors to a 106-
93 victory over the Minnesota
Timberwolves on Wednesday night.
David Lee had 22 points and 15 rebounds
and Andre Iguodala scored 20 points for the
Warriors (4-1), who entered this season
brimming with confidence following last
year’s run to the second round of the play-
offs.
Kevin Love had 25 points, 16 rebounds
and six assists for the Timberwolves, who
have lost two straight after a 3-0 start.
Kevin Martin added 23 points, but the
Wolves’ bench was outscored 27-10.
Stephen Curry had just five points on 2-
for-8 shooting with seven assists in 24
minutes and sat out the fourth quarter with a
bone bruise on his left foot.
When Thompson found the mark, Curry
wasn’t needed.
Thompson was 2 for 9 in the first half, but
hit his first seven shots of the second half to
help the Warriors pull away. With backup
shooting guard Alexey Shved off to a terri-
ble start, Wolves coach Rick Adelman had
no choice but to try 5-foot-11 J.J. Barea on
the 6-7 Thompson.
Predictably, Thompson just rose right up
and shot over the little guy, drilling 3 after
3 in the second half. He scored 11 straight
points for the Warriors in the fourth quarter,
the last a soft jumper for a 94-80 lead, and
the Warriors never looked back.
Barnes missed the first four games with
left toe inflammation. He was a game-time
decision, but he entered
the game with just over 5
minutes to go in the first
quarter and made an imme-
diate impact. He hit two
quick jumpers and scored
on a pretty reverse layup
to ignite the uncharacter-
istically sluggish
Warriors offense, and the
second unit chewed the
Wolves bench up to start the second quarter.
The only thing that prevented the
Warriors from pulling away in the first half
was the struggles from the sharpshooting
backcourt. Curry and Thompson combined
to shoot 3 for 14 in the first half and the
Warriors, who entered the game making a
league-high 13.3 3s per game, went 0 for 8
from long distance.
The Warriors got a mini-scare in the third
quarter when Curry got tangled up with
Ricky Rubio and walked away limping.
Trainers looked at his right ankle and right
knee, but he quickly returned to the game.
The Wolves cut a 10-point deficit to 67-64
with four minutes to go in the third, but
Iguodala’s 3-pointer off of a turnover by
Love pushed it back to 75-64.
NOTES: Rubio had another rough night.
He had seven points on 2-for-8 shooting
with seven assists and four turnovers. ...
Curry, a career 90 percent free throw shoot-
er, missed one in the second quarter. He
missed 29 last season. ... Barnes had a
vocal cheering section behind one basket.
He grew up in Ames, Iowa, about a 3-hour
drive from the Twin Cities.
Warriors top T’wolves
Warriors 106, T’wolves 93
Klay Thompson
SPORTS 13
Thursday • Nov. 7, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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ENGLEWOOD, Colo. — John Moffitt wasn’t unhappy
with a lack of playing time in Denver. He quit the NFL
because he’d lost his love for the game and was tired of risk-
ing his health.
The third-year guard from Wisconsin called the Broncos
from his home in Seattle this week to notify them he would-
n’t be returning to the team following its bye.
Then he announced on Twitter that he was calling it a
career, saying, “Football was fun but my head hurts-haha
kidding roger goodell. I’m on to new things, thanks to
everyone along the way!!!”
The Broncos put him on their reserve/left team list on
Tuesday when they activated center J.D. Walton from the
physically unable to perform list.
They have five days to formally release Moffitt, who left
more than $1 million on the table, including about
$312,500 for the remainder of this season and $752,500 in
non-guaranteed salary in 2014.
Moffitt, who signed a four-year contract for nearly $3
million after Seattle made him the 75th overall draft pick in
2011, said he knows teammates and fans don’t understand
how he could forgo the fame and fortune of pro football.
“I just really thought about it and decided I’m not happy.
I’m not happy at all,” Moffitt told The Associated Press in a
phone interview from Seattle. “And I think it’s really mad-
ness to risk your body, risk your well-being and risk your
happiness for money.
“Everybody, they just don’t get it and they think it’s
crazy. But I think what I was doing is crazy. ”
He said he didn’t want to see things through this season
for the shot at a Super Bowl.
“I don’t care about the Super Bowl. I don’t,” Moffit t
insisted. “I used to. I mean, anytime I played this game, I
gave my heart to it and I’m a person that does thing with his
heart. ... I don’t need the Super Bowl experience. I played in
great stadiums and I played against great players. And I had
that experience and it’s enough.”
The Broncos acquired Moffitt on Aug. 20 from the
Seahawks after he’d lost out on one of two starting guard
spots in Seattle during training camp. He played in two
games for the Broncos (7-1).
Moffitt, 27, made about $1.8 million before taxes in his
2 1/2 seasons in the NFL.
“I’ve saved enough. It’s not like I’m sitting here and I’m
a millionaire,” he said. “That’s what I kind of realized. I’m
sitting here and I got to this point and I was like, what is
the number that you need? How much do you really need?
What do you want in life? And I decided that I don’t really
need to be a millionaire.
“I just want to be happy. And I find that people that have
the least in life are sometimes the happiest. And I don’t
have the least in life. I have enough in life. And I won’t sac-
rifice my health for that.”
Moffitt stressed that he’s not passing
judgment on his former colleagues, say-
ing, “This is all my personal stuff and I
respect this game and I respect the men in
this game.”
Although Moffitt never had a history of
concussions, he acknowledged all the
blows he sustained in practices and
games concerned him.
“I’m not trying to be the poster boy for
‘Oh, I thought I should leave because of concussions.’ I’m
just saying, it’s a valid point,” Moffitt said. “I love the
game and I respect the game and everybody who plays it
knows what they risk and I knew what I risked when I
played, and I’m no longer willing to risk it.”
Moffitt majored in sociology at Wisconsin and said his
world view was really shaped over the last couple of years
when he began studying the writings of the Dalai Lama and
Noam Chomsky.
Now that he’s out from behind the NFL shield, Moffit t
said he’s looking forward to speaking his mind on the radio
and in podcasts he’s going to produce. He said he has plen-
ty of opinions to share on everything from philosophy to
politics, although he has less to say about sports.
He said he also wants to go on a diet now that he doesn’t
have to maintain his 319-pound physique.
Moffitt said the timing of his decision had nothing to do
with Walton being activated from the reserve/PUP list,
although “I’m glad it worked out like that.” And he said he
felt bad his decision coincided with coach John Fox’s heart
operation.
He doesn’t regret playing football, either.
“Obviously, I wish things worked out better in Seattle. I
wish I played more there, but I loved college football. I
loved being in Seattle playing football. It wasn’t always
the easiest, but I live here now and I’m thankful,” he said. “I
look back and I’m thankful for the whole experience. That’s
enough for me.”
Moffitt said he wants to spend more time with his parents
in Connecticut and with his girlfriend and her 5-year-old
daughter in Seattle. He said his father is “my best friend and
I never get to see him.”
Moffitt said he’ll miss playing in games and goofing
around with the guys, but he’s glad the rest of his NFL life
is over.
“Once you tear away all the illusions of it, it’s hard work.
And it’s dangerous work. And you’re away from your family.
And it’s not good for families. It’s very tough on families,”
he said.
Moffitt is also glad to leave the league on his terms.
“I’m ready to go to work and start doing other things
right now,” Moffitt said. “So, it’s a smoother transition and
I’m still young enough to start a career and my body’s
healthy and I’m good. I look at it as a great start to life, you
know?”
Denver OL walks away from NFL, $1 million
John Moffitt
By Steven Wine
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
DAVIE, Fla. — Miami Dolphins tackle Jonathan
Martin talked of quitting football earlier in his pro career
before leaving the team last week to undergo counseling
for emotional issues, two people familiar with the situa-
tion said Wednesday.
One of the people said Martin considered giving up the
sport because he was mistreated by
other offensive linemen on the
Dolphins. That person said Martin
now plans to continue his career.
Both people spoke to the Associated
Press on condition of anonymity
because the organization has said lit-
tle about his departure.
Martin’s agent last week made alle-
gations of day-to-day harassment over
an extended period, prompting an NFL
investigation and the suspension of
veteran guard Richie Incognito. Commissioner Roger
Goodell appointed a New York lawyer with experience in
sports cases to prepare a report that will be made public.
The case attracted more than 100 reporters and camera-
men to the Dolphins’ complex Wednesday, and when the
throng entered the locker room after practice, a player
pushed the button on a boom box sitting at Incognito’s
stall.
Circus music began to play.
And then the Dolphins, clearly weary of the circus
atmosphere, opened up. They passionately defended
Incognito and insisted they didn’t see the blowup coming
that led Martin to leave the team, saying he and
Incognito were friends.
“The whole thing, it’s kind of mind-blowing to me,”
quarterback Ryan Tannehill said. “It’s kind of mind-blow-
ing to most of the guys on our team right now. ”
While players interviewed were unanimous in rallying
behind the embattled Incognito, they were less vehement
in their support of Martin.
“I don’t know why he’s doing this,” offensive tackle
Martin considered
quitting football
Jonathan
Martin
See DOLPHINS, Page 14
SPORTS 14
Thursday • Nov. 7, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
650-354-1100
95.7 The Game Wednesday afternoon,
that’s like asking the guy with the sledge-
hammer to hammer a nail in the wall to
hang a picture.
And yet, many unnamed players in the
NFL back Incognito while assigning blame
to Martin. “Stand up for yourself,” “hit the
bully in the mouth,” “handle it in-house,”
“be a man,” “handle your business.” These
are all phrases that have been used to
describe what Martin should have done, as
well as suggesting he is less than a man, or
“soft,” for “snitching” on Incognito.
Personally, I can’t think of anything
more manly than raising your voice and
letting the powers-that-be know you will
no longer stand for this type of treatment.
“Being a man” means making the tough
decision, knowing that your actions could
have serious repercussions against you and
doing it anyway.
Is there any better way to stand up to a
bully than by calling him out to the
authorities? Like Miami Herald reporter and
ESPN radio host Dan Le Batard said, Martin
chose the best of no-win choices.
In sports, there is too much of a street
mentality, which includes the battle cry of
“snitches get stitches.” It’s time for a
majority of athletes to grow up and start
treating their own teammates with respect.
I think that is the most disturbing aspect
of this story: this is teammate-on-team-
mate harassment. I can understand going
after an opponent, getting in his head and
trying to break his will. But how, exactly,
does attacking your own teammate foster
camaraderie in the locker room?
And this includes all level of sports —
high school and college as well. These
people are your teammates, for crying out
loud. How does humiliation and intimida-
tion increase the bond between teammates?
“Well, it happened when I was a first-year
player,” goes the usual refrain. Well, it’s
time to break the cycle.
***
Within days of each other, a pair of NFL
coaches — Denver’s John Fox and
Houston’s Gary Kubiak — suffered life-
threatening health scares. Fox underwent
surgery to replace a faulty heart valve,
while Kubiak essentially suffered a mild
stroke on the sideline of the Texans game
against Indianapolis Sunday night.
The good news is both are expected to
make complete recoveries and maybe it
will also force the NFL’s hand to take into
account the health of their coaches as well
as their players.
There has been a lot of talk over the last
couple of years about the impact the game
has on the well-being of their players, con-
sidering many suffer from brain injuries
and problems with various other body parts
following their career and the league has
taken steps to address those issue.
But what about the coaches? These guys,
literally, sleep in their offices and reports
are Kubiak had spent the better part of
three weeks at the Texans’ facilities, trying
to figure how to turn around his team’s fail-
ing season.
These are not the first coaches to suffer
due to the stresses of the game. They are
just the latest and something needs to be
done to protect these “type A” personali-
ties from themselves.
Really, how much can be accomplished
on cat naps and coffee during a 20-hour
work day? How well did you do on that test
you spent all night cramming for? I never
did very well. Seems there becomes a point
of diminishing returns by spending 20
hours in the office, trying to put a finger on
a team’s problems. If you can’t figure it out
in 10 to 12 hours, go home, get some rest,
and attack the problem with a clear head
the following day.
I’m not sure what can be done, short of
an NFL official standing guard and kicking
coaches out of their offices at midnight.
But the stresses of coaching the NFL needs
to be addressed before one of these guys
dies on the sideline or in the chair at their
desk.
Nathan Mollat can be reached by email:
nathan@smdailyjournal.com or by phone: 344-
5200 ext. 117. He can also be followed on Twitter
@CheckkThissOutt.
Continued from page 11
LOUNGE
Tyson Clabo said. “And the only person
who knows why, his name is Jonathan
Martin.”
Martin, a 24-year-old second-year pro,
was briefly hospitalized after he left the
team and is now with his family in
California.
Tannehill said he was shocked when
Martin departed.
“It’s tough for me, because you can’t help
a situation that you didn’t know existed —
that no one on this team knew existed,”
Tannehill said. “We have a bunch of good
guys in this locker room. To be put in a sit-
uation where everyone’s attacking the lock-
er room saying it’s such a bad place, such a
bad culture, no leadership to stand up and
stop the situation — no one knew there was
a situation to be stopped.”
Incognito’s alleged harassment of Martin
included voicemail and text messages that
were racist and threatening, but several
players said the two were close.
“If you had asked Jon Martin a week
before who his best friend on the team was,
he would have said Richie Incognito,”
Tannehill said. “The first guy to stand up for
Jonathan when anything went down on the
field, any kind of tussle, Richie was the first
guy there. When they wanted to hang out
outside of football, who was together?
Richie and Jonathan.”
Guard John Jerry said he never heard
Incognito use the racist term included in one
voicemail and wouldn’t have objected any-
way.
“I would have just laughed it off,” Jerry
said. “I know the type of person he is, and I
know he doesn’t mean it that way.
Everybody’s got friends that when you’re
out, they say those type of things. It’s
never made a big deal.”
Incognito, 30, was kicked off his team at
Nebraska, and has long had a reputation as
one of the NFL’s dirtiest players. But he has
been universally praised by his teammates
this week.
“Does he like to give guys a hard time?
Yes. Does he like to pester guys and have
fun? Yes,” Tannehill said. “But he brought a
lot of laughter to this locker room, he
brought a lot of cohesiveness to this locker
room and he was the best teammate that I
could ask for. ”
For Martin, the final straw was a lunch-
room prank at the team complex, and he
then left the squad. Tannehill and Jerry said
the same prank has been pulled on many
other players.
Hijinks are especially common among
the offensive linemen, Clabo said.
“We have a system of basically it’s just a
big joke, basically,” he said. It helps cama-
raderie. It keeps things light in the room.
Everyone participates. No one is exempt
and so I don’t see how ... we would all be
guilty of bullying.”
Continued from page 13
DOLPHINS
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — World Series MVP David
Ortiz has won his sixth Silver Slugger award
as the top designated hitter in voting by
major league managers and coaches.
Yankees second baseman Robinson
Cano, Detroit third baseman Miguel
Cabrera and Minnesota catcher Joe Mauer
each were selected for the fifth time.
Silver Slugger awards are given to the top
offensive player at each position in the
American and National Leagues. They were
handed out Wednesday night on the MLB
Network.
Nine of the 18 recipients were first-time
winners with major league home run and
RBI leader Chris Davis of Baltimore taking
home a bat-shaped trophy as the best AL
first baseman.
The Orioles led all teams with three win-
ners: Outfielder Adam Jones and shortstop
J.J. Hardy joined Davis in being picked for
the first time.
Pittsburgh, Detroit and St. Louis each had
two winners.
First-time selectee Pedro Alvarez (third
base) was joined by Pirates teammate
Andrew McCutchen. The star outfielder won
his second prize.
St. Louis’ Yadier Molina (catcher) and
Matt Carpenter (second base) received their
first Silver Sluggers.
The Tigers’ Torii Hunter (outfield) got his
second.
Washington’s Ian Desmond (shortstop),
Cincinnati’s Jay Bruce (outfield) and the
Angels’ Mike Trout (outfield) each earned
their second straight Silver Slugger.
Other first-time winners were: Arizona’s
Paul Goldschmidt (first base), Colorado’s
Michael Cuddyer (outfield) and the Dodgers’
Zack Greinke (pitcher).
Several players earned bonuses or salary
escalators for winning the award:
Cabrera, Hunter and Ortiz each get
$100,000 bonuses, while Hardy receives
$75,000 and Bruce, Cuddyer, Davis and
Molina earn $50,000 apiece. Jones’ base
salary next year escalates by $200,000 to
$10.2 million and Cuddyer’s rises by
$500,000 to $11.5 million.
Boston’s Ortiz wins 6th Silver Slugger as top DH
SPORTS 15
Thursday • Nov. 7, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Ralph D. Russo
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
College football has never had a Thursday
night like this — though you can expect more
of them in the future.
Two games with championship implica-
tions, matching four highly ranked teams.
No. 12 Oklahoma at No. 5 Baylor, with first
place on the line in the Big 12, kicks off at
about 7:30 EST on Fox Sports 1. Then, a few
minutes after 9 p.m., comes No. 2 Oregon
against No. 6 Stanford, the Pac-12 game of the
year.
“Alot went into it to get us here and a lot had
to break right,” said Ilan Ben-Hanan, ESPN
vice president of programming and acquisi-
tions. “Now that it’s here, we’re so fired up.”
The folks over at Fox Sports are psyched,
too. OU-Baylor is one of the biggest events
the fledgling all-sports cable channel has
shown since it went on the air last summer. It’s
the type of game that Fox officials hope can
accelerate the growth of FS1 and help build a
regular audience.
“We like to call them tent-pole events. This
is one,” said Bill Wanger, executive vice pres-
ident of research and programming for Fox
Sports.
Thursday night college football has been a
staple on ESPN for more than two decades,
with games regularly involving ranked teams.
The Atlantic Coast Conference and the Big
East were among the first conferences to
embrace the idea of playing televised games
on Thursday nights as a way to shine a spot-
light on their leagues.
ESPN’s most viewed Thursday night game is
No. 3 Texas’49-39 victory against Texas A&M
on Thanksgiving 2009. Second was USC-
Oregon State in September 2008, a memorable
upset of the top-ranked Trojans.
“We’ve always told our conference partners
Thursday night is a big-time opportunity to
gain exposure because everybody is watch-
ing,” Ben-Hanan said. “On Saturdays the
games tend to wash over you. There’s some-
thing great about that too. Thursdays are differ-
ent. Your teams have the stage to themselves.
It becomes a really cool spotlight opportuni-
t y, and our partners have embraced it.”
The Pac-12 and Big 12 embraced it when
they each signed multibillion dollar television
rights contracts with ESPN and Fox.
The deal calls for each conference to make
four games available to the networks for week-
day broadcasts every season.
Pac-12 deputy commissioner Kevin
Weiberg, who was once the commissioner of
the Big 12, said the trend toward playing more
night games is tied to conferences seeking “to
unlock more value” in their television rights
deals.
ESPN and Fox make recommendations on
matchups they’d like to be made available,
mindful of certain guidelines determined by
each conference, and then they divvy up those
games equally.
Weiberg said the Pac-12 officials didn’t
think twice about playing what was potential-
ly the conference’s most important game of
the season on Thursday night.
College football embraces
Thursday night showdowns
Nick Saban: Remains ’very
committed to Alabama’
TUSCALOOSA, Ala. — Nick Saban says
he remains “very committed to the
University of Alabama” and disputed an
account of his agent’s conversation with
Texas early this year.
The Crimson Tide coach was asked
Wednesday about an Associated Press report
regarding his agent’s conversation in
January about possibly replacing Mack
Brown at Texas.
Saban’s agent, Jimmy Sexton, indicated
that the coach would consider leaving
Tuscaloosa for the Texas job during a January
phone call, according to an email sent by
former Texas Regent Tom Hicks.
“Sexton confirmed that UT is the only job
Nick would possibly consider leaving
Alabama for, and that his success there creat-
ed special pressure for him,” Hicks wrote of
a call involving Sexton, himself and current
Regent Wallace Hall.
Asked about the account, Saban said: “No
one’s said anything like that.”
“First of all, I don’t know where y’all get
these reports and I don’t know where y’all
get the information,” said Saban, who
smiled when a reporter asked about the AP
report. “But I’ve already commented on all
this stuff. There’s nothing new or different
that’s ever happened. I’m very committed to
the University of Alabama, love being here.
We’ve talked about it before. Don’t need to
talk about it again.
“We’ve got a big game with LSU this
week. That’s where our focus is and that’s
what we’re focusing on. There’s really noth-
ing new to comment about.”
Hicks detailed the call in a Sept. 24 email
that was obtained Tuesday by The Associated
Press through an open-records request.
Saban, who turned 62 on Oct. 31, has at
least twice said since the initial report of the
Texas conversation that he was too old to
take over another program.
“I’m too damn old to go someplace else
and start over, I can tell you that,” he said
after the Tennessee game.
Sexton has declined to comment.
It isn’t clear who initiated the contact
between the agent and Texas.
Two days after the call, Hicks approached
Brown about the possibility of the Texas
coach retiring. Brown, who is under contract
until 2020, said he wanted to stay. He has led
the Longhorns to five straight wins and the
Big 12 Conference lead after an 0-2 start.
Sports brief
16
Thursday • Nov. 7, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SPORTS
toughness that it takes to battle through the
injury that he battled through and to be able
to come back like he’s been able to come
back,” coach Dennis Allen said. “I have no
doubt that he will be able to respond, he’ll
be able to come back and he’ll perform at a
high level. Not a lot of people have gone
through the things that he had to go
through.”
Hayden has played about two-thirds of
Oakland’s defensive snaps as the nickel cor-
nerback and has had an up-and-down cam-
paign so far. He struggled at the start of the
season but showed signs of improvement
with an interception against San Diego on
Oct. 6 and a forced fumble the following
game in Kansas City.
But he is coming off a disastrous perform-
ance against the Eagles. The rough day
started when he stopped in the middle of the
end zone as Riley Cooper ran past him to
make a 17-yard touchdown catch. On
Philadelphia’s next offensive play, Hayden
lost his footing a bit to lead to a 63-yard TD
pass from Nick Foles to Cooper.
“This past game I gave up two touch-
downs and it’s something I’ve got to put
past me. I’ve got to keep going on to the
next play and getting better,” he said. “It’s
about how you respond to it. I could have
made both plays, I’ve just got to finish the
play. If I’d have finished the play, who
knows what the outcome would have been.”
Hayden later had tight coverage on
DeSean Jackson’s 59-yard catch but was
unable to make a play on the ball. That has
been a recurring issue for Hayden this sea-
son as he has often been in position but just
unable to get his hands on the ball to break
up a pass or make an interception.
“He was in position,” teammate Charles
Woodson said. “He was in position to make
plays. Those are plays he’s going to have to
make going forward. I know he’ll replay
those plays in his mind every second of the
day going forward and he’ll figure out what
he needs to do to make those plays.”
For the season, Hayden has allowed 26
catches on 40 throws with him in coverage
for 376 yards and three touchdowns. He has
the one interception and has allowed a 110
passer rating against.
NOTES: QB Terrelle Pryor practiced fully
three days after leaving a game with a sore
knee. ... RB Darren McFadden missed prac-
tice after re-injuring his groin that forced
him to miss a game earlier this season. ...
WR Juron Criner (shoulder), RT Tony
Pashos (hip), K Sebastian Janikowski
(ribs), LB Kaluka Maiava (ribs) and RTMatt
McCants (toe) did not practice. ... OLAndre
Gurode (quadriceps) returned to practice on a
limited basis.
Continued from page 11
RAIDERS
At the start of practice, the first full session
for Crabtree since he was medically cleared
Tuesday, he planted hard with his healthy
right foot to cut inside on a short route.
Between drills, he shuffled his feet in a little
jive as Bruce Springsteen’s “Born in the
U.S.A.” blared from the sound system.
Harbaugh wandered over for a glimpse of the
receivers doing their position work.
“Good to have him back, 15 reporting eli-
gible,” Harbaugh said earlier, referencing
Crabtree’s uniform number. “Everybody kind
of watches out of the corner of their eyes
doing their drills. It’s neat to see any player
who comes back from a serious injury, under-
standing the grueling rehab that’s taken place,
the mental toughness grinding through those
rehab sessions. ... He’ll be on a pitch count.”
Just imagine what San Francisco’s 32nd-
ranked passing game might look like down
the stretch with these two back in the offen-
sive mix for Kaepernick to complement
Anquan Boldin. Suddenly, San Francisco’s
players will allow themselves to think about
the added big-play potential for a unit already
on a nice roll and riding a five-game winning
streak in which the team has scored at least 30
points in each victory.
“It’ll be crazy,” running back Frank Gore
said. “Looking back the way guys were play-
ing, especially with Kap and Crab on the field
last year and how they were so used to break-
ing a lot of plays down the field, the running
game will be getting easier. That’s big for the
team. Alot of teams are playing us with a lot
of people in the box. With those guys back
out there making plays, with the people who
are already making plays — Vernon (Davis),
Anquan Boldin, adding Crab, Mario, that’s
big.”
Before his injury last December,
Manningham had 42 receptions for 449 yards
and one touchdown in 12 games and 10 starts.
He injured his left knee in a loss at Seattle Dec.
23 then underwent reconstructive surgery to
repair torn anterior cruciate and posterior cru-
ciate ligaments.
Crabtree, the team’s 10th overall pick in the
2009 draft out of Texas Tech, established
career highs last season with 85 receptions
for 1,105 yards and nine touchdowns. Then
Crabtree sustained the injury during 7-on-7
drills in an organized team activity May 21.
Manningham is likely to make his season
debut for the 49ers in Sunday’s home game
against Carolina. Crabtree shouldn’t be more
than a couple of weeks behind him.
In Crabtree’s case, the 49ers have slightly
less than three weeks before they must acti-
vate him.
“I had the math since the surgery, five
months, 27 days as of Sunday, so five months,
30 days, today,” Harbaugh said. “Surprised? I
don’t know the surprise there, I guess because
you watch them day to day. Successful surgery,
on track at every point, doing everything he
was asked to do by the doctors. All reports
were really good.”
Continued from page 11
49ERS
three field goals on the night, including a
potential game winner at the end of regula-
tion, as well as one in overtime. After the
game, Williamson wept in the locker room
with the unbearable feeling that somehow
he had let his team down.
“It was really difficult because I had never
been through anything like that before,”
Williamson told the Associated Press. “It’s
something you won’t forget, but it’s some-
thing that you have to use to motivate you.”
Though the game — a battle whose win-
ner will be labeled the best team in the Pac-
12 — won’t necessarily come down to a field
goal, Maldonado feels confident and ready
for anything to happen this time around.
“I like kicking at Stanford,”
Maldonadosaid. “I’m really comfortable
going down there. It gives me more confi-
dence. “
Maldonado isn’t the only Oregon player
with something to prove against Stanford.
Ducks quarterback Marcus Mariota, a
Heisman Trophy front runner who has yet to
throw an interception this season, has one
blemish on his nearly flawless track record
— a single loss. Mariota is 20-1 in his
career as Oregon’s starting quarterback, his
only loss coming against the Cardinal on
Nov. 17 of last year. For a guy who hasn’t
experienced much defeat in his young
career, he believes that last year’s loss
against Stanford has benefited him in the
long run.
“When you experience failure, it helps
you not fear it,” Mariota said after practice
Saturday. “You’ll fear failure and that’s not
how you play football. I think getting that
out of my system, going through that has
really helped me this year. ”
Despite being held to just 14 points in
last years matchup, Oregon still remains
confident that their offense will perform just
how they have for the entire season. Just
ask Ducks’ running back De’Anthony
Thomas.
“We’ve got a lot of guys that can con-
tribute to the offense and that’s what makes
this offense so dynamic,” Thomas said. “I
feel like this team, we should at least put up
40 (points).”
Stanford head coach David Shaw has no
problem with Oregon talking about their
scoring prowess, because the Ducks have
shown all season that they can score in
bunches.
“Those guys are firing on all cylinders,”
Shaw said. ““I’ve seen them play and I have
no problem with [Thomas] saying that.
They score at least 40 on everybody. That’s
confidence, not arrogance.”
Stanford’s defense, led by a veteran core
in the secondary, has yet to allow a team to
score more then 28 points this season.
Even without starting defensive end Ben
Gardner, who is out for the season with a
chest-muscle injury, the Stanford defense
expects to be an inconvenience for the
Oregon offense. They just have to mix up
their defensive front and not allow Oregon
to get comfortable.
“If you stay static, they’ll kill you,” Shaw
said. “So we have to be able to mix it up
while not making any mistakes. If you
make a mistake, they’ll catch you (with a
big play).”
Continued from page 11
STANFORD
SPORTS 17
Thursday • Nov. 7, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
vs. Seattle
1:25p.m.
FOX
12/8
vs.Carolina
1:05p.m.
FOX
11/10
@Saints
1:25p.m.
FOX
11/17
@Redskins
5:40p.m.
ESPN
11/25
vs.Rams
1:25p.m.
FOX
12/1
@Dallas
1:30p.m.
CBS
11/28
@Giants
10a.m.
CBS
11/10
@Houston
10a.m.
CBS
11/17
vs.Titans
1:05p.m.
CBS
11/24
@Canucks
7p.m.
CSN-CAL
11/14
vs.Canucks
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
11/7
@Winnipeg
5p.m.
CSN-CAL
11/10
@Calgary
6p.m.
CSN-CAL
11/12
@Chicago
4p.m.
CSN-CAL
11/17
@Oilers
7p.m.
CSN-CAL
11/15
@Tampa
10a.m.
FOX
12/15
@Jets
10a.m.
CBS
12/8
vs. Chiefs
1:05p.m.
CBS
12/15
vs.Detroit
7:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
11/12
at Minnes.
5p.m.
CSN-BAY
11/6
at Spurs
5:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
11/8
@Memphis
5p.m.
CSN-BAY
11/9
vs.Utah
7:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
11/16
vs.Thunder
7:30p.m.
TNT
11/14
THURSDAY
Girls’ tennis
Singles and doubles
Championship and third-place matches at
Burlingame, 3:15 p.m.
Volleyball
Hillsdale at Aragon, Menlo-Atherton at Woodside,
San Mateo at Burlingame, Carlmont at South City,
Mills at Capuchino, Jefferson at Westmoor, Terra
Nova at Half Moon Bay, El Camino at Sequoia, 5:45
p.m.
Boys’ water polo
WCAL semifinal
No. 4 St. Francis vs. No. 1 Sacred Heart Prep, 3 p.m.
Girls’ water polo
WCAL semifinal
No. 3 Mitty at No. 2 Sacred Heart Prep, 6 p.m.
FRIDAY
Football
Terra Nova at Sacred Heart Prep, King’s Academy
at Hillsdale,Half Moon Bay at Capuchino,2:45 p.m.;
Woodside at Burlingame, San Mateo at Aragon,
Menlo School at Menlo-Atherton,South City at Se-
quoia, Mills at Carlmont, Jefferson vs. El Camino at
South City, 7 p.m.
Girls’ water polo
CCSplay-inmatch
Woodside atCarlmont, 3 p.m.
Boys’ water polo
CCSplay-inmatch
Hillsdale at Sequoia, 3 p.m.
WCALtournament
Fifth-placematch
No. 6 Valley Christian at No. 5 Serra, 5:30 p.m.
SATURDAY
Cross country
PAL championships at Crystal Springs Course, 10
a.m.
Football
Serra at Riordan, 1 p.m.
Boys’ water polo
WCAL tournament championship and third-place
match at Sacred Heart Prep, 4:30 and 7:30 p.m.
Girls’ water polo
WCAL tournament championship and third-place
match at Sacred Heart Prep,TBA
WHAT’S ON TAP
NATIONALCONFERENCE
EAST
W L T Pct PF PA
Dallas 5 4 0 .556 257 209
Philadelphia 4 5 0 .444 225 231
Washington 3 5 0 .375 203 253
N.Y. Giants 2 6 0 .250 141 223
SOUTH
W L T Pct PF PA
New Orleans 6 2 0 .750 216 146
Carolina 5 3 0 .625 204 106
Atlanta 2 6 0 .250 176 218
Tampa Bay 0 8 0 .000 124 190
NORTH
W L T Pct PF PA
Green Bay 5 3 0 .625 232 185
Detroit 5 3 0 .625 217 197
Chicago 5 3 0 .625 240 226
Minnesota 1 7 0 .125 186 252
WEST
W L T Pct PF PA
Seattle 8 1 0 .889 232 149
San Francisco 6 2 0 .750 218 145
Arizona 4 4 0 .500 160 174
St. Louis 3 6 0 .333 186 226
AMERICANCONFERENCE
EAST
W L T Pct PF PA
New England 7 2 0 .778 234 175
N.Y. Jets 5 4 0 .556 169 231
Miami 4 4 0 .500 174 187
Buffalo 3 6 0 .333 189 236
SOUTH
W L T Pct PF PA
Indianapolis 6 2 0 .750 214 155
Tennessee 4 4 0 .500 173 167
Houston 2 6 0 .250 146 221
Jacksonville 0 8 0 .000 86 264
NORTH
W L T Pct PF PA
Cincinnati 6 3 0 .667 217 166
Cleveland 4 5 0 .444 172 197
Baltimore 3 5 0 .375 168 172
Pittsburgh 2 6 0 .250 156 208
WEST
W L T Pct PF PA
Kansas City 9 0 0 1.000 215 111
Denver 7 1 0 .875 343 218
San Diego 4 4 0 .500 192 174
Oakland 3 5 0 .375 146 199
Thursday’sGame
Washington at Minnesota, 5:25 p.m.
Sunday, Nov. 10
Detroit at Chicago, 10 a.m.
Philadelphia at Green Bay, 10 a.m.
Jacksonville at Tennessee, 10 a.m.
Cincinnati at Baltimore, 10 a.m.
St. Louis at Indianapolis, 10 a.m.
Seattle at Atlanta, 10 a.m.
Oakland at N.Y. Giants, 10 a.m.
Buffalo at Pittsburgh, 10 a.m.
Carolina at San Francisco, 1:05 p.m.
NFL GLANCE
EASTERNCONFERENCE
ATLANTICDIVISION
W L Pct GB
Philadelphia 3 2 .600 —
Brooklyn 2 2 .500 1/2
Toronto 2 3 .400 1
New York 1 3 .250 1 1/2
Boston 1 4 .200 2
SOUTHEASTDIVISION
W L Pct GB
Miami 3 2 .600 —
Charlotte 3 2 .600 —
Orlando 3 2 .600 —
Atlanta 2 2 .500 1/2
Washington 1 3 .250 1 1/2
CENTRALDIVISION
W L Pct GB
Indiana 5 0 1.000 —
Milwaukee 2 2 .5002 1/2
Detroit 2 2 .5002 1/2
Cleveland 2 3 .400 3
Chicago 1 3 .250 3 1/2
WESTERNCONFERENCE
SOUTWESTDIVISION
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 4 1 .800 —
Houston 4 1 .800 —
Dallas 3 1 .750 1/2
New Orleans 2 3 .400 2
Memphis 2 3 .400 2
NORTHWEST DIVISION
W L Pct GB
Oklahoma City 2 1 .667 —
Minnesota 3 2 .600 —
Portland 2 2 .500 1/2
Denver 0 3 .000 2
Utah 0 5 .000 3
PACIFICDIVISION
W L Pct GB
Golden State 4 1 .800 —
L.A. Clippers 3 2 .600 1
Phoenix 3 2 .600 1
L.A. Lakers 2 3 .400 2
Sacramento 1 3 .250 2 1/2
Wednesday’sGames
Orlando 98, L.A. Clippers 90
Washington 116, Philadelphia 102
Indiana 97, Chicago 80
Charlotte 92,Toronto 90
Boston 97, Utah 87
Golden State 106, Minnesota 93
Milwaukee 109, Cleveland 104
New Orleans 99, Memphis 84
San Antonio 99, Phoenix 96
Dallas at Oklahoma City, late
Thursday’sGames
L.A. Clippers at Miami, 4 p.m.
Atlanta at Denver, 6 p.m.
L.A. Lakers at Houston, 6:30 p.m.
Friday’sGames
Boston at Orlando, 4 p.m.
NBA GLANCE
EASTERNCONFERENCE
ATLANTICDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Toronto 14 10 4 0 20 48 32
Tampa Bay 13 9 4 0 18 43 33
Detroit 14 8 4 2 18 33 37
Boston 12 8 4 0 16 35 22
Montreal 14 8 6 0 16 40 27
Ottawa 13 4 6 3 11 39 43
Florida 13 3 8 2 8 26 46
Buffalo 15 2 12 1 5 23 43
METROPOLITANDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Pittsburgh 14 10 4 0 20 45 33
N.Y. Islanders 13 5 5 3 13 42 43
Washington 13 6 7 0 12 41 38
Carolina 13 4 6 3 11 26 39
N.Y. Rangers 12 5 7 0 10 20 37
Columbus 12 5 7 0 10 33 33
New Jersey 12 3 5 4 10 26 37
Philadelphia 12 3 9 0 6 20 37
WESTERNCONFERENCE
CENTRALDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Colorado 12 11 1 0 22 38 18
Chicago 13 8 2 3 19 45 38
St. Louis 11 8 1 2 18 42 25
Minnesota 14 7 4 3 17 34 34
Nashville 13 6 5 2 14 27 37
Dallas 13 5 6 2 12 33 39
Winnipeg 14 5 7 2 12 34 40
PACIFICDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
San Jose 13 10 1 2 22 51 24
Anaheim 14 10 3 1 21 44 36
Phoenix 14 9 3 2 20 48 44
Vancouver 15 9 5 1 19 42 41
Los Angeles 14 9 5 0 18 40 36
Calgary 13 5 6 2 12 39 47
Edmonton 14 3 9 2 8 36 54
NOTE:Two points for a win,one point for overtime
loss.
Wednesday’sGames
N.Y. Rangers 5, Pittsburgh 1
Chicago 4,Winnipeg 1
Nashville at Colorado, late
Phoenix at Anaheim, late
Thursday’sGames
Florida at Boston, 4 p.m.
Montreal at Ottawa, 4 p.m.
New Jersey at Philadelphia, 4 p.m.
Minnesota at Washington, 4 p.m.
N.Y. Islanders at Carolina, 4 p.m.
N.Y. Rangers at Columbus, 4 p.m.
Dallas at Detroit, 4:30 p.m.
Edmonton at Tampa Bay, 4:30 p.m.
Calgary at St. Louis, 5 p.m.
NHL GLANCE
NFL
DALLASCOWBOYS—SignedDTEverett Dawkins.
Signed G Phillipkeith Manley and DE Hall Davis to
the practice squad.
GREENBAYPACKERS—Signed QB Scott Tolzien
from the practice squad. Signed WR Alex Gillett to
the practice squad.
HOUSTONTEXANS —Named Wade Phillips in-
terim coach.
NEW ORLEANS SAINTS —Placed LB Jonathan
Vilma on the injured reserve list.
PITTSBURGHSTEELERS—PlacedLBSeanSpence
on the injured reserve list.
TRANSACTIONS
18
Thursday • Nov. 7, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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specifically for same-sex marriages for six
years now.
Colleen Rafferty co-founded the jewelry
store 18 years ago and said she is excited
her store is the first and only one to carry
the Rony Tennenbaum line in all of
California.
“It’s fashion forward, something that
stands out and doesn’t have a sameness to
it,” Rafferty said.
Christensen and Rafferty Fine Jewelry
only started carrying Rony Tennenbaum’s
jewelry a couple of weeks ago, and it hasn’t
received the entire order shipment, so there
hasn’t been any clients requesting to see
the new pieces yet. However, Rafferty said
she has had same-sex clients in the past
and, in her experience, these couples aren’t
as interested in the typical, “traditional”
rings offered in her store. They tend to want
individualized rings.
Tennenbaum said same-sex couples often
aren’t looking for the flash of traditional
bands, but rather rings that are symbolic of
their love.
“I try to focus on what’s representative of
a couple,” Tennenbaum said. “I don’t think
jewelry out there puts much into the sym-
bolism. LVOE and my other designs res-
onate with people; they have a significance
other than being a gold ring.”
Tennenbaum said part of his decision to
make jewelry specifically for the gay com-
munity was people, especially recently,
were struggling with creating new customs
and traditions. Now that same-sex couples
are getting married, people are sorting out
new questions. Questions such as who pro-
poses to who, and do couples wear match-
ing rings, are starting to be answered.
“[The decision to step out on my own]
was very clear-cut for me,” Tennenbaum
said. “I’d done almost everything there was
to do [in the jewelry business.] I wanted to
focus that knowledge and experience on my
community. There was no one else doing it,
so I felt I needed to do it.”
Another way Tennenbaum is making his
jewelry different from many other design-
ers is using what is know as EcoGold,
which is essentially using recycled gold
and other metals when making jewelry.
Using gold obtained through mining is
destructive to the environment and pol-
lutes water supplies, but using recycled
metals allows water to be mostly purified
of chemicals before being released back
into the environment.
The different Tennenbaum rings at the
San Mateo store include Shadow, LVOE,
Ripples, Air, Bricks, Euro, Tie the Knot and
a pavé black diamond ring. The
Tennenbaum jewelry line prices start at
$675 and can go up to $3,500, Rafferty
said. Of the rings available so far at
Christensen and Rafferty, none of them
have a large gem in them. Most still seem
flashy because of the metal being shiny and
reflective, but a couple stand out because
they have a solid, bold look that almost
demand your attention.
While this jewelry line was made with the
gay community in mind, anyone can pur-
chase these rings. Both Rafferty and
Tennenbaum said they have had clients who
aren’t gay express interest in
Tennenbaum’s jewelry.
Continued from page 1
LOVE
Measure P only received 46.6 percent
approval, short of 55 percent voter
approval it required Tuesday, according to
semi-official election results from the San
Mateo County Elections Office. The dis-
trict’s Board of Trustees placed Measure P on
the ballot this summer to rebuild and expand
Bowditch Middle School to add Foster City
fifth graders and reopen Knolls Elementary
School in San Mateo for the 2016-17
school year. It would have cost property
owners $19 per $100,000 assessed property
value.
The measure aimed to help the district’s
issues with overcrowding. For the past five
years, district enrollment has grown from
1,703 students from 10,079 to 11,782.
Trustee Ellen Mallory Ulrich helped lead
the opposition campaign and had worried
about equity in the district between schools
in Foster City and San Mateo.
“With the level of engagement in the
community so high and the community
members’ knowledge of the district’s issues
and needs so sharp and current, we are great-
ly anticipating a community wide discus-
sion on a plan that serves all of our students
to the best of our ability,” Mallory Ulrich
said in an email.
The Bowditch plan would have brought
the school from 1,000 to 1,500 students.
The school would grow up and out — adding
a floor and expanding on the ground level as
well. Bowditch is currently grades 6-8.
The measure would have allowed Knolls in
San Mateo, which has been used as a tempo-
rary overflow school, to reopen for the
2016-17 school year. This would have hap-
pened following a design process and con-
struction of about three years, taking about
$18 million. About $60 million to $80 mil-
lion would have gone to Bowditch in Foster
City expanding from 1,000 to 1,500 stu-
dents, adding a floor and expanding on the
ground level to address growing enrollment.
Yes on P was backed by those such as
Simms, board President Lory Lorimer
Lawson and Measure P co-chairs Daniela
Relaford and Doug Stoveland.
Voters previously approved Measure L, a
$175 million bond measure in 2008. There
is still $70 million in funds left from
Measure L, Lawson previously said.
Last year, the district nixed a $130 mil-
lion bond measure that would have proposed
buying up land in Foster City to build a new
school so it could better communicate its
goals with the public. This came after the
Superintendent’s Committee on
Overcrowding Relief recommended the
board replace Bowditch and move fifth
graders there, which was part of failed bond
measure.
The district will review the strategies and
processes it used during the campaign as
part of its next steps, along with reviewing
the polling data and consulting with its var-
ious constituent groups, said Molly Barton,
assistant superintendent of student services.
angela@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 105
Continued from page 1
OPTIONS
all blame KDF Hallmark for the early-morn-
ing fire because of its failure to “properly
inspect, maintain and safeguard the proper-
ty from a foreseeable unit fire.”
The fire at the 72-unit apartment complex
at 531 Woodside Road is believed to have
started in a third-floor unit where the
deceased, 48-year-old Darin Michael
Demello-Pine, was cooking at about 1:45
a.m. The fire then moved through the 1964
complex which was not outfitted with sprin-
klers. In their respective suits, the plain-
tiffs said the Hallmark investment group
should have readily seen when purchasing
the building in 2003 that it lacked them and
other safeguards like smoke detectors.
Without them, “what should have been a
localized fire, quickly extinguished by
sprinklers, turned into a six-alarm blaze,”
the suits state.
The suits contend KDF Hallmark was
more interested in recouping its $8 million
investment as quick as possible than in
making basic improvements.
Tenants Jorge and Juanita Chavez filed the
first suit 11 days later and others have fol-
lowed. On Monday, a judge approved con-
solidation into one case.
In addition to suing, the tenants were left
trying to pick up the pieces of their former
homes. Landlord KDF Hallmark refunded
residents’ July rent and returned deposits
and gave letters of recommendations for the
former tenants to help them find new hous-
ing. At least one and maybe more moved
into the Terrace Apartments down the road
which itself went up in flames Oct. 17. That
older building was also not required to have
sprinklers because it predated current fire
code.
Hallmark attorney Kasey Townsend could
not be reached for comment.
Continued from page 1
FIRE
SUBURBAN LIVING 19
Thursday • Nov. 7, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ALL ELECTRIC SERVICE™
650-322-9288
FOR ALL YOUR ELECTRICAL NEEDS®
SERVICE CHANGES
SOLAR INSTALLATIONS
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ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
By Kim Cook
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Home beer and spirit-making
have become popular hobbies.
Bars and beverage stores feature a
growing range of artisanal spirits
and craft brews. Cocktail parties
are back in vogue.
And retailers are responding to
all this imbibing by offering furni-
ture, barware and accessories with
cosmopolitan flair. All you need are
a few invitations, snacks and some
good music for the party to begin.
Let’s pop the cork on what’s
new:
“Nowadays, entertaining does
not have to mean having a glitzy
full bar. Bar carts have become
more delicate, refined, and smaller
in scale, so you can tuck them into
a corner of a room or blend them in
with the rest of the furniture,” says
Veranda magazine’s market editor
Catherine Lee Davis.
West Elm’s Parker slim-profile
cart in acorn-stained walnut veneer
with brass rail trim has a mid-cen-
tury vibe. The walnut-stained
Dodson cart features a flip-down
front concealing a mirror-lined
interior with plenty of storage.
And a cart in polished nickel with
two foxed mirror shelves evokes
Art Deco glamour. (www.west-
elm.com)
If you want the look of a built-in
bar, consider Pottery Barn’s modu-
lar collection of wine grids and
drawered cabinets. In black or
mahogany finish, the pieces can be
configured to look like a hutch or
buffet. (www.potterybarn.com)
Davis says that with barware, the
trend is toward shaking it up. “We
see lots of different materials like
hammered silver, tortoise, or sha-
green,” she says. “It’s all about
mixing and matching. After all,
entertaining should be about hav-
ing fun.”
Gent Supply Co. has a natty col-
lection of coasters, glassware and
flasks printed with illustrations of
turn-of-the-century gentlemen
duelers, narwhals, anchors, and
animals dressed in distinguished
garb. (www.gentsupplyco.com)
Artist Richard E. Bishop, known
for wildlife etchings in the 1930s,
‘40s and ‘50s, has his work on an
array of bar glasses and decanters.
Ducks, trout, foxes and horses set a
“country house” tone.
(www.richardebishop.com)
A punchbowl that rests in the
clutches of an octopus, and a
sculpted shell held by a delicate
coral stand are part of an aluminum
barware collection at Z Gallerie.
There’s also a faux crocodile serv-
ice tray in rich eggplant, studded
with silver rivets, that makes a
sophisticated statement.
Silver cocktail picks and stir
sticks topped with airplanes evoke
the Second World War. And a mir-
rored sign with phrases like
“Stirred” and “Straight Up” printed
in a gold retro font would make
great wall art. (www.zgallerie.com)
JC Penney has a whimsical yet
elegant wine decanter from
Michael Graves Design that fea-
tures his signature bird as built-in
aerator. (www.jcp.com)
At Homegoods, there are ham-
mered metal cocktail shakers with
handy drink recipes printed on the
side. Standing wine buckets are
useful accessories, leaving more
room on dining tables and buffets
for nicely-sized tools — small
muddlers, sieves, scoops and
tongs, for example — that will
have amateur bartenders looking
like experts.
(www.homegoods.com ;
www.surlatable.com)
Making a good martini may be
an art, but how about making your
own gin? No bathtub is required,
just a kit like one from Uncommon
Goods containing all the spices,
juniper berries and accessories
needed to turn garden-variety
vodka into a custom gin.
New York artist Aymie Switzer’s
laser-etched cedar coasters depict
neighborhood maps of many major
cities, including Philadelphia,
Chicago, Boston and San
Francisco. Coasters recycled from
old tires are stamped by Los
Angeles artists with different
graphic number fonts. And
Colorado designer David
Rasmussen’s black walnut
stemware is distinctive and beauti-
ful. All at www.uncommon-
goods.com.
Right at Home: Bar gear gets swanky
The walnut-stained Dodson cart features a flip-down front concealing a
mirror-lined interior with plenty of storage.
SUBURBAN LIVING 20
Thursday • Nov. 7, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
E V E RY T HI NG MARKE D DOWN!
We Don’t Meet
Our Competition,
We Create It!
601 El Camino Real, San Bruno
Hours: Mon.- Sat. 10am to 7pm
Sun. Noon to 6pm
Phone: 650.588.0388
Fax: 650.588.0488
Grand
Opening Sale
By Sean Conway
TRIBUNE CONTENT AGENCY
I’m no fan of winter, but I must
admit that the cooler tempera-
tures of the past few weeks have
given me a boost of energy.
Lately, I have had and a sense of
urgency to complete my fall gar-
dening tasks before the cold
weather arrives.
A quick glance around the gar-
den lets me know I am not alone
preparing for winter. Most, if not
all, of our trees have displayed
fall color. Some, like my
Japanese maples, are about to
peak while others, like our giant
old ash, have shed their leaves.
Trees are a good indicator of
weather conditions and this year
mine started showing fall color
about three weeks early. This
early display of color had little to
do with the arrival of cooler tem-
peratures. In fact, our fall weather
has been spectacular this year. It
has been warm and sunny, and not
a single one of my kid’s soccer
games has been cancelled due to
rain.
And therein lies the cause to the
early fall color. Warm sunny days
with no rain created extremely dry
soil conditions for our area.
Stress like that causes trees and
many shrubs to start the process
of dormancy sooner than usual in
an effort to conserve moisture.
Plants lose moisture through
their leaves, and if the ground
stays dry for too long, especially
at the end of the growing season,
trees will respond by dropping
their leaves early in an effort to
conserve moisture.
Fortunately, we received some
rain a couple weeks ago, and
within a day you could almost
hear a sigh of relief throughout
the garden.
Lack of moisture not only caus-
es trees to drop their leaves early;
it also causes leaves to become
dull in color. Even those trees in
my garden whose leaves had not
yet begun to change color were
listless and much less verdant
than they should be.
After a good soaking rain, they
looked vibrant again. Some, like
sugar maples and other late-to-
turn trees, got enough moisture to
hold on to their leaves a little
longer and produce brilliant fall
color in later weeks.
Once the leaves in my garden
begin falling, I start becoming
diligent about raking. I rake
about every three days so leaves
don’t accumulate on the grass or
end up lodged in or under my
shrubs.
If leaves sit on top of grass for
too long, they can quickly cause
problems. A blanket of heavy,
wet leaves can kill patches of
grass fairly quickly by blocking
light and decreasing air circula-
t i on.
I don’t get rid of my leaves
however; on the contrary I save
all of them and even ask my
neighbors for theirs! Leaves
make an excellent soil condition-
er, and once broken down into
what avid gardeners refer to as
“leaf mold” will very quickly
improve the quality of your soil.
Leaves can be added to regular
compost piles, but since they are
made up of mostly carbon, they
take longer to decompose than
ordinary compostable material
such as grass clippings or veg-
etable scraps, which consist
mostly of nitrogen.
Rather than add them to my
compost, I make large leaf piles in
a shaded area of my garden and let
them stay there for a full year to
break down. Leaves decompose
quicker when moist, which is why
I keep the piles in a shady loca-
tion.
After a year of decomposing,
the resulting leaf mold can either
be added as a top dressing to gar-
den plots or tilled in. Once you
start using leaf mold, you will
notice the difference in your soil
very quickly. If you also add com-
post to your garden along with
leaf mold, you will notice a big
difference in the growth and over-
all health of your plants.
Fallen leaves make a great soil conditioner
After they put on their fall show, these leaves can be put to good use in the garden.
SUBURBAN LIVING
22
Thursday • Nov. 7, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Dean Fosdick
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Allergies can put a serious crimp in gar-
dening: A runny nose, itchy eyes, or a
wheezing and persistent cough can drive
allergy sufferers indoors during the grow-
ing season.
But there are many things you can do to
reduce those irritations and remain a dedi-
cated gardener.
Start by determining what’s causing your
allergies. See an allergist for tests to
define the problem. Then you can garden
smarter by avoiding plants that give off
harmful pollen, and working only when
fewer spores are in the air.
An estimated 50 million Americans have
seasonal allergy problems, according to
the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of
America. The cause is pollen from plants,
trees, grasses, weeds and mold spores.
Peak season usually is March through
October, but that varies by region. Tree
pollen can be a problem for allergy suffer-
ers as early as January in the South.
The degree of distress ranges from
annoying to life threatening.
“For most individuals, the gardening
allergies do, in fact, affect their quality of
life, especially during the seasons,” said
Dr. Clifford Bassett, director of Allergy and
Asthma Care of New York. “However, some
folks with allergic asthma may experience
a flare or exacerbation of their respiratory
symptoms that may become more serious,
and necessitates them to refrain from or
curtail gardening activities.”
Some allergy avoidance tips:
• Gear up. Medications suggested by a
doctor or pharmacist usually relieve the
symptoms, said Leonard Perry, an exten-
sion horticulturist with the University of
Vermont and an allergy sufferer. “Those
should be begun a couple of weeks prior to
the onset of a particular allergy season so
the body can adjust and be ready,” he said.
• Wear a mask. Simple paper masks leak,
said Dr. Richard Weber, an allergist and
president of the American College of
Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. For
more sensitive allergy sufferers, he said,
“it makes more sense to get the more
sophisticated masks with respirators on
each side of your face.”
• Planting sites: Be careful where you
grow things. “It’s a common practice to
use evergreens as foundation plants, yet
they’re pretty allergy-making,” Weber
said. “Imagine somebody sensitive having
a juniper outside their bedroom window in
summer. They’d have lots of trouble.”
• Check the daily pollen count. Avoid
direct outside exposure on high pollen
days when it is sunny, dry and windy,
Bassett said. Pollen levels generally are
lower in early morning and late evening,
as well as on cloudy, windless and wet
days.
• Eliminate problem plants, especially
weeds that can aggravate late summer and
fall allergies, Bassett said. Choose
plants that are less likely to cause aller-
gies, such as azalea, bulbs, cacti, daisies,
dahlia, pansies and petunias, dogwood
trees, hibiscus, boxwood and yucca
shrubs.
• Clean up when done. “Drop your cloth-
ing in a utility room and go shower, ”
Weber said. The pollen is “in your hair,
eyelashes and nose. Do a saltwater wash
in your nose and get it out. That probably
helps more than any other item.”
How to reduce allergies while gardening
“For most individuals, the gardening allergies do, in fact,
affect their quality of life, especially during the seasons.”
— Dr. Clifford Bassett, director of Allergy and Asthma Care of New York
DATEBOOK 23
Thursday • Nov. 7, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
THURSDAY, NOV. 7
Free noon lecture on bankruptcy
law. Noon. San Mateo County Law
Library, 710 Hamilton St., Redwood
City. Free. For more information call
363-4913.
Moving from Cost Center to
Strategic Planner. 7:30 a.m. to 9:30
a.m. 1850 Gateway Drive, Suite 600,
San Mateo. Learn how to effectively
leverage the financial and opera-
tional language of business to firm-
ly establish a strategic leadership
role. General admission is $35 or
free for Northern California Human
Resources Association. For more
information contact Nancy Tubbs at
nancy_tubbs@fullcalendar.com.
Skyline College Hosts Fall 2013
Lecture with Gloria Ladson
Billings. 11 a.m. Theater, Building 1,
3300 College Drive, San Bruno. Free.
For more information call 738-4346.
Pottery on the Coast. Noon to 5
p.m. The Coastal Arts League
Museum, 300 Main St., Half Moon
Bay. This show will reflect the last
four decades of ceramic production
along the coast. Through Dec. 8.
There will be a reception 5 p.m. to 7
p.m. Dec. 7. The gallery hours are
from noon to 5 p.m. Friday to
Monday. For more information call
726-6519 or visit coastalart-
sleague.com.
A Taste of San Mateo. 5:30 p.m. to 8
p.m. College of San Mateo Bayview
Dining Room, 1700 W. Hillsdale
Blvd., Building 10, San Mateo. Wine
tasting event — first glass of wine or
beer included in admission price.
$25. For more information call 401-
2441.
Gift Planning Seminar: Leave an
Environmental Legacy. 6 p.m. to
7:30 p.m. Merrill Lynch, 333 Middle
Ave., Menlo Park. Free. For more
information call 390-8494.
Martine Jardel — Strands of Time
opening reception. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.
The Studio Shop, 244 Primrose
Road, Burlingame. Jardel’s solo
painting exhibit opens with this
reception. Paintings show a process
of sedimentation. Thin layers of
paint are combined with a cold wax
process on canvas to allow light to
seep out from within the painting.
For more information email
julie@thestudioshop.com.
Pacifica Spindrift Players presents
‘Social Security,’ a comedy by
Andrew Bergman. 8 p.m. Muriel
Watkin Gallery, 1050 Crespi Drive,
Pacifica. Tickets are $10. Runs
through Nov. 24. For tickets call the
reservation line at 359-8002.
FRIDAY, NOV. 8
Broadway by the Bay Presents:
‘Guys and Dolls.’ Fox Theatre, 2215
Broadway, Redwood City. Continues
through Nov. 17. Tickets are $35 to
$55 per person plus ticket fees. For
more information call 579-5565.
Holiday Boutique. 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Municipak Services Building, 33
Arroyo Drive, South San Francisco.
Free.
Peninsula Youth Theater Presents
‘Turk and Runt.’ 9:30 a.m. and 11
a.m. Mountain View Center for the
Performing Arts, 500 Castro St.,
Mountain View. Presented as part of
Peninsula Youth Theatre’s ‘Stories on
Stage’ program. These dramatiza-
tions are designed to foster literacy
by encouraging young children to
‘read the book, then see the play.’
Shows also 11:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m.
Nov. 9 $8. For tickets call 903-6000.
California Raptor Art Show. 5 p.m.
to 8 p.m. 788 Main St., Half Moon
Bay. The diversity of California’s resi-
dent and migratory raptor popula-
tion has been captured in 35 origi-
nal works by 20 local artists. Free. For
more information call 726-5056.
Conversations: An Evening with
Khaled Hosseini. 6 p.m.
Spangenberg Theatre, 780
Arastradero Road, Palo Alto. $30 for
students and $50 for general admis-
sion. For more information call 925-
299-2010.
‘The Tale of Snow White.’ 7 p.m.
Mustang Hall, Central Middle
School, 828 Chestnut St., San Carlos.
Shows run through Nov. 17. $12 for
students 18 and under, $15 for
adults. For more information go to
www.sancarloschildrenstheater.co
m.
BHS Musical — ‘Curtains.’ 7 p.m.
Burlingame High School
Auditorium, 1 Mangini Way,
Burlingame. $15 general admission,
$10 for students, seniors and chil-
dren. For more information call 558-
2854.
Mills High School presents Derik
Nelson. 7:30 p.m. Mills High School
Theatre, 400 Murchison Drive,
Millbrae. Derik Nelson, a singer,
songwriter and lead guitarist on
Fox’s ‘Glee,’ will be performing live
at a fundraiser concert. Tickets are
$15, $22, or $30. Unsold tickets may
be available at door. For more infor-
mation go to www.millsmusic.org.
Architecture Lecture Series. 8 p.m.
San Mateo Public Library, 55 W. Third
Ave., San Mateo. The lecture series
will feature leading pioneers in
architecture who have had a signifi-
cant impact on design and built
environment. For more information
call 522-7818.
The Roger Steen Band and Miles
Schon (double bill). 8 p.m. Club
Fox, 2209 Broadway, Redwood City.
$18. For more information call (877)
435-9849 or visit
www.clubfoxrwc.com
Pacifica Spindrift Players presents
‘Social Security,’ a comedy by
Andrew Bergman. 8 p.m. Muriel
Watkin Gallery, 1050 Crespi Drive,
Pacifica. Tickets are $25 for adults
and $20 for seniors and students.
Runs through Nov. 24. For tickets call
the reservation line at 359-8002.
Roger Glenn Latin Jazz Ensemble.
8:30 p.m. Angelicas Supper Club,
836 Main St., Redwood City. Roger’s
original compositions from his soon
to be released CD ‘In the Moment.’
Advance tickets are $25 for regular
table seating. Premier table seating
is $30. For more information go to
www.angelicasllc.com or call 679-
8184.
SATURDAY, NOV. 9
Five Little Monkeys celebrates
Neighborhood Toy Store Day. Five
Little Monkeys, 1111 Burlingame
Ave., Burlingame. 20 percent off
entire store.
Master Gardener Winter Plant
Clinic. 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. Gamble
Garden, 1431 Waverly St., Palo Alto.
A UC Master Gardener will be there
to answer gardening questions. For
more information go to www.gam-
blegarden.org.
Kaplan Test Prep free ACT practice
test. 9 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Belmont
Library, 1110 Alameda de las Pulgas,
Belmont. Registration starts Oct. 21.
For more information call the
Belmont Library at 591-8286.
Flu Shots. 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Millbrae
Library, 1 Library Ave., Millbrae. Free.
For more information call 697-7607.
San Mateo Japanese American
Community Center Holiday Fair
and Bake Sale. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Gardeners’ Hall, Fifth and Claremont
streets, San Mateo. Annual fundrais-
er featuring Asian goods and much,
much more. Free. For more informa-
tion call 343-2793.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
Charley of the city attorney’s office dur-
ing a presentation at the meeting.
“The property is essentially bursting at
the seams,” she said. “FlightCar has pro-
ceeded to absolutely act contrary to the
norm and the violations are egregious.”
FlightCar’s primary service is renting
out people’s cars through its website
while traveling, giving it a share of the
proceeds, free airport parking and a car
wash in exchange. Customers are taken by
limousine from a nearby airport parking
lot to their flights at the San Francisco
International Airport, while the company
says renters get a cheaper price.
In addition to issues with Millbrae, the
company ran into trouble this summer
with the San Francisco City Attorney
Dennis Herrera, who wanted to shut it
down until it complied with the regula-
tions, including conducting pickups and
dropoffs at a special area, paying 10 per-
cent of gross profits to the airport and
paying a $20 per rental transaction. This
summer the California Public Utilities
Commission proposed regulating ride-
sharing at SFO such as Lyft, SideCar and
UberX, which are currently prohibited
from operating at SFO. Petrovic said
FlightCar isn’t affected by this regulation
since its limo service is licensed by the
airport and Public Utilities Commission.
Issues with the city of Millbrae include
three FlightCar rentals being stolen since
the company moved in to the 14,159-
square-foot 480 El Camino Real site of
two parcels that is part of the former
Daland Nissan, according to the police
department. The company’s claim that one
can’t report a stolen car for five days is
not true, police said. The suspects in the
cases have criminal records and this
invites crime into the city, police said.
However, FlightCar Co-founder and
COO Kevin Petrovic said the officer was
not correct in saying the company doesn’t
do background checks and that they do,
but it only checks the driving record, not
the criminal record. He noted FlightCar
wants to expand these checks and it’s
working with its insurance provider to
prevent this kind of thing in the future,
including having better identification
checking policies and a better payment
verification methods.
“FlightCar is a dynamic company and
it’s important to take that into perspec-
tive; we had a successful summer and we’re
also expanding,” Petrovic said. “We’ve
been working tirelessly to bring the site
up to condition. Each and every one of the
conditions is met now. FlightCar has
gone far above and beyond the require-
ments of [the city] that did not themselves
know what they wanted in requirements
from FlightCar. ”
He went on to say that FlightCar is not
a business that’s trying to operate in spite
of the city and that the results of the deci-
sion will have repercussions down the
line.
“This is an administrative mess,”
Petrovic said. “The issue is whether
Millbrae is open to small business or
embarking on a crusade against it.”
Petrovic cited extra hurdles the city
added for FlightCar, including when the
city asked the company to redo the con-
crete of the sidewalk when the company
asked for permission to paint the curb.
“We were taken for a ride,” he said. “I
think the city was very kind in turning a
blind eye to let us do stuff there when per-
mitting wasn’t place, but again we were
not badly intentioned either. It felt they
had to take corrective action to save face
and don’t think we’re at fault for not
accomplishing all the stuff they wanted;
delays came from their side.”
Members of the Planning Commission
were in disagreement with Petrovic.
FlightCar has not acted in good faith,
said Planning Commissioner Catherine
Quigg.
Concern about a number of accusations
and insinuations about the city was
brought up by Planning Commissioner
Lorrie Kalos-Gunn.
“We’re seeing a lot of safety concerns
left undone for a long time and that’s
problematic,” she said. “To make blame is
not business appropriate. It’s really trou-
bling me that this has gone this far. I’m
willing to give the benefit of the doubt to
any entrepreneur willing to bring busi-
ness to this city, but it needs to be safe,
follow the rules, give young people an
opportunity to try a business, but this did
not work.”
She also suggested forwarding the City
Council supporting information that
shows noncompliance such as the fact
that FlightCar hasn’t paid the city’s air-
port parking tax or obtained a business
license, Kalos-Gunn said.
Neighbors of FlightCar came to the
meeting to speak about their experiences
with the company.
Rob Moda, who lives on Hermosa
Avenue around the corner, complained
about double parking by the company and
extra people parking in the neighbor-
hood. He said hoped the noise and prob-
lems associated with the company would
end.
Another resident on Hermosa Avenue
said the company’s bright, white flashing
lights have given her a migraine. She
requested FlightCar raise the light higher
so it’s not at eye level or change the color
of the light so it’s not so startling.
City officials found a number of other
issues with the business.
On Aug. 15, the Fire Marshal Jim Allan
observed two electrical generators on the
site and a neighbor on Hermosa Avenue
reported to staff that a generator had been
operating 24 hours a day. The use of the
generators was never approved, according
to a staff report. He also observed a
makeshift exhaust for the temporary gen-
erator attached to a portable toilet enclo-
sure. The downspout/exhaust stack was
unprotected and was very warm to the
touch and could have potentially reached a
temperature capable of burning skin,
according to the report.
Further, there was an empty fire extin-
guisher and no smoke detector in the tem-
porary office structure, unauthorized curb
painting and stored vehicles present a
potential Class B fire hazard. Dead plants
observed on the property also violated the
requirement that the landscape must be
maintained in neat, healthy and growing
condition, according to the report.
What will the company do if they do
lose the permit? It’s not a situation that
will go away particularly quickly for the
city, Petrovic said.
“Given the situation, we don’t doubt it
[the city] will [revoke the permit],”
Petrovic said. “First we would file an
appeal, go through the process. We’ve
been consulting with some attorneys and
pending result of that [appeal], then we
will take appropriate action to continue
operating when it’s resolved.”
The Millbrae City Council next meets 7
p.m. Nov. 12 at Council Chambers, 621
Magnolia Ave.
angela@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 105
Continued from page 1
PERMIT
COMICS/GAMES
11-7-13
WEDNESDAY’S PUZZLE SOLVED
PREVIOUS
SUDOKU
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Jumble Page 2 • La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifieds
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Boggle Puzzle Everyday in DateBook


Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.
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ACROSS
1 Dolphin’s home
4 Ode inspirer
7 Colorful carp
10 — -de-sac
11 Coil
13 Swimming hole
14 Branch
15 Pew locale
16 Hydrox rival
17 Taco kin
19 Not phony
20 Doctrine
21 Add up
23 Catherine — -Jones
26 Coral island
28 Turkish official
29 MPG watchdog
30 Spandex fiber
34 Spoil (2 wds.)
36 Hawaii’s Mauna —
38 Corral
39 Apple drink
41 Flung
42 Pier
44 Feathery wrap
46 Leafs out
47 Relaxed (hyph.)
52 Jason’s vessel
53 Low voice
54 Take the title
55 Zen riddle
56 — -do-well
57 Dined
58 Make mistakes
59 Music buys
60 Longbow wood
DOWN
1 “Beat it, cat!”
2 French currency
3 Charity
4 Humerus neighbors
5 Gas station buy (2 wds.)
6 Exploding star
7 Divided country
8 Ryan or Tatum
9 Teen fave
12 Basil sauce
13 Overweight
18 — Maria
22 Earthen jar
23 Zig opposite
24 Narcissus’ flaw
25 Bar bill
27 Chaucer offering
29 Proofread
31 Tax pro
32 In medias —
33 Formic acid producer
35 Follows, as advice (2
wds.)
37 Circled the earth
40 Singer Bob —
41 Truck front
42 Verdict giver
43 Psychic — Cayce
45 Smells
46 Harden, as clay
48 Sir — Guinness
49 On vacation
50 Quote
51 Had down pat
DILBERT® CROSSWORD PUZZLE
CRANKY GIRL®
PEARLS BEFORE SWINE®
GET FUZZY®
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2013
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) — Attend events that will
help you reconnect with your past. The opportunity
to try something new or to give an old idea a face-lift
will prove enlightening.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) — Slow down and
take a moment to look before you leap. Impulse will be
the enemy, unless it is confined to the privacy of your
home. A false sense of security should be discouraged.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) — Step up and be
counted. You will have the ability to make others listen
and respond. You can wield power and dominate a
situation to suit your concerns and needs.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) — Don’t wait until you
are forced into a tricky situation. Make decisions that
counter what others want you to do. Assert your right
to choose by standing up for what you want.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) — State your position
forthrightly and with candor. The less you leave
untold, the better. You want everyone to have a clear
idea of your position. If you and others know where
you stand, you’ll succeed.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) — Control will be
necessary. Instead of simply reacting, re-evaluate a
situation and consider all the possible consequences
as well as the pros and cons of a major decision. Strive
for simplicity, moderation and order.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) — Your thirst for
knowledge will lead to engaging conversations and
research that will help you mastermind some big
projects. A supportive individual will point you in
the right direction.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) — Make sure that you have
the correct information before you make a move. You
are likely to be disillusioned regarding what someone
or something is offering you. Get everything in writing.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) — Show everyone how
much fun you can be today. Getting involved in
activities that have a creative or unusual twist will
allow you to show off your talents. Follow your heart
wherever it may lead.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) — Don’t leave room for
complaints regarding your job performance. Take care
of business before you make plans to party. A different
environment will be tempting, but you need to make
sure that it’s conducive to getting things done.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) — You always have a
choice, and as long as you don’t let someone play mind
games with you, it will be easy for you to make the
right decisions. Let your intuition guide you.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) — Work hard and finish
everything that’s expected of you. Don’t let your
productivity suffer because of what someone says or
does. Give it your best and stay within your budget.
COPYRIGHT 2013 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
24 Thursday • Nov. 7, 2013
THE DAILY JOURNAL
25 Thursday • Nov. 7, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
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fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
110 Employment
CAREGIVERS, HHA, CNA’S
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY
15 N. Ellsworth Avenue, Ste. 201
San Mateo, CA 94401
PLEASE CALL
650-206-5200
Please apply in person from Monday to Friday
(Between 10:00am to 4:00pm)
You can also call for an appointment or
apply online at
www.assistainhomecare.com
ASSISTA
IN-HOME CARE
DRY CLEANERS / Laundry, part time,
Saturday 7am to 4pm. Counter, must
speak English Apply LaunderLand, 995
El Camino, Menlo Park.
110 Employment
CAREGIVERS
2 years experience
required.
Immediate placement
on all assignments.
Call (650)777-9000
CRYSTAL CLEANING
CENTER
San Mateo, CA
Two positions available:
Customer Service/Seamstress;
Presser
Are you…..Dependable,
friendly, detail oriented,
willing to learn new skills?
Do you have….Good English skills, a
desire for steady employment and
employment benefits?
Immediate openings for customer
service/seamstress and presser
positions.
If you possess the above
qualities, please call for an
Appointment: (650)342-6978
RESTAURANTS -
Managers, Servers, Bussers, Bartend-
ers, wanted. New Downtown San Mateo
Restaurant, Call (650)340-7684
110 Employment
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
110 Employment
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
RETAIL JEWELRY SALES +
SALES MGR- (jewelry exp req)
Benefits-Bonus-No Nights!
650-367-6500 FX 367-6400
jobs@jewelryexchange.com
110 Employment
SEWER AUTHORITY MID-COASTSIDE
Collection Maintenance
Worker I/II D.O.Q.
(Salary: $3947 -$4798/mo. for Collection
Maintenance Worker I D.O.Q.)
(Salary: $4930- $5992/mo. for Collection
Maintenance Worker II D.O.Q.)
Sewer Authority Mid-Coastside (SAM),
located in the City of Half Moon Bay,
is accepting applications for the posi-
tion of Collection Maintenance Worker
I or II (depending on qualifications).
The Collection Maintenance Worker I is
an entry level maintenance position.The
Collection Maintenance Worker II is a
journey level maintenance position.
MININUM QUALIFICATIONS: Educa-
tion: Equivalent to completion of the 12th
grade. License: Possession of a valid
State of California Class C Driver’s Li-
cense. 6 months previous sewer collec-
tions systems experience desired.
APPLICATION DUE DATE: November
15, 2013 by 3:00 pm. Applications may
be submitted online, via email, delivered
in person, or via US Postal Service (must
be postmarked November 15, 2013).
HOW TO OBTAIN AN APPLICATION
AND JOB DESCRIPTION:
For an application and complete job de-
scription please visit SAM’s website:
www.samcleanswater.org, click on the
link to the left, “Employment Opportuni-
ties”, or you may phone 650-726-0124.
TAXI & LIMO DRIVER, Wanted, full
time, paid weekly, between $500 and
$700 cash, (650)766-9878
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 523423
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Ryan Francis Rovai-Pickett
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Ryan Francis Rovai-Pickett
filed a petition with this court for a decree
changing name as follows:
Present name: Ryan Francis Rovai-Pick-
ett
Proposed name: Ryan Francis Pickett
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on December 3,
2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J, at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 10/22/ 2013
/s/ Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 10/22/2013
(Published, 10/24/13, 10/31/2013,
11/07/2013, 11/14/2013)
26 Thursday • Nov. 7, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 524322
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Christie Ann Ariate
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Christie Ann Ariate filed a peti-
tion with this court for a decree changing
name as follows:
Present name: Christie Ann Ariate
Proposed name: Christie Ariate Parsons
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on December 4,
2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J, at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 10/18/ 2013
/s/ Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 10/10/2013
(Published, 10/24/13, 10/31/2013,
11/07/2013, 11/14/2013)
CASE# CIV 524611
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Nicola Lea Stalnaker
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Nicola Lea Stalnaker filed a
petition with this court for a decree
changing name as follows:
Present name: Nicola Lea Stalnaker
Proposed name: Nicola Lea Hunt
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on December 4,
2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J, at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 10/11/ 2013
/s/ Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 10/10/2013
(Published, 10/17/13, 10/24/2013,
10/31/2013, 11/07/2013)
CASE# CIV 524636
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Olga Sergeyev
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Olga Sergeyev filed a petition
with this court for a decree changing
name as follows:
Present name: Olga Sergeyev
Proposed name: Olga Mescherskaya
Miller
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on December
11, 2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J,
at 400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 10/23/ 2013
/s/ Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 10/18/2013
(Published, 10/31/13, 11/07/2013,
11/14/2013, 11/21/2013)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258093
The following person is doing business
as: Shamrock Day Spa, 267 Baldwin
Ave, SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Hou
Qin Liu, 448 Woodcock Ct, Milpitas CA
95035 and Xiaoying Zhang, 425 Aca-
lanes Dr, #13, Sunnyvale CA 94086. The
business is conducted by a General Part-
nership. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
/s/ Hou Qin Liu /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/16/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/17/13, 10/24/13, 10/31/13, 11/07/13).
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV524378
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Roni Sheffer-Hogan
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Roni Sheffer-Hogan filed a pe-
tition with this court for a decree chang-
ing name as follows:
Present name: Roni Sheffer-Hogan
Proposed name: Roniya Sheffer-Hogan
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on December 3,
2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J, at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 10/15/ 2013
/s/ Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 10/10/2013
(Published, 10/17/13, 10/24/2013,
10/31/2013, 11/07/2013)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258072
The following person is doing business
as: Peppermax, 533 Keoncrest Dr.,
SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94080 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Fabiola Levati-Woo and Johnson Woo,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by a Limited Liability Partnership. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on.
/s/ Fabiola Levati-Woo /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/15/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/17/13, 10/24/13, 10/31/13, 11/07/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257957
The following person is doing business
as: Bijou Jewels, 444 Westlake Center
DALY CITY, CA 94015 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Kyunglim
Choe, 101 Crescent Way, 2216, San
Francisco, CA 94015. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 10/01/2013.
/s/ Kyunglim Choe /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/07/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/17/13, 10/24/13, 10/31/13, 11/07/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258008
The following person is doing business
as: Elements Massage, 39 E. 4th Ave.,
SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Sunnyvale
Massage, LLC, CA. The business is con-
ducted by a Limited Liability Company.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 10/01/2013.
/s/ Lisa Meteyer /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/09/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/17/13, 10/24/13, 10/31/13, 11/07/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258088
The following person is doing business
as: Reed Investments, 2916 Delores
Way, BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is here-
by registered by the following owner:
Patricia Reed and Thomas B. Reed Jr.,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by a Co-Partners. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on 10/01/1979.
/s/ Patricia M. Reed /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/16/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/17/13, 10/24/13, 10/31/13, 11/07/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257982
The following person is doing business
as: Prestige Wines and Liquors, 1300
Burlingame Ave., BURLINGAME, CA
94010 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Tottenham Wines & Spirits,
Inc., CA. The business is conducted by a
Corporation. The registrants commenced
to transact business under the FBN on
06/07/2006.
/s/ Avtar Johal /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/08/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/17/13, 10/24/13, 10/31/13, 11/07/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257948
The following person is doing business
as: Seven Day Creation, 355 Gellert
Blvd., Ste 200, DALY CITY, CA 94015 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Jeromy Hogue, and Bethany Hogue 12
Ida Dr. South San Francisco, CA 94080 .
The business is conducted by a Married
Couple. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on.
/s/ Bethany Hogue /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/07/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/24/13, 10/31/13, 11/07/13, 11/14/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258077
The following person is doing business
as: Be Prepared First Aid, 723 Cuesta
Ave., SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Marita
Nickison, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ Marita Nickison /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/15/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/24/13, 10/31/13, 11/07/13, 11/14/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258057
The following person is doing business
as: Parthenon Properties, 540 Elm St.,
SAN CARLOS, CA 94070, is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: 540 Elm
Associates, LLC, CA. The business is
conducted by a Limited Liability Compa-
ny. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on.
/s/ John Gerontides /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/15/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/24/13, 10/31/13, 11/07/13, 11/14/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258148
The following person is doing business
as: Pacific Residential Realty, 118 Ascot
Ct., Apt. F, MORAGA, CA 94556 is here-
by registered by the following owner:
Keith Miller, same address. The business
is conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ Keith Miller /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/21/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/24/13, 10/31/13, 11/07/13, 11/14/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258189
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Sunny Ridges Joint Venture,
185 Ridgeway Rd., Hillsborough, CA
94101 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owners: Naomi Sobocinski, same ad-
dress and Robert Balopole, 1650 Borel
Pl., Ste. 224, San Mateo CA 94402. The
business is conducted by a Joint Ven-
ture. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on.
/s/ Naomi Sobocinski /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/22/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/24/13, 10/31/13, 11/07/13, 11/14/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258203
The following person is doing business
as: 8 Sushi, 2470 Skyline Blvd., PACIF-
ICA, CA 94044 is hereby registered by
the following owner: My Ocean 8 Incor-
poration, CA. The business is conducted
by a Corporation. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on.
/s/ Tracy Mok /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/23/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/24/13, 10/31/13, 11/07/13, 11/14/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257935
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Rumi, 1179 Laurel St., SAN
CARLOS, CA 94070 is hereby registered
by the following owners: Andrew Joseph
Gambardella and Sharon Lee Gambra-
della, 2747 Hallmark Dr. Belmont, CA
94002. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on.
/s/ Andrew Gambardellal /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/04/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/31/13, 11/07/13, 11/14/13, 11/21/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258302
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Superior Landscaping Service,
3945 Branson Dr., SAN MATEO, CA
94403 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owners: Sergio Martinez, and Laura
A. Martinez, 3945 Branson Dr., San Ma-
teo, CA 94403. The business is conduct-
ed by a Married Couple. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on.
/s/ Sergio Martinez /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/30/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/31/13, 11/07/13, 11/14/13, 11/21/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258298
The following person is doing business
as: Drewsco Consulting & Marketing
Services, 988 San Felipe Ave., SAN
BRUNO, CA 94066 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Andrew G. Daly,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on.
/s/ Andrew G. Daly /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/29/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/31/13, 11/07/13, 11/14/13, 11/21/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257966
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Lolita, 650 El Camino Real, #B,
MENLO PARK, CA 94025 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Lolita,
650 El Camino Real, #B, MENLO PARK,
CA 94025. The business is conducted by
an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on.
/s/ Paulina Kanbar /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/07/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/07/13, 11/14/13, 11/21/13, 11/28/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258371
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Hero International, 1375 Burlin-
game Ave., BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Onyx Style, Inc, DE. The business is
conducted by a Corporation. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ Adil Waliuddin /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/05/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/07/13, 11/14/13, 11/21/13, 11/28/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258092
The following person is doing business
as: Tokyo Sushi & Bar, 2278 Westbor-
ough Blvd, Ste. 201B, SOUTH SAN
FRANCISCO, CA 94080 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: New
Shanghai Restaurant, Inc, CA. The busi-
ness is conducted by a Corporation. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on.
/s/ Cindy Zhu /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/16/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/07/13, 11/14/13, 11/21/13, 11/28/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258368
The following person is doing business
as: Green Acres Express Market and
Produce, 3800 El Camino Real, 3800 El
Camino Real SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Gary and Evlin, Inc, CA. The business is
conducted by a Corporation. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ Gabriel Kholry/
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/05/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/07/13, 11/14/13, 11/21/13, 11/28/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258314
The following person is doing business
as: Veggiebellie.com, 137 15th Ave. SAN
MATEO, CA 94402 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Mary McInnis,
same address and Maggie Foard, 265
Portola St. Pk. Rd., La Honda, CA 94020
. The business is conducted by a Gener-
al Partnership. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 10/30/13.
/s/ Mary McInnis /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/30/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/07/13, 11/14/13, 11/21/13, 11/28/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258184
The following person is doing business
as: Diva Chic Salon, 4060 S. El Camino
Real, Ste A, SAN MATEO, CA 94402 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Melissa B. Dunlap, 304 Castilian Way,
San Mateo, CA 94402. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on .
/s/ Melissa B. Dunlap /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/22/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/07/13, 11/14/13, 11/21/13, 11/28/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258401
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Realty World, 2) Gold Leaf Real
Estate, 724 B Linden Ave., BURLIN-
GAME, CA 94010 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Linda D. Lowe,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on .
/s/ Linda D. Lowe /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/06/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/07/13, 11/14/13, 11/21/13, 11/28/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258119
The following person is doing business
as: Alana’s Cafe, 1408 Burlingame Ave.,
BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Too Tarts,
LLC. The business is conducted by a
Limited Liability Company. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 12/05/2002.
/s/ Teresa Lindhartsen /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/17/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/07/13, 11/14/13, 11/21/13, 11/28/13).
NOTICE OF APPLICATION TO SELL
ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES
Date of Filing Application: Oct. 15, 2013
To Whom It May Concern:
The Name(s) of the applicant(s) is/are:
Amour Amour Cafe
The applicant(s) listed above are apply-
ing to Department of Alcoholic Beverage
Control to sell alcoholic beverages at:
305 E. 4th Ave.
SAN MATEO, CA 94401-4008
Type of license applied for:
41 - On-Sale Beer and Wine - Eating
Places
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
October 24, 31, November 7, 2013
210 Lost & Found
LOST AFRICAN GRAY PARROT -
(415)377-0859 REWARD!
LOST DOG-SMALL TERRIER-$5000
REWARD Norfolk Terrier missing from
Woodside Rd near High Rd on Dec 13.
Violet is 11mths, 7lbs, tan, female, no
collar, microchipped. Please help bring
her home! (650)568-9642
LOST GOLD Cross at Carlmont Shop-
ping Cente, by Lunardi’s market
(Reward) (415)559-7291
LOST JORDANIAN PASSPORT AND
GREEN CARD. Lost in Daly City, If
found contact, Mohammad Al-Najjar
(415)466-5699
LOST ON Sunday 03/10/13, a Bin of
Documents on Catalpa Ave., in
San Mateo. REWARD, (650)450-3107
LOST SET OF CAR KEYS near Millbrae
Post Office on June 18, 2013, at 3:00
p.m. Reward! Call (650)692-4100
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
REWARD!! LOST DOG - 15LB All White
Dog, needs meds, in the area of Oaknoll
RWC on 3/23/13, (650)400-1175
RING FOUND IN BURLINGAME CALL
TO IDENTIFY (description) Foster City
Police Department Property Section
(650)286-3300
294 Baby Stuff
BABY CAR SEAT AND CARRIER $20
(650)458-8280
HIGH CHAIR by Evenflo. Clean, sturdy,
barely used. $20 (650)726-4985
NURSERY SET - 6 piece nursery set -
$25., (650)341-1861
295 Art
ART PAPER, various size sheets, 10
sheets, $20. (650)591-6596
ART: 5 charcoal nude figures, unframed,
14” x 18”, by Andrea Medina, 1980s.
$40. 650-345-3277
RUB DOWN TYPE (Lettraset), hundreds
to choose from. 10 sheets for $10.
(650)591-6596
296 Appliances
2 DELONGHI Heaters, 1500 Watts, new
$50 both (650)520-3425
2 DELONGHI Heaters, 1500 Watts, new
$50 both (650)520-3425
AMANA HTM outdoor furnace heat ex-
changer,new motor, pump, electronics.
Model ERGW0012. 80,000 BTU $50.
(650)342-7933
COIN-OP GAS DRYER - $100.,
(650)948-4895
ELECTRIC DRYER (Kenmore) asking
$95, good condition! (650)579-7924
GAS STOVE (Magic Chef) asking $95,
good condition! (650)579-7924
HAIR DRYER, Salon Master, $10.
(650)854-4109
HUNTER OSCILLATING FAN, excellent
condition. 3 speed. $35. (650)854-4109
KENMORE MICROWAVE Oven: Table
top, white, good condition, $40 obo
(650) 355-8464
LEAN MEAN Fat Grilling Machine by
George Foreman. $15 (650)832-1392
LG WASHER/ DRYER in one. Excellent
condition, new hoses, ultracapacity,
7 cycle, fron load, $600, (650)290-0954
MAYTAG WALL oven, 24”x24”x24”, ex-
cellent condition, $50 obo, (650)345-
5502
OSTER MEAT slicer, mint, used once,
light weight, easy to use, great for holi-
day $25. (650)578-9208
PRESSURE COOKER Miromatic 4qt
needs gasket 415 333-8540 Daly City
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
REFRIGERATOR - Whirlpool, side-by-
side, free, needs compressor,
(650)726-1641
ROTISSERIE GE, US Made, IN-door or
out door, Holds large turkey 24” wide,
Like new, $80, OBO (650)344-8549
296 Appliances
SANYO MINI REFRIGERATOR- $40.,
(415)346-6038
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
298 Collectibles
101 MINT Postage Stamps from Eu-
rope, Africa, Latin America. Pre 1941,
All different . $6.00, (650)787-8600
1920'S AQUA Glass Beaded Flapper
Purse (drawstring bag) & Faux Pearl
Flapper Collar. $50. 650-762-6048
1940 VINTAGE telephone bench maple
antiques collectibles $75 (650)755-9833
1953 CHEVY Bel Air Convertible model.
Sun Star 1:18 scale.Blue. Original box.
$20 cash. (650)654-9252
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
2 VINTAGE Light Bulbs circa 1905. Edi-
son Mazda Lamps. Both still working -
$50 (650)-762-6048
2003 AMERICAN Eagle silver proof dol-
lar. Original velvet box and COA. $70
Cash. (650)654-9252
84 USED European (34), U.S. (50) Post-
age Stamps. Most pre-World War II. All
different, all detached from envelopes.
$4.00 all, 650-787-8600
AFGHAN PRAYER RUG - very ornate,
$100., (650)348-6428
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
AUTOGRAPHED GUMBI collectible art
& Gloria Clokey - $35., (650)873-8167
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23”, $50. OBO,
(650)754-3597
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
JAPANESE MOTIF end table, $99
(650)520-9366
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MARK HAMILL autographed Star Wars
Luke figure, unopened rarity. 1995 pack-
age. $75 San Carlos, 650-255-8716.
MEMORABILIA CARD COLLECTION,
large collection, Marilyn Monroe, James
Dean, John Wayne and hundreds more.
$3,300/obo.. Over 50% off
(650)319-5334.
MICHAEL JORDAN POSTER - 1994,
World Cup, $10., (650)365-3987
SCHILLER HIPPIE poster, linen, Sparta
graphics 1968. Mint condition. $600.00.
(650)701-0276
SILVER PIECE dollar circulated $30 firm
415 333-8540 Daly City
STAR WARS 9/1996 Tusken Raider ac-
tion figure, in original unopened package.
$5.00, Steve, SC, 650-255-8716
TATTOO ARTIST - Norman Rockwell
figurine, limited addition, $90., (650)766-
3024
TEA POTS - (6) collectables, good con-
dition, $10. each, (650)571-5899
TRIPOD - Professional Quality used in
1930’s Hollywood, $99, obo
(650)363-0360
UNIQUE, FRAMED to display, original
Nevada slot machine glass plate. One of
a kind. $50. 650-762-6048
WORLD WAR II US Army Combat field
backpack from 1944 $99 SOLD!
299 Computers
HP PRINTER Deskjet 970c color printer.
Excellent condition. Software & accesso-
ries included. $30. 650-574-3865
27 Thursday • Nov. 7, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LEGAL NOTICES
Fictitious Business Name Statements, Trustee
Sale Notice, Alcohol Beverage License, Name
Change, Probate, Notice of Adoption, Divorce
Summons, Notice of Public Sales, and More.
Published in the Daily Journal for San Mateo County.
Fax your request to: 650-344-5290
Email them to: ads@smdailyjournal.com
300 Toys
‘66 CHEVELLE TOY CAR, Blue collecti-
ble. $12. (415)337-1690
LARGE ALL Metal Tonka dump truck.
as new, $25, SOLD!
PINK BARBIE 57 Chevy Convertible
28" long (sells on E-Bay for $250) in box
$99 (650)591-9769
RADIO CONTROL car; Jeep with off
road with equipment $99 OBO
(650)851-0878
STAR WARS R2-D2 action figure. Un-
opened, original 1995 package. $10.
Steve, San Carlos, 650-255-8716.
STAR WARS, Battle Droid figures, four
variations. Unopened 1999 packages.
$60 OBO. Steve, 650-255-8716.
TONKA DUMP Truck with tipping bed,
very sturdy Only $10 SOLD!
TONKA METAL Excavator independent
bucket and arm, $25 SOLD!
TOY - Barney interactive activity, musical
learning, talking, great for the car, $16.
obo, (650)349-6059
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
1920 MAYTAG wringer washer - electric,
gray color, $100., (650)851-0878
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14” x 21”, carved top, $45.,
(650)341-7890
ANTIQUE CRYSTAL/ARCADE Coffee
Grinder. $80. 650-596-0513
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE WASHING MACHINE - some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
BREADBOX, METAL with shelf and cut-
ting board, $30 (650)365-3987
MAHOGANY ANTIQUE Secretary desk,
72” x 40” , 3 drawers, Display case, bev-
elled glass, $500. (650)766-3024
303 Electronics
2 RECTILINEAR speakers $99 good
condition. (650)368-5538
27” SONY TRINITRON TV - great condi-
tion, rarely used, includes remote, not flat
screen, $65., (650)357-7484
46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
APPLE Harmon Kardon speakers, sub-
woofer, one side rattles. In San Carlos,
$40, 650-255-8716.
AUTO TOP hoist still in box
$99.00 or best offer (650)493-9993
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
BLACKBERRY PHONE good condition
$99.00 or best offer (650)493-9993
DVD PLAYER, $25. Call (650)558-0206
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
IPHONE GOOD condition $99.00 or best
offer (650)493-9993
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
PHILLIPS ENERGY STAR 20” color TV
with remote. Good condition, $20
(650)888-0129
PIONEER STEREO Receiver 1 SX 626
excellent condition $99 (650)368-5538
SAMSUNG 27" TV Less than 6 months
old, with remote. Moving must sell
$100.00 (650) 995-0012
SANYO C30 Portable BOOM BOX,
AM/FM STEREO, Dolby Metal Tape
player/recorder, 2/3 speakers boxes, $50
650-430-6046
SET OF 3 wireless phones all for $50
(650)342-8436
SLIDE PROJECTOR Air Equipped Su-
per 66 A and screen $30 for all
(650)345-3840
SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with re-
mote good condition $99 (650)345-1111
304 Furniture
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
3 DRAWER PLATFORM BED Real
wood (light pine, Varathane finish). Twin
size. $50 (650)637-1907
8 DRAWER wooden dresser $99
(650)759-4862
ALASKAN SCENE painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
ARMOIRE CABINET - $90., Call
(415)375-1617
304 Furniture
ANODYZED BRONZE ETEGERE Tall
banker’s rack. Beautiful style; for plants
flowers sculptures $70 (415)585-3622
AUTUMN TABLE Centerpiece unop-
ened, 16 x 6, long oval shape, copper
color $10.00 (650)578-9208
BBQ GRILL, Ducane, propane $90
(650)591-4927
BRASS DAYBED - Beautiful, $99.,
(650)365-0202
CABINET BLONDE Wood, 6 drawers,
31” Tall, 61” wide, 18” deep, $45.
(650)592-2648
CHAIR MODERN light wood made in Ita-
ly $99 (415)334-1980
CHANDELIER, ELEGANT, $75.
(650)348-6955
CHINA CABINET, 53” x “78” wooden
with glass. Good shape. $120 obo.
(650)438-0517
CHINESE LACQUERED cabinet, 2
shelves and doors. Beautiful. 23 width 30
height 11 depth $75 (650)591-4927
CURIO CABINET 55" by 21" by 12"
Glass sides, door & shelves $95 OBO
(650)368-6271
DINETTE TABLE walnut with chrome
legs. 36”x58” with one leaf 11 1/2”. $50,
San Mateo (650)341-5347
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DRESSER - 6 drawer 61" wide, 31" high,
& 18" deep $50., (650)592-2648
DRESSERlarge, $55. Call
(650)558-0206
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
END TABLE, medium large, with marble
top. and drawer. $60 or best offer,
(650)681-7061
EZ CHAIR, large, $15. Call (650)558-
0206
FLAT TOP DESK, $35.. Call (650)558-
0206
HEADBOARD, QUEEN-SIZE,HALF-
MOON shape,decorated with small
stones,very heavy. Free to take away!
(650-342-6192)
I-JOY MASSAGE chair, exc condition
$95 (650)591-4927
KITCHEN CABINETS - 3 metal base
kitchen cabinets with drawers and wood
doors, $99., (650)347-8061
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
MATCHING RECLINER, SOFA & LOVE
SEAT - Light multi-colored fabric, $95.
for all, (650)286-1357
MIRRORS, large, $25. Call
(650)558-0206
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
NATURAL WOOD table 8' by 4' $99
(650)515-2605
OAK ENTERTAINMENT Cabinet/lighted,
mirrored,glass Curio Top. 72" high x 21"
deep x 35" wide. $95.00 (650)637-0930
OFFICE LAMP, small. Black & white
pen and paper holder. Brand new, in
box. $10 (650)867-2720
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PATIO TABLE with 4 chairs, glass top,
good condition 41” in diameter $95
(650)591-4927
PEDESTAL DINETTE 36” Square Table
- $65., (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL SINK $25 (650)766-4858
PORTABLE JEWELRY display case
wood, see through lid $45. 25 x 20 x 4 in-
ches. (650)592-2648.
PRIDE MECHANICAL Lift Chair, Infinite
postion. Excellent condition, owner’s
manual included. $400 cash only,
(650)544-6169
QUEEN SIZE Hide a Bed, Like new
$275, (650)245-5118
RECLINING CHAIR, almost new, Beige
$100 (650)624-9880
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
ROCKING CHAIR Great condition,
1970’s style, dark brown, wooden,
suede cushion, photo availble, $99.,
(650)716-3337
ROCKING CHAIR w/wood carving, arm-
rest, rollers, swivels $99., (650)592-2648
ROUND DINING table, by Ethan Allen,
sturdy good cond. $95 (650)726-4985
SEWING TABLE, folding, $20. Call
(650)558-0206
SHELVING UNIT from IKEA interior
metal, glass nice condition $50/obo.
(650)589-8348
304 Furniture
SOFA 7-1/2' $25 (650)322-2814
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
STORAGE TABLE light brown lots of
storage good cond. $45. (650)867-2720
TEA / UTILITY CART, $15. (650)573-
7035, (650)504-6057
TEACART - Wooden, $60. obo,
(650)766-9998
TEAK BASE and glass cover cheese
holder. Great for holidays. $18.
(650)341-6402
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
TV CABINET, brown wood, 3 shelves, 2
doors, brass hardware, 34 3/8wx20
1/2dx28 3/8h good condition. $35
(650)347-5104
TV STAND brown. $40.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
TV STAND, with shelves, holds large TV,
very good condition. $90. (650)573-7035,
(650)504-6057.
WHITE 5 Drawer dresser.Excellent con-
dition. Moving. Must sell $90.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
WICKER DRESSER, white, 3 drawers,
exc condition 31 width 32 height 21.5
depth $35 (650)591-4927
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE” decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Three avail-
able, Call (650)345-5502
BRADFORD COLLECTOR Plates THAI
(Asian) - $35 (650)348-6955
CANDLEHOLDER - Gold, angel on it,
tall, purchased from Brueners, originally
$100., selling for $30.,(650)867-2720
COFFEE MAKER, Makes 4 cups $12,
(650)368-3037
COOKING POTS(3) stainless steel with
lids: 21/2 gal, 4 gal, 5 gal $20 for all.
(650)574-3229
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
HOUSE HEATER Excellent condition.
Works great. Must sell. $30.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
ICE CREAM MAKER - Westbend 4 qt.
old fashion ice cream maker, brand new,
still in box, $30., (650)726-1037
KIRBY VACUUM cleaner good condition
with extras $90 OBO (650)345-5502
MANGLE-SIMPLEX FLOOR model,
Working, $20 (650)344-6565
OSTER BREAD maker (new) $45.,
(650)520-3425
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
PUSH LAWN MOWER - very good
condition $25., (650)580-3316
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
STANDARD BATHROOM SET beige lid,
cover and mat. $10 (650)574-3229
TWO 21 quart canning pots, with lids, $5
each. (650)322-2814
VACUMN EXCELLENT condition. Works
great.Moving. Must sell. $35.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
VINTAGE VICTORIAN cotton lawn
dress, - $65. (650)348-6955
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
LADIES GLOVES - gold lame' elbow
length gloves, size 7.5, $15. new,
(650)868-0436
PRO DIVER Invicta Watch. Brand new in
box, $60. (650)290-0689
WATCHES - Quicksilver (2), brand new
in box, $40. for both, (650)726-1037
308 Tools
12-VOLT, 2-TON Capacity Scissor Jack
w/ Impact Wrench, New in Box, Never
Used. $85.00 (650) 270-6637 after 5pm
6-8 MISC. TOOLS - used, nail tray with
nails, $15., (650)322-2814
BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269
CIRCULAR SAW, Craftsman, 10”, 4 long
x 20” wide. Comes w/ stand - $70.
(650)678-1018
CRACO 395 SP-PRO, electronic paint
sprayer.Commercial grade. Used only
once. $600/obo. (650)784-3427
CRAFTMAN JIG Saw 3.9 amp. with vari-
able speeds $65 (650)359-9269
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN 9" Radial Arm Saw with 6"
dado set. No stand. $55 (650)341-6402
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
ESSIC CEMENT Mixer, gas motor, $850,
(650)333-6275
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
LOG CHAIN (HEAVY DUTY) 14' $75
(650)948-0912
308 Tools
MAKITA 10" mitre saw with 100 tooth
carbon blade $60 SOLD!
PROFESSIONAL MORTAR BOX Like
New $25 (650)368-0748
PUSH LAWN mower $25 (650)851-0878
ROLLING STEEL Ladder10 steps, Like
New. $475 obo, (650)333-4400
TOOL BOX full of tools. Moving must
sell. $100.00 (650) 995-0012
309 Office Equipment
CANON COPIER, $55. Call
(650)558-0206
DESK - 7 drawer wood desk, 5X2X2.5'
$25., (650)726-9658
FILING CABINET, 4-drawer, letter $25
(650)341-8342
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20., (650)871-7200
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20.00 (650)871-7200
2 FLOWER pots with Gardenia's both for
$20 (650)369-9762
2 GALLON Sprayer sears polythene
compressed air 2 1/2 inch opening, used
once $10 San Bruno (650)588-1946
4 IN 1 STERO UNIT. CD player broken.
$20., (650)834-4926
70 BAMBOO POLES - 6 to 12ft. long
$40. for all can deliver, (415)346-6038
ADULT VIDEOS - (3) DVDs classics fea-
turing older women, $20. each or, 3 for
$50 (650)212-7020
Alkaline GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM - ,
PH Balance water, anti-oxident proper-
ties, new, $100., (650)619-9203.
ALUMINUM WALKER, Foldable with
wheels. $15 (650)756-7878
ALUMINUM WINDOWS - (10)double
pane, different sizes, $10. each,
(415)819-3835
ANTIQUE CAMEL BACK TRUNK -wood
lining. (great toy box) $99.,
(650)580-3316
ANTIQUE KILIM RUNNER woven zig
zag design 7' by 6" by 4' $99.,
(650)580-3316
ANTIQUE LANTERN - (7) Olde Brooklyn
lanterns, battery operated, safe, new in
box, $100. for all, (650)726-1037
ARTIFICIAL FICUS TREE 6 ft. life like,
full branches. in basket $55. (650)269-
3712
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
BABY BJORN Little Potty Ideal 4
travel/early training,(650)595-3933
BLUE/WHITE DUCK shaped ceramic
teapot, hand painted, made in China.
$18. (650)341-6402
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
BODY BY JAKE AB Scissor Exercise
Machine w/instructions. $50.00
(650)637-0930
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BREVILLE JUICE Maker multi speed
(Williams Somoma) never used $90
(650)994-4783
BRIEFCASE 100% black leather
excellent condition $75 (650)888-0129
BUFFET CENTERPIECE: Lalique style
crystal bowl. For entre, fruit, or dessert
$20 (415)585-3622
CHEESESET 6 small and 1 large plate
Italian design never used Ceramica Cas-
tellania $25. (650)644-9027
DOLLS: NEW, girl and boy in pilgrim
costume, adorable, soft fabric, beautifully
made. $30. 650-345-3277
DVD'S TV programs 24 4 seasons $20
ea. (650)952-3466
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good
condition $50., (650)878-9542
EXOTIC EROTIC Ball SF & Mardi gras 2
dvd's $25 ea. (415)971-7555
EXTENDED BATH BENCH - never
used, $45. obo, (650)832-1392
FOLDING MAHJHONG table with medal
chrome plated frame $40 SOLD!
FULL SIZE quilted Flowerly print green &
print $25 (650)871-7200
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GEORGE Magazines, 30, all intact
$50/all OBO. SOLD!
GOURMET SET for cooking on your ta-
ble. European style. $15 (650)644-9027
GRANDFATHER CLOCK with bevel
glass in front and sides (650)355-2996
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10),
(650)364-7777
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
HOT SANDWICH maker elec, perfect,
$9.95 (650)595-3933
HUMAN HAIR Wigs, (4) Black hair, $90
all (650)624-9880
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
IGLOO COOLER - 3 gallon beverage
cooler, new, still in box, $15.,
(650)345-3840
JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
310 Misc. For Sale
K9 ADVANTIX - for dogs 21-55 lbs.,
repels and kills fleas and ticks. 9 months
worth, $60., (650)343-4461
KENNESAW ORIGINAL salute cannon
$30. (650)726-1037
LAMPSHADE - Shantung, bell shaped,
off white, 9” tall, 11” diameter, great con-
dition, $7., (650)347-5104
LANDSCAPE PICTURES (3) hand
painted 25" long 21" wide, wooden
frame, $60 for all 3, (650)201-9166
LAWN CHAIRS (4) White, plastic, $8.
each, (415)346-6038
LOW RIDER magazines 80 late 1999 all
for $80 SOLD!
LUGGAGE, BLACK Samsonite with roll-
ers, 3 compartments, condition clean,
never used. makeshift handle, $40
(650)347-5104
MANUAL LAWN mower ( by Scott Turf )
never used $65 (650)756-7878
MARTEX TOWEL SET (bath, hand,
face) - gold-colored - $15 (650)574-3229
MARTEX TOWEL SET (bath, hand.
face) - clay-colored - $15 (650)574-3229
MATCHING LIGHT SCONCES - style
wall mount, plug in, bronze finish, 12”Lx
5”W , $12. both, SOLD!
MEDICINE CABINET - 18” X 24”, almost
new, mirror, $20., (650)515-2605
MEN’S LEATHER travel bags (2), used
$25 each.(650)322-2814
MERITAGE PICNIC Time Wine and
Cheese Tote - new black $45
(650)644-9027
MIRROR 41" by 29" Hardrock maple
frame $90 OBO (650)593-8880
MODERN ART Pictures: 36"X26", $90
for all obo Call (650)345-5502
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
OUTDOOR GREENHOUSE. Handmade.
33" wide x 20 inches deep. 64.5 " high.
$70.00 (650)871-7200
OVAL MIRROR $10 (650)766-4858
PATIO ARMILLARY vintage iron 18" rd,
$60 obo SOLD!
PET CARRIER Excellent Condition Very
Clean Size small "Petaire" Brand
$50.00 (650)871-7200
PRINCESS PLANT 6' tall in bloom pot-
ted $15 (415)346-6038
PUNCH BOWL SET- 10 cup plus one
extra nice white color Motif, $25.,
(650)873-8167
QUEENSIZE BEDSPREAD w/2 Pillow
Shams (print) $30.00 (650)341-1861
RED DEVIL VACUUM CLEANER - $25.,
(650)593-0893
REVERSIBLE KING BEDSPREAD bur-
gundy; for the new extra deep beds. New
$60 (415)585-3622
RICHARD NORTH Patterson 5 Hard-
back Books @$3.00 each (650)341-1861
ROGERS' BRAND stainless steel steak
knife: $15 (415)585-3622
SCARY DVD movies, (7) in cases, Zom-
bies, Date Movie, Labyrinth, in original
boxes. $10/all. (650)578-9208
SET OF 11 Thomas registers 1976 mint
condition $25 (415)346-6038
SF GREETING CARDS -(300 with enve-
lopes) factory sealed, $10 (650)365-3987
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48” x 69”
$70 (650)692-3260
SINGER SEWING machine 1952 cabinet
style with black/gold motor. $35.
(650)574-4439
SONY EREADER - Model #PRS-500, 6”,
$60., (650)294-9652
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
STERLING SILVER loving cup 10" circa
with walnut base 1912 $65
(650)520-3425
TRIVIAL PURSUIT - Master Game/Ge-
nus Edition. Has all cards. Mint condi-
tion. Asking $10. (650)574-3229
TWIN SIZE quilt Nautica, New. Yellow,
White, Black Trim “San Marino" pattern
$40 Firm (650)871-7200.
USB VEHICLE charger any mini USB
device $20 (650)595-3933
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
310 Misc. For Sale
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WALKER - never used, $85.,
(415)239-9063
WEST AFRICAN hand carved tribal
masks - $25 (650)348-6955
WHEEL CHAIR asking $75 OBO
(650)834-2583
WOMEN'S LADY Cougar gold iron set
set - $25. (650)348-6955
XMAS DECORATIONS: 6 unique, hand
painted, jointed new toy soldiers, holding
musical instrument. $34. 650-345-3277
311 Musical Instruments
GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO -
Appraised @$5450., want $3500 obo,
(650)343-4461
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
LAGUNA ELECTRIC 6 string LE 122
Guitar with soft case and strap $75.
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
SHERMAN CLAY Player Piano, with 104
player rolls, $1000, (650)579-1259
UKULELE STILL in box unused, no
brand $35 (650)348-6428
312 Pets & Animals
BAMBOO BIRD Cage - very intricate de-
sign - 21"x15"x16". $50 (650)341-6402
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
100% COTTON New Beautiful burgundy
velvet drape 82"X52" W/6"hems: $45
(415)585-3622
ALPINESTAR MOTORCYCLE JEANS
Twin Stitched. Internal Knee Protection.
Tags Attached. Mens Sz 34 Grey/Blue
Denim $50.00 (650)357-7484
AUTHENTIC PERUVIAN VICUNA PON-
CHO: 56” square. Red, black trim, knot-
ted fringe hem. $99 (650)375-8044
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
HOODED ALL-WEATHER JACKET:
reversible. Outer: weatherproof tan color.
Iner: Navy plush, elastic cuffs. $15
(650)375-8044
INDIAN SARI $50 (650)515-2605
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES DONEGAL design 100% wool
cap from Wicklow, Ireland, $20. Call
(650)341-8342
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES FUR Jacket (fake) size 12 good
condition $30 (650)692-3260
LADIES WINTER coat 3/4 length, rust
color, with fur collar, $30 obo
(650)515-2605
LADIES WOOL BLAZER: Classic, size
12, brass buttons. Sag Harbor. Excellent
condition. $18.00 (650)375-8044
LEATHER JACKET Classic Biker Style.
Zippered Pockets. Sturdy. Excellent Con-
dition. Mens, XL Black Leather $50.00
(650)357-7484
LEATHER JACKET, brown bomber, with
pockets.Sz XL, $88. (415)337-1690
LEATHER JACKETS (5) - used but not
abused. Like New, $100 each.
(650)670-2888
MENS JEANS (11) Brand names various
sizes 32,33,34 waist 30,32 length $100.
for all (650)347-5104
MINK CAPE, beautiful with satin lining,
light color $75 obo (650)591-4927
28 Thursday • Nov. 7, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 Hollywood special
effects, briefly
4 Did, but doesn’t
now
10 1970s-’80s
sketch comedy
show
14 “Prince Valiant”
prince
15 Brian McKnight/
Vanessa
Williams duet
with the line “It
conquers all”
16 Chain with stacks
17 Wine enthusiast’s
list of killer reds?
20 “I __ Symphony”:
Supremes hit
21 Hoover
underlings
22 Stands the test of
time
25 Out to lunch, so
to speak
28 Shed tears
29 Kaput
31 Mineo of film
32 Barcelona bar
bites
34 Dust particle
36 Wine enthusiast’s
“That’s how it
goes”?
40 Bankrolls
41 Man-to-boy
address
42 Feel ill
43 It’s saved in bits
44 Stinging insect
48 Effervesce, as
some wine
52 Helter-__
54 “Uh-oh”
56 Sierra __:
Freetown’s
country
57 Wine enthusiast’s
philosophy?
61 Champagne
choice
62 First novel in
Christopher
Paolini’s
Inheritance Cycle
63 Take steps
64 Eggs sprinkling
65 Levels of society
66 __ down the law
DOWN
1 Nut used in Asian
cooking
2 Novelist
Graham
3 Overrun
4 Arm bone-related
5 Lawn maker
6 Celebration
time
7 Fall on __ ears
8 Choice piece
9 Singer K.T.
10 Judged, with
“up”
11 Waters off
Taiwan
12 Cargo unit
13 Cheney and
Biden: Abbr.
18 Lost one’s
temper
19 Sumac of Peru
23 Glimpse
24 __-Pei
26 Golfer Johnson
27 Antlered animal
30 Neighbor of Kobe
and Kyoto
33 Mule parent
34 “Sammy the
Seal” author Hoff
35 Cat burglar
36 Bon mot
37 Illicit
38 Google goals
39 Minn. neighbor
40 Scale notes
43 Hit the road
45 Like many a John
Cage
composition
46 Largest of New
York’s Finger
Lakes
47 Comely
49 Butler of fiction
50 Ornamental pond
fish
51 Draws the short
straw, say
53 Justice Kagan
55 Lasting mark
57 Lots of ozs.
58 Keogh plan kin
59 Ottoman
dignitary
60 Sci-fi sidekick,
often
By Andrea Carla Michaels and Gregory Cameron
(c)2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
11/07/13
11/07/13
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
316 Clothes
MENS WRANGLER jeans waist 31
length 36 five pairs $20 each plus bonus
Leonard (650)504-3621
NIKE PULLOVER mens heavy jacket
Navy Blue & Red (tag on) Reg. price
$200 selling for $59 (650)692-3260
PROM PARTY Dress, Long sleeveless
size 6, magenta, with shawl like new $40
obo (650)349-6059
SILK SCARF, Versace, South Beach
pattern 100% silk, 24.5”x34.5” made in
Italy, $75. $(650)591-6596
VICTORIA SECRET 2 piece nightgown,
off white, silk lace. tags attached. paid
$120, selling for $55 (650)345-1111
WHITE LACE 1880’s reproduction dress
- size 6, $100., (650)873-8167
WINTER COAT, ladies european style
nubek leather, tan colored, green lapel &
hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
WOMAN;S LEVI'S Jacket Pristine cond.,
faded Only $29 (650)595-3933
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10 labeled Du-
plex and is priced at $15 (650)574-4439
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10. Elie Tahari
new, never worn $25 (650)574-4439
317 Building Materials
(1) 2" FAUX WOOD WINDOW BLIND,
with 50" and 71" height, still in box, $50
obo (650)345-5502
30 FLUORESCENT Lamps 48" (brand
new in box) $75 for all (650)369-9762
70 SPREADER cleats, 1” x 8” for 8”
foundations. $25. (650)345-3840
BATHROOM VANITY, antique, with top
and sink: - $65. (650)348-6955
BRAND NEW Millgard window + frame -
$85. (650)348-6955
DRAIN PIPE - flexible, 3” & 4”, approx.
20’ of 3”, 40 ft. of 4”, $25.all,
(650)851-0878
ELECTRICAL MATERIAL - Connectors,
couplings, switches, rain tight flex, and
more.Call. $30.00 for all (650)345-3840
ONE BOX of new #1 heavy CEDAR
SHAKE shingles $14.00.(650)341-8342
PACKAGED NUTS, Bolts and screws,
all sizes, packaged $99 (650)364-1374
PVC - 1”, 100 feet, 20 ft. lengths, $25.,
(650)851-0878
317 Building Materials
USED LUMBER pieces 5 2x4's, 2 2x6's,
3 plywood sheets ALL $30.00
SOLD!
318 Sports Equipment
"EVERLAST FOR HER" Machine to
help lose weight $30., (650)368-3037
2 BASKETBALLS Spalding NBA, Hardly
used, $30 all (650)341-5347
2 SOCCER balls hardly used, $30 all
San Mateo, (650)341-5347
BOWLING BALLS. Selling 2 - 16 lb.
balls for $25.00 each. (650)341-1861
BUCKET OF 260 golf balls, $25.
(650)339-3195
CAMPER DOLLY, excellent condition.
Used only once. $150. (650)366-6371
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18” di-
meter, “Halex” brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
DL1000 BOAT Winch Rope & More,
$50., (650)726-9658
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
FISHERS MENS skis $35 (650)322-2814
GIRLS BIKE, Princess 16” wheels with
helmet, $50 San Mateo (650)341-5347
GOTT 10-GAL beverage cooler$20.
(650)345-3840
KIDS 20" mongoose mountain bike 6
speeds front wheel shock good condition
asking $65 (650)574-7743
LADIES BOWLING SET- 8 lb. ball, 7 1/2
sized shoes, case, $45., (650)766-3024
LADIES STEP thruRoadmaster 10
speed bike w. shop-basket Good
Condition. $55 OBO call: (650) 342-8510
MENS ROLLER Blades size 101/2 never
used $25 (650)520-3425
POWER PLUS Exercise Machine $99
(650)368-3037
REI 2 man tent $40 (650)552-9436
SALMON FISHING weights 21/2 pound
canon balls $25 (650)756-7878
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
SCHWINN 26" man's bike with balloon
tires $75 like new (650)355-2996
318 Sports Equipment
Say Goodbye To The 'Stick In
Style & Gear Up For a Super
Season!
49er Swag at Lowest Prices
Niner Empire
957C Industrial Rd. San Carlos
T-F 10-6; Sa 10 -4
ninerempire.com
(415)370-7725
STATIONARY BIKE, Volt, Clean, $15
(650)344-6565
STATIONERY BIKE, $20. (650)573-
7035, (650)504-6057.
VINTAGE ENGLISH ladies ice skates -
up to size 7-8, $40., (650)873-8167
WET SUIT - medium size, $95., call for
info (650)851-0878
WO 16 lb. Bowling Balls @ $25.00 each.
(650)341-1861
322 Garage Sales
GARAGE
SALE
Great Variety
Saturday,
November 9
8:00 to 5:00
1251 Parrott Drive
San Mateo 94402
322 Garage Sales
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
335 Rugs
THROW RUG, 8’ x 11’, black and gold.w/
fring, beautiful,clean. $50. SOLD!
335 Garden Equipment
CRAFTSMAN 5.5 HP gas lawn mower
with rear bag $55., (650)355-2996
LAWNMOWER - American made, man-
ual/push, excellent condition, $50.,
(650)342-8436
REMINGTON ELECTRIC lawn mower,
$40. (650)355-2996
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
CLASSICAL YASHICA camera
in leather case $25. (650)644-9027
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
VIVITAR ZOOM lens-28mm70mm. Filter
and lens cap. Original owner. $50. Cash
(650)654-9252
VIVITAR ZOOM lens. 28mm-210mm. Fil-
ter and lens cap. Original owner. $99.
Cash. (650)654-9252
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $99
(415)971-7555
345 Medical Equipment
MEDICAL EQUIPMENT - Brand new
port-a-potty, never used, $40., Walker,
$30., (650)832-1392
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
380 Real Estate Services
HOMES & PROPERTIES
The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
weekly Real Estate Section.
Look for it
every Friday and Weekend
to find information on fine homes
and properties throughout
the local area.
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom, New carpets,
new granite counters, dishwasher, balco-
ny, covered carports, storage, pool, no
pets. (650)595-0805
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49.-59.daily + tax
$294.-$322. weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator & A/C
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
FLEETWOOD ‘93 $ 3,500/offer. Good
Condition (650)481-5296
GMC '99 DENALI Low miles. This is
loaded with clean leather interior, nice
stereo too. Just turned 100k miles, new
exhaust and tires. Well taken care of. No
low ballers or trades please. Pink in hand
and ready to go to next owner.
(650)759-3222 $8500 Price is firm.
MERCEDES ‘06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
TOYOTA ‘00 CAMRY LE, 4 dr, auto,
clean title, smogged. 129K miles, $3,800.
(650)342-6342
VW ‘01 BEETLE, Turbo Sport, 97K
miles, auto, $5,800. (650)342-6342
625 Classic Cars
FORD ‘63 THUNDERBIRD Hardtop, 390
engine, Leather Interior. Will consider
$7,500 obo (650)364-1374
FORD ‘63 THUNDERBIRD Hardtop, 390
engine, Leather Interior. Will consider
$7,500 obo (650)364-1374
635 Vans
‘67 INTERNATIONAL Step Van 1500,
Typical UPS type size. $2500, OBO,
(650)364-1374
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
MOTORCYCLE GLOVES - Excellent
condition, black leather, $35. obo,
(650)223-7187
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAGS with
brackets and other parts, $35.,
(650)670-2888
655 Trailers
SMALL UTILITY TRAILER - 4’ wide, 6
1/2 ‘ long & 2 1/2’ deep, $500.obo,
(650)302-0407
670 Auto Service
GRAND OPENING!
Sincere Affordable Motors
All makes and models
Over 20 years experience
1940 Leslie St, San Mateo
(650)722-8007
samautoservices@gmail.com
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
BOX OF auto parts. Miscellaneous
items. $50.00 OBO. (650) 995-0012.
CAR TOWchain 9' $35 (650)948-0912
HONDA SPARE tire 13" $25
(415)999-4947
MECHANIC'S CREEPER vintage, Com-
et model SP, all wood, pillow, four swivel
wheels, great shape. $40.00
(650)591-0063
MECHANIC'S CREEPER vintage, Com-
et model SP, all wood, pillow, four swivel
wheels, great shape. $40.00
(650)591-0063
NEW BATTERY and alternator for a ‘96
Buick Century never used Both for $80
(650)576-6600
NEW, IN box, Ford Mustang aluminum
water pump & gasket, $60.00. Call
(415)370-3950
RUBBERMAID 2 Gallon oil pan drainers
(2). Never used tags/stickers attached,
$15 ea. (650)588-1946
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, 1
gray marine diesel manual $40
(650)583-5208
SHOP MANUALS for GM Suv's
Year 2002 all for $40 (650)948-0912
TIRE CHAIN cables $23. (650)766-4858
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
35 Years Experience
2001 Middlefield Road
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
29 Thursday • Nov. 7, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Asphalt/Paving
NORTHWEST
ASPHALT REPAIR
Driveways, Parking Lots
Asphalt/Concrete
Repair • Installation
Free Estimate
(650)213-2648
Lic. #935122
Carpentry
D n’ J REMODELING
Finish Carpentry
• Windows • Doors •
• Cabinets • Casing •
• Crown Moulding •
• Baseboards •
• Mantels • Chair Rails •
(650)291-2121
Cabinetry
Carpets
COLEMAN'S
CARPET SERVICE
Green, Soap free,
Detergent Free Carpet Cleaning!
Dry in a few hours! $99.00!
2 Room minimum!
Call Gisele (510)590-7427
Contractors
WARREN BUILDER
Contractor & Electrician
Kitchen, Bathroom, Additions
Design & Drafting Lowest Rate
Lic#964001, Ins. & BBB member
Warren Young
(650)465-8787
Cleaning
ANGELICA’S HOUSE
CLEANING & ERRAND
SERVICES
• House Cleaning • Move In/Out
Cleaning • Janitorial Services
• Handyman Services
• General Errands • Event Help
New Client Promotion
(650)918-0354
myerrandservicesca@gmail.com
Cleaning
Concrete
Construction
DEVOE
CONSTRUCTION
Kitchen & Bath
Remodeling
Belmont, CA
(650) 318-3993
O’SULLIVAN
CONSTRUCTION
(650)589-0372
New Construction, Remodeling,
Kitchen/Bathrooms,
Decks/ Fences
Licensed and Insured
Lic. #589596
Construction
SPI CONSTRUCTION INC
• Remodels • New Additions
• Kitchens • Bathrooms
For all your construction needs
(650)208-8855
Lic. #812356
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed • Insured • Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
VICTOR’S FENCES
and House Painting
•Interior •Exterior
Power Wash
•Driveways •Sidewalk •Houses
Free Estimates
(650)583-1270
or (650)808-5833
Lic. # 106767
Doors
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
Gardening
GENERAL
LANDSCAPE
MAINTENANCE
Commercial & Residential
Gardening
New lawn &
sprinkler installation,
Trouble shooting and repair
Work done by the hour
or contract
Free estimates
Licensed
(650)444-5887, Call/Text
glmco@aol.com
Flooring
SHOP
AT HOME
WE WILL
BRING THE
SAMPLES
TO YOU.
Call for a
FREE in-home
estimate
FLAMINGO’S FLOORING
CARPET
VINYL
LAMINATE
TILE
HARDWOOD
650-655-6600
SLATER FLOORS
. Restore old floors to new
. Dustless Sanding
. Install new custom & refinished
hardwood floors
Licensed. Bonded. Insured
www.slaterfloors.com
(650) 593-3700
Showroom by appointment
Gutters
GUTTER
CLEANING
O.K.’S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutters
Down Spouts
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Roof & Gutter Repairs
Friendly Service
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
(650)556-9780
RAIN GUTTERS
• Gutters and downspouts,
• Rain gutter repair,
• Rain gutter protection (screen),
• Handyman Services
Free Estimates
(650)669-6771
(650)302-7791
Lic.# 910421
Handy Help
AAA HANDYMAN
& MORE
Repairs • Maintenance • Painting
Carpentry • Plumbing • Electrical
Contractor Lic. 468963 Since 1976
Bonded and Insured
All Work Guaranteed
(650) 995-4385
CONTRERAS
HANDYMAN
• Fences • Decks • Patios •
Power Washes • Concrete
Work • Maintenance •
Clean Ups • Arbors
Free Est.! $25. Hour
Call us Today!
(650)350-9968
(650)4581572
contreras1270@yahoo.com
FLORES HANDYMAN
Serving you is a privilege.
Painting-Interior & Exterior• Roof
Repair • Base Boards New Fence •
Hardwood Floors • Plumbing • Tile •
Mirrors • Chain Link Fence • Windows
Bus Lic# 41942
Call today for free estimate.
(650)274-6133
Handy Help
HONEST HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766
(650)740-8602
SENIOR HANDYMAN
“Specializing in Any Size Projects”
•Painting • Electrical
•Carpentry •Dry Rot
40 Yrs. Experience
Retired Licensed Contractor
(650)201-6854
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
•Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
•Refinish
•High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
by Greenstarr
Chris’s Hauling
Licensed Bonded and Insured
Since 1985 License # 752250
www.yardboss.net
º Yard c|ean up - att|c,
basement
º Junk meta| remova|
|nc|ud|ng cars, trucks and
motorcyc|es
º 0emo||t|on
º 0oncrete remova|
º Fxcavat|on
º Sw|mm|ng poo| remova|
&
Tom 650.355.3500
Chris 415.999.1223
CHAINEY HAULING
Junk & Debris Clean Up
Furniture / Appliance / Disposal
Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo
Starting at $40& Up
www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
Landscaping
by Greenstarr
º 0omp|ete |andscape
ma|ntenance and remova|
º Fu|| tree care |nc|ud|ng
hazard eva|uat|on,
tr|mm|ng, shap|ng,
remova| and stump
gr|nd|ng
º 8eta|n|ng wa||s
º 0rnamenta| concrete
º Sw|mm|ng poo| remova|
Tom 650. 355. 3500
Licensed Bonded and Insured
www.yardboss.net
Since 1985 License # 752250
Moving
Bay Area
Relocation Services
Specializing in:
Homes, Apts., Storages
Professional, friendly, careful.
Peninsula’s Personal Mover
Commercial/Residential
Fully Lic. & Bonded CAL -T190632
Call Armando (650) 630-0424
Painting
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Quality Work, Reasonable
Rates, Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
MK PAINTING
Interior and Exterior,
Residental and commercial
Insured and bonded,
Free Estimates
Peter McKenna
(650)630-1835
Lic# 974682
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
NICK MEJIA PAINTING
A+ Member BBB • Since 1975
Large & Small Jobs
Residential & Commercial
Classic Brushwork, Matching, Stain-
ing, Varnishing, Cabinet Finishing
Wall Effects, Murals, More!
(415)971-8763
Lic. #479564
30 Thursday • Nov. 7, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Plumbing
Remodeling
HARVEST KITCHEN
& MOSAIC
Cabinets * Vanities * Tile
Flooring * Mosaics
Sinks * Faucets
Fast turnaround * Expert service
920 Center St., San Carlos
(650)620-9639
www.harvestkm.com
Tree Service
Hillside Tree
Service
LOCALLY OWNED
Family Owned Since 2000
• Trimming Pruning
• Shaping
• Large Removal
• Stump Grinding
Free
Estimates
Mention
The Daily Journal
to get 10% off
for new customers
Call Luis (650) 704-9635
Tile
CUBIAS TILE
• Entryways • Kitchens
• Decks • Bathrooms
• Tile Repair • Floors
• Grout Repair • Fireplaces
Call Mario Cubias for Free Estimates
(650)784-3079
Lic.# 955492
Tile
BELMONT TILE &
FOLSOM LAKE TILE
Your local tile store
& contractor
• Tile • Mosaics
• Natural Stone Countertops
• Remodeling
Free Estimates
651 Harbor Blvd.
(near Old County Road)
Belmont
650.421.6508
www.belmontile.com
M-Sa 8:30 am - 5 pm
CASL# 857517
Window Washing
EXTERIOR
CLEANING
SERVICES
- window washing
- gutter cleaning
- pressure washing
- wood restoration
- solar panel cleaning
(650)216-9922
services@careful-clean.com
Bonded - Insured
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
Attorneys
• BANKRUPTCY •
Huge credit card debit?
Job loss? Foreclosure?
Medical bills?
YOU HAVE OPTIONS
Call for a free consultation
(650-363-2600
This law firm is a debt relife agency
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Dental Services
MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER
Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken
(650)697-9000
15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA
Food
GET HAPPY!
Happy Hour 4-6• M-F
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
JACK’S
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
NEW ENGLAND
LOBSTER CO.
Market & Eatery
Now Open in Burlingame
824 Cowan Road
newenglandlobster.net
LIve Lobster ,Lobster Tail,
Lobster meat & Dungeness Crab
PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA
Because Flavor Still Matters
365 B Street
San Mateo
www.sfpanchovillia.com
VEGETARIAN
BAMBOO GARDEN
Lunch & Dinner
Only Vegetarian Chinese
Restaurant in Millbrae!
309 Broadway, Millbrae
(650)697-6768
Financial
RELATIONSHIP BANKING
Partnership. Service. Trust.
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
Half Moon Bay, Redwood City,
unitedamericanbank.com
San Mateo
(650)579-1500
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
Furniture
WESTERN FURNITURE
Grand Opening Sale
Everything Marked Down !
601 El Camino Real
San Bruno, CA
Mon. - Sat. 10AM -7PM
Sunday Noon -6PM
We don't meet our competition,
we beat it !
Guns
PENINSULA GUNS
(650) 588-8886
Handguns.Shotguns.Rifles
Tactical and
Hunting Accessories
Buy.Sell.Trade
360 El Camino Real, San Bruno
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
DENTAL
IMPLANTS
Save $500 on
Implant Abutment &
Crown Package.
Call Millbrae Dental
for details
650-583-5880
EYE EXAMINATIONS
579-7774
1159 Broadway
Burlingame
Dr. Andrew Soss
OD, FAAO
www.Dr-AndrewSoss.net
NCP COLLEGE OF NURSING
& CAREER COLLEGE
Train to become a Licensed
Vocational Nurse in 12 months or a
Certified Nursing Assistant in as little
as 8 weeks.
Call (800) 339-5145 for more
information or visit
ncpcollegeofnursing.edu and
ncpcareercollege.com
PAIN & STRESS RELIEF
$29 UP
Weight loss, Migraine, Stroke,
Fatigue, Insomnia, PMS, HBP,
Cough, Allergies, Asthma,
Gastrointestinal, Diabetes
(650)580-8697
Acupuncture, Acupressure Herbs
1846 El Camino Real, Burlingame
Accept Car & work injury, PPO
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
STUBBORN FAT has met its match.
FREEZE Your Fat Away with
COOLSCULPTING
Bruce Maltz, M.D.
Carie Chui, M.D.
Allura Skin & Laser Center, Inc.
280 Baldwin Ave., San Mateo
(650) 344-1121
AlluraSkin.com
Insurance
AANTHEM BLUE
CROSS
www.ericbarrettinsurance.com
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
Insurance
AFFORDABLE
HEALTH INSURANCE
Personal & Professional Service
JOHN LANGRIDGE
(650) 854-8963
Bay Area Health Insurance Marketing
CA License 0C60215
a Diamond Certified Company
HEALTH INSURANCE
All major carriers
Collins Insurance
Serving the Peninsula
since 1981
Ron Collins
650-701-9700
Lic. #0611437
www.collinscoversyou.com
PARENTI & ASSOCIATES
Competitive prices and best service to
meet your insurance needs
* All personal insurance policies
* All commercial insurance policies
* Employee benefit packages
650.596.5900
www.parentiinsurance.com
1091 Industrial Rd #270, San Carlos
Lic: #OG 17832
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues, Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
ASIAN MASSAGE
$45 per Hour
Present ad for special price
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
ENJOY THE BEST
ASIAN MASSAGE
$40 for 1/2 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
851 Cherry Ave. #29, San Bruno
in Bayhill Shopping Center
Open 7 Days 10:30am- 10:30pm
650. 737. 0788
Foot Massage $19.99/hr
Free Sauna (with this Ad)
Body Massage $39.99/hr
Hot StoneMassage $49.99/hr
GRAND OPENING
Massage Therapy
RELAX
REJUVENATE
RECHARGE
in our luxury bath house
Water Lounge Day Spa
2500 S. El Camino
San Mateo
(650)389-7090
SEVEN STARS
DAY SPA
615 Woodside Road Redwood City
(650)299-9332
Body Massage $60/hour
$40/half hour,
$5 off one hour w/ this ad
Open Daily 9:30 AM to 9:30 PM
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes • Multi-family •
Mixed-Use • Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Real Estate Services
VIP can help you with all of your
real estate needs:
SALES * LEASING * MANAGEMENT
Consultation and advice are free
Where every client is a VIP
864 Laurel St #200 San Carlos
650-595-4565
www.vilmont.com
DRE LIC# 1254368
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living
Care located in
Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
&
Burlingame Villa
- Short Term Stays
- Dementia & Alzheimers
Care
- Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
NAZARETH VISTA
Best Kept Secret in Town !
Independent Living, Assisted Living
and Skilled Nursing Care.
Daily Tours/Complimentary Lunch
650.591.2008
900 Sixth Avenue
Belmont, CA 94002
crd@belmontvista.com
www.nazarethhealthcare.com
Travel
FIGONE TRAVEL GROUP
(650) 595-7750
www.cruisemarketplace.com
Cruises • Land & Family vacations
Personalized & Experienced
Travel Service
Family Owned & Operated
Since 1939
CST#100209-10
WORLD 31
Thursday • Nov. 7, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Taxi
By Rob Gilles
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
TORONTO — Toronto’s embattled mayor
on Wednesday rejected the advice of city
council allies to take a temporary leave of
absence, returning to work a day after
acknowledging he had smoked crack.
Deepening the crisis, Rob Ford’s long-
time policy adviser resigned, continuing an
exodus that started in May when news reports
emerged of a video showing the mayor smok-
ing what appears to be crack. Police
announced last week they had a copy of the
video, which has not been released publicly.
After months of evading the question, Ford
acknowledged for the first time Tuesday that
he smoked crack “probably a year ago” when
he was in a “drunken stupor.” But he has
refused to step aside despite immense pres-
sure.
Ford arrived at City Hall just past noon on
Wednesday but took a back stairway to his
office to avoid a crush of media.
The mayor later blew a kiss to members of
the media as he gave a tour of his office to
school children.
More than 200 people protested outside
City Hall.
“Hey hey! Ho ho! Rob Ford has got to go!”
they chanted.
City Councilor James Pasternak said the
controversy consuming Canada’s largest city
cannot go on day after day. He said several
city councilors asked Deputy Mayor Norm
Kelly to approach Ford and “orchestrate a dig-
nified exit from city hall.”
Kelly met with Ford and suggested he take a
temporary leave until later this year or early
next year, but Ford rejected that idea.
Councilor Frances Nunziata, also a Ford ally,
said they are all frustrated Ford won’t step
aside temporarily.
“There’s nothing we can do. He’s the only
one who can make the decision,” Nunziata
said. “He needs to take some time off and get
the help he needs.”
Kelly earlier said Ford didn’t tell anyone he
would admit to smoking crack before he did
so Tuesday.
“It came right out of the blue,” said Kelly,
who learned about it from a member of Ford’s
staff after the mayor stopped on his way to
his office to tell reporters.
Toronto mayor rejects latest call to step aside
REUTERS
Toronto Mayor Rob Ford responds to the Toronto police investigation in Toronto, Canada.
By Mohammed Daraghmeh
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
RAMALLAH, West Bank — Swiss scien-
tists have found evidence suggesting Yasser
Arafat may have been poisoned with a
radioactive substance, a TVstation reported
Wednesday, prompting new allegations by
his widow that the Palestinian leader was
the victim of a “shocking” crime.
Palestinian officials have long accused
Israel of poisoning Arafat, a claim Israel
has denied. Arafat died under mysterious cir-
cumstances at a French military hospital in
2004, a month after
falling ill at his Israeli-
besieged West Bank com-
pound.
The findings reported
Wednesday appear to be
the most significant so
far in an investigation
into Arafat’s death initi-
ated by his widow, Suha,
and the satellite TV sta-
tion Al-Jazeera.
Last year, Switzerland’s Institute of
Radiation Physics discovered traces of
polonium-210, a deadly radioactive iso-
tope, on some of Arafat’s belongings. Soil
and bone samples were subsequently taken
from Arafat’s grave in the West Bank.
On Wednesday, the TV station published
the Swiss team’s 108-page report on the
soil and bone samples. The results “moder-
ately support the proposition that the death
was the consequence of poisoning with
polonium-210,” the report said.
Repeated attempts to reach the main
aut hor, Pat r i ce Mangi n, or t he
Lausanne-based i nst i t ut e’s
spokesman, Dar cy Chr i st en, wer e
unsuccessful Wednesday ni ght .
Experts not connected to the report said
the results support the case that Arafat was
poisoned, but don’t prove it.
Suha Arafat told Al-Jazeera she was
stunned and saddened by the findings.
“It’s a shocking, shocking crime to get
rid of a great leader,” she said.
She did not mention Israel, but suggested
that a country with nuclear capability was
involved in her husband’s death. “I can’t
accuse anyone, but how many countries
have an atomic reactor that can produce
polonium?” she said.
Possible evidence of Arafat poisoning is reported
Yasser Arafat
32 Thursday • Nov. 7, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL

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