BY SARAH FOWLER

sfowler@cdispatch.com
A look at Columbus Munic-
ipal Court Judge Nicole Clink-
scales’ Facebook page portrays
someone who sees herself as a
part of a city power struggle,
often using references to race
to define competing factions.
Clinkscales, who has served
on the court since 2010, has
made at least four references
to race in the last six months
on her personal Facebook page
and has endorsed candidates
for public office. Both actions
could be viola-
tions of the code
of judicial con-
duct.
T hr oughout
her Facebook
posts and com-
ments, Clink-
scales, who is
black, describes a combative
atmosphere in the city, using
imagery such as lynchings,
cotton field laborers, sepa-
rate-but-unequal treatment and
bondage.
While Clinkscales’ page can
only be viewed by her Face-
book friends, The Dispatch
accessed the page through one
of Clinkscales’ 2,044 Facebook
friends. A University of Missis-
sippi School of Law professor
said that judges have no expec-
tation of privacy even on their
private Facebook accounts.
When asked for comment
Tuesday, Clinkscales’ secre-
tary said the judge had no com-
ment.
On June 18 Clinkscales
WEATHER
134RD YEAR, NO. 205
Hayden Moore
Third grade, Caledonia
High 62 Low 35
Mostly sunny, cooler
Full forecast on
page 2A.
FIVE QUESTIONS
1 What Dutchman invented the pendu-
lum clock in 1656?
2 What sportscaster was “traded”
from Disney to NBC in 2006 in
exchange for the rights to 1920s
cartoon character Oswald the Lucky
Rabbit?
3 Where was the glass bridge called
the Skywalk opened in 2007?
4 Who took time out of his wedding
feast to ask all his groomsmen a weird
riddle about a beehive nested inside
the carcass of a lion?
5 What former U.S. president was
elected to head the National Rifle
Association in 1883?
Answers, 8B
INSIDE
Classifieds 7B
Comics 6B
Obituaries 5A
Opinions 4A
LOCAL FOLKS
Greg Harrell works at American
Eurocopter.
CALENDAR
Today
■ “Medieval Islam and Its
Neighbors”: MUW’s Dr. Amber
Handy discusses the Middle
East’s earlier culture and religion,
5:30 p.m., Columbus-Lowndes
Public Library. 662-329-5300.
■ “ARTfordable”: A free
reception 5:30-7 p.m. opens a
show by a variety of artists at
the Rosenzweig Arts Center; all
artwork priced $100 or less for
holiday shopping. 662-328-2787.
■ Town hall meeting: Public
Service Commissioner Brandon
Presley holds a meeting concern-
ing utility rates, services and lack
of cellular phone and high-speed
Internet service at 6 p.m., Lown-
des County Courthouse, 515
Second Ave. N.
Today-Saturday, Nov. 7-9
■ “A Catered Affair”: Starkville
Community Theatre’s production
begins at 7:30 p.m., Playhouse
on Main, 108 E. Main St., Re-
serve tickets at 662-323-6855.
Friday, Nov. 8
■ Art auction: Annunciation
Catholic School’s annual fund-
raising gala (formerly Jeans and
Jazz) begins at 7 p.m. at Trotter
Convention Center in Columbus,
with heavy hors d’oeuvres and
silent and live auctions. Tickets
are $25. For more information,
contact the Annunciation School
office, 662-328-4479.
DISPATCH CUSTOMER SERVICE 328-2424 | NEWSROOM 328-2471
ESTABLISHED 1879 | COLUMBUS, MISSISSIPPI
CDISPATCH.COM 50 ¢ NEWSSTAND | 40 ¢ HOME DELIVERY
THURSDAY | NOVEMBER 7, 2013
Move to learn
Micah Green/Dispatch Staff
Larry Calhoun, with Move to Learn Mississippi, does exercises with students at New Hope Elementary Wednesday morning.
Move to Learn Mississippi is dedicated to getting kids moving in the classroom and preaches that it improves not only health
but academic performance as well.
Judge’s Facebook posts may violate judicial code
Two men
arrested on
aggravated
assault
One involves shooting
allegations; one involves
ramming cruisers with
vehicle
BY SARAH FOWLER
sfowler@cdispatch.com
Wednesday was
busy for local law
enforcement after
two suspects were
arrested in separate
incidents for pending
charges of aggravated
assault with a weapon.
Willie Hairston, 52,
of 176 Margret Hair-
ston Road in Craw-
ford, led deputies on
a three-county chase
Wednesday morning
after he was involved
in a domestic distur-
bance in Noxubee
County. Hairston fled
the scene, ramming
two Noxubee County police cruisers
with his vehicle in the process. Hair-
ston fled to Crawford before elud-
ing law enforcement and heading
into Oktibbeha. He drove back into
Lowndes County early Wednesday
afternoon and was apprehended af-
ter he pulled over on Hairston Bend
road and surrendered, according to
law enforcement.
Hairston was charged with aggra-
vated assault with a deadly weapon
and is currently in the custody of the
Lowndes County Adult Detention
Courtesy photo
The Columbus
Christmas
parade is
scheduled to
start at 5:30
p.m. The date
was moved
to Dec. 14
from Dec.
2 to accom-
modate the
Clydesdales’
schedule.
Mickens plans return for Nov. 19 meeting
BY NATHAN GREGORY
ngregory@cdispatch.com
Joseph Mickens said he plans to re-
turn to his duties as councilman by the
time city leaders meet again Nov. 19.
Mickens, 55, has been absent for the
last two council meetings after he had
surgery last month to remove a benign
cyst on one of his lungs. He said the cyst
was found after a yearly
physical led to a visit to an
imaging center at the sug-
gestion of his doctor. An
X-ray revealed a non-can-
cerous growth the size of a
golf ball, Mickens said.
“They found out the
tissue was not cancer, but
there was a possibility lat-
er on that it could have turned into can-
cer, so we figured the best thing to do
was to remove it now while I’m still rel-
atively young,” Mickens said. “I’m pray-
ing and hoping to God that I’m going
to be able to come to the next meeting.
That’s my goal.”
Mickens, owner of local business
Floor Specialist, said he’ll be away from
the usual duties of his day job indefinite-
ly as he recovers.
“I’m doing better every day and get-
ting a little stronger every day,” he said.
“We’re just trying to let it heal, and that’s
a process.”
Mickens began his second term as
Ward 2 councilman in July. He first took
office in 2009.
Mickens
INSIDE
■ OUR VIEW: Clinkscales has
proven herself to be unfit for the
bench. Page 4A.
■ VOICE OF THE PEOPLE: City
attorney Jeff Turnage disputes
Dispatch’s reporting. Page 4A.
BY NATHAN GREGORY
ngregory@cdispatch.com
Columbus municipal code prohib-
its billboard signs referencing beer or
light wine. Violators would be commit-
ting a misdemeanor.
If you can bring Clydesdales to the
Friendly City, councilmen might be
willing to make an exception.
Councilmen unanimously ap-
proved a request from Main Street
Columbus Executive
Director Barbara Bi-
gelow Tuesday night
to allow two billboards
containing an image of
the iconic horses with
the Budweiser logo in
the city limits leading
up to Columbus’ Dec.
14 Christmas parade.
Billboards to promote Clydesdales
Council bucks beer advertisement ordinance to
hype Christmas parade appearance
Councilman had surgery for
non-cancerous cyst on lung
Clinkscales uses racial imagery,
supports candidates on her account
Clinkscales
See CLYDESDALES, 6A
See CLINKSCALES, 6A
Bigelow
See CRIME, 6A
Hairston
Jones
THE DISPATCH • www.cdispatch.com 2A THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2013
DID YOU HEAR?
CONTACTING THE DISPATCH
SUBSCRIPTIONS
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Published daily except Saturday. Entered at the post offce at Columbus, Mississippi.
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Five-Day forecast for the Golden Triangle
Almanac Data National Weather
Lake Levels
River Stages
Sun and Moon Solunar table
Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
City Hi Lo W Hi Lo W City Hi Lo W Hi Lo W
Weather(W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, i-ice, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms,
r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow
Yesterday 7 a.m. 24-hr.
Lake Capacity yest. change
The solunar
period schedule
allows planning days
so you will be fshing
in good territory or
hunting in good cover
during those times.
Temperature
Precipitation
Tombigbee
Yesterday Flood 7 a.m. 24-hr.
River stage yest. change
Columbus Wednesday
High/low ..................................... 74°/47°
Normal high/low ......................... 70°/44°
Record high ............................ 83° (1975)
Record low .............................. 24° (1976)
Wednesday ...................................... 0.22"
Month to date ................................. 0.22"
Normal month to date ...................... 0.87"
Year to date .................................. 52.08"
Normal year to date ....................... 46.37"
Friday Saturday
Atlanta 62 40 s 62 42 s
Boston 51 35 pc 49 41 pc
Chicago 47 40 pc 56 33 pc
Dallas 69 50 pc 73 53 s
Honolulu 86 72 c 85 72 c
Jacksonville 68 49 c 73 56 pc
Memphis 62 42 s 66 46 pc
62°
36°
Friday
Sunshine
65°
42°
Saturday
Partly sunny
68°
44°
Sunday
Mostly sunny and
pleasant
71°
46°
Monday
Partly sunny and
comfortable
Aberdeen Dam 188' 162.79' -0.11'
Stennis Dam 166' 136.67' -0.11'
Bevill Dam 136' 136.38' +0.03'
Amory 20' 11.49' +0.25'
Bigbee 14' 3.64' -0.12'
Columbus 15' 4.97' -0.06'
Fulton 20' 7.32' +0.15'
Tupelo 21' 0.00' none
New
Dec. 2
Last
Nov. 25
Full
Nov. 17
First
Nov. 9
Sunrise ..... 6:18 a.m.
Sunset ...... 4:56 p.m.
Moonrise . 10:24 a.m.
Moonset .... 9:09 p.m.
Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. ©2013
Major ..... 4:03 a.m.
Minor ... 10:17 a.m.
Major ..... 4:31 p.m.
Minor ... 10:46 p.m.
Major ..... 5:03 a.m.
Minor ... 11:17 a.m.
Major ..... 5:30 p.m.
Minor ... 11:44 p.m.
Friday Thursday
Friday Saturday
Nashville 57 34 s 63 43 s
Orlando 78 64 c 80 65 pc
Philadelphia 54 35 s 54 40 s
Phoenix 82 57 s 83 59 s
Raleigh 57 34 s 60 40 s
Salt Lake City 62 40 pc 65 39 s
Seattle 52 42 sh 50 43 c
Tonight
Mainly clear and
chilly
35°
A THOUSAND WORDS
AP Photo/Dmitry Lovetsky
The Soyuz-FG rocket booster with Soyuz TMA-11M space ship carrying new crew to the International Space
Station, ISS, blasts off at the Russian leased Baikonur cosmodrome, Kazakhstan, this morning. The rocket
carrying the Olympic flame successfully blasted off from earth ahead of the Sochi 2014 Winter Games.
Thursday
SAY WHAT?
“The biggest thrill you get in coaching is
seeing a player succeed.”
Jones County Junior College
coach Ray Perkins. Story, 1B.
CMA Awards, fellow stars
salute George Strait
BY CHRIS TALBOTT
AP Music Writer
NASHVILLE — The
entertainer of the year
trophy at the Country Mu-
sic Association Awards is
one of the most coveted
honors in the genre, but
sometimes it’s OK to lose
— like, say, when George
Strait is a nominee.
Strait won his third
entertainer of the year
award and his first since
1990 Wednesday night
against country music’s
current hitmakers, and no
one seemed disappoint-
ed. Blake Shelton — one
of five performers with a
leading two victories —
was excited to lose to the
61-year-old whose popular-
ity defies his age.
“That’s how it needs to
be because he’s not just
entertainer of the year,
he’s entertainer of the last
three decades, I guess,
or four decades,” Shelton
said. “I don’t know who’s
keeping score. I mean, it’s
George Strait. He’s King
George. I couldn’t be hap-
pier with how this turned
out.”
Shelton was one of five
top winners with two tro-
phies apiece, along with
Florida Georgia Line and
the trio of Taylor Swift,
Tim McGraw and Keith
Urban, who won music
video and music event of
the year for their “High-
way Don’t Care” collabo-
ration.
Like Strait, Swift also
was going for her third
entertainer of the year,
which would have been a
CMA record for a woman.
Like Shelton, she couldn’t
have cared less when she
lost, instead hugging Faith
Hill as they cried tears of
joy for Strait. She noted
they’ve both opened for
Strait in their careers and
she recounted a story
about how Strait and his
wife Norma dropped in to
one of her first headlining
concerts when she was a
teenager just to wish her
luck.
Wade Payne/Invision/AP
George Strait accepts the
award for entertainer of
the year at the 47th annu-
al CMA Awards at Bridge-
stone Arena on Wednes-
day in Nashville, Tenn.
User burnout could threaten Twitter’s prosperity
BY RYAN NAKASHIMA
AP Business Writer
LOS ANGELES —
They loved it. Now they
hate it.
A growing number of
celebrities, athletes and
self-promoters are burnt
out and signing off of
Twitter. Many have gotten
overwhelmed.
Some people built big
audiences on the short
messaging service only
to have their followers
turn against them. Others
complain that tweets that
once drew lots of attention
now get lost in the noise.
As Twitter Inc. pre-
pares to go public this
week, the company is sell-
ing potential investors on
the idea that its user base
of 232 million will contin-
ue to grow along with the
500 million tweets that are
sent each day. The com-
pany’s revenue depends
on ads it inserts into the
stream of messages.
But Wall Street could
lose its big bet on social
media if prolific tweeters
lose their voice.
Evidence of Twitter
burnout isn’t hard to find.
Just look at the celebri-
ties who — at one time
or another — have taken
a break from the service.
The long list includes ev-
eryone from Alec Baldwin
to Miley Cyrus to “Lost”
co-creator Damon Linde-
lof.
Actress Jennifer Love
Hewitt lamented “all the
negativity” she saw on the
service when she quit,
temporarily, in July. Ac-
tress Megan Fox left near-
ly a million followers dan-
gling when she checked
out in January, explaining
that “Facebook is as much
as I can handle.” Pop star
John Mayer deleted his
account in 2011, say-
ing Twitter absorbed so
much of his thinking, he
couldn’t write a song.
“I was a tweetaholic,”
he told students during
a talk at the Berklee Col-
lege of Music.
If Twitter turns off
celebrities who have a fi-
nancial incentive to stay
in close contact with fans,
how can the company pre-
vent average users from
becoming disenchanted?
For some users, Twit-
ter tiredness sets in slow-
ly. At first, they enjoy
seeing their tweets of 140
characters or less bounce
around the Web with
retweets and favorites.
But new connections soon
get overwhelming. Obli-
gation sets in — not only
to post more, but to reply
to followers and read their
tweets.
Many users conclude
that Twitter is a time-suck-
ing seduction and turn
away. One who calls her-
self patrilla$$$thrilla excit-
edly tweeted “first tweet,
wocka wocka” just after
she joined in July.
On Wednesday, 161
tweets and 27 followers
later, the romance was
over. She quit to “fully en-
joy the little details in life I
miss because I’m too busy
here,” she tweeted.
The cacophony creeps
into everyday life. Twit-
ter fanatics tweet from
the dinner table, during
a movie, in the bathroom,
in bed. Vacations can
seem like time wasted not
tweeting.
AP Photo/Richard Drew
The Twitter bird logo is pictured on a phone post on
the floor of the New York Stock Exchange on Wednes-
day.
Twitter’s initial public offering was
priced at $26 a share on Wednesday
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — It’s
not just the federal gov-
ernment intercepting your
communications. It could
be a nosy relative or jeal-
ous partner.
Among five individuals
added this week to the
FBI’s list of “most wanted”
cybercriminals is a former
San Diego college student
who sold online an $89 pro-
gram dubbed “Loverspy.”
The program was billed as
a way to “catch a cheating
lover” by sending the per-
son an electronic greeting
card that, if opened, would
install malware that could
capture emails and instant
messages, even spy on
someone using the vic-
tim’s own webcam.
The case of Carlos
Enrique Perez-Melara is
noteworthy because he
appears to have made rel-
atively little money on the
scheme. But he helped to
turn average computer
users into sophisticated
hackers who could use the
information to stalk their
victims.
FBI wants hacker who helped catch cheaters
ONLINE SUBSCRIPTIONS
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MSU SPORTS BLOG
Visit The Dispatch MSU Sports Blog for breaking
Bulldog news: www.cdispatch.com/msusports
@
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2013 3A
MI HACIENDA
Mexican Restaurant
Mon-Wed 11:00am-9:30pm
THURS 11:00am-10:00pm
FRI-SAT 11:00am-10:30pm
SUN 11:00-9:00pm
COLUMBUS
1207 Hwy. 45 North
Suite 10
STARKVILLE
911 Hwy. 12 West
Suite 101A
$
1
off
Any
Meal
Purchase
Both Locations
St. Paul’s
Episcopal Church
318 College Street • Columbus
St. Paul’s Episcopal Church
The Rev. Anne Harris
328-6673 • www.stpaulscolumbus.com
Holy Communion
8:00 a.m. & 10:30 a.m.
on Sunday
(Childcare Provided)
BY JEFF AMY
The Associated Press
JACKSON — Mississippi is the
most improved state in the nation
for energy-saving policies, a ratings
group says.
The American Council for an
Energy-Efficient Economy lauded
the state Wednesday for efforts in
the last year that included lawmak-
ers passing a new energy code for
buildings and the Public Service
Commission passing requirements
for electric and gas utilities to offer
customers ways to use less energy.
“Mississippi is clearly on its way
to becoming a regional leader in en-
ergy efficiency,” U.S. Energy Secre-
tary Ernest Moniz said in telephone
news conference. He said efficiency
pushes in states align well with the
Obama administration’s efforts to
limit climate change induced by car-
bon dioxide emissions.
Moniz said states “are in the
front lines of dealing with the con-
sequences of climate change.” He’s
scheduled Friday to visit the $5
billion coal-fueled power plant that
Mississippi Power Co. is building
in Kemper County, to spotlight its
efforts to capture carbon dioxide
emissions from burning lignite.
Mississippi ranked last in the
council’s 2012 efficiency rankings,
improving to No. 47 this year. The
council predicts Mississippi will con-
tinue to improve as efforts that were
passed this year bear fruit. Missis-
sippi scored 8 points on a 50-point
scale, gaining 5.5 points from 2012,
the largest increase of any state.
Massachusetts led the state rank-
ings for the third year in a row.
“Massachusetts has some of
the most ambitious energy-saving
targets in the country,” said Annie
Downs, who authored the council’s
scorecard.
In July, the Mississippi Public
Service Commission adopted rules
requiring all gas and electric com-
panies with more than 25,000 cus-
tomers to begin offering energy effi-
ciency programs within six months.
Those programs could include ener-
gy audits, tuning customer heating
and air conditioning systems, appli-
ance and lighting rebates, weather-
izing homes, and paying builders to
make new homes and commercial
structures more efficient.
Mississippi lauded for most
improved state in energy efficiency
Lowndes County
Marriages
Oct. 26- Nov. 3
■ Terico Vontrel Greenleaf
and Ameia Nicole Bowens
■ Jonathan Evan Hawkins
and Ashley Shannon Winders
■ Kyle David Clark and Callee
Elizabeth Cosby
■ Jeremy Stephen Yarbrough
and Rikki Leann Lucas
■ John Paul Koehler and
Sarah Jane Kyle
■ Antolin Mikel Conley and
Brittany Rochelle Malone
■ Phillip Wayne Roberts Sr.
and Linda Ann Alderson
■ Robert Daniel Brown and
Anna Lillian Davidson
■ Kevin James Burrus and
Jamie Lynn Staples
■ Derico Bontrell Howard and
Christina Ann McBride
■ James Campbell Spears II
and Melinda Green
■ Dillon Matthew Beard and
Lindsey Nicole Whitehead
■ Rodney Gene Cosby and
Wendy Gay Sutton
Divorces
Oct. 26
■ None at pres time.
AREA ARRESTS
MARRIAGES AND DIVORCES
The following arrests
were reported by the
Lowndes County Sher-
iff’s Department and the
Columbus Police Depart-
ment:
■ Antion Gerlle
Sparks, 33, 702 Ninth St.
N., was arrested at 1917
Main St., Nov. 5 by CPD
and charged with viola-
tion of probation, sim-
ple assault, contempt of
court, failure to obey a
police officer, providing
false information to a po-
lice officer, resisting ar-
rest and possession of a
controlled substance. His
court date is scheduled
for Dec. 4.
■ Crystal Diane How-
ell, 43, of 2853 Nashville
Ferry Road, was arrest-
ed on Sanders Lane Nov.
5 by LCSO and charged
with public drunkenness
and violation of probation.
Her court date is sched- uled for Nov. 26.
Sparks Howell
Send in your church’s religious brief!
Email: editorialassistant@cdispatch.com
Subject: Religious brief
State ranked last in group’s 2012 listing
Game time
Luisa Porter/Dispatch Staff
Mississippi University for Women senior Ivan Gray prepares to throw a dodge ball at the other team in the Pohl
Gym on campus during a game Tuesday. Gray is originally from Pearl, Miss.
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
JACKSON — The Fitch
credit rating agency has
downgraded Mississippi’s
bond rating outlook from
stable to negative.
The state’s bond rating
remains AA+, only one
notch below the highest
AAA level, but the agency
warns the rating could be
lowered unless officials
take steps to shore up fi-
nances. A lower bond rat-
ing would make it more
expensive for state gov-
ernment to borrow money.
The agency says the re-
vised outlook reflects Mis-
sissippi’s slow recovery
from the recession and
continued use of one-time
money to cover recurring
government expenses. It
says poverty and low ed-
ucation levels hurt Missis-
sippi.
The agency also said
Tuesday that Mississippi’s
unfunded liability for pub-
lic employees’ pensions is
too high.
Fitch is one of the three
leading U.S. credit rat-
ing agencies, along with
Standard & Poor’s and
Moody’s Investors Ser-
vice.
Agency warns Mississippi about its bond rating
Bond rating outlook downgraded
from stable to negative
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
HATTIESBURG — The
ROTC program at the Uni-
versity of Southern Missis-
sippi will survive at least
another two years.
The Army told Missis-
sippi elected officials on
Wednesday that it’s delay-
ing a decision about wheth-
er to close the program on
the Hattiesburg campus.
The program will be put on
probationary status during
that time.
The Army had an-
nounced in October that it
intended to close 13 of the
273 ROTC programs na-
tionwide.
USM President Rodney
Bennett was joined by Gov.
Phil Bryant, U.S. Sens.
Thad Cochran and Roger
Wicker, U.S. Rep. Steven
Palazzo and Maj. Gen. Au-
gustus L. Collins, the adju-
tant general of Mississippi,
in asking the Army to re-
consider.
“An examination of the
Army’s rationale for clos-
ing the Southern Miss
ROTC program made it
clear that more analysis is
needed,” Cochran, who is
vice chairman of the Sen-
ate Defense Appropriations
Committee, said in a news
release Wednesday. “Two
years will give the Army
plenty of time to more care-
fully consider the success-
ful history of the Southern
Miss program.”
USM ROTC program to survive at least two years
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NATCHEZ — Three
film makers in Natchez
are launching a fund rais-
ing campaign to make a
documentary about “Miss
Nellie” Jackson, who ran a
bordello in the Mississip-
pi River town for decades.
The Natchez Democrat
reports Mark Brockway,
Lauren Jones and Tim
Givens launched the cam-
paign Wednesday on the
website indiegogo.com.
Brockway said the goal
is to raise $20,000 for the
film “Mississippi Madam:
The Story of Nellie Jack-
son.”
Jackson died in 1990
after a neighbor alleged-
ly doused her in gasoline
and set her afire.
Jones said the story
of Jackson, a black wom-
an who ran a brothel in a
Southern town, is an im-
portant one.
Among details the doc-
umentary will explore
will be Jackson’s use of
money to bail Civil Rights
workers out of jail in the
1960s.
Fund raising launched for documentary on Natchez madam
Program on probationary status
4A THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2013
Opinion
BIRNEY IMES SR. Editor/Publisher 1922-1947
BIRNEY IMES JR. Editor/Publisher 1947-2003
BIRNEY IMES III Editor/Publisher
PETER IMES General Manager
SLIM SMITH Managing Editor
BETH PROFFITT Advertising Director
MICHAEL FLOYD Circulation/Production Manager
DISPATCH
THE
PERSONAL PRIVACY
OUR VIEW
In her role as municipal
court judge for the City of Co-
lumbus, Nicole Clinkscales is
expected to perform her duties
without bias or prejudice. By
either word or conduct, she
should not display bias or prej-
udice on the basis of race or
any number of public issues.
This is not a mere expecta-
tion or a standard to strive for.
It is an absolute requirement.
A judge who cannot or will
not abide by this requirement
is unfit for the considerable
responsibility entrusted to him
or her.
Based on recently exposed
comments Clinkscales has
made through her Facebook
account, it is clear beyond all
doubt she has proven herself
unfit to sit as a city judge.
She should resign or be
removed from her position.
Last week, The Dispatch re-
ported Clinkscales, in her crit-
icism of Columbus Municipal
School District board member
Aubra Turner, suggested Turn-
er was guilty of “tom” foolery,
a thinly-veiled accusation that
Turner, who like Clinkscales is
black, was an “Uncle Tom.”
The use of quotation marks
around only the “tom” part
of the word “tomfoolery,” is a
clear reference to the Uncle
Tom euphemism used to
describe a black person who
serves the interest of white
people who are in a position of
authority.
While some have argued
that the use of the word is too
ambiguous to discern Ms.
Clinkscales attitude on race,
a more thorough examination
of her Facebook posts remove
any ambiguity.
In her posts, Clinkscales
makes repeated references to
“us vs. them” and other com-
ments leave little doubt as to
who the “us” and “them” are.
Just a few samples are
enough to make it clear:
n “If my people don’t wake
up and walk in the authority
God has given, you can very
well look up and be right back
in bondage. And just as before
— they will shove their will
down your throat and never
give it a second thought! Stop
pandering and apologizing
and RULE!”
n “I am simply amazed that
those who created and estab-
lished the very institutions and
systems that those who were
still in the cotton fields during
their inception now operate
in are complaining about how
those systems...are playing
out?...It’s a classic case of
separate and unequal. In other
news, “it ain’t no fun when the
rabbit got the gun!”
n “...Don’t misunderstand
me. I have an unabashed love
for my people. I know the
power we have and it’s time to
walk in that privilege!”
n “Prayer must come first.
Then we have to move! We’ve
sat by too long and allowed
them to manipulate and dese-
crate our community. Enough
is enough!”
We are saddened by the
views expressed in these posts
and remain confident that the
good people of Columbus, both
white and black, are able to
see through and reject the sort
of open racial conflict Clink-
scales seems to advocate.
While it is unfortunate
these views exist among some
residents of our community,
its goes far beyond unfortu-
nate when those views are
espoused by a judge.
When a judge shows a clear
inclination to view her commu-
nity in an us-vs.-them/black-
vs.-white context, it severely
erodes public confidence in
a fair and impartial justice
system, one of the bedrocks
of our American society. A
judge who displays this atti-
tude makes a mockery of the
judiciary.
Municipal judges are
appointed by the city council,
which has both the right and
obligation to remove a judge
when that judge has proven
unfit for the bench.
To date, the city council
has taken no action. There is
a belief that the council will
defer the matter to the Missis-
sippi Commission of Judicial
Performance.
That is unfortunate. To
abdicate its responsibility in
this matter, the council will
demonstrate a moral weakness
and lack of leadership that
further erodes public trust in
its leaders.
Among all her inflammato-
ry rants, we do agree with one
point Clinkscales made on her
Facebook page.
Enough is enough.
For the good of the commu-
nity, the city council should
perform its duty and remove
Clinkscales from her position
as municipal court judge.
I need to know how to build a
bomb.
This is not, I hasten to add, for
my use or, indeed, for the use of
any real person. Rather, it is for
Clarence and Dwayne, two hapless
wannabe terrorists in a novel I’m
writing.
In researching a novel, you often
find yourself going places you would
not ordinarily go and asking ques-
tions you would not ordinarily ask,
seeking details that lend verisimili-
tude to the narrative. For “Before I
Forget” I sat in on an Alzheimer’s support group. For “Free-
man,” I visited a horse farm catering to disabled riders.
For “Grant Park,” I’m trying to figure out enough of fertil-
izer bomb mechanics to describe what such a device looks
like and give my characters some realistic stuff to do as they
discuss their nefarious plot. Failing that, I’ll have to fake it
with passages like the following:
“Our nefarious plot is really going well,” said Clarence as
he connected the frammistat to the hornuculator.
“Yes,” said Dwayne as he tested the level of tetratryglic-
eryde in the doohickey tanks, “it is really fun to be nefarious
and have a plot.”
OK, so the dialogue could also use some work. The point
is, I know squat about bomb building. Ordinarily, that’d be
no problem. Helping writers do their research is the whole
reason Al Gore invented the Internet.
But an odd thing happened when I went online last week:
I found myself hesitating. I wondered what secret watch list
this would put me on. I tried to guess how long it would take
after I typed “bomb building” into Google before men in FBI
jackets started banging at my door. Or maybe they’d forgo
such formalities and simply rappel down from helicopters
and come in through the windows.
It didn’t help that last week saw the massive data dump
by NSA leaker Edward Snowden continue to be Topic A in
America. Pass lightly over the news that’s getting most of
the attention, allegations that the National Security Agency
eavesdrops on the electronic communications of our nation’s
allies. For all the indignation France, Germany and other al-
lies expressed at the news, it strains credulity to believe they
aren’t watching us every bit as closely as we do them.
No, the headline here is the degree to which our spies
are spying on us. The Washington Post reports that the NSA
“has secretly broken into the main communications links
that connect Yahoo and Google data centers around the
world” enabling it to collect data from hundreds of millions
of people internationally — and here at home. This, accord-
ing to Snowden’s documents and Post reporting.
And here’s the thing: The NSA already has a process
allowing it to access user accounts. But despite having a key
to the front door, it has taken a crowbar to the back.
In a statement, the spy agency swears it uses its powers
only for good, i.e., to spy on foreign targets. You may choose
to be assuaged by that if you wish. Me, I’m trying to remem-
ber all the Google and Yahoo searches I have conducted in
the last year. And wondering if Clarence and Dwayne can be
convincing terrorists if I arm them with rocks. And recalling
how sanguine some of us were when the Patriot Act was
passed and secret No Fly lists were compiled and the feds
started snooping through library records. And marveling at
how much George Orwell got right in “1984.” And mourn-
ing the Fourth Amendment. And lamenting how readily a
frightened people will give up their freedoms for the illusion
— and delusion — of security.
I’m reminded of a lyric Michael Jackson sang in 1984: “I
always feel like somebody’s watching me.” The song was a
comic take on one man’s overwrought fear of prying eyes.
But what sounded like paranoia then feels like prescience
now.
I’d have more to say, but I can hardly think with that heli-
copter hovering so low. Hey, look, the door is opening.
Leonard Pitts is a columnist for the Miami Herald. His
e-mail address is lpitts@miamiherald.com.
VOICE OF THE PEOPLE
Editors Note: An unedited ver-
sion of Turner’s letter can be found
at cdispatch.com.
On behalf of the Mayor and
City Council I am writing in re-
sponse to your numerous articles
calling upon the Mayor and City
Council to suspend or remove
from office Municipal Court
Judge Nicole Clinkscales.
In the Oct. 29 edition of The
Commercial Dispatch, Sarah
Fowler began the charge against
Judge Clinkscales in an article
entitled “Judge attacks school
board member on Facebook.”
The lead sentence of the article
then stated “A Columbus Munic-
ipal Judge took to her Facebook
page to portray a member of the
Columbus Municipal School
District Board of Trustees as an
Uncle Tom.”
Ms. Fowler in the same article
referred to the Mississippi
Supreme Court case of Missis-
sippi Commission on Judicial
Performance v. Osborne, 11 So. 3d
107 (Miss. 2009), which involved
the discipline of a judge for
making racist comments during
a campaign for re-election in
Greenwood.
From my perspective, it
appears that the Dispatch has
attempted to “reverse engineer”
your articles about Judge Clink-
scales posts in an effort to con-
tort Judge Clinkscales Facebook
comments so as to be bound
by the precedent established in
Osborne. However, Osborne, is
drastically different from Judge
Clinkscales’ Facebook postings.
In Osborne, County Court Judge
Solomon Osborne addressed the
Greenwood Voters League as
follows:
White folks don’t praise you
unless you’re a damn fool. Unless
they think they can use you. If you
have your own mind and know
what you’re doing, they don’t want
you around.
Osborne, 11 So. 3d at 109.
To be sure, there can be
no debate that Judge Osborne
classified members of the white
race in a negative light. His
statements patently called into
question his ability to be fair
when adjudicating court cases
involving white persons.
In contrast to Osborne, Judge
Clinkscales’ Facebook posting
said “I never thought I’d see the
kind of “tom” foolery AGAIN that
I have seen in what is supposed
to be an arena of education and
higher order thinking. We are yet
reduced back to having to defend
an opposing view and race is the
dirty little word no one wants to
say yet it continues to be tossed
around. I am SO over Board
Member Turner!”
In order for a person to
conclude that Judge Clinkscales
was referring to board member
Turner as an “Uncle Tom” one
has to draw an inference or a
conclusion from words that do
not appear in the writing. Apply-
ing that approach, The Dispatch
would have the Mayor and City
Council remove a municipal
court judge from office based
upon what it thinks she thought
when she made the post.
It has been suggested that the
Mayor and City Council had no
choice but to suspend or remove
Judge Clinkscales from office
because they suspended some
emergency responders follow-
ing their vile and reprehensible
social media comments about
the mother of an injured minor.
Yet, Judge Clinkscales Facebook
posts were in no way similar to
the comments of the fireman
who resigned following his social
media postings. Therein, the
fireman posted:
“People never cease to amaze
me. Mama yelling oh my babyeee
my babyeee ....
Hey you stupid ass, where was
babyeees mama at [sic] while
your 2 year old was getting hit by
a truck [sic]. Mama needs to have
her guts cut out so there won’t be
anymore [sic] babes [sic]. Free-
loading Ignorant woman.
I cannot disclose what con-
versations occurred during the
executive session on Tuesday
night, Nov 5, 2013. Nor would I
discuss an active personnel mat-
ter. However, the Mayor and City
Council are aware that a judge
has to forfeit some of her rights
under the First Amendment that
might otherwise be available to
“John Q Citizen.” That having
been said, a municipal court
judge does not, by virtue of her
office, forfeit all of her First
Amendment rights. Case law
supports this.
In the end, there may be a
time when the Mayor and Coun-
cil would have no choice but to
suspend or remove a judge of the
Municipal Court for his or her
public comments or social media
postings. Perhaps in this case
even reasonable minds can differ
as to what Judge Clinkscales was
trying to communicate. However,
to employ inferences and innu-
endo in an effort to categorize
ambiguous speech in a way that
would justify discipline is ill-ad-
vised. Otherwise, people could
be punished not for what they
said, but for what others con-
clude what they were thinking
even when they said something
different. That is a prospect even
George Orwell didn’t contem-
plate in his book “1984.”
Jeff Turnage
General Counsel
City of Columbus
City responds to newspaper’s
criticism of judge
Think you’re
being watched?
Maybe you are
Fair and impartial? Clinkscales must go
Leonard Pitts
THE DISPATCH • www.cdispatch.com THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2013 5A
S
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SERVING YOU
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AREA OBITUARIES
COMMERCIAL DISPATCH
OBITUARY POLICY
Obituaries with basic informa-
tion including visitation and
service times, are provided
free of charge. Extended obit-
uaries with a photograph, de-
tailed biographical information
and other details families may
wish to include, are available
for a fee. Obituaries must be
submitted through funeral
homes unless the deceased’s
body has been donated to
science. If the deceased’s
body was donated to science,
the family must provide official
proof of death. Please submit
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328-2471.
George Gibson
COLUMBUS —
George Gibson, 69,
died Nov. 3, 2013, at his
residence.
Services are Satur-
day at 11 a.m. at New
Hope MB Church.
Burial will follow in the
church cemetery. Vis-
itation is Friday from
3-5 p.m. at Carter’s
Funeral Home.
Bobbie Hankins
GUIN, Ala. — Bob-
bie Erwin Hankins,
72, died Nov. 5, 2013,
at Northwest Medical
Center in Winfield, Ala.
Services are today
at 2 p.m. at Guin First
Baptist Church with
Kenny Hatcher offici-
ating. Burial will follow
in Guin City Cemetery.
Visitation is two hours
prior to services. Nor-
wood Funeral Home is
in charge of arrange-
ments.
Mrs. Hankins was a
member of Guin First
Baptist Church.
She was preceded in
death by her parents,
Robert Aaron and Mary
Wilma Rowland Erwin;
and brother, Jim Erwin.
Survivors include
her husband, William
Lowell Hankins of
Guin; sons, Lowell
Hankins of Guin and
Scott Hankins of Ope-
lika, Ala.; daughter,
Christy Savage of Sara-
sota, Fla.; sister, Linda
O’Bryant of Tuscaloosa,
Ala.; and four grand-
children.
Alana Aucoin
PHEBA — Alana
Marsh Aucoin, 52, died
Nov. 3, 2013, at North
Mississippi Medical
Center.
Memorial services
are Friday at 11 a.m.
at St. Joseph Catholic
Church. Welch Funeral
Home is in charge of
arrangements.
Mrs. Aucoin was a
graduate of Mississippi
State University and
was formerly employed
as a special education
teacher with the Ok-
tibbeha County School
system.
Survivors include
her daughter, Megan
Aucoin of Pheba; and
parents, John Marsh of
Starkville and Jeanette
Vail of Pheba.
Memorials may
be made to Helping
Hands, c/o St. Joseph
Catholic Church, 607
University Drive,
Starkville, MS 39759.
Freddie Carruth
BEAVERTON, Ala.
— Freddie Carruth,
65, died Nov. 4, 2013,
at Northwest Medical
Center in Winfield, Ala.
Services are today
at 2 p.m. at Sulligent
First Baptist Church
with Edward Puckett
and Byron Pickering
officiating. Burial will
follow in Piney Grove
Cemetery. Otts Funeral
Home is in charge of
arrangements.
Mr. Carruth was
born April 22, 1948, in
Lamar County, Ala.,
to the late Cecil and
Robbie O’Mary Car-
ruth. He was a 1968
graduate of Sulligent
High School. He was
formerly employed with
Verizon/Century Link
Telecommunication
Company. He was a
member of Sulligent
First Baptist Church.
He was named the 2012
RHBA World Celebra-
tion Amateur Owned
and Trained Gentle-
man Rider and Saddle
Club Multi High Point
Winner.
In addition to his
parents, he was preced-
ed in death by his son,
Kevin Carruth.
Survivors include his
wife, Alice Ann Gosa
Carruth of Beaverton;
son, Daniel Carruth of
Decatur, Ala.; daugh-
ter, Nicole Taylor of
Sulligent, Ala.; brother,
Dewey Carruth, Larry
Carruth and James Ray
Carruth, all of Sulligent
and Donald Joe Carruth
of Pell City, Ala.; sis-
ters, Linda Stuckey of
Sulligent and Deborah
Latil of Mobile, Ala.;
and five grandchildren.
Pallbearers are mark
Carruth, Eric Carruth,
Brent Carruth, Barry
Carruth, Berney Car-
ruth, Kenny Carruth,
Jamie Carruth, Nick
Stuckey, and Greg
Stuckey.
Elmer Templeton Jr.
STARKVILLE — El-
mer Otto Templeton Jr.,
87, died Nov. 5, 2013, at
OCH Regional Medical
Center.
Services are Fri-
day at 11 a.m. at First
Baptist Church in
Starkville with the
Rev. Chip Stevens and
the Rev. Clifton Curtis
officiating. Burial will
follow in Memorial
Garden Park Ceme-
tery. Visitation is two
hours prior to services.
Welch Funeral Home
is in charge of arrange-
ments.
Mr. Elmer was a
member of First Baptist
Church and he was a
graduate of Mississippi
State University.
He was preceded in
death by his parents,
Elmer Otto Templeton
Sr. and Odelia John-
son Templeton; wife,
Corrine Edwards Tem-
pleton; and brother,
Charles Henry Temple-
ton.
Survivors include his
wife, Betty Templeton
of Starkville; daughter,
Elisa Kennedy of Mo-
bile, Ala.; son, Tee Tem-
pleton of New York; and
two grandchildren.
Eria Kennard
GARY, Ind. — Eria
Gay Kennard, 87, died
Oct. 31, 2013.
Services are Friday
at 11 a.m. at Bethel MB
Church with the Rev.
Lee Brand Jr. officiat-
ing. Burial will follow
in Bethel Cemetery.
Visitation is today from
1-6 p.m. at West Memo-
rial Funeral Home.
Survivors include a
sister, Ruth Elliott of
Starkville.
Henry Buck
COLUMBUS —
Henry Buck, 63, died
Nov. 2, 2013, in Bir-
mingham, Ala.
Services are Friday
at 11 a.m. at Southside
MB Church with Ray
Evins
officiating.
Visitation
is today at
Lee-Sykes
Funeral
Home.
Mr.
Buck
was born
May 27, 1950, to the
late Henry Lewis and
Carrie Lee Buck Sr. He
was formerly employed
as a chef and was a
member of Southside
MB Church.
In addition to his
parents, he was pre-
ceded in death by his
brothers, Henry Lee
and James; and sister,
Ramie.
Survivors include
his wife, Dorethea Faye
Buck; children, Anto-
nio of California, Fred-
rick, Rita and Lapeno,
all of Columbus, Quan
of Tupelo, Twanda of
Maitland, Fla., Paris of
Baytown, Texas, Lato-
nya and April, both of
Houston, Texas; broth-
ers, Rochoste Hill of
Nebraska, Ira Cribbs of
Racine, Wis., and Lon-
nie Buck of Columbus;
stepbrother, Bonnie of
Columbus; and many
grandchildren and
great-grandchildren.
Donna Seay
COLUMBUS —
Donna Seay died Nov.
6, 2013, at Aurora
Health and Rehabilita-
tion.
Arrangements are
incomplete and will be
announced by Lowndes
Funeral Home.
Buck
Buckle up...
and your child, too
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
PORTLAND, Ore. —
With federal and state
online health care mar-
ketplaces experiencing
glitches a month into im-
plementation, concern is
mounting for a vulnerable
group of people who were
supposed to be among the
health law’s earliest bene-
ficiaries.
Hundreds of thou-
sands of people across the
country with pre-existing
chronic conditions such
as cancer, heart failure
or kidney disease who
are covered through high
risk-insurance pools will
see their coverage dis-
solve by year’s end.
They are supposed to
gain regular coverage un-
der the Affordable Care
Act, which requires in-
surers to cover those with
severe medical problems.
But many of them have
had trouble signing up for
health insurance through
the exchanges and could
find themselves without
coverage in January if
they don’t meet a Dec. 15
deadline to enroll.
Administration offi-
cials say the federal ex-
change, which covers
more than half the states,
won’t be working probably
until the end of November,
leaving people just two
weeks to sign up if they
want coverage by Jan. 1.
“These individuals
can’t be without coverage
for even a month,” said
Tanya Case, the chair-
woman of the National As-
sociation of State Compre-
hensive Health Insurance
Plans, which represents
the nation’s high-risk
pools. “It’s a matter of life
or death.”
High-risk pools were
created by state legisla-
tures to provide a safety
net for people who have
been denied or priced
out of coverage. The Af-
fordable Care Act will
forbid insurers from turn-
ing away people in poor
health. And while cover-
age can be purchased out-
side the exchanges, those
who qualify for subsidies
can only get them through
a state or federal market-
place.
More than a dozen
of the 35 states that run
insurance pools for peo-
ple with serious medical
issues will permanently
close their pools within
a month and half. Oth-
er states will keep their
pools running for a few
more months.
The federal pool covers
about 100,000 people and
was created in 2010 by the
Affordable Care Act as a
temporary bridge until
the law fully kicks in. It
will cease to exist at the
end of December.
“I’m scared. I’m in the
middle of my cancer treat-
ment, and if my insurance
ends, I’m going to have to
cancel the rest of my treat-
ment,” said Kelly Bachi,
an Oklahoma boat repair
business owner who has
breast cancer and is cov-
ered through a pool.
Cancer treatment with-
out insurance would cost
her about $500,000, she
said.
Bachi has not been able
to enroll via the health-
care.gov federal website,
although not for lack of
trying. She attempted to
sign up half a dozen times,
was eventually able to cre-
ate an account, but was
later blocked from access-
ing the account.
Health law clock is ticking for sickest patients
Hundreds of thousands of people
with pre-existing chronic conditions
covered through high risk-insurance
pools will see their coverage dissolve
THE DISPATCH • www.cdispatch.com 6A THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2013
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Clydesdales
Continued from Page 1A
Local Anheuser-Busch
beer wholesaler Mitchell
Distributing will furnish
five billboards for $2,500
promoting the Clydes-
dales’ appearance.
The signs in Columbus
will be featured near the
intersection of Highway
45 North and Bluecutt
Road and the Highway 50
exit of Highway 82. The
advertisement will also
be featured on signs be-
tween Starkville and Co-
lumbus on Highway 82,
in Starkville and in Aber-
deen.
Bigelow noted the ads
do not encourage the sale
or consumption of alcohol.
She said Mitchell Distrib-
uting has done much to
support the community.
“We’re very apprecia-
tive of all that Mitchell
Distributing has done and
we’re looking forward to
those magnificent animals
being a part of our parade,”
Bigelow said.
Mitchell Beverage Co-
lumbus general manager
Tony Carley said the com-
pany’s Tupelo operation
won the opportunity to
have the horses at a public
event of their choosing be-
cause it was one of seven
Anheuser-Busch whole-
salers to earn an award for
excellence in management
and marketing.
“They were sent in for
Tupelo, but we opted to
have them into Columbus
because we wanted to try
to help out the Christmas
parade and Columbus as a
whole,” Carley said. “Eco-
nomically, it’s going to be
a big push for Columbus.”
That push will likely be
as a result of visitors who
would not have attended
the parade had such an
attraction not been on the
bill, he said.
“You can’t put a price
on having something like
that,” Carley said. “We go
to all these places (in Mis-
sissippi) and I’ve heard so
many people talk about
how they have not been
to Columbus at all or to a
Christmas parade in Co-
lumbus even they lived
around there but they
would be coming now.”
The parade is scheduled
to start at 5:30 p.m. The
date was moved to Dec. 14
from Dec. 2 to accommo-
date the horses’ schedule.
Crime
Continued from Page 1A
Center.
Another local man was
taken into custody and
charged with aggravat-
ed assault with a weapon
Wednesday night after he
allegedly shot his brother.
Albert Jones, 63, of
2876 Hairston Bend Road
was arrested at his home
after he allegedly shot his
brother, Marvin Jones,
in the back and in the
leg. The brothers were
involved in a verbal alter-
cation when Albert Jones
allegedly shot his brother,
according to law enforce-
ment.
Albert Jones was ar-
rested on scene and is
currently in the custody
of the LCADC awaiting
bond.
BY SARAH FOWLER
sfowler@cdispatch.com
A Lowndes County man
was arrested and charged
with sexual battery after
he allegedly raped a wom-
an on the side of the road.
Deshaun Anton Cur-
ry, 30, of 897 Crowe Road,
was charged with sexual
battery last week after he
allegedly raped a female
acquaintance.
According to law en-
forcement, Curry was a
passenger in the victim’s
vehicle when he demanded
the driver pull over. Law
enforcement alleges Curry
then took the victim’s car
keys and sexually assault-
ed her.
The victim drove herself
to Baptist Memorial Hospi-
t al - Gol den
Triangle.
C r o we ,
who works
security at
the Huddle
House and
was arrest-
ed by the
L o w n d e s
County Sheriff’s Depart-
ment, is currently in the
custody of the Lowndes
County Adult Detention
Center on a $50,000 bond.
Man charged with rape after alleged roadside incident
30-year-old remains in custody
Curry
Clinkscales
Continued from Page 1A
wrote, “People are no lon-
ger hanged from trees.
They are crucified of
their character with lies
and innuendo.” In the
post, Clinkscales alluded
to former superintendent
Dr. Martha Liddell. Lid-
dell, who is black, was
fired from the Columbus
Municipal School District
on June 17.
On June 20, three days
after Liddell’s firing,
Clinkscales took to her
Facebook page declaring
a “modern day mutiny”
was taking place and en-
couraged “her people” to
“walk in authority.”
“What is happening
now is a modern day mu-
tiny!” the post read. “If
my people don’t wake up
and walk in the authority
God has given, you can
very well look up and be
right back in bondage.
And just as before — they
will shove their will down
your throat and never
give it a second thought!
Stop pandering and apol-
ogizing and RULE! #run-
teldat”
Clinkscales comment-
ed on the post on June 21
and said, “But we can’t
expect the media to accu-
rately reflect the feelings
of our community. Time
for another plan.” She
then commented, “And
don’t misunderstand me.
I have an unabashed love
for my people. I know the
power we have and it’s
time to walk in that priv-
ilege!”
In a Sept. 19 post,
Clinkscales referenced
working in cotton fields
and “separate but un-
equal” treatment.
The post read, “I am
simply amazed that those
who created and estab-
lished the very institu-
tions and systems that
those who were still in the
cotton fields during their
inception now operate in
are complaining about
how those systems (i.e.
business travel, discre-
tionary spending, police
power) are playing out?
Give me a break from
the manufactured con-
cern. It’s a classic case
of separate and unequal.
In other news, ‘it ain’t no
fun when the rabbit got
the gun!’ #don’tbefooled.”
On Oct. 24, the judge
made a post accusing
school board member Au-
bra Turner of “‘tom’ fool-
ery.” On Oct 29., Clink-
scales again commented
on her post regarding
board member Turner.
“What they would like is
for me to do the same.
Just shut up and/or leave.
I am doing neither at least
not for the foreseeable
future. Somebody has to
be willing to liberate and
educate and even if I have
to take the darts in the
process, so be it!”
Several of her Face-
book friends responded
to Clinkscales’ comment
and she again respond-
ed, saying, “Prayer must
come first. Then we have
to move! We’ve sat by too
long and allowed them
to manipulate and des-
ecrate our community.
Enough is enough!”
No expectation of
privacy for judges
Commentary under
Canon 2 on the Missis-
sippi Code of Judicial
Conduct states, “A judge
must expect to be the
subject of constant pub-
lic scrutiny. A judge must
therefore accept restric-
tions on the judge’s con-
duct that might be viewed
as burdensome by the or-
dinary citizen and should
do so freely and willingly.
The prohibition against
behaving with impropri-
ety or the appearance
of impropriety applies
to both the professional
and personal conduct of
a judge.”
Ben Cooper, a pro-
fessor at the University
of Mississippi School of
Law and an expert in so-
cial media, said a judge
does not have an expec-
tation of privacy on social
media.
“The direction that we
get from the American
Bar Association ethics
opinion, as well as other
ethics opinions from oth-
er states, is nothing that
judges say on Facebook
should be construed as
private. Judges should
assume that everything
they say on Facebook is
public.”
Cooper, who has not
seen Clinkscales’ posts,
said despite Clinkscales’
privacy settings on her
social media page, the
public can still gain ac-
cess to her posts.
“Once you put it out
there it’s just too easy for
it to be transferred along
to other people, even if
you only show your posts
to your friends,” he said.
“Obviously those friends
can then pass along what
you say on your page.”
Clinkscales backs
candidates
In addition to her ra-
cially charged remarks,
Clinkscales has also
made at least four pub-
lic endorsements for
political candidates or
a political party on her
Facebook page since
November 2012. Accord-
ing to Canon 5(B) of the
Code of Judicial Conduct,
a judge is prohibited
from publicly endorsing
a political candidate.
“Canon 5 prohibits a
judge or judicial candi-
date from endorsing a
candidate for public of-
fice,” said Darlene Bal-
lard, executive director
of the Mississippi Com-
mission on Judicial Per-
formance. Ballard said
the code of conduct ap-
plies to municipal court
judges, despite the fact
that the position can be
considered part time.
On Jan. 12, Clink-
scales encouraged peo-
ple on her friends list to
vote for Angela Turner
Lairy in a special elec-
tion. Lairy sought the
District 16 State Senate
seat vacated by the death
of her father Bennie
Turner earlier this year.
The post read, “Good
Morning FBF’s! Yes,
it is cold and raining!
But DON’ T FORGET to
VOTE TODAY! ...Cast
your vote in the Senate
District 16 Special Elec-
tion. I will be voting for
Angela Turner Lairy!
..Let’s not lose this seat!”
In November 2012,
Clinkscales showed her
support for President
Barack Obama and the
Democratic Party during
Obama’s bid for reelec-
tion. On election day,
Clinkscales posted, “I
wanna live in a blue state
for a change! To quote
Day-Day “I’m trying to
see what that be like!”
Cooper, who again
stressed that he had
not seen the posts, said
Clinkscales support of a
political candidate on her
Facebook page could be
viewed as judicial mis-
conduct.
“It sounds like it might
be a problem under Can-
on 5 in the code of judi-
cial conduct because
the canons forbid judges
from endorsing politi-
cal candidates,” Cooper
said.
Clinkscales is one of
two municipal judges
for the city. She and fel-
low lawyer Marc Amos
were appointed by the
city council in 2010. Each
judge hears approximate-
ly 150 cases monthly, the
majority of which are mis-
demeanors. Clinkscales
and Amos also conduct
bond hearings for those
accused of felony crimes.
They were unanimously
reappointed by the city
council in June. There is
not a term limit.
Buckle up...
and your child, too
THE DISPATCH • www.cdispatch.com THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2013 7A
662-329-9445
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BY LOLITA C. BALDOR
The Associated Press
CAMP LEJEUNE, N.C. — Anna
Schnatzmeyer’s face is taut with
concentration as she slowly maneu-
vers the Riverine assault boat away
from the dock, using the complex
controls to try and inch the 34-foot
craft straight back without sliding
sideways.
Her instructor, standing next to
her, orders her forward again, and
despite the slow, careful creep, the
Navy boat knocks into the pier.
It’s the first time she’s ever pilot-
ed a boat. She’s in full battle gear
and the sun is beating off Mile Ham-
mock Bay on the edge of Camp Le-
jeune. A stiff wind is tossing waves
against the nearby shore. And the
pressure is mounting.
By year’s end, Schnatzmeyer and
five others are expected to become
the first women formally assigned
to a Riverine combat company, a
battlefront Navy job that is just now
opening up to women. The three
Riverine Delta Company units are
used for combat operations, often
called on to move quickly into shal-
low waters where they can insert
forces for raids, or conduct rescue
missions.
The Delta Company jobs are
some of the first combat positions
in the military to formally accept
women, and breaking through the
barriers hasn’t been easy. So, here,
in this tangle of coastal waterways,
Schnatzmeyer and the two oth-
er women in the crewman course
know all too well that the world is
watching.
She’s already passed the combat
skills course, allowing her to be
part of a Delta Company crew, as an
intelligence analyst or maybe a gun-
ner who controls one of the machine
guns mounted on the boat, jobs
that weren’t open to women before.
But this Riverine crewman course
would allow her to be a boat captain
or coxswain — crew leaders who
drive the boat or direct the fight.
“Ever since I was little, this
is what I wanted to do,” said
Schnatzmeyer, who was in grade
school when terrorists attacked on
9/11. “My dad would take me to air
shows and I would tell my family I
wanted to be a soldier.”
She was drawn to the combat, to
the guns.
“Growing up you want to join the
branch and you want to do what you
can to help, and then you realize, ‘I
can’t go into combat,’” Schnatzmey-
er said. “You think, what’s the pur-
pose of me being in the military? To
sit at a desk?”
Women heading to Navy combat jobs
AP Photo/Gerry Broome
In this Aug. 13 photo, U.S. Navy Master-at-Arms Third Class Anna
Schnatzmeyer, left, and Master-at-Arms Third Class Danielle Hinchliff, both
of Coastal Riverine Squadron 2, eat their Meals Ready to Eat (MRE) as
they participate in a U.S. Navy Riverine Crewman Course at the Center for
Security Forces Learning Site at Camp Lejeune, N.C. They are among the
first time female participants have received this training as women begin
to take on combat roles in the military.
By year’s end, six are
expected to become the
first women formally
assigned to a Riverine
combat company
BY DONNA CASSATA
The Associated Press
WASHINGTON —
The Senate is headed for
a historic vote on legis-
lation outlawing work-
place discrimination
against gay, bisexual and
transgender Americans,
demonstrating the na-
tion’s quickly evolving
attitude toward gay rights
nearly two decades after
Congress rejected same-
sex marriage.
All 55 members of the
Democratic majority, in-
cluding senators from the
Deep South, and several
Republicans were ex-
pected to unite today in
backing the Employment
Non-Discrimination Act.
Sen. John McCain, the
GOP’s presidential nomi-
nee in 2008, signaled his
conditional support on
Wednesday.
Senate passage would
be a major victory for
gay rights advocates in
a momentous year. The
Supreme Court in June af-
firmed gay marriage and
granted federal benefits
to legally married same-
sex cou-
ples. In the
hear t l and,
Illinois is on
the verge of
be c omi ng
the 15th
state to le-
galize gay
marriage along with the
District of Columbia.
The progress was
tempered by the reality
that the Republican-led
House, where conserva-
tives have a firm grip on
the agenda, is unlikely
to even vote on the bill.
Speaker John Boehner,
R-Ohio, maintains his
longstanding opposition
to the measure, arguing
that it is unnecessary and
certain to create costly,
frivolous lawsuits for busi-
nesses. Outside conserva-
tive groups have cast the
bill as anti-family.
Senate nears historic vote on gay rights
Speaker John Boehner argues bill
unnecessary, will create lawsuits
Boehner
BY ROB GILLIES
The Associated Press
TORON-
TO — Toron-
to’s embat-
tled mayor
on Wednes-
day rejected
the advice of
city council
allies to take
a temporary
leave of absence, returning
to work a day after acknowl-
edging he had smoked
crack.
Deepening the crisis, Rob
Ford’s long-time policy advis-
er resigned, continuing an
exodus that started in May
when news reports emerged
of a video showing the mayor
smoking what appears to be
crack. Police announced last
week they had a copy of the
video, which has not been
released publicly.
After months of evading
the question, Ford acknowl-
edged for the first time Tues-
day that he smoked crack
“probably a year ago” when
he was in a “drunken stu-
por.” But he has refused to
step aside despite immense
pressure.
Ford arrived at City Hall
just past noon on Wednesday
but took a back stairway to
his office to avoid a crush of
media.
Toronto
mayor rejects
latest call to
step aside
Ford
Advance tickets are recommended and can be purchased at
the Columbus Arts Council, 501 Main Street, Columbus, MS
All tours begin at the Tennessee Williams Home
& Welcome Center located at 300 Main Street
Columbus, Mississippi
November 8 & 9
Tickets
$
10
For more ticket information,
Columbus Arts Council
662-328-2787
Tours Begin:
6 pm, 6:30 pm,
7:30 pm, & 8 pm
Columbus
Cultural Heritage
Foundation
- Presented By -
Columbus Arts Council
MUW Center for Women’s Research & Public Policy
MUW Department of Theatre
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100 Russell Street
662-324-0810
Christmas
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November 8 & 9
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$
10
For more
ticket information,
Columbus Arts
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662-328-2787
Advance tickets are recommended and can be purchased at
the Columbus Arts Council, 501 Main Street, Columbus, MS
All tours begin at the Tennessee Williams Home
& Welcome Center located at 300 Main Street
Tours Begin: 6pm, 6:30 pm, 7:30 pm, & 8pm
117 Third St. S. • Downtown Columbus
662-329-1191
www.columbus-ms.org
Tell your child a bedtime story.
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
RAMALLAH, West Bank —
Swiss scientists have found evi-
dence suggesting Yasser Arafat
may have been poisoned with a ra-
dioactive substance, a TV station re-
ported Wednesday, prompting new
allegations by his widow that the
Palestinian leader was the victim of
a “shocking” crime.
Palestinian officials have long ac-
cused Israel of poisoning Arafat, a
claim Israel has denied. Arafat died
under mysterious
circumstances at a
French military hos-
pital in 2004, a month
after falling ill at his
Israeli-besieged West
Bank compound.
The findings re-
ported Wednesday
appear to be the most significant so
far in an investigation into Arafat’s
death initiated by his widow, Suha,
and the satellite TV station Al-Ja-
zeera.
Last year, Switzerland’s Institute
of Radiation Physics discovered
traces of polonium-210, a deadly
radioactive isotope, on some of Ara-
fat’s belongings. Soil and bone sam-
ples were subsequently taken from
Arafat’s grave in the West Bank.
On Wednesday, the TV station
published the Swiss team’s 108-page
report on the soil and bone samples.
The results “moderately support
the proposition that the death was
the consequence of poisoning with
polonium-210,” the report said.
Possible evidence of Arafat poisoning is found
Arafat
BY JOSH FUNK
The Associated Press
OMAHA, Neb. — Don-
ald DeVault wonders what
kind of memories his Tri-
umph motorcycle helped
make in the 46 years since
it was stolen, and he’s look-
ing forward to making
more of his own when it’s
returned.
The 73-year-old Omaha
man learned last week that
California authorities had
recovered his 1953 Tri-
umph Tiger 100 at the Port
of Los Angeles. The bike
was about to be shipped
to Japan when U.S. Cus-
toms & Border Protection
agents who checked the
vehicle identification num-
ber discovered the motor-
cycle had been reported
stolen in February 1967.
DeVault said he is eager
to get the bike back, but he
thinks investigators may
be even more excited than
him about the motorcy-
cle’s recovery. DeVault had
had the bike for only a year
or two when it was taken
from his fenced backyard.
“I really want to protect
it this time,” DeVault said.
“I’m sure there’s people
out there that would want
to take it away.”
The bike was valued at
$300 when in 1967. The
shipping documents listed
its value today at $9,000.
DeVault already has
a Harley-Davidson and a
Kawasaki motorcycle in
his garage, so he plans to
reserve the Triumph for
special rides.
DeVault said he’s talked
about the motorcycle over
the years whenever he
was around bikers. It had
a couple features unusual
for Triumphs made in the
early 1950s, such as its
hardtail frame.
DeVault recalls Marlon
Brando riding a similar
Triumph bike in the mov-
ie “The Wild One,” and
after that it seemed like
everyone wanted to ride a
motorcycle.
But DeVault said he was
already riding motorcy-
cles by the time the movie
came out, and continued
riding for much of his life.
Man glad stolen motorcycle found after 46 years
AP Photo/Nati Harnik
Donald DeVault poses with a photo of his stolen motor-
cycle Wednesday in Omaha, Neb.
BY JOE MANDAK
The Associated Press
PITTSBURGH — A
homeless man has gone
from the proverbial pent-
house to the big house af-
ter he was found sleeping
in the presidential suite at
one of Pittsburgh’s swanki-
est hotels.
Jeffrey Lennon Wat-
son, 48, told police he was
from Los Angeles and was
passing through the city to
return to California when
he was nabbed by security
at the Omni William Penn
Hotel on Tuesday night, po-
lice spokeswoman Diane
Richard said Wednesday.
Hotel guests were
checking into the suite
about 7:30 p.m. when they
saw Watson sleeping on a
couch and notified hotel
staff, police said. Hotel se-
curity officers woke him
up, took him to their office
and called police, Richard
said.
Hotel general manager
Eric DeStefano issued a
short statement explaining
what occurred.
The parlor area of the
Presidential suite is “a gen-
eral-use area for receptions
and small events. The door
had been programmed to
remain unlocked for an
event earlier that day. As
soon as the occupant was
discovered, he was escort-
ed off the property,” DeSte-
fano said.
Watson told police “he
has been in Pittsburgh for
over a month and sleeps
wherever he can locate
somewhere comfortable
to rest his head,” Richard
said.
There aren’t too many
places more comfortable
than Watson’s chosen lo-
cation. The 16th-floor suite
features a 1,300-square-
foot parlor plus three bed-
rooms, and includes crys-
tal chandeliers, a dining
room, grand piano, a full
kitchenette, wet bar and
sitting room, according to
the hotel’s website.
Homeless man found sleeping in hotel presidential suite
SECTION
B
SPORTS EDITOR
Adam Minichino: 327-1297
SPORTS LINE
662-241-5000
Sports
THE DISPATCH n CDISPATCH.COM n THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2013
Thomas Ware
Hazelwood
ONLINE
n PREP PREVIEWS:
A look at more area
games can be found
at www.cdispatch.com
College Volleyball
Women’s College Basketball
See WOMEN, 3B
See RIVALS, 4B See PERKINS, 4B
BY SCOTT WALTERS
swalters@cdispatch.com
STARKVILLE — For Missis-
sippi State University, the setting
was perfect Wednesday night.
However, the final outcome
was not.
Playing before the largest
crowd ever to see a Southeastern
Conference volleyball match on
campus, the MSU volleyball team
dropped a 3-1 (25-20, 20-25, 25-15,
25-20) decision to arch-rival Ole
Miss.
A crowd of 1,633
packed out the New-
ell-Grissom Build-
ing. The Famous
Maroon pep band
was in attendance,
as well as the cheer
leaders. Several fra-
ternities and sorori-
ties took advantage
of a series of promotions, with stu-
dents lined out the door minutes
before first serve. Free food and
t-shirts were available. The match
was also televised nationally by
ESPNU.
“It was all you could have ever
hoped for and more,” MSU head
coach Jenny Hazelwood said. “I
can not thank the student body
and fan base enough for their
support. Newell-Grissom was the
loudest it has been in my five years
and one of the loudest I have been
apart of in the SEC. We showed
tonight why we have some of the
best fans in the SEC.”
While the fans delivered, the
team was unable to match in per-
formance. Ole Miss snapped a
three-match conference losing
streak, while MSU saw its slide
extend to five straight.
“We may have been trying too
hard there early in the match,”
MSU sophomore libero Roxanne
McVey said.
“The fan support was incredi-
ble and it really helped us a lot. We
just didn’t play well and couldn’t
get settled into the match and get
anything going.”
F
or Ray Perkins, it has always been
about seeing a player of group of play-
ers find success.
“The biggest thrill you get
in coaching is seeing a player
succeed,” Perkins said. “I did not
get in this business because of
me. Even after all of these years,
it is still not about me. To be able
to see a player of group of players
work hard to achieve something
and to see that smile when they do
makes it all worthwhile. The thrill
of seeing that in a player’s face is
the same today as it was when I
first started coaching.”
Perkins has coached a bunch of football
players and seen first-hand a bunch of
success stories.
Thus it can’t come as a really big sur-
prise that he has another big game to coach
Saturday.
In his second season at Jones
County Junior College, Perkins
has the Bobcats ranked fourth
nationally. Jones will play No.
2 East Mississippi Community
College Saturday in Scooba for
the Mississippi Association of
Community and Junior Colleges
state championship.
BIG GAME
For a man who served as a
head coach at the University of Alabama,
Adam Minichino/Dispatch Staff
Mississippi State coach Vic Schaefer will begin his second season
as women’s basketball coach Friday at Houston.
BY ADAM MINICHINO
aminichino@cdispatch.com
STARKVILLE — The
nerves were there.
Inside, Breanna Richardson
was just like any other fresh-
man Monday night playing
in her first college game. But
those butterflies disappeared
as soon as the 6-foot-1 forward
from Conyers, Ga., hit her first
basket — a shot from the low
block off a pass from Savannah
Carter — 50 seconds into her
debut in a Mississippi State uni-
form.
Nearly two hours later, Rich-
ardson could take pride in the
fact she didn’t play like a fresh-
man in a 75-44 victory against
Shorter in an exhibition game
at Humphrey Coliseum. Rich-
ardson finished second on the
team with 16 points and added
six rebounds and six steals to
help MSU pass its first test of
the season.
“Bre’s motor was running
pretty high,” MSU coach Vic
Schaefer said. “This is what
we need out of her and Ketara
(Chapel), that ability to get
out on the perimeter and deny
and be a wrecker of every-
body else’s offense that flows
through that trailing post play-
er. We talk about that every day
in practice, but I thought she
really brought that and did a
nice job. She got her hands on
and deflected balls, as well as
stole them. Her and Ketara are
exactly what we need at the four
(power forward). I thought she
looked comfortable.”
Schaefer hopes Richardson
can duplicate that effort when
the lights come on for real at
Bulldogs count on several newcomers
College Football
Men’s College Basketball
BY MATTHEW STEVENS
mstevens@cdispatch.com
STARKVILLE — The
last thing Rick Ray be-
lieves about his men’s
basketball team is just be-
cause they’re a year older
doesn’t necessarily make
them better at the game.
The Mississippi State
head coach enters his sec-
ond year in Starkville with
all five starters back from
one of the most frustrat-
ing seasons of his coach-
ing career. Ray is the first
to point out that counting
returning starters and re-
turning lettermen from a
team is a lazy path to de-
termining a team’s future
success.
“I don’t know if that’s
true,” Ray said when
asked if his team is re-
laxed knowing it can’t
get worse from the 2012-
13 season. “It is possible
we could have less wins,
more injuries and no one
knows that for sure.”
As MSU enters its new
season Friday night in a
home game against Prai-
rie View A&M, which
finished 15-19 last sea-
son, the major question
on Ray’s mind is how im-
proved the team actually
has gotten after summer
and fall conditioning
drills.
“It still remains to be
seen if our guys have
gotten better because it’s
hard for me to stand here
and tell you Fred Thom-
as is a better shooter or
Gavin Ware is a more
conditioned athlete until
they go out and prove it
against other opponents,”
Ray said. “Eventually
there needs to be results
against opposing teams.”
The laundry list of im-
provements that had to be
made from a 10-22 season
that saw as little as six
scholarship players due
to injuries and player sus-
pensions included player
weights, identifying spe-
cific skills and even eval-
uating Ray himself as a
head coach.
Ray identified Thom-
as, a sophomore guard,
as the most improved
member of the team as he
continues to add muscle
and improve his shooting
figures from a learning
experience that was last
season. Thomas stands at
about 203 pounds now, far
removed from the skin-
ny athlete from Jackson
that signed with MSU un-
der previous head coach
Rick Stansbury. Also he’s
looking to get back the
one skill he thought he
was naturally bringing to
campus – his jump shot.
Thomas shot 32.8 percent
from the field and 23.8
percent from three-point
range in 28.7 minutes
per game. These num-
bers just don’t replicate
the form of the 6-foot-5
wing when the basketball
leaves his right hand.
“I think Fred has the
talent to be a guy that can
go out and get 15 points
Ray hopes older means better, wiser for still youthful Bulldogs
Record crowd
watches MSU
fall to Ole Miss
Junior College Football: MACJC State Championship
JUCOWeekly.org photo
A 28-year college and professional coaching veteran, Ray Perkins has fourth-ranked Jones
Junior College in this week’s MACJC state championship game.
STILL GOING FULL STEAM
Perkins leads Jones Junior College against East Mississippi C.C. for title
Scott Walters
BY ADAM MINICHINO
aminichino@cdispatch.com
The Heritage Academy football
team didn’t want to be in this sit-
uation.
But looking back and wonder-
ing what could have been isn’t go-
ing to help the Patriots. Instead,
coach Barrett Donahoe’s team is
going to have to stay focused on
helping itself and making sure it
plays its best game of the season
at 7 p.m. Friday when it plays at
Madison-Ridgeland Academy in
a Mississippi Association of Inde-
pendent Schools Class AAA, Dis-
trict 1 matchup.
A victory
secures a
playoff spot
for Heritage
A c a d e my
(8-3, 3-3
Class AAA,
District 1, Division II). A loss
means Heritage Academy will
have to keep its Twitter handles
crossed and hope Starkville Acad-
emy can beat Pillow Academy
(4-6, 2-4). Pillow Academy beat
Heritage Academy in the regular
season and holds the edge if the
teams end the regular season tied.
Even though the game is a
week shy of the playoffs, Dona-
hoe makes no mistake what kind
of atmosphere his team will face
Friday night.
“We just told the guys they
need to prepare for this game like
it is any other playoff game,” Do-
nahoe said. “That is essentially
what it is for us. If we don’t win,
we have the ability to get in with
somebody else’s loss, which is a
high possibility.
“Everybody knows about it, so
we don’t really talk much about
it. We will just wait and see what
are outcome is, and if we don’t
have a positive outcome, we’ll get
our information and see if we are
in the playoffs. If we are, we will
come back and get ready for La-
Patriots can
clinch spot
with victory
See PATRIOTS, 4B
SEASON OPENER
n FRIDAY’S GAME: Com-
plete coverage of MSU’s
season opener against Prai-
rie View A&M may be found
online Friday night at www.
cdispatch.com and also in
Sunday’s print edition.
See MEN, 3B
OPENING GAME
n FRIDAY’S GAME: Complete cov-
erage of MSU’s season opener
at Houston may be found online
Friday night at www.cdispatch.
com and also in Sunday’s print
edition.
Prep Basketball
Thursday’s Games
Leake Academy at Central Academy
Immanuel Christian at Starkville Christian
Kirk Academy at Oak Hill Academy
Saturday’s Games
West Point Classic
Hamilton Classic
Aberdeen at Nettleton Classic
Oak Hill Academy at Jackson Academy
Monday’s Game
Starkville Christian at Hebron Christian
Winston Academy at Heritage Academy
Tuesday’s Games
Columbus at West Lowndes
New Hope, West Point at Tupelo Classic
Aberdeen (girls) vs. Faulkner at Belmont
Caledonia at Smithville
Hamilton Tournament
Noxubee County at Louisville
Central Academy at Newton Academy
Hebron Christian at Grace Christian
Jackson Prep at Starkville Academy
Oak Hill Academy at Heritage Academy
Immanuel Christian at Winona Christian
Prep Soccer
Saturday’s Matches
Louisville at Starkville, 10 a.m.
New Hope hosts Golden Triangle Classic
College Football
Saturday’s Games
Arkansas at Ole Miss, 11:21 a.m.
Mississippi State at Texas A&M, 2:30 p.m.
LSU at Alabama, 7 p.m.
Men’s College Basketball
Friday’s Games
Alabama vs. Oklahoma (Dallas), 4 p.m.
Prairie View A&M at Mississippi State, 7 p.m.
Troy at Ole Miss, 7:30 p.m.
Jackson State at Southern Miss, 7:30 p.m.
Women’s College Basketball
Friday’s Games
West Alabama at Southern Miss, 11 a.m.
Jacksonville State at Ole Miss, 5 p.m.
Mississippi State at Houston, 5:30 p.m.
Alabama at Chattanooga, 6:30 p.m.
Sunday’s Game
Central Arkansas at Ole Miss, 2 p.m.
College Volleyball
Friday’s Matches
Marshall at Southern Miss, 5 p.m.
Ole Miss at Tennessee, 6 p.m.
Texas A&M at Mississippi State, 7 p.m.
Arkansas at Alabama, 7 p.m.
Junior College Football
MACJC State Championship
Saturday’s Game
Jones at East Mississippi, 2 p.m.
Junior College Basketball
Thursday’s Games
Women: Itawamba at Snead State, 5:30 p.m.
Men: Itawamba at Snead State, 7:30 p.m.
Women: EMCC at Meridian, 6 p.m.
Men: EMCC at Meridian, 8 p.m.
Today
AUTO RACING
6 p.m. — Global Rallycross Championship, at
Las Vegas, ESPN2
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
6:30 p.m. — Oklahoma at Baylor, FS1
8 p.m. — Oregon at Stanford, ESPN
GOLF
3 a.m. — European PGA Tour, Turkish Airlines
Open, second round, at Antalya, Turkey, TGC
Noon — PGA Tour, The McGladrey Classic, first
round, at St. Simons Island, Ga., TGC
NBA
6 p.m. — L.A. Clippers at Miami, TNT
8:30 p.m. — L.A. Lakers at Houston, TNT
NFL
7 p.m. — Washington at Minnesota, NFL Net-
work
SOCCER
11 a.m. — UEFA Europa League, Swansea City
at Kuban, FS1
2 p.m. — UEFA Europa League, Sheriff at Totten-
ham, FS1
7 p.m. — MLS, playoffs, conference semifinals,
leg 2, teams TBA, NBC Sports
7:30 p.m. — MLS, playoffs, conference semifi-
nals, leg 2, teams TBA, ESPN2
TENNIS
2 p.m. — ATP World Tour Finals, round robin, at
London, ESPN2
Friday
AUTO RACING
11 a.m. — NASCAR, Nationwide Series, practice
for ServiceMaster 200, at Avondale, Ariz., FS1
12:30 p.m. — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, practice for
AdvoCare 500, at Avondale, Ariz., FS1
2:30 p.m. — NASCAR, Nationwide Series, prac-
tice for ServiceMaster 200, at Avondale, Ariz.,
FS1
7 p.m. — NASCAR, Truck Series, Lucas Oil 150,
at Avondale, Ariz., FS1
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
7:30 p.m. — Louisville at UConn, ESPN2
GOLF
3 a.m. — European PGA Tour, Turkish Airlines
Open, third round, at Antalya, Turkey, TGC
Noon — PGA Tour, The McGladrey Classic, sec-
ond round, at St. Simons Island, Ga., TGC
MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
4 p.m. — Alabama vs. Oklahoma, at Dallas, FSN
5 p.m. — Boston College at Providence, FS1
5:30 p.m. — Maryland vs. UConn, at Brooklyn,
N.Y., ESPN2
6:30 p.m. — Armed Forces Classic, Oregon vs.
Georgetown, at Seoul, South Korea, ESPN
9 p.m. — Colorado vs. Baylor, at Dallas, FSN
MEN’S COLLEGE HOCKEY
6:30 p.m. — Minnesota at Notre Dame, NBC
Sports
SOCCER
1 a.m. — Youth, FIFA, U-17 World Cup, champi-
onship, teams TBD, at Abu Dhabi, United Arab
Emirates (delayed tape), ESPN2
TENNIS
2 p.m. — ATP World Tour Finals, round robin, at
London, ESPN2
CALENDAR
ON THE AIR
BRIEFLY
Local
Robertson to address Starkville QB Club
Steve Robertson, Recruiting Analyst for Scout.com/Fox Sports
will be the featured speaker for the Starkville Quarterback Club
speaker at its weekly meeting Thursday.
Robertson will address the club about 2013 recruits and 2014
prospects for the Mississippi State University football program.
The club meets at the Starkville Country Club. The social hour
will begin at 6 p.m., dinner will be served at 6:30 p.m., and the
meeting will start at 7 p.m.
John Hevesy, MSU’s Offensive Line/Running Game Coordina-
tor, will update members on the MSU football team and provide a
scouting report on this week’s opponent, Texas A&M.
The teams meet at 2:30 p.m. Saturday in College Station, Tex.
Cadence Bank and McAlister’s Deli are sponsoring this week’s
featured speaker. The dinner for the evening will be fried chicken,
mashed potatoes, green beans, rolls, salad bar, dessert and tea.
QB club information is available online at www.starkvillequar-
terbackclub.com or by phone at 662-323-6546.
n Green Wave plays football tonight: West Point High
School will kick off the final week of regular season play tonight
when it plays host to Lewisburg in a Mississippi High School
Activities Association Class 5A, Region 1 contest.
Kickoff is set for 7 p.m. at Hamblin Stadium.
West Point (6-4, 4-2 Class 5A, Region 1) can clinch the third
seed from the region with a win tonight. If Clarksdale beats Center
Hill Friday night, West Point will travel for an opening-round playoff
game on Nov. 15.
Miss. State
Ramey places second
Princeville, Hawaii — Mississippi
State senior Chad Ramey carded a
final-round 70 to claim a personal-best
15-under-par 201 and a runner-up
finish in the Warrior Princeville Makai
Invitational.
The Fulton native finished the
54-hole event in a three-way tie for
first, sending Ramey, Robert Geibel
of Louisville and Mark Anguiano of
Cal State Fullerton to a sudden-death
playoff hole. The senior Bulldog parred
the hole, but Geibel nailed a birdie for
the WPMI title.
Despite tying a school record,
MSU finished third at the WPMI. The
Bulldogs turned in a 38-under-par 826
to tie the program’s all-time record set
in 1983. Cal State Fullerton (42-under
822) held off Louisville (41-under 823)
for the WPMI team championship.
State improved its record to 42-31-
1 after beating out 14 teams in Hawaii,
including Top 50 clubs No. 15 Baylor,
No. 27 Arizona State and No. 42 East
Tennessee State.
“Our guys competed hard all week
and we beat several good teams,”
Bulldog coach Clay Homan said.
“Overall it was a positive way to end the
fall season and I’m proud of how all of
our guys played this week.”
All five Bulldogs finished under par
for the WPMI.
Senior Joe Sakulpolphaisan
posted his second Top 10 of the
season after shooting a 5-under 67 on
Wednesday. The total score of 12-un-
der 204 propelled Sakulpolphaisan to
fifth place.
A total score of 7-under 209 helped
sophomore Ben Wood turn in his fourth top 25 of the season after
tying for 15th overall.
Seniors Axel Boasson (2-under 214) and Barrett Edens (1-un-
der 215) finished tied for 35th and 41st, respectively, from Hawaii.
n Stropp competes at Indoors event: At Starkville, with
the 2014 dual match season just around the corner, the 2013 fall
campaign culminates in New York City, N.Y., this weekend as
Mississippi State men’s tennis senior Malte Stropp will represent
the Bulldogs in the 2013 USTA/ITA National Indoor Intercollegiate
Championships, beginning Thursday, Nov. 6.
After capturing the 2013 USTA/ITA Southern Regional Singles
Championship last month, Stropp earned a bid to prestigious
tournament, which features 32 of the nation’s top singles players
and 20 of the nation’s top doubles squads. It is the second major of
the collegiate tennis season.
Stropp, ranked 40th nationally, will begin play against North
Carolina’s Brett Clark in the first round. The MSU senior will need
five wins to capture the title of singles champion.
Play begins Thursday with the first round of singles, followed
by the round of 16 and quarterfinals on Friday, Nov. 8. Semifinals
will be played Saturday, Nov. 9, with the championship match to be
decidedon Sunday, Nov. 10.
n Winship earns league honor: At Starkville, Mississippi
State goalkeeper CJ Winship values the opportunity to give back
to the community, and her dedication to service has earned her a
place on the SEC’s 2013 Community Service Team.
Winship, who was selected to be team co-captain during the
season, received the honor for the second-straight year.
“We are proud of CJ that the SEC has recognized her service
to the community,” MSU coach Aaron Gordon said. “CJ has been a
tremendous leader to our team on and off the field, and she is such
a great representative of Mississippi State University to the people
in our community.”
Last spring Winship assisted in baking goods to benefit Relay
For Life. She has also been a regular speaker at the Attala County
Library for their Literacy Awareness Week.
Since joining the Mississippi State soccer team, the Ridgeland
native has been an FCA huddle leader at Starkville High School
and a speaker to students at Starkville Academy.
n Women’s tennis completes fall schedule: At Starkville,
the Mississippi State women’s tennis team will wrap up 2013 fall
action this weekend as members of the Bulldog squad compete
in two tournaments on different sides of the nation - one in Los
Angeles, Calif., and the other in Sarasota, Fla.
All-SEC sophomore Georgiana Patrasc and senior Rosie Dion
will be competing in the Jack Kramer Invitational in Los Angeles,
Calif.
Meanwhile, representing Mississippi State at the Lakewood
Ranch Invitational in Sarasota, Fla., will be seniors Alexandra
Perper and Petra Ferancova, junior Naomi Tran and true freshman
Timea Guibe.
“We are looking forward to capping off a solid tournament
season,” Greenan said. “We have had highlights throughout this
fall from every player on our team. The girls have worked very hard
this semester and are prepared for a strong finish.”
Action for the Jack Kramer will begin today, while the Lake-
wood Ranch event starts on Friday.
Ole Miss
Soccer advances at conference tournament
ORANGE BEACH, Ala. — The Rebels opened play at the
Southeastern Conference Tournament on Wednesday and notched
a pair of goals from two of the top players in the program’s history
as No. 22 Ole Miss (15-4-2) defeated Kentucky (13-6-1) by a score
of 2-0.
With the win, the Rebels will advance to the semifinals of the
annual tournament and face the top-seeded Florida Gators at 4
p.m. Friday.
The shutout was the ninth of the season for the Rebels and
gave junior goalkeeper Kelly McCormick her 33rd career win,
giving her the most wins in a career of any goalkeeper in program
history. Rafaelle Souza also tied for the career record in goals,
putting in her 41st goal of her career to extend the Rebel lead in the
second half.
“I’m really proud of the team tonight and the effort against a
very good Kentucky team,” said Ole Miss head coach Matt Mott.
“We played a complete game tonight and got some very good
performances all-around in a total team win. Mandy (McCalla) and
Rafa (Souza) both continued to just do what they do for us, and
that’s put the ball in the net. Now we have to rest and get ready to
face a very good Florida team on Friday.”
After trading feints early in the match, the Rebels became the
first team to convert an attack into a successful score when Betha-
ny Bunker and Mandy McCalla connected for the game’s first goal.
McCalla put the Rebels on the board in the 22nd minute when
she took the ball at the top corner of the box on the far side of the
field off a pass from Bunker. McCalla faked to her right and then
turned left with the ball, firing the ball into the goal past the near
post to take the 1-0 lead on the Wildcats.
— From Staff, Special Reports
THE DISPATCH • www.cdispatch.com 2B THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2013
BY MATTHEW STEVENS
mstevens@cdispatch.com
STARKVILLE — The little se-
cret being talked about around the
Seal Family Football Complex this
week is Mississippi State hasn’t
seen a wide receiver like Mike Ev-
ans all season.
As the Bulldogs began their
preparation for a nationally tele-
vised matchup with No. 11 Texas
A&M (7-2, 3-2 in Southeastern Con-
ference), the tape of their eight pre-
vious games simply don’t give them
any reference for Evans’ skill set.
“He’s a completely different kid
at 6-foot-5 and 220 pounds that is
freakishly fast and can jump out of
the gym as they say,” MSU defen-
sive coordinator Geoff Collins said.
“He’s a completely different animal
that we’ve just never seen.”
Not even when trying to defend
the LSU duo of Odell Beckham Jr.,
and Jarvis Landry can give MSU
cornerbacks any pointers on trying
to defend easily the SEC’s most pro-
lific pass catcher in the 2013 season.
Evans, who is clearly the favor-
ite and most easily found target
for 2012 Heisman Trophy winning
quarterback Johnny Manziel, leads
all receivers in the conference in
yards (1,147), touchdowns (12) and
yards per touch (22.1 yards) this
season.
When MSU had the displeasure
of facing Beckham Jr., and Landry,
both of who are also considered
high NFL Draft picks eventually as
well, the duo shredded the Bulldogs
for 275 total receiving yards.
MSU had trouble on two specif-
ic big plays keeping track of South
Carolina’s best receiving threat as
Connor Shaw found for two catches
resulting in touchdowns during the
Gamecocks’ 34-16 victory in Colum-
bia, S.C.
“At this point in the season it isn’t
frustrating really to get beat like
that,” MSU redshirt freshman cor-
nerback Cedric Jiles said. “It’s more
of a mindset like ‘let me get my stuff
together and don’t get beat’.”
Professional scouts have Ev-
ans, a third-year sophomore, rated
as one of the best receivers in the
country and a possible first round
draft pick if he chooses to forgo his
final two years of eligibility at A&M.
CBSSports.com draft analyst Rob
Rang has Evans possibly taken in
the Top 10 of 2014 NFL Draft.
Evans is truly a big-play target on
every passing play from the spread
offense brought by Aggies head
coach Kevin Sumlin and perfected
by the improvisation of Manziel.
Evans is one of only six receivers
in the Football Bowl Subdivision
to already surpass the 1,000- yard
plateau. He leads the nation with 15
catches of 30 or more yards.
“I don’t know about the talent of
other receivers but Mike is a big
guy that is extremely physical,”
Sumlin said. “He plays hard without
the football, is a talented guy with
the ball in his hands. He looks like
an intermediate guy that you can
throw the ball to short and be phys-
ical with but he’s a deep threat no
doubt.”
Sumlin went so far Saturday af-
ter the Aggies dominated UTEP
57-7 to suggest Evans should have
his name bantered about for the
Heisman Trophy along with his rock
star quarterback trying to repeat as
the winner.
“I’m puzzled why Mike Evans
isn’t in the Heisman race,” Sumlin
said. “I think he’s as good a play-
er as there is in the country. He’s
second in the country in yards per
game and everybody knows we’re
going to throw him the ball.”
Sumlin is familiar with having
two high profile offensive players
draw attention during a season after
being an assistant at Oklahoma.
“People say you can’t have two
guys that can do that,” Sumlin said.
“But I was on a team at Oklahoma
that had (quarterback) Jason White
and (running back) Adrian Peter-
son.”
In 2004, as a special teams coor-
dinator, Sumlin saw White and Pe-
terson share the spotlight en route
to finishing second and third for the
award behind Matt Leinart.
Evans is close to breaking NCAA
record for yards per catch in a sea-
son, 24.4, set by longtime NFL wide
receiver Henry Ellard while at Fres-
no State in 1982. Evans has at least
one 20-yard catch in 20 of 22 career
games. MSU’s defense has limited
teams to just 24 total passing plays
over 20 yards this season, which
ranks tied for fifth in the SEC.
MSU coach Dan Mullen suggest-
ed Monday that focusing too much
on defending the Manziel and Ev-
ans combination could be detrimen-
tal to the Bulldogs defensive plan.
“That’s your problem because
you can only put so many guys on so
many people,” Mullen said. “They
have a very good receiving corps of
not just one guy, of multiple guys.
So you say ‘OK, let’s put two guys
on Manziel and two guys on Evans’,
(then) the other seven take the nine
(and) we’re two short and that could
be problems for you.”
Follow Matt Stevens on Twitter @
matthewcstevens.
BY MATTHEW STEVENS
mstevens@cdispatch.com
STARKVILLE — On the day of
the funeral for Mississippi State
sophomore quarterback Dak
Prescott’s mother Peggy, Bulldogs
assistant head coach Tony Hughes
started his time on the Southeast-
ern Conference media teleconfer-
ence with a message for the signal
caller.
“Our hearts go out to Dak
Prescott who is truly a team player
and a great representative of Missis-
sippi State...and his family today,”
said Hughes, who is also the team’s
recruiting coordinator and safeties
coach. “He is very well respected
by his teammates and the coaching
staff here at Mississippi State.”
Hughes substituted for MSU
coach Dan Mullen as the fifth-year
head coach was scheduled to attend
the Prescott funeral in Louisiana
Wednesday.
Peggy Prescott died Sunday
morning, losing her long battle with
colon cancer and leaves three chil-
dren with Dak being the youngest
of the trio. Dak Prescott left the
MSU program Sunday to be with
his family in Haughton, La., and
funeral proceedings were set for
Wednesday with the entire MSU
team planning to attend the ser-
vices. MSU (4-4, 1-3 in Southeast-
ern Conference) will travel Friday
afternoon for a road game at No. 11
Texas A&M and Mullen said Mon-
day he’s currently unsure if Prescott
will play Saturday (2:30 p.m., CBS).
“We train year-round during
the offseason, spring and summer
conditioning program for adversi-
ty,” Hughes said when asked about
coaching the team this week after
the tragic news of one of their lead-
er’s families.
“We teach them the game of foot-
ball is like the game of life. Some-
times you’re going to get knocked
down and sometimes circumstanc-
es are going to happen that you can’t
control. You have to rise up past the
adversity. Our young men here at
Mississippi State are resilient and
mentally tough.”
n Chick-fil-A Bowl to send rep-
resentative to MSU-A&M game
Saturday in College Station:
The Chick-fil-A Bowl announced
Wednesday morning they will be
sending representative Rod Hovater
to visit Kyle Field when MSU travels
to face No. 11 Texas A&M. The bowl
committee confirmed both teams
are being scouted as potential rep-
resentatives in the 2013 Chick-fil-A
Bowl on Dec. 31.
The ACC and SEC team selec-
tions for the 46th annual Chick-fil-A
Bowl will be announced on Sunday,
Dec. 8. The Chick-fil-A Bowl is the
oldest guaranteed Atlantic Coast
Conference vs. Southeastern Con-
ference match-up in the bowl busi-
ness.
Texas A&M (7-2, 3-2 in SEC) has
never appeared in the Chick-fil-A
Bowl as the Aggies just joined the
SEC in football last season. MSU
has made three appearances in the
Chick-fil-A Bowl, most recently in
1999, when the game was simply
called the Peach Bowl, with a 17-7
victory against Clemson. The Bull-
dogs competed in the 1994 and 1992
bowl games as well.
n Derek Sherrod activated
from the PUP list by Green Bay
Packers for first time since inju-
ry: The Green Bay Packers activat-
ed tackle Derek Sherrod from the
reserve/physically unable to per-
form list. Sherrod, 24, was the Pack-
ers’ first-round draft pick (32nd
overall) out of Mississippi State in
2011.
He appeared in five games as a
rookie offensive right tackle but suf-
fered a broken leg and hasn’t been
on the active roster since the injury.
The Packers may need help along
the offensive line as guard T.J. Lang
suffered a concussion in Monday’s
loss to the Chicago Bears.
Sherrod, a Columbus native and
former four-star recruit to MSU
under then-head coach Sylvester
Croom, signed a rookie deal with
the Packers worth $6.602 million
with $5.3 million guaranteed and a
signing bonus of $3.3 million.
Follow Matt Stevens on Twitter @
matthewcstevens.
College Football
A&M’s Evans hard to stop
Bulldogs thinking about Prescott
Basketball
NBA
Wednesday’s Games
Orlando 98, L.A. Clippers 90
Washington 116, Philadelphia 102
Indiana 97, Chicago 80
Charlotte 92, Toronto 90
Boston 97, Utah 87
Golden State 106, Minnesota 93
Milwaukee 109, Cleveland 104
New Orleans 99, Memphis 84
San Antonio 99, Phoenix 96
Oklahoma City 107, Dallas 93
Today’s Games
L.A. Clippers at Miami, 6 p.m.
Atlanta at Denver, 8 p.m.
L.A. Lakers at Houston, 8:30 p.m.
Football
College
Wednesday’s Game
MIDWEST
Ball St. 44, Cent. Michigan 24
Today’s Games
SOUTH
Prairie View (5-4) at Alcorn St. (7-
3), 6:30 p.m.
Troy (5-4) at Louisiana-Lafayette
(6-2), 6:30 p.m.
SOUTHWEST
Oklahoma (7-1) at Baylor (7-0),
6:30 p.m.
FAR WEST
Oregon (8-0) at Stanford (7-1),
8 p.m.
NFL
Today’s Game
Washington at Minnesota, 7 p.m.
Hockey
NHL
Wednesday’s Games
N.Y. Rangers 5, Pittsburgh 1
Chicago 4, Winnipeg 1
Nashville 6, Colorado 4
Anaheim 5, Phoenix 2
Today’s Games
Florida at Boston, 6 p.m.
Montreal at Ottawa, 6 p.m.
New Jersey at Philadelphia, 6 p.m.
Minnesota at Washington, 6 p.m.
N.Y. Islanders at Carolina, 6 p.m.
N.Y. Rangers at Columbus, 6 p.m.
Dallas at Detroit, 6:30 p.m.
Edmonton at Tampa Bay, 6:30 p.m.
Calgary at St. Louis, 7 p.m.
Buffalo at Los Angeles, 9:30 p.m.
Vancouver at San Jose, 9:30 p.m.
THE DISPATCH • www.cdispatch.com THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2013 3B
Pigskin Picks Pigskin Picks
Week 11
HIGH SCHOOL
Warren Central at Columbus
Heritage Academy at
Madison-Ridgeland Academy
Pillow Academy at
Starkville Academy
Ethel at East Oktibbeha
Hamilton at Coffeeville
COLLEGE
Stanford at Oregon
Mississippi State at Texas A&M
Arkansas at Ole Miss
LSU at Alabama
Vanderbilt at Florida
Through the course of football season these local school
principals will be selecting their winning teams, both in High School
and College. Look in Thursday’s edition of
The Dispatch to keep up with their predictions.
Billie Smith
Fairview Elementary
60-40
Cindy Wamble
Heritage Academy
69-31
Billy Wilbanks
Starkville Academy
60-40
Warren Central
MRA
Starkville Aca.
Ethel
Coffeeville
Oregon
Texas A&M
Ole Miss
Alabama
Florida
Warren Central
Heritage
Starkville Aca.
Ethel
Coffeeville
Oregon
Texas A&M
Ole Miss
Alabama
Florida
Columbus
Heritage
Starkville Aca.
East Oktibbeha
Hamilton
Oregon
Mississippi State
Ole Miss
Alabama
Florida
Columbus
MRA
Starkville Aca.
East Oktibbeha
Coffeeville
Oregon
Texas A&M
Ole Miss
Alabama
Florida
Warren Central
MRA
Pillow Academy
East Oktibbeha
Hamilton
Oregon
Texas A&M
Ole Miss
Alabama
Florida
Columbus
Heritage
Starkville Aca.
Ethel
Hamilton
Oregon
Texas A&M
Ole Miss
Alabama
Florida
Hattie Thomas
Noxubee County H.S.
57-43
Tim Dickerson
Hamilton High School
68-32
Keith Fennell
Starkville High School
61-39
Randy Barnett
Caledonia High School
63-37
Yandell Harris
Oak Hill Academy
64-36
Samuel Williams
West Point H.S.
65-35
Robert Sanders
West Lowndes Elem.
63-37
Jill Savely
Columbus High School
60-40
Chris Hamm
Victory Christian Aca.
69-31
Top
Pickers
Cindy Wamble
Heritage Academy
69-31
Chris Hamm
Victory Christian Aca.
69-31
Tim Dickerson
Hamilton High School
68-32
Columbus
Heritage
Starkville Aca.
East Oktibbeha
Hamilton
Oregon
Mississippi State
Ole Miss
Alabama
Florida
Columbus
Heritage
Starkville Aca.
East Oktibbeha
Hamilton
Oregon
Mississippi State
Ole Miss
Alabama
Florida
Warren Central
MRA
Pillow
Ethel
Coffeeville
Oregon
Texas A&M
Ole Miss
Alabama
Vanderbilt
Warren Central
MRA
Starkville Aca.
East Oktibbeha
Hamilton
Oregon
Texas A&M
Ole Miss
Alabama
Florida
Columbus
Heritage
Starkville Aca.
Ethel
Coffeeville
Oregon
Mississippi State
Ole Miss
Alabama
Florida
Columbus
MRA
Starkville Aca.
East Oktibbeha
Coffeeville
Oregon
Texas A&M
Ole Miss
Alabama
Florida
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Women
Continued from Page 1B
5:30 p.m. Friday in the season open-
er at Houston.
Richardson was 6 of 8 from the
field, and all but one of her field
goals — a 3-pointer — was from in
the paint area. The only negatives
on her stat sheet was a 3-for-8 show-
ing from the free-throw line and
four turnovers.
“I was attacking off the hole and
getting offensive rebounds for put-
backs,” Richardson said. “I should
have made more free throws and
had more points, but it was a team
effort. Wherever the team needed
me, I just play my role.”
Schaefer can live with the turn-
overs from “newbies” like Richard-
son and the other three healthy
newcomers to the program. His
hope is Richardson and classmate
Chapel, who played only 15 minutes
as she recovers from being sick,
can improve the Bulldogs’ produc-
tion from the forward positions.
Richardson’s versatility gives
her a chance to deliver double-digit
totals every night. She said Wednes-
day at the team’s media day that the
coaches have made their expecta-
tions clear to her, so she knows she
won’t be able to ease into the action.
With opponents likely set to focus
on junior returners Martha Alwal
and Kendra Grant, MSU will need
other players to emerge to take the
pressure off Alwal and Grant.
“I understand different positions
and the roles I have to take on as a
player on offense for us to succeed,”
Richardson said.
Richardson anticipates the
nerves being there Friday night,
too. They might be there today
when she and the team fly to Hous-
ton to get ready for their opener. It
will be Richardson’s first flight, so
she will have to put that anxiety
aside — just like she did Monday
in her first game as a Bulldog — to
settle down and enjoy the ride.
“I just accepted the challenge
and I just played to the best of my
ability,” Richardson said.
Follow Dispatch sports editor
Adam Minichino on Twitter @
ctsportseditor.
Men
Continued from Page 1B
a night but we can’t have Fred get-
ting 24 points one night and then
nine points the next game,” Ray
said. “Fred will be a good shooter
over his career despite what the per-
centages say because you just look
at the fundamentals of his stroke.”
Thomas, who was 3-of-7 from
the field in a 86-57 victory over
Auburn University at Montgomery
last week in a exhibition game, says
he believes the shooting statistics
will change based on his maturity
of figuring out the definition of a
good shot.
“The way I can get those per-
centages back up is by being patient
and that’s something in my mind all
day, everyday,” Thomas said. “I’ve
turned down shots this season be-
cause I’m tired and the ball proba-
bly wasn’t going in. I hope that’s de-
veloping and maturing as a player.”
Ware, a sophomore center, has
dropped 28 pounds since arriving
on campus and according to MSU
strength and conditioning coach
Richard Atkins is at his targeted
weight of 262.
Ware, who grew up in Starkville
modeling his game after All-NBA
first team selection center Dwight
Howard, was able to turn back the
clock with his game but yet aver-
age 8.4 points and a team-best 6.4
rebounds per game in his freshman
season at MSU. He’ll be half of the
two-man combination with fresh-
man point guard IJ Ready in Ray’s
motion offense.
Part of that weight loss for Ware
has been simply identifying what
he can and can’t eat from a calorie
standpoint on a daily basis. These
habits exclude late night trips to
Waffle House as a freshman before
last season began.
“Over a period of time once
he started losing weight and get-
ting stronger in the weight room,
(Ware) started to see his game im-
prove,” Akins said. “If you can ever
get them to that point early in their
careers, it’s a lot easier.”
With the new officiating points
of emphasis demanding freedom
of movement for players, Ray is still
concerned about injuries and foul
trouble with his frontcourt depth
that essentially includes just three
players (Ware and senior forwards
Colin Borchert and Roquez John-
son).
“I’ve got to be very conscious
of the new rules because there’s
just nobody behind me at center so
I’m aware that fouling can put me
on the bench and now there’s two
power forwards out there then,”
Ware said. “It’s a big responsibility
there’s no doubt about it.”
In the team’s media day at Hum-
phrey Coliseum, Ray talked about
how he learned as a coach how to
better handle practices with pa-
tience when instructing a young,
immature team. Last season Ray
would immediately stop practice
when a player did a fundamental
thing wrong instead of letting the
possession finish with a rebound.
This led, he believes, to the Bull-
dogs being just 11th in the league
in rebounds per game.
“One thing I’ve focused on this
year as a coach is letting guys play
through a possession no matter how
many mistakes I saw,” Ray said.
“What I had to do is train myself
to let that possession play out and
pull that player aside afterwards be-
cause we weren’t practicing the end
result of a defensive stop, which is
the rebound.”
With MSU looking to avoid back-
to-back losing seasons for the first
time since 1988 and 1989, the im-
provement will be clearly dictated
by the core of team coming back
simply not relying on osmosis for a
better record.
“We tell our guys all the time it’s
really hard to suggest just because
I’m a year older that I’m a year bet-
ter at my craft,” Ray said. “It’s about
the hard work you put into your
game that will determine if your
better. Not just that you’re a year
older than somebody else.”
Follow Matt Stevens on Twitter @
matthewcstevens.
THE DISPATCH • www.cdispatch.com 4B THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2013
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Perkins
Continued from Page 1B
Arkansas State University and in
the National Football League with
the New York Giants and Tampa
Bay Buccaneers, one might have to
wonder where a junior college state
championship game ranks on the
all-time list.
“A championship game is still
a championship game,” Perkins
said. “You have brought in a group
of young men with the promise of
playing for a championship. When
you reach the championship game,
there is a great deal of satisfaction.
You have seen the players work so
hard from the first day they report
on your campus. This is where you
promised you could take them. So
it is an incredible feeling to know
that this group of young men put it
all together and found a way to play
for that championship.”
Perkins retired from the NFL
following the 2000 season. He and
his wife Lisa decided to make the
Hattiesburg area their retirement
destination. Several years later,
Presbyterian Christian School
lured Perkins out of retirement to
be a volunteer coach with the high
school football program.
When Jones started actively
seeking a replacement for Eddie
Pierce, Jones president Dr. Jesse
Smith had a surprise resume cross
his desk - it belonged to Perkins.
“I just felt like I still had some-
thing to give,” Perkins said. “It was
a unique opportunity in an unique
setting.”
Perkins has quickly come up
to speed on the level of play in the
MACJC. Being named five days
before Christmas in 2011, the
ability to put together a complete
recruiting class was non-existent.
However, Perkins and his staff
did the best they could on the fly
and posted a 6-3 record, including
victories over arch-rivals Mississip-
pi Gulf Coast Community Col-
lege and Pearl River Community
College. Jones tied for the division
championship but lost out on the
tie-breaker and did not make the
playoffs.
This season, the Bobcats did not
need a tie-breaker. Jones finished
9-1, with its only loss being to
Hinds Community College. Again,
the Bobcats beat Gulf Coast and
Pearl River making Perkins the
first-ever Jones coach to start 4-0
against the main two rivals.
After being one of the state’s
best programs for close to three
decades last century, Jones is back
in the spotlight. The Bobcats will
try to win their first state cham-
pionship since 2001. Jones also
played for the title in 2002 and
2007.
“The level of play in this league
is massively under-rated,” Perkins
said. “I don’t think people realize
how many really great players play
in the league. It is the perfect first
stop for some players who are not
ready to play Division I football.
The drawing point is that the game
is high-scoring. Every team in the
league throws it all over the field.
Most of the teams have some really
great skilled athletes. So it is an
entertaining product for the fans.
The players can become acclimat-
ed with all of the expectations of
being a college student-athlete. It
has been quite a learning experi-
ence for me. I think the game on
this level is great.”
For the Jones players, it has
been a learning experience as well.
Not only is the 71-year-old Perkins
imparting four decades of playing
and coaching experience, he is
taking a genuine interest in their
futures.
Earlier this season, Perkins’
close friend and National Football
League Hall of Fame coaching
colleague Bill Parcells spoke to the
team, spent the night with Perkins
and rode with the team to a game
at Southwest Mississippi Commu-
nity College.
FINAL GAME
Perkins quickly deflects the
praise for his team to a hard-work-
ing coaching staff. Defensive coor-
dinator Steve Boyd has coached 21
seasons on the Jones campus. At
this point in his career, Perkins is
not going to drive the back roads of
Mississippi looking for the dia-
monds in the rough.
“I have the hardest-working staff
in the state,” Perkins said. “That
makes my job easy.”
Not making the job easy is
the recent changes in recruiting
policies for MACJC institutions.
In the fall of 2011, the recruiting
districts were eliminated and
schools no longer could protect the
22 best high school seniors in their
district. Thanks to the late hiring
of Perkins and the elimination of
districts, a scramble took place to
complete last season’s roster.
Less than 10 miles from the
Jones campus, Laurel High School
played in the 2011 Mississippi High
School Activities Association’s
Class 4A state championship. Off
that team, five players will suit up
for EMCC Saturday and none for
Jones.
“We went after all five of them
but it was too late,” Perkins said.
“We are going to stay at home
with our recruiting. Even though
we now can, it makes no sense to
recruit the entire state. It is not
financially an option. There are
enough players for us to win with,
right here in our own backyard.”
Perkins has won with those play-
ers. And now, he and the Bobcats
are one win away from a champi-
onship.
Scott Walters is a reporter for the
Dispatch. Contact him at swalters@
cdispatch.com and follow him on
Twitter at @dispatchscott.
COMING FRIDAY
n GAME PREVIEW/FACT BOX: East
Mississippi C.C. meets Jones J.C. for
the state championship Saturday.
Rivals
Continued from Page 1B
Ole Miss (12-12, 2-9
SEC) won for the sixth
time in the last seven se-
ries meetings. Coach Joe
Getzin saw his team tee-
tering again Wednesday
night, after dropping the
second set and entering
the intermission in a 1-1
tie.
“We got up pretty bad
on the road last weekend
(in 3-0 losses at Missouri
and Arkansas),” Getzin
said. “We really chal-
lenged to the kids to come
out and start stronger. We
knew this would be an in-
tense rivalry match. We
had to match the intensi-
ty. I thought we did an in-
credible job of that.”
Ole Miss seized con-
trol of the match in the
third set.
A kill by Dani McCree
brought the Bulldogs
within 13-12. Ole Miss re-
sponded with a 10-2 run to
steal all of the momentum
in the match. Ole Miss
had seven stretches of
three consecutive points
or more in the match,
while MSU only had two
such stretches.
“We knew if we could
steal a point or two, we
could make a three or
four point run,” Getzin
said. “Both teams sided
out real well. We simply
talked to our team about
pushing for one point, and
if we get one it turns into
two.”
MSU (11-14, 2-9) ap-
peared tight in the first
match and Ole Miss took
full advantage. While try-
ing to get its service game
in gear, MSU still eased
out to an 11-10 advantage.
A couple of unforced er-
rors proved costly. Ty
Laporte had four kills as
Ole Miss quickly built a
lead late and took a 25-20
win in that set. MSU had
five of its 11 service er-
rors in that set.
The Bulldogs fought
right back with a strong
finish to the second set.
MSU ended the set with
7-2 run to gain the mo-
mentum going into the
break.
“We thought we were
ready to take over,” MSU
freshman OPP Kimmy
Gardiner said. “We have
to learn how to play well
in back-to-back sets be-
cause we really had the
momentum and we let it
get away.”
Getzin knew his team
would need a spark to re-
gain control.
Behind six kills from
Nakeyta Clair and four
kills from Marie-Pierre
Bakima, Ole Miss rode a
.353 attacking percentage
in the third set to com-
plete control in the match.
MSU held no greater than
a two-point lead in either
of the final two sets.
“I was really worried
about our mental state
after State got it back to
1-1,” Getzin said. “I real-
ly like how we attacked
in the third set. It was a
defensive match and we
were able to get some sep-
aration.
Gardner led MSU with
17 kills, seven digs and a
block, while senior Dani
McCree added nine kills.
McVey finished with 21
digs, while Alex Warren
had five blocks.
For Ole Miss, Clair fin-
ished with a career-high
19 kills on a .536 hitting
percentage. Junior Cara
Fisher, the Rebels’ libe-
ro, had a career-high 17
digs. Freshman Aubrey
Edie posted her fifth dou-
ble-double with 42 assists
and 12 digs.
Ole Miss beat Tennes-
see earlier this season for
its other conference win.
Those teams meet against
Friday in Knoxville,
Tenn. Meanwhile, MSU
resumes its homestand
with a 7 p.m. start Friday
against Texas A&M.
“There is no time to
get discouraged,” Hazel-
wood said. “We just have
to come back out here and
get ready for Friday.”
Follow Scott Walters on
Twitter @dispatchscott.
Patriots
Continued from Page 1B
mar. If not, we will go to basketball
season.”
Heritage Academy still controls
its destiny after a 47-13 loss to Mag-
nolia Heights because Pillow Acad-
emy lost to Washington School 28-
14. As good as Magnolia Heights
looked Friday night against Heri-
tage Academy, Donahoe believes
his team might be in for an even
tougher challenge against MRA (7-
3, 5-1 Division I). He said MRA has
size, speed, strength, and could be
the most talented squad his team
faces this season. Heritage Acad-
emy will have to prepare for that
challenge after taking a loss that
“kicked us in the gut pretty good.”
He credited the Chiefs for playing
well up front and for having a strong
a dual-threat running attack as his
team has faced this season.
“I just think we got a little bit
overwhelmed with their size and
strength up front,” Donahoe said.
“Any time you’re able to mesh up
linemen on safeties and linemen on
linebackers and you have running
backs who can make one man miss
all night, it is going to get ugly.”
Donahoe admits he saw an “in-
consistent” first two days of prac-
tice this week as his team prepared
for MRA. As tough as it has been
on his team for playing in its 12th
week in a row without a break, Do-
nahoe said it isn’t time to make ex-
cuses or to get down on itself after a
disappointing home loss. He knows
MRA won’t take it easy on his group
just because it needs to win to get
back to the playoffs to defend its
Class AAA, Division II title.
“We need to be able to control
the ball,” Donahoe said. “We need
to get 20 first downs if we are going
to win the football game. We are go-
ing to have to control the clock and
make some of those possessions
count by scoring.”
Donahoe said the Patriots will be
without senior wide receiver/defen-
sive back Cody Mordecai, who hurt
his knee last week. He said senior
Blake Ballard likely would move
into the lineup and sophomore Mi-
chael Ledbetter would shift to cor-
nerback.
Donahoe also said Heritage will
be without senior lineman Josh Fox-
worthy due to injury.
“We just have to get some de-
fensive linemen in there who want
to get low and try to do everything
they can do to keep those linemen
off our linebackers,” Donahoe said.
“If we’ll get down and create dou-
ble teams and keep our linebackers
free, we’ll be OK. If we don’t, we’re
not going to be OK. That is the key.”
Follow Dispatch sports editor
Adam Minichino on Twitter @
ctsportseditor.
MAIS PLAYOFFS
All Games at 7 p.m. Friday
Class AA — Second Round
No. 8 Lee Academy at No. 1 Simpson
Academy
No. 5 Leake Academy at No. 4 Indi-
anola Academy
No. 7 Tri-County Academy at No. 2
Centreville Academy
No. 11 Glenbook School at No. 3
ACCS
Class A — Second Round
No. 8 Newton Academy at No. 1 Trini-
ty Episcopal
No. 12 Riverdale Academy at No. 4
Cenla Christian
No. 7 DeSoto School at No. 2 Mar-
shall Academy
No. 6 Sylva Bay Academy at No. 3
Benton Academy
AREA GAMES
All games start at 7 p.m. Friday
Except Where Noted
n Lewisburg at West Point (Today)
nWarren Central at Columbus
nNew Hope at Saltillo
nNoxapater at West Lowndes
nClinton at Starkville
nHamilton at Coffeeville
nEthel at East Oktibbeha
nWest Oktibbeha at Nanih Waiya
nHeritage Academy at MRA
nPillow Academy at Starkville Academy
n Gentry at Noxubee County (MHSAA
playoffs)
nHumphreys County at Aberdeen (MH-
SAA playoffs)
nDelta Academy at Hebron Christian
(MAIS playoffs)
nSamson at Lamar Co. (AHSAA playoffs)
nAliceville at Long (AHSAA playoffs)
nGaylesville at Pickens Co. (AHSAA
playoffs)
nLakeside at Pickens Ac. (AISA playoffs)
THE DISPATCH • www.cdispatch.com THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2013 5B
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Who Needs
Life Insurance?
Life insurance isn’t for everyone. If
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©2013 THE MOTLEY FOOL/DIST. BY UNIVERSAL UCLICK 11/7
Business
MONEY TIP
n Clean clothes inexpensively. Wash and iron clothes your-
self. If you use a cleaner, compare prices at different establish-
ments. A 50 cent difference in cleaning a shirt, for example, can
add up to $100 a year.
Source: americasaves.org
City of Columbus
Oct. 28
nNot available at press time.
Lowndes County
Oct. 30- Nov. 6
nLawrence Egger; 348 Dale
Road; Addition to Single Family
Residence; Owner
n Reggie McCarter; George
Bridges Road; Construct Sin-
gle Family Residence; Owner
n Todd Bailey; Nashville Ferry
Road; Construct Single Family
Residence; Bostick Construc-
tion
n Ronnie Gray; Highway 45
Alt. S.; Construct Single Family
Residence; Owner
n Curtis Routley; Phillips Hill
Road; Construct Single Family
Residence; Owner
n Mary Lou Watt; 84 Leon
Drive; Construct Single Family
Residence; Owner
n Al Curtis and Pearl Hairston;
Will Hairston Road; Construct
Single Family Residence;
Owner
n Johnny Phillips; 4534 Hardy
Billups Road; Move Mobile
Home; Timberline Homes Inc.
n Johnny Phillips; 4534 Hardy
Billups Road; Set Up Mobile
Home; Jessie James
n Kevin and Angie Clark;
Wolfe Road; Construct Single
Family Residence; Sunnyslope
Development
BUILDING PERMITS
U.S. economic growth likely slowed in third quarter
BY MARTIN CRUTSINGER
AP Economics Writer
WASHINGTON —
U.S. economic growth is
likely languishing in the
second half of 2013, held
back by federal policies
and a slowdown in hiring
that has kept consumers
from stepping up spend-
ing.
Economists are hope-
ful that the impact from
Washington may soon
ease, clearing the way
for stronger growth next
year.
Analysts forecast that
the economy grew at a 2
percent annual rate in the
July-September quarter,
according to a survey by
Factset. That would be
down from an annual rate
of 2.5 percent in the April-
June period. Most econo-
mists expect growth will
stay at the tepid 2 percent
rate or weaken slightly in
the October-December
quarter.
Slowdown in hiring sours consumers
William Browning
BY WILLIAM BROWNING
wbrowning@cdispatch.com
T
his is the first
of what will be a
weekly column ap-
pearing in The Dispatch
each Thursday. The tone
will be laidback, the news
will be accurate and the
topic will always be about
business happenings in
the Golden Triangle.
Sometimes we’ll talk
about initiatives.
Like the fact that
Christina Berry, city
planner for Columbus,
is proposing a corridor
improvement district
for Highway 45 North
that would run from the
Magnolia Bowl to the city
limits. That’s a four-mile
stretch and Berry said
parcels included are 90
percent commercial.
“Its main
purpose is to
create a pos-
itive sense of
place amongst
a heavily
trafficked
corridor to
encourage
and attract
continued
reinvestment,”
Berry said.
It could
include capital improve-
ments, like street lights,
signage, landscaping,
sidewalks and public art.
The district would “weigh
heavily on addressing
highway safety, traffic
and access issues,” Berry
added.
“The capital improve-
ments for the district will
be paid for be setting
side new ad valorem tax
revenue in a
special fund
to cover those
costs,” she
said.
Of course,
the city coun-
cil will have to
approve both
the district
boundaries
and revenue
fund.
There is a
public meet-
ing slated to take place
from 4 to 6 p.m. Tuesday
at the Trotter Convention
Center regarding the
district. Business owners
and private citizens will
be able to view map
boundaries and also
provide ideas capital
improvement ideas in
writing to city officials.
The meeting, Berry said,
will be informal.
“Making capital im-
provements along a major
corridor brings value to
any development project,”
Berry said. “It helps to
improve or stabilize prop-
erty values, it’s attractive
to investors and overall
it improves the image
of Columbus. Everyone
utilizes Highway 45 for
various reasons. Im-
proving it would be just
another example of their
tax dollars at work.”
Sometimes this
column will talk about
business gatherings.
Like the “Solar Array
Open House” events
that Synergetics DCS in
Starkville is having this
month and next. The
company, which began
in 1992, installed its first
solar array in 2011 on
the top of its warehouse.
The array is currently the
largest in the state.
“The open house will
educate business owners
on the tax advantages
of solar power and how
to financially structure
their projects to achieve
positive cash flow as soon
as year one,” said J.R.
Cromer, solar consultant
with Synergetics.
The open house
seminars — held today
at 3 p.m. and on Nov. 21
at 3 p.m.; and Dec. 3 and
17 at 3 p.m. — are free.
A tour of the array and
presentation on solar
array ownership will be
made. People interested
in attending can register
at www.synergetics-solar.
com.
And sometimes,
this column will keep it
simple.
Like when we inform
you that Jack’s, a Bir-
mingham, Ala.-based
fast food chain, is getting
closer to opening. A
“Jack’s” sign has gone up
in front of the building
that formerly housed
Bojangles on Highway 45
North.
Of course, we want
your input for this col-
umn. Send items and tips
to news@cdispatch or to
wbrowning@cdispatch.
com.
Columbus eyes corridor improvement project on Hwy. 45
BROWNING ON BUSINESS
DILBERT
ZITS
GARFIELD
CANDORVILLE
BABY BLUES
BEETLE BAILEY
DOONESBURY
MALLARD FILMORE
FOR SOLUTION SEE THE
CROSSWORD PUZZLE
IN CLASSIFIEDS
FAMILY CIRCUS
D
EAR ABBY:
Veterans
Day is next
week, and I hope
you’ll address
something I have
encountered over
the years. I am a
Navy veteran who
served four years
as a Seabee. I
was one of the
first women to
be assigned to a
combat unit, and
I am proud of my
service. However,
I dread it when
Veterans Day
rolls around. Why do people
assume that because I’m a
woman I am not a veteran?
Two years ago, when I went
into a restaurant that serves
veterans a free meal, the man
in front of me was asked if
he wanted a veterans’ menu.
He declined. The hostess did
not ask me if I needed one; I
had to request it. Later in the
meal, the manager went to
each of the tables speaking
to the veterans, but skipped
mine.
Today, many women serve,
and it should not be a stretch
that some veterans are
female. Would you comment,
Abby? — OVERLOOKED IN
LEXINGTON, KY.
DEAR OVERLOOKED:
Gladly. I can understand why
you were offended. However,
I hope you realize that what
happened occurred because
of these people’s ignorance,
and it wasn’t personal. While
our armed forces have always
been predominantly male,
women have officially been
part of our mil-
itary only since
World War II.
Many veter-
ans wear hats
or other items
that identify
what branch
of the service
they were in.
To prevent this
oversight from
happening to
you again, wear
an insignia next
Monday, which
is Veterans Day.
If you do, it will
draw attention
to the fact that many women
serve in the military, which
might be helpful to other fe-
male veterans. Thank you for
your service to our country.
DEAR ABBY: My wife and
I are having a disagreement
about texting. She insisted
that you can text anyone
anytime — day or night. I
feel you shouldn’t text after a
time when you wouldn’t CALL
someone.
Cellphones are set to ring
when texts come in just as
landlines do. I say if you don’t
need an immediate response,
send an email. What is proper
etiquette regarding when
people should send texts? —
POLITE IN KATY, TEXAS
DEAR POLITE: I don’t think
there are hard-and-fast rules
of etiquette regarding texting
— yet. But common sense
would suggest that if people
suspect they “might” disturb
someone by texting, then they
should refrain. Of course,
recipients who don’t wish to
be interrupted can put their
cellphones on silent or turn
them off.
If the texts you’re arguing
about are intruding on time
the two of you should be
concentrating on each other,
I see no reason why they
shouldn’t be responded to the
next day.
DEAR ABBY: Our family
is moving into a new house
soon. When we were looking
at the house, our 10-year-old
daughter asked if she could
have the bigger bedroom. We
said yes, and our 12-year-old
son said he “didn’t care.”
We have been in contract
for two months and have gone
to see the house several
times. When we did our final
walk-through, our son pulled
my husband aside and said
because he is older, he should
get the bigger bedroom.
Of course, our daughter is
upset. My husband seems to
think the older kid should get
his way. My thought is that
our son had more than two
months to speak up, but at
the 11th hour the green-eyed
monster is emerging. What do
you think? — STARTING ANEW
IN OHIO
DEAR STARTING ANEW:
I think that at this point, to
keep peace in your new home,
it would be advisable for your
children to draw straws to
decide who gets the larger
bedroom.
Dear Abby is written by
Abigail Van Buren, also known
as Jeanne Phillips, and was
founded by her mother, Pau-
line Phillips. Write Dear Abby
at www.DearAbby.com or P.O.
Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA
90069.
THE DISPATCH • www.cdispatch.com 6B THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2013
Comics & Puzzles
Dear Abby
Dear Abby
TODAY’S BIRTHDAY (Nov.
7). You really don’t give your-
self enough credit, but your
humility will serve you well
this year, as it enables you to
learn from everyone you meet.
New business in December
lines your pockets. Your family
grows in January. Someone
falls in love with your depth
in February. Pick up a skill in
March. You’ll travel in style in
June. Gemini and Libra people
adore you. Your lucky numbers
are: 8, 39, 33, 31 and 47.
ARIES (March 21-April
19). To some people, all of
that thinking that you do looks
like you just sitting quietly. But
make no mistake, thinking is
labor. Today it will be taxing
labor, too, but by the day’s
end, you’ll have sorted out a
big problem.
TAURUS (April 20-May
20). Accomplishments will
happen because of one per-
son’s will. An entire company
of people wouldn’t be able to
do what you alone do today
and with great intention and
focus.
GEMINI (May 21-June
21). You may feel like your
performance is being scruti-
nized. Celebrate the awesome
and the awful of it. If you were
perfect on the first try, the
fun of learning, growing and
improving would be lost.
CANCER (June 22-July
22). Doctors don’t heal
wounds; rather, they do what
they can to support the body’s
natural healing abilities.
Non-physical wounds work in
the same way. In a supportive
environment, they gradually
mend.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22).
You’re afraid that if you forgive
someone, he or she will keep
perpetuating the wrong be-
havior. You may be right about
this. To avoid a codependent
relationship, you’ll have to
spell out the boundaries.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22). Mastery is about appor-
tioning your attention intelli-
gently. You will give prolonged
focus to a practice every day
so that later you can execute
the task with minimal effort.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23).
Having the same opinion as a
large number of other people
doesn’t make your opinion
right or wrong. It only reduces
the chances that you’ll be
persecuted for it.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov.
21). You can learn about what
it means to be courageous
through stories of courageous
acts. But you can only learn
about your own courage by
finding it inside yourself and
using it when the moment
arises.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21). The day is
mostly filled with positives,
but it’s peppered with a few
frustrations. Just when you
start to think your life is hard,
someone with a truly difficult
circumstance helps you get
perspective.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19). Originality will count in
a big way. Don’t blend in; fit
in instead. Be like a puzzle
piece, providing the parts
that are lacking or lacking the
parts that are provided.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
18). Until you find someone
to listen to you or some other
way to unload your thoughts,
your mind may feel a bit like a
drawer crammed with strange
accumulated items from your
past.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20). You’ll get more than your
fair share of feedback, and
most of it good. But you won’t
learn much from positive
comments, so keep digging
and asking what you could do
better.
Horoscopes
BY MICHAEL LIEDTKE
AP Technology Writer
SAN FRANCISCO — The
final curtain is falling on the re-
maining Blockbuster video-rent-
al stores that Dish Network
Corp. runs in the U.S.
About 300 Blockbuster loca-
tions scattered around the coun-
try will be closed by early Janu-
ary. But 50 franchised stores will
remain open in the U.S.
As part of Dish Network’s
retreat, Blockbuster’s DVD-
by-mail service is also shutting
down next month.
About 2,800 people who work
in Blockbuster’s stores and DVD
distribution centers will lose
their jobs, according to Dish
Network.
The cost-cutting measures
culminate a Blockbuster down-
fall that began a decade ago with
the rise of Netflix’s DVD-by-mail
service, followed by the introduc-
tion of a subscription service that
streams video over high-speed
Internet connections.
“This is not an easy decision,
yet consumer demand is clearly
moving to digital distribution of
video entertainment,” Dish Net-
work CEO Joseph Clayton said
in a statement Wednesday.
The shift has been a boon for
Netflix Inc., which now boasts
31 million subscribers to its In-
ternet video service and another
7.1 million DVD-by-mail custom-
ers. The company’s success has
minted Netflix with a market val-
ue of $20 billion.
But Blockbuster absorbed
huge losses. It closed thousands
of its stores before landing in
bankruptcy court three years
ago. Dish Network bought Block-
buster’s remnants for about $234
million in 2011 and then tried to
mount a challenge to Netflix.
But the Englewood, Colo., sat-
ellite-TV provider couldn’t wring
a profit from Blockbuster either,
prompting even more store clo-
sures.
Just a decade ago, Blockbust-
er reigned as one of the coun-
try’s most ubiquitous retailers
with 9,100 stores in the U.S.
Dish to close rest of its Blockbuster stores in U.S.
50 franchise stores to remain open
THE DISPATCH • cdispatch.com THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2013 7B
NORTHWOOD TOWN-
HOUSES 2BR, 1.5BA,
CH/A, stove, fridge,
DW, WD hookups, &
private patios. Call
Robinson Real Estate
328-1123
LOFT APT. $525/mo.
1
st
mo. free. High ceil-
ings, lots of architectual
features. Very secure.
Call 662-223-3062
BEAUTIFUL HISTORIC
Downtown 1BR apart-
ment available. Call
Chris Chain 662-574-
7879
3BR/1BA. New paint &
floor covering. Caledo-
nia School Dist. $500/
mo. $500 dep. Call
386-7694 or 364-1030
2BR TOWNHOUSES
Starting @ $450. Move-
in specials. Short term
leases avail. Next to
hospital. 662-328-9471
1&2BR. Move in spe-
cials. Starting @ $600
or $500 w/military disc.
Short term leases avail.
Located next to Hospi-
tal. Fox Run Apts. 662-
328-9471
***$99 1st Month***
Feels like home to me.
Clean 1-4BR remodeled
apts. Stove, fridge, w/d
hookups, mini-blinds.
HUD accepted. Call Mar-
lene. 662-630-2506
Apartments For
Rent: Northside
701
OWN YOUR OWN busi-
ness whether a busi-
ness or franchise oppor-
tunity...when it comes to
earnings or locations,
there are no guaran-
tees. A public service
message from The Dis-
patch and the Federal
Trade Commission
Business
Opportunity 605
MORKIE PUPPIE. Male,
10 wks old, 2 ½ lbs,
$350. Call 662-245-
0416 or 549-8926
Pets 515
GUN SMITH. Over 45
yrs. exp. (As good as
the best, better than
most). New & used
guns, new scopes, re-
pairs, rebuilding, clean-
ing & scopes, mounted
& zeroed on range, an-
tique guns restored, &
wood refinished. Ed
Sanders, West Point. 3
mi. N. Barton Ferry on
Darracott Rd. Open Tue-
Sat. Call for appt. 494-
6218
Sporting
Goods 472
16FT. ALUMA-WELD
boat. 90 model. 40hp
Yamaha motor. 45 lb.
thrust Minn Kota trolling
motor. $3200. 662-
329-2803
Sporting
Goods 472
DRUM SET. Great condi-
tion. Stool included.
$350 obo. Call 549-
1484
Musical
Instruments 469
JUST IN TIME for Christ-
mas. Scazzi Designer
Ranch Mink Coat. Full
length swing back.
$2900. Can be seen at
Freddie's Furniture on
Gardner Blvd
GOT ROACHES? Kill
them w/Harris 1 yr.
roach killer. Marvin's
328-1874. Brown's
Farm & Garden 329-
2281. Lowndes Farm
Supply 328-3481
General
Merchandise 460
ESTATE SALE. 550
North West, Gordo, AL
near football field. Oct.
Thur. Nov. 7, Fri. Nov. 8,
Sat. Nov. 9, 8a-5p. An-
tiq. furn, glassware,
tools, jugs, bottles,
trunks, ferns, piano, ac-
cordion, winder type
washing machine, coins
& knives. Too much to
list. FMI call 256-590-
4507
Garage Sales:
Other 456
6149 OKTOC. Fri 12-5,
Sat 7-5. Holiday décor,
winter wear, linens,
furn, books, toys, gifts,
plants, vintage, misc
Garage Sales:
Starkville 455
86 JESSICA Ln. Christ-
mas decor, furn, lamps,
hhold, clothes, old LP
records
112 CENTER Rd Satur-
day 6am. Toys, men,
women, kids & baby
clothes, furn, misc.
hhold & kitchen items
108 TENNECO Dr. Fri.
3-6pm, Sat 6-1pm. Lots
of tools, new chainsaw,
sm. kit. appl, dishes, lg.
stg. heaters, shed, fish-
ing equip, grills, tires,
dvds, dog clothes/toys,
wood doors
Garage Sales:
New Hope 453
659 WOLFE Rd. Sat.
6am. Clothing, electron-
ics, toys, computer &
much more
239 SHRINEWOOD Dr.
Moving Sale. Nov. 9th-
23
rd
. 9am-5pm
2305 BLUECUTT Rd.
Fri. 11a-5p & Sat. 8a-
12p. Hhold, office itms,
antiq, lg. bk. case, rugs,
mirrors, pics, tbls, wine
rack & much more
1122 BLACK Creek Rd.
Fri. & Sat. 8a-4p.
Clothes & hhold items
Garage Sales:
North 452
CORNER COMPUTER
desk & hutch, by Magel-
lan. Black. $150 cash.
549-2039
CHINA CABINET, light
oak, beveled glass with
lights. Extra nice &
would make a great
Christmas gift. $550.
662-356-6295. Please
leave message
Furniture 448
COLUMBUS MEMORIAL
Gardens. 4 spaces in
the Garden of the Good
Shepherd. $2k or 2
spaces $1200. Call 1st
UMC. 328-5252
5 SPACES in Friendship
Cemetery in old section.
FMI, call 205-712-9111
Please leave message
2 CEMETERY plots in
Memorial Gardens. Lo-
cated in the Garden of
Cristus. $1700. Call
601-397-2644
Burial Plots 425
ROUGH CUT cedar lum-
ber. Cut to order. $1 per
board ft. Please call
662-272-8237
Building
Materials 424
TROMBONE IN working
condition. $75. Box of
25 toy wrestlers. $25.
Call 386-1859
SOLID WOOD desk $25.
Quilt rack $15. 19" Ori-
on televisions without
remote. $25. 364-0548
OAK FIREWOOD. $70/
truck load. Pickup or lo-
cal delivery. New Hope
area. 574-4163
FREE CHURCH pews,
upholstered. Call 662-
574-3347
BRAND NEW. Still in
box. Stylish slim media
player. $30. 364-0548
BLK. FORMAL dress
w/shawl. Sz. Med. $40.
5/6. $20. 251-1835
Bargain
Column 418
BLK. FORMAL dress
w/sequins. Sz. 6. $35.
Pnk. pageant dress sz.
5/6. $20. 251-1835
BLK. FORMAL dress
w/sequins. Sz. 12.
$75. Brn. formal dress
sz. 10. $20. 251-1835
4 TIER/6HOLDER plant
stand. 72”x32”. $20.
Exc. cond. Call 368-
1523
3 SHELF baker's rack.
5'x23”. $10. Kids style
decorated dresser. Exc.
cond. $65. 368-1523
Bargain
Column 418
WE SELL used appli-
ances & haul off your
old ones. CALL 662-
549-5860 or 662-364-
7779
Appliances 409
2 YRS OTR EXP!
Flatbed, no tarping or
chaining. Coast-to-coast
hauls. 3,000+ mi./wk.
Meridian is homebase.
Call 601-776-3135
Truck Driving 370
WAREHOUSE
DELIVERY
Start immediately.
Pay dependent upon
applicant. Must be 21
with a clean, valid
driver's license.
Call 662-549-5749
ROUTE SALES
Route person wanted.
Company vehicle &
training provided.
Cash bonus paid daily.
Start immediately.
Columbus, MS area.
Call 228-547-8675
LOCAL MINING opera-
tions needs laborer/op-
erator with 1 year expe-
rience. Drug testing is
required. Email resume
to: flopark60@yahoo.-
com or call 662-434-
8555 between
10:00am – 4:00pm
LOCAL COMPANY look-
ing for a secretary. Pre-
vious experience helpful
but not necessary. Com-
puter skills a must.
Send resume to Box
502, c/o The Commer-
cial Dispatch, PO Box
511, Columbus, MS
39703
LOCAL CO. seeks FT
Alarm Tech. w/license &
2-5 yr. exp, Req: phone
syst. & CCTV exp, great
cust. serv. skills, punc-
tuality & working well
w/others. Also have
sales position opening.
Send resume to box
504 c/o Commercial
Dispatch, PO Box 511,
Columbus, MS, 39703
FREELANCE WRITERS
w/a passion for story
telling needed for
Community Expressions
Magazine. Work @ your
own pace. Journalism
background a + but not
req. If interested email
resume, 2 writing
samples & questions to
communityexpressions
mag@gmail.com
EXECUTIVE ASSIS-
TANT. The Columbus
Arts Council seeks an
enthusiastic self-starter
to join our team. Ideal
candidate is technically
proficient & a great
communicator. Graphic
Design Skills a plus!
Send resume & cover
letter to tina.columbus.
ms.arts@gmail.com
ESTABLISHED BARBER
& beauty shop now hir-
ing barbers & hair
stylists. Shop provides
great location & low
booth rent. Great oppor-
tunity to build clientel
with first 2 weeks free.
For more info, please
call Victor Johnson 662-
549-8838
CONSTRUCTION CO.
seeks equipment opera-
tors. Must be able to
pass a drug test. We
pay health insurance,
holidays, vacation &
bonus based on job per-
formance. Being at work
is a must. Send resume
to: Equipment Operators
Needed P0 Box 2982
Columbus, MS 39704
General Help
Wanted 320
COLUMBUS SERVICE
Group is hiring house-
keepers! Looking for
hard working, depend-
able, honest people that
are able to pass a back-
ground check. Inter-
views are every Thurs-
day from 1:00 to 3:30.
402 Wilkins Wise Rd,
Suite #44, Columbus,
MS
General Help
Wanted 320
2 MS State VS ALA foot-
ball tickets for Nov. 16.
West side, 50 yd. line,
row 23. 662-356-6507
Special
Notices 240
LET US HELP find your
lost pet. Email, fax, mail
or bring your information
by the office and we will
run your lost & found ad
in the Pet Finder for 3
days FREE!
Lost & Found 230
~Fully Insured ~Big
trees ~Small trees
~Trees over house
~Storm cleanup ~
~Brush clearing~ FREE
QUOTES. Call today.
662-801-7511
J.R. BOURLAND
Tree & Stump
Removal. Trimming
w/bucket truck
Licensed & Bonded
Firewood 4 sale LWB
$75. 662-574-1621
J&A TREE REMOVAL
Work from a bucket
truck. Insured/bonded.
Call Jimmy for a
free estimate
662-386-6286
A&T Tree Service
Bucket truck & stump
removal. Free est.
Serving Columbus
since 1987. Senior
citizen disc. Call Alvin @
242-0324/241-4447
“We'll go out on a limb
for you!”
Tree Service 186
QUIT LOOKING at those
ugly stumps! Let me
grind them for you! Free
estimates. All Stump
Grinding Service. 662-
361-8379
Stump
Removal 179
PAINTING INC. Int/ext
painting, sheet rock re-
pair & pressure wash-
ing. Special prices on
wall paper removal. Free
est. Call Derek 662-
364-0048. Honest-Reli-
able-Insured
SULLIVAN'S PAINT
SERVICE
Certified in lead removal
Offering special prices
on interior & exterior
painting, pressure
washing & sheet rock
repairs. Free Estimates
Call 435-6528
Painting &
Papering 162
TERRA CARE
LANDSCAPING, LLC
Landscaping, tree
removal, property clean
up, plant care, bush
hogging & herbicide
spraying. 662-549-1878
JESSE & BEVERLY'S
LAWN SERVICE
Fall clean up, firewood,
landscaping, tree cut-
ting, & clean-up.
356-6525
MURRAY'S LAWN
service of Caledonia.
Let me help you clear
your property. Bush hog-
ging, tilling & leveling.
Very reasonable prices.
Also do commercial cut-
ting. Call 662-242-8809
Lawn Care
Landscaping 147
PIANO TUNING & re-
pairs. Call 662-617-
3356
General
Services 136
RETAINER WALL, drive-
way, foundation, con-
crete/riff raft drainage
work, remodeling, base-
ment foundation, re-
pairs, small dump truck
hauling (5-6 yd) load &
demolition/lot cleaning.
Burr Masonry 242-0259
MICHELE'S A-1 clean-
ing. Antebellum homes,
business, residential,
steam cleaning. Free
est. & ref. Mention ad,
10% off. 205-399-6182
INGRAM CONSTRUC-
TION. Ceramic tile,
wood floors, renovation
&/or repair work. No job
too small. Call Dan for
free est. 662-329-8592
HOME OR BUSINESS
cleaning, honest & de-
pendable. References
avail. Limited availabili-
ty. 662-386-3132
BROWN GRAVEL for
$185 local. Backhoe,
driveways & mobile
home pads. Haul dirt
& sand, bush hogging.
891-7766/369-3173
General
Services 136
CARPET & CERAMIC
repair & installation.
Commercial or residen-
tial. We stretch carpet.
662-328-9587
Carpet & Flooring
115
TOM HATCHER, LLC
Custom Construction,
Restoration, Remodel-
ing, Repair, Insurance
claims. 662-364-1769.
Licensed & Bonded
REMODELING OF all
types. Apartment main-
tenance, brick masonry,
stone work & painting.
Free estimates. 574-
7325 or 570-3430
TODD PARKS
CONSTRUCTION
New Construction, Re-
modeling, Repairs, Con-
crete. Free est. Call or
email 662-889-8662 or
toddparks.construction
@gmail.com
Building &
Remodeling 112
CASH FOR your car?
Don't sell or trade
your used car for
less than it's worth!
For the most cash call
662-574-3527
Automotive
Services 109
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
THE STATE OF MISSISSIPPI
LOWNDES COUNTY
Letters Testamentary have been
granted and issued to the under-
signed upon the estate of Willet
Doyle Faulkner, deceased, by
the Chancery Court of Lowndes
County, Mississippi, on the 11
th
day of October, A.D., 2013. This
is to give notice to all persons
having claims against said es-
tate to Probate and Register
same with the Chancery Clerk of
Lowndes County, Mississippi,
within ninety (90) days from this
date. A failure to so Probate and
Register said claim will forever
bar the same.
This the 11
th
day of October,
2013.
/s/ Timothy Franklin Faulkner
Publish: 10/24, 10/31 &
11/7/2013
Thence continue North a dis-
tance of 401.0 feet; thence run
East a distance of 1,307.0 feet,
more or less, to the West right
of way line of U. S. Highway No.
45 Alternate.(South Bound
Lane); thence run South 1 de-
grees 00 minutes along said
right of way a distance of 401.0
feet; thence run West a distance
of 1,300.0 feet to the Point of
Beginning.
Being 12.0 acres located in the
Northwest Quarter of the North-
east Quarter of Section 19,
Township 19 North, Range 16
East of Lowndes County, Missis-
sippi.
I will convey only such title as is
vested in me as Special Master
Witness my signature on this the
21st day of October, 2013.
/s/ JOHN S.MOORE, Special
Master
PUBLISH: October 31, Novem-
ber 7, November 14, and
November 21
Legal Notices 001
SPECIAL MASTER'S
NOTICE OF SALE
WHEREAS, on January 23,
2008, Mississippi Adult Proper-
ties, LLC executed a deed of
trust to John S. Moore, Trustee
for the benefit of Jessica Hunt
and Barbara A. Hunt, which deed
of trust is recorded in Deed Of
Trust Book 2008 at page
16619 in the land records in the
Office of the Chancery Clerk of
Lowndes County, State of Mis-
sissippi; and
WHEREAS, by instrument dated
February 20, 2009, the said Jes-
sica Hunt assigned her interest
in the deed of trust to Barbara
Hunt as shown by instrument
recorded in Book 2009 at page
4534 in the land records in the
Office of the Chancery Clerk of
Lowndes County, State of Mis-
sissippi; and
WHEREAS, Barbara A. Hunt died
on or about January 22, 2012,
and Letters of Administration
were issued to Elizabeth Unz in
the matter styled In The Matter
Of The Estate Of Barbara A.
Hunt, Deceased, Oktibbeha
County Chancery Court cause
number 12-0155-B; and
WHEREAS, default has been
made in the terms and condi-
tions of the said deed of trust
and the entire debt secured
thereby has been declared to be
due and payable in accordance
with the terms of the said deed
of trust; and
WHEREAS, the Administrator of
the Estate of Barbara A. Hunt
filed a Complaint To Foreclose
Deed Of Trust in cause number
2012-0693-B in the Chancery
Court of Lowndes County, Mis-
sissippi; and
WHEREAS, the Lowndes County
Chancery Court, by order dated
August 29, 2013,
appointed the undersigned John
S. Moore as Special Master to
execute the trust and sell said
land and property in accordance
with the terms of the said deed
of trust and for the purpose of
raising the sums due thereun-
der, together with attorney's
fees, trustee's fees and expens-
es of sale.
NOW, THEREFORE, I, John S.
Moore, Special Master, will on
the 22nd day of November,
2013, offer for sale at public
outcry and sell within legal hours
(being between the hours of
11:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m.) at
the front door of the County
Courthouse of Lowndes County
at Columbus, Mississippi to the
highest and best bidder for cash
the following described property
situated in Lowndes County,
Mississippi, to-wit:
Commence at the Southwest
corner of the Northwest Quarter
of Section 29, Township 19
North, Range 16 East of Lown-
des County, Mississippi, and run
North a distance of 333.4 feet;
thence run West a distance of
27.0 feet; thence run North a
distance of 1,4650.0 feet to the
Point of Beginning.
continued next column
IN THE CHANCERY COURT OF
LOWNDES COUNTY,
MISSISSIPPI
IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE
OF MILTON CURTIS NEYMAN,
DECEASED
MILTON CURTIS NEYMAN, JR.,
ADMINISTRATOR C.T.A.
NO. 2013-0143
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
Letters Testamentary have been
granted and issued to Milton
Curtis Neyman, Jr., Administra-
tor C.T.A. of the Estate of Milton
Curtis Neyman, deceased, by
the Chancery Court of Lowndes
County, Mississippi, on the 17
th
day of October, 2013. This is to
give notice to all persons having
claims against said estate to
Probate and Register same with
the Chancery Clerk of Lowndes
County, Mississippi, within nine-
ty (90) days from this date. A
failure to so Probate and Regis-
ter said claim will forever bar the
same.
This the 15
th
day of October,
2013.
/s/Milton Curtis Neyman, Jr.
Publish: 10/24, 10/31 &
11/7/13
ronmental Permits Division at
the above Permit Board address
and telephone number and on
the MDEQ's website at: http://
lopc.deq.state.ms.uslsearch_ai.
aspx. This information is also
available for review at the follow-
ing location during normal busi-
ness hours:
Mississippi Department of
Environmental Quality Office
of Pollution Control
515 East Amite Street
Jackson, MS 39201
(601)961-5171
Please bring the foregoing to the
attention of persons whom you
know will he interested.
Publish: 10/1, 10/3, 10/4,
10/5, 10/6, 10/7, 10/8,
10/10, 10/11, 10/12
Legal Notices 001
Public Notice
Mississippi Environmental
Quality Permit Board
P. 0. Box 2261
Jackson, Mississippi 39225
Telephone No. (601) 961-5
KiOR Inc. biofuels facility located
at 600 Industrial Park Access
Road in Columbus Mississippi,
(662)368-6300 is requesting an
Optional Pre-Permit Construction
approval from the Mississippi
Department of Environmental
Quality (MDEQ) as allowed by
the Mississippi Air Permit Regu-
lations 11 Miss. Admin. Code
Pt. 2, R. 2.15.B. The facility is
publishing this public notice to
provide the public with the op-
portunity to comment to the
MDEQ regarding the proposed
project.
The proposed project consists of
an additional biofuels production
facility at our existing site. This
proposed project will result in a
potential emissions increase of
regulated air pollutants. Howev-
er, the increase of emissions
will be below the Prevention of
Significant Deterioration signifi-
cance levels as specified in the
Mississippi Regulations for the
Prevention of Significant Deterio-
ration of Air Quality, 11 Miss.
Admin. Code Pt. 2, Ch. 5, and
more specifically in 40 CFR Part
52.21.
Persons wishing to comment
upon or object to the proposed
request are invited to submit
comments in writing to Chief,
Environmental Permits Division
at the Permit Board's address
shown above no later than 10-
days from the date of publica-
tion of this notice. All
comments received or post-
marked by this date will be con-
sidered in the determination re-
garding the pre-permit construc-
tion approval. After receipt of
public comments and thorough
consideration of all comments,
MDEQ will formulate its recom-
mendations regarding pre-permit
construction approval.
Additional details about the pro-
posed project are available by
writing or calling the Chief, Envi-
continued next column
IN THE CHANCERY COURT OF
LOWNDES COUNTY,
MISSISSIPPI
IN RE: ESTATE OFJAMES EARL
MCAFEE, DECEASED
TRACI LOVETT WRIGHT, EX-
ECUTRIX
CAUSE NO.: 2013-0197-D
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
Letters Testamentary have been
granted and issued to Traci
Lovett Wright, Executrix of the
Estate of James Earl McAfee,
deceased, by the Chancery
Court of Lowndes County, Mis-
sissippi, on the 17
th
day of Octo-
ber, 2013. This is to give notice
to all persons having claims
against said estate to
Probate and Register same with
the Chancery Clerk of Lowndes
County, Mississippi, within nine-
ty (90) days after the first publi-
cation of this Notice to Credi-
tors. A failure to so Probate and
Register said claim will forever
bar the same.
/s/Traci Lovett Wright, Executrix
Publish: 10/24, 10/31 &
11/7/2013
Lot 8 of Northaven Woods, Sec-
ond Extension, a subdivision of
Columbus, Lowndes County,
Mississippi, as shown by map or
plat thereof of record in Plat
Book 3, Page 57, of the land
records of Lowndes County, Mis-
sissippi.

Title to the above described
property is believed to be good,
but I will convey only such title
as is vested in me as Substitute
Trustee.
WITNESS my signature,
on this the 22nd day of October,
2013.

BRADLEY P. JONES
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE
PREPARED BY:
ADAMS & EDENS
POST OFFICE BOX 400
BRANDON, MISSISSIPPI 39043
(601) 825-9508
A&E File #13-01269
PUBLISH: 10/31/2013,
11/07/2013, 11/14/2013
Legal Notices 001
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S
NOTICE OF SALE

WHEREAS, on the 16th day of
June, 2009, Jahanzeb Memon
and Fareen Memon, executed a
Deed of Trust to Michael Lyon,
Trustee for the use and benefit
of Mortgage Electronic Registra-
tion Systems, Inc., acting solely
as nominee for Quicken Loans,
Inc., which Deed of Trust is on
file and of record in the office of
the Chancery Clerk of Lowndes
County, Mississippi, in Deed of
Trust Book 2009 at Page
15917 thereof; and
WHEREAS, said Deed of Trust
was assigned to Bank of Ameri-
ca, N.A. successor by merger to
BAC Home Loan Servicing, LP
fka Countrywide Home Loans
Servicing, LP, by assignment on
file and of record in the office of
the Chancery Clerk of Lowndes
County, Mississippi, in Book
2012 at Page 5644 thereof;
and
WHEREAS, the legal holder of
the said Deed of Trust and the
note secured thereby, substitut-
ed Bradley P. Jones, as Trustee
therein, as authorized by the
terms thereof, by instrument
recorded in the office of the
aforesaid Chancery Clerk in
Book 2013 at Page 28149,
thereof; and
WHEREAS, default having been
made in the performance of the
conditions and stipulations as
set forth by said Deed of Trust,
and having been requested by
the legal holder of the indebted-
ness secured and described by
said Deed of Trust so to do, no-
tice is hereby given that I,
Bradley P. Jones, Substitute
Trustee, by virtue of the authori-
ty conferred upon me in said
Deed of Trust, will offer for sale
and will sell at public sale and
outcry to the highest and best
bidder for cash, during the legal
hours (between the hours of 11
o'clock a.m. and 4 o'clock p.m.)
at the Southeast front door of
the County Courthouse of Lown-
des County, at Columbus, Mis-
sissippi, on the 21st day of
November, 2013, the following
described land and property be-
ing the same land and property
described in said Deed of Trust,
situated in Lowndes County,
State of Mississippi, to-wit:
Lying and being situated in
Lowndes, County, Mississippi,
and being more particularly de-
scribed as follows, to-wit:

continued next column
IN THE CHANCERY COURT OF
LOWNDES COUNTY,
MISSISSIPPI
ESTATE OF GERALDINE
SANDERS, DECEASED
NO. 2013-0172B
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
WHEREAS, Letters Administra-
tion upon the Estate of Geral-
dine Sanders, Deceased, were
duly issued to the undersigned
as Administratrix of the estate
by the Chancery Court of Lown-
des County, Mississippi, on the
23rd day of October, 2013;
therefore, legal notice is hereby
given that all persons having
claims against the estate are re-
quired by law to have them filed,
probated, and registered with
the Clerk of the Chancery Court
of Lowndes County, Mississippi,
at Columbus City, Mississippi,
within ninety (90) days' time
from the first publication of this
notice, and the failure to file,
probate, and register their
claims with the Clerk within the
time will forever bar the claims.
ESTATE OF GERALDINE
SANDERS, DECEASED
By: /s/ Gloria Jean Conner
Gloria Jean Conner, Administra-
trix
Prepared by:
_/s/_Jeannie Hogan Sansing
Jeannie Hogan Sansing
(MSB# 6463)
Brunini, Grantham, Grower &
Hewes, PLLC
410 Main Street
Post Office Box 7520
Columbus, Mississippi 39705-
0024
Telephone: (662) 240-9744
Email: jsansing@brunini.com
Publish: 10/31, 11/7 &
11/14/2013
Legal Notices 001
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LEGAL NOTICES
published in
this newspaper
and other
Mississippi
newspapers are
on the
INTERNET
THE DISPATCH • www.cdispatch.com 8B THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2013
Sudoku
YESTERDAY’S ANSWER
Sudoku is a number-
placing puzzle based on
a 9x9 grid with several
given numbers. The object
is to place the numbers
1 to 9 in the empty spaces
so that each row, each
column and each 3x3 box
contains the same number
only once. The difIculty
level increases from
Monday to Sunday.
Grease monkey
WHATZIT ANSWER
ACROSS
1 Mooring place
5 Accords
10 Garden pest
12 In the area
13 General at
Gettysburg
14 Gettysburg’s st.
15 Samovar
16 Splash in drops
18 Glib talk
20 Exploit
21 Winged archer
23 Caesar of
comedy
24 Gasp for air
26 Prayer end
28 Half a sawbuck
29 Family room
fixture
31 Crumb carrier
32 Talk casually
36 Strew
39 Gardner of film
40 First odd prime
41 Luggage clip-on
43 Correct text
44 Soft leather
45 High homes
46 Mineral sources
DOWN
1 Block
2 Met offering
3 Monk’s music
4 Youngster
5 One of a bear trio
6 Assist in crime
7 Bruise
8 Locates on the
dial
9 Was rude, in a
way
11 Barren areas
17 Debate side
19 High rating
22 Game quests
24 “Am I dream-
ing?” request
25 Star in Scorpio
27 Small rug
28 Connect
30 Low digit
33 Spud
34 Stay away from
35 Fads
37 Circus setting
38 Turner and
Danson
42 Couple
Five Questions
1 Christiaan
Huygens
2 Al Michaels
3 The Grand
Canyon
4 Samson
5 Ulysses
Grant
Cl assi fi ed
Advertising
Gets
Response
There’s one thing you can count on when you advertise your unwanted
goods in The Dispatch Classifieds-Response!
Hundreds of people shop classified daily. And they’re ready to buy. We
guarantee many of them will be interested in what you have to sell.
Remember: interest generates response; response activates sales.
Interest. Response. Sales. With classified, it’s as easy as 1-2-3
Classified Advertising
328-2424
2007 HONDA Goldwing.
Blk & chrome, 19,500
mi, new tires & battery
with over $3500 in ac-
cessories. Garage kept
& very clean. Call Tim at
662-251-8232
Motorcycles &
ATV's 940
TOMBIGBEE RIVER RV
Park. 85 Nash Rd. Full
hookups, $295/mo.
Has pavillion w/bath-
house & laundry. Call
328-8655 or 574-7879
AFTER HOURS
RV SERVICE
Call Wayne at
434-6413 (anytime)
434-6563 (day)
30 FT. JAYCO TT.
$4500. Everything
works. Can demo. Alum.
top, no rubber. Truck
avail. $5k. Dish tail-
gaiter $400. 327-7303
Campers &
RV's 930
1994 21 FT. Crownline
w/350 motor (2 yrs.
old). Seats recovered,
wood replaced in floor &
tower put on. New tires
put on trailer last year.
$10k. Call 662-304-
0128
Boats &
Marine 925
NEED A
CAR?
Guaranteed
Credit Approval!
No Turn
Downs!
We offer late model
vehicles w/warranty.
Call us!
We will take an
application over the
phone!
We help rebuild your
credit.
Tousley Motors
662-329-4221
4782 Hwy 45 North
(by Shell Station
& 373 Turn Off )
2000 TOYOTA Echo.
Good cond. Cold air, hot
heat, auto. trans, new
tires, 40 mpg. $3200.
Call 356-6413 or 251-
5003
1998 DODGE Ram 5.9
Cummings diesel, Ext.
cab, straight shift, 2WD.
For more information
Call 205-662-4565 or
205-764-3900
Autos For Sale 915
WANT A double wide
but do not have a lot of
money? I have the an-
swer. 1996 24x56,
3BR/2BA. Delivered &
setup for only $9995.
Call 662-296-5923
VERY NICE 2003,
16x80 3BR/2BA. Vinyl
siding shingle roof, fire-
place, total electric de-
livery & setup for only
$19,900. Call 662-296-
5923
4 YRS. free lot rent!!!!
That's right!....4 yrs.
free lot rent at The
Grove Mobile Home
Community! Beautiful
new energy-efficient,
16x80 Clayton home.
3BR/2BA. Move in to-
day at 508 Lehmberg
Rd, Columbus, MS. Call
662-329-9110 for more
details
NICE 16X80 3BR/2BA.
Total electric, home in
good cond. Comes w/all
appliances, delivered &
setup for only $15,995.
Call 662-296-5923
MUST SEE to believe.
2007 River Birch 32x76
4BR/2BA manufactured
home. Large master
bedroom/bath. Must be
moved. Asking payoff
only. Contact Deborah
364-8408
FALL SPECIAL: For sale
2014 Clayton “Wild
Card” 16x84 3BR/
2bath. Home includes
huge bedrooms, large
kitchen w/stainless ap-
pliances, thermal win-
dows, glamour bath,
“Ashley” furn, washer/
dryer & more! All for
only $339. (plus es-
crow) per month! Call
1-877-684-4857 for de-
tails! www.southern
colonelmeridian.com
FALL KICKOFF Sale:
For sale 2013 Southern
Estates “Bulldog”
28x80 4BR/2BA home
includes awesome
kitchen w/black appli-
ances, glamour bath,
huge rooms w/walk-in
closets, thermal win-
dows, “Ashley” furn,
washer/dryer & more!!!
All for only $459 per
month plus escrow!
Call Southern Colonel
Homes at 1-877-684-
4857! www.southern
colonelmeridian.com
Mobile Homes
For Sale 865
LAST 4BR/2BA! Don't
miss out on this home.
DW ready to move in at
The Grove Mobile Home
Community. Easy financ-
ing avail. Only $27,900.
Call 662-329-9110 for
more info today!
I PAY top dollar for
used mobile homes.
Call 662-296-5923
DEER CAMP special.
14X70, 2BR, front
kitchen, total electric,
hardwood floors in living
room. Home is solid,
with good roof no leaks.
Needs a good cleaning.
Will deliver & set up for
only $5995. Call 662-
296-5923
BANK OWNED repos!!! I
have access to 100's of
bank owned homes &
with a 575 credit score
& 10% down, I can put
you into one. Call me
day or night @ 662-213-
3648
4BR/2BA, 16X80. Mint
cond. Home has a 4
bedrooms & will be de-
livered & set up on your
property for $13,900.
Call 662-397-9339
2013 DOUBLEWIDE.
Brand new 28X80,
4BR/2BA. Delivered, un-
derpinned, A/C & 1 yr
warranty in the 50's.
Wow that's cheap! Call
Chad day or night @
662-213-3648
2011 DOUBLEWIDE.
4BR & 2BA. Delivered,
underpinned, A/C, &
warranty for only
$39,900. Call Chad,
day or night @ 662-213-
3648
2011 4BR/2BA, 32x60
Riverbirch. Home is in
exc. cond. Comes w/all
appliances, has built in
entertainment center.
Delivery & set up on
your property for
$47,900. Call 662-397-
9339
2011 32X60 4BR/2BA.
Like new condition, cen-
tral heat & air, black ap-
pliances. Must Sell! Call
662-401-1093
16X80 3BR/2BA. Must
be moved. Needs some
TLC. Only $9900. Won't
last long. Cash only!
Call 662-401-1093
'95 PALM Harbor. Set
up in The Grove. New
roof, new a/c, 2 cov-
ered porches, carport,
covered patio, walk-in
tub, 10x20 storage bld,
landscaping & many ex-
tras. $35k. Must see to
appreciate. Call 662-
244-8997
Mobile Homes
For Sale 865
SEALED BID Sale for
land and/or timber:
Thursday, November
21, 2013. Kemper Co,
MS. +/- 301 ac. with
+/- 226 ac. Merchant-
able timber, +/- 71 ac.
pine plantation, road
frontage, interior roads,
food plots & excellent
hunting. For a detailed
prospectus, call Scott
Smith at Natural Re-
source Management
Company. 601-626-
8088
WINTER BLOWOUT
sale. 2½ acre lots.
Good/bad credit. $995
down. $197/mo. Eaton
Land. 662-726-9648
LOCATED IN Caledonia
School dist. 20.33
acres on Henry Wells
Rd. $5K per acre or
best offer. FMI, Call
662-889-1431
FSBO. 477 Elm Dr. Elm
Lake Golf Course. Home
site overlooks 18
th
tee
box & lake. $25k. Call
662-574-6032. Contrac-
tors welcome
80 AC. in Millport, AL in
Luxapalila Creek bot-
tom. Deeded easment
to track off of Hwy. 96.
Great hunting tract, min-
eral rights avail. $800/
ac. 205-712-3180
35 ACRES in N.H. w/24
yr. old pines. $3500/
ac. Will divide into 10
ac. plots. 1.8 ac. on
Tiffany Ln. $7500. 2, 1
ac lots on Hildreth Rd.
$7500 each. 915 6
th
St. S. $3500. 913
Shady St. $2500, Own-
er fin. avail. 386-6619
26+/- ACRES mixed
pine & hardwood, cor-
ners on County Rd 67 &
Bays Lake Rd in Fayette
Co. AL. $1275 per acre.
FMI 662-418-8077
2 RIVER Subdivision on
Tombigbee. 2 lg. lots. 1
has boat house. Call
205-361-7890
11 AC. (+/-) New Hope
School, yet close to
Columbus. Mini-farm
has open land, barn &
hardwood timber. Utili-
ties available. Paved
road frontage & mostly
fenced. Priced to sell.
Call 662-549-8711
Lots &
Acreage 860
WANTED TO BUY. All
types of real estate.
Cash paid...fast closing
by local investors. Call
Long & Long @ 328-
0770 or 574-3903
Houses For Sale:
Other 850
NEW CONSTRUCTION
6569 Greenfield Rd.
Tibbee Comm. 3BR/
2BA 2.5 ac, 1950 sf,
LR, cstm. cabs, ss appl,
gran. tops, lg. MA, deck.
Move in ready. $218k.
295-0250
FSBO, 3BD/2BA home
at Elm Lake Golf Course
2100 sq ft, very appeal-
ing inside & out. 3 yrs
old. $213,000 662-
574-8575
Houses For Sale:
West 835
3BR/2BA. 3330
Yorkville Rd. E. New
Hope Pk. Remodeled,
enclosed garage, new
fridge & stove, fenced in
bk. yd, covered patio,
fully wired shop. $156k.
Call 662-251-0190 or
889-3521
Houses For Sale:
New Hope 825
RENOVATED 3BR/1.5
BA. Fresh paint, new
carpet, fenced bk. yd.
w/pecan trees! Spa-
cious dwelling w/pay-
ments under $500 for
qualified buyer. Call P &
D Builders, Inc. @ 328-
0770 or 574-3903 to
buy directly from owner.
Builders/Brokers. Good
location
3BR/2BA. Huge brkfast
rm, wrap around porch,
& much more. Good in-
vestment property. Rock
bottom price. $17,500.
228-596-1897
Houses For Sale:
East 820
FSBO. 3BR/2BA. 2800
sf, older, remod. home.
Lg. den, lg. closets, sun
rm, hwood/tile, ss appl,
scr. porch, fen. yd, de-
tached garage. Quiet
area. Conv. to Hwy 45
N. $169k. 386-3593
A REAL charmer for
sale in Oakdale Pk. Sub-
division. 54 N. Butternut
Dr. Columbus. $150k.
More info: http://www.
militarybyowner.com/ho
mes/MS/Columbus/N_
Butternut_Drive/MBO28
3336.aspx
3BR/2BA. 1700 sf.
Brick, HW flrs, cent.
H/A, detached cpt, 914
6th Ave. N. 662-425-
9678. $75k. Great in-
vestment property
Houses For Sale:
Northside 815
MASTR SUITE. Share
lg. 2BR downstairs apt.
in Columbus. Your BR is
12'x14' w/full bath &
lg. closet. Apt. has spa-
cious LR & kitchen &
washer & dryer. Apt.
property is gated & has
a pool & clubhouse.
$500/mo incl. utilities,
internet & cable. Con-
tact Bill at 615-512-
3104
Rooms 745
1100 SF, corner of
Bluecutt Rd. & Chubby
Dr. Call 662-327-2020
Office Spaces 730
RENT TO own 3BR/2BA
mobile home. $475/
mo. 3784 Hwy. 373
Columbus. HUD/SEC8.
Call 684-9936
RENT A fully equipped
camper w/utilities & ca-
ble from $135/wk -
$495/month. 3 Colum-
bus locations. Call 601-
940-1397
MOBILE HOMES to rent
by the wk/mo. 2BR
starting @ $125/wk.
Incl. util. or $325/mo.
Call Don 386-5552
3BR/2BA. BILL Walker
Dr. New Hope schools.
3BR/2BA, 16X80 Jess
Lyons Rd, Caledonia
schools. $500 lease &
dep. 2BR furnished
apts. Incl. utilities.
$250 week. Weathers
Rentals Columbus, 327-
5133
3BR/2BA. 16x80.
$500 mo.+ $500 dep.
No pets. New Hope. Call
662-329-4512 or 574-
4292
2BR/1BA in Steens.
Good condition. Owner
pays for water, sewer,
garbage & lawn mainte-
nance. $375/mo. plus
dep. Call 386-8618
Mobile Homes
For Rent 725
HISTORIC SOUTHSIDE
3BR/2BA brick home.
For sale or lease. Nice
back deck, fridge, cent.
h&a, h/wood floors,
fenced in back yard.
Avail. 11/1. 352-3205
COMPLETELY REMOD-
ELED. 3BR/2BA. West
Point. Sun room & car-
port. $725/mo. $725
deposit. Call 662-251-
2434
Houses For Rent:
Other 718
3BR/4BR, 2BA, Large
fenced, private lot,
close to school. 2000
sq ft. $1000 per mo &
1 mo dep. No HUD.
662-251-4914
House For Rent:
New Hope 713
4BR/2BA. 303 Beverly
Dr. Formal living room,
dining room, den, lg.
kitchen, privacy fence, 2
car garage, newly re-
modeled. $900/month.
$900 dep. No indoor
pets. 327-5528 or 549-
9298
3BR/2BA, Union St.
$400/mo. Lease & dep.
City schools. Weathers
Rentals 327-5133
2BR/1 BA at 209 Tay-
lor St. House comes
with stove, ref, W/D
hookups. Electric & gas,
carport. Call 662-364-
6854
Houses For Rent:
East 712
Houses For Sale:
Other 850
NEWLY REMODELED
3BR/2BA. Central h/a,
stove, d/washer, fridge,
dbl. garage. Exc. loca-
tion. Conv. to shopping.
$725/mo. $500 dep.
No HUD. 662-352-4776
Houses For Rent:
Northside 711
3BR FOR $450/month.
Next to Propst Park. No
HUD accepted. Call
662-617-1538 for more
info
COLONIAL TOWNHOUS-
ES. 2 or 3 bedroom w/
2-3 bath townhouses.
$575/$700. 662-549-
9555. Ask for Glenn or
leave message
3BR/1BA. 109 Moss
St. HUD accepted.
Washer/dryer hookup.
$475/mo. Deposit neg.
Call Shelia Willis. 601-
953-2731
3BD/2BA BRICK HOME
CH/A, All appl furnished
dbl carport w/fenced bk
yd. No animals inside,
No HUD. $800 mo +
dep. 662-328-4719
3BD/1BA, w/d hook-
up, w/enclosed garage,
large yard, nice neigh-
borhood off Hwy. 45 N.
& Ridge Rd. 3 min. from
air base. 1058 Perkins
Rd. $675/mo. 504-813-
1200
2 & 3BR. No HUD ac-
cepted. Call 662-617-
1538 for more info
1BR & 2BR house on
Hwy 373. Across st.
from Shaw's Trailer
Park. Call 662-492-
4647 for more informa-
tion & appointment
Houses For Rent:
Northside 711
OFFICE SPACE in east
Columbus. Starting at
$285-$800/mo. In-
cludes utilities & inter-
net. 662-386-7694 or
364-1030
Commercial
Property For Rent
710
Houses For Sale:
Other 850
Rivergate
Apartments
“Quiet Country Living”
• Studio,
1&2 Bedrooms
• Executive Units
• Water
Furnished
Monday - Friday
8a-5p
327-6333
300 Holly Hills Rd.
Columbus
© Commercial Dispatch
Chateaux
Holly Hills
Apartments
102 Newbell Rd
Columbus
Mon-Fri 8-5
328-8254
• Central Heat & Air
Conditioning
• Close to CAFB
• Onsite Laundry Facility
• All Electric/Fully Equipped
Kitchen
• Lighted Tennis Court
• Swimming Pool
Where Coming
Home is the
Best Part of
the Day
Apartments For
Rent: Other 708
SEVERAL RENTAL units
available. $275 & up
with approved applica-
tion. NO HUD. Call Long
& Long @ 328-0770
1, 2 & 3 BEDROOM
APARTMENTS &
TOWNHOUSES.
1BR/1BA Apt. $300
2BR/1BA Apt. $350-
$400. 2BR/2BA 3BR /
2BA Townhouses $550-
$800. No HUD allowed.
Lease, deposit, credit
check required. Cole-
man Realty. 329-2323
2BR/2BA. Nice 1250
sf, repainted, lg deck,
kit. appl, W/D. Close to
MUW & downtown. No
pets. Ref. & credit ck.
328-1940/242-2730
1 & 2BR apts. in North
& East. CH&A, all elec,
water & sewer furn, con-
venient to shopping.
$350/mo. Call 352-
4776
Apartments For
Rent: Other 708
NORTHSTAR PROPER-
TIES. 500 Louisville St.
1, 2 & 3BR avail. 662-
323-8610. 8-5pm, M-F.
northstarstarkville.com.
Basic cable included
Apartments For
Rent: Starkville
707
VIP
Rentals
Apartments
& Houses
1 Bedrooms
2 Bedrooms
3 Bedrooms
Unfurnished
1, 2 & 3 Baths
Lease, Deposi t
& Credit Check
viceinvestments.com
327-8555
307 Hospital Drive
Furnished &
Apartments For
Rent: West 705
HISTORIC DOWNTOWN
2BR apts & loft apts.
Beautifully & completely
furnished. Also avail. 1
unfurn. loft apt. FMI call
662-574-7176
Apartments For
Rent: South 704
2BR/1BA. $475/mo.
$475 dep. Includes wa-
ter & DirecTV. Call 386-
7694 or 364-1030
Apartments For
Rent: New Hope
703
TOWNHOUSE. 2BR/1.5
BA. New ceramic tile &
carpet. Central air &
heat. HUD accepted.
662-425-6954
1, 2, 3 BEDROOMS &
townhouses. Call for
more info. 662-549-
1953
1 & 2BR apts. avail-
able. Free water & gas.
Call & ask about our
move in special. 662-
418-8324
Apartments For
Rent: East 702
1, 2, 3 BEDROOM
apartments & townhous-
es. Call for more info.
662-549-1953
FOR RENT
EASY STREET PROPERTIES
1 & 2BR very clean & main-
tained. Soundproof. 18
units which I maintain per-
sonally & promptly. I rent to
all colors: red, yellow, black
& white. I rent to all ages
18 yrs. to not dead. My du-
plex apts. are in a very quiet
& peaceful environment.
24/7 camera surveillance.
Rent for 1BR $600 w/1yr
lease + security dep. Incl.
water, sewer & trash ($60
value), all appliances incl. &
washer/dryer. If this sounds
like a place you would like
to live call David Davis @
662-242-2222. But if can-
not pay your rent, like to
party & disturb others, you
associate w/criminals &
cannot get along w/others,
or drugs is your thang, you
won't like me because I'm
old school, don't call!!!!
Apartments For
Rent: Northside
701
2500 Military Rd Suite 1
Columbus, MS 39705 · 662-328-7500
www.westrealtycompany.com
“Go West
for the Best”
WEST REALTY COMPANY
Phyllis Enis
386-3838
Top Producers
FOR OCTOBER
©

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Teleah Carter
386-2900
Bill Strauss
574-0720