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11-07-13 - Metro Weekly - Maurice Hines

11-07-13 - Metro Weekly - Maurice Hines

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2 NOVEMBER 7, 2013 METROWEEKLY.

COM
3 METROWEEKLY.COM NOVEMBER 7, 2013
4 NOVEMBER 7, 2013 METROWEEKLY.COM
ENDA

s Next Act
Supporters plot post-Senate strategies with nondiscrimination bill facing
much tougher fight in the House
House Speaker Boehner
N
EARLY 200 MEMBERS OF
the House of Representatives
support the Employment
Non-Discrimination Act, but
the man who controls that chamber ap-
pears poised to block even debate of that
bill on the House floor.
A spokesman for House Speaker
John Boehner (R-Ohio) confirmed last
week that Boehner opposes ENDA,
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which would prohibit discrimination on
the basis of sexual orientation and gen-
der identity, because he believes it will
lead to frivolous lawsuits and hurt small
businesses.
The news was not entirely unexpected
– Boehner voted against ENDA the last
time a similar bill was considered and ap-
proved by the Democratically controlled
House in 2007 – but it proved a blow for
advocates. Without Boehner’s support,
it becomes increasingly less likely that
House leadership will even allow ENDA
to be brought to the floor for a vote.
Boehner’s opposition is indicative of
the uphill battle advocates have always
known they would face on ENDA in the
House with its current composition.
ENDA has seen substantial movement
in recent months for a piece of legisla-
L
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News
Now online at MetroWeekly.com
Poliglot: Virginia gets McAuliffe, Illinois gets
marriage equality
4 NOVEMBER 7, 2013 METROWEEKLY.COM
by Justin Snow
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5 METROWEEKLY.COM NOVEMBER 7, 2013
LGBTNews
6
defending the unconstitutional law the
Defense of Marriage Act in court, that is
pretty rich,” Reid stated.
Citing a study by the Government Ac-
countability Office of the 21 states pro-
hibiting LGBT workplace discrimination,
Reid said fewer than 10 lawsuits have
been filed between 2007 and 2012. “Not
only is Speaker’s Boehner’s claim that
ENDA would hurt businesses untrue, it’s
also callous,” Reid said.
Without Boehner’s support, advocates
are charting a different path forward. Pe-
losi herself pointed to tactics used to force
tion that has languished in Congress for
decades. A Senate committee approved
ENDA with a bipartisan vote in about 15
minutes this past June. On Nov. 4, ENDA
cleared a major Senate hurdle when a
procedural vote on ENDA cleared the full
Senate 61-30, with the support of seven
Republican senators. Although not a final
vote on the bill, which is expected after
Metro Weekly publication time, the sup-
port of Republican Sens. Rob Portman,
Kelly Ayotte, Pat Toomey, Dean Heller
and Orrin Hatch, along with the bill’s two
Republican co-sponsors – Sens. Mark
Kirk (Ill.) and Susan Collins (Maine) –
sent a significant message to Republicans
in the Senate, but also the House.
“The fact that some previously unan-
nounced senators supported cloture –
namely Ayotte and Toomey – shows me
that there is wider support for ENDA
than was first thought. I think the same
holds true in the House,” said Gregory T.
Angelo, executive director of Log Cabin
Republicans, which has been lobbying
on behalf of ENDA. “The growing num-
ber of GOP co-sponsors and supporters
of ENDA in the House announced just in
the last week bears that out.”
ENDA gained its fifth Republican and
194th co-sponsor in the House after Rep.
Chris Gibson (N.Y.), who is being chal-
lenged for re-election by out candidate
Sean Eldridge, attached his name to the
bill Oct. 30. Despite support that only
seems to be growing, ENDA backers have
voiced frustration with House leadership.
“As the Senate places our nation on
the doorstep of history, the House Repub-
lican leadership is standing in the way of
progress,” said Minority Leader Nancy
Pelosi (D-Calif.), who as speaker in 2007
passed a version of ENDA through the
House. “Even with 193 co-sponsors in
the House, including five Republicans,
Speaker Boehner has indicated that he
will block a simple up-or-down vote on
ENDA.”
Taking to the Senate floor, Major-
ity Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.) blast-
ed Boehner’s opposition to ENDA as
“fail[ing] to take into account the heart-
break and suffering – not to mention lost
wages and productivity – that workplace
discrimination causes each year.”
“I was disappointed to read that
Speaker Boehner opposes the Employ-
ment Non-Discrimination Act because he
believes it will lead to frivolous lawsuits.
But coming from the man whose cau-
cus spent $3 million in taxpayer dollars
Pelosi is not alone in looking to the
reauthorization of VAWA in February as
providing a potential path forward. As
Angelo notes, “VAWA’s passage marked
the first time in history a Republican-
controlled House passed pro-LGBT leg-
islation, and showed me that if the pres-
sure is there from members in Congress
and grassroots coalitions, an ENDA vote
isn’t out of the question.”
“GOP leadership brought VAWA to
the floor and allowed members to vote
their conscience, and it passed with the
votes of 87 Republicans. The VAWA vote
has given us a roadmap for ENDA,” An-
gelo said. “I’m not saying all Republicans
who voted for VAWA will vote for ENDA,
but at the very least LGBT protections are
not a poison pill for those members.”
Reid and Sen. Tammy Baldwin (D-
Wis.), the chamber’s first out member
and who previously served in the House,
have both said they are confident ENDA
would pass the House if leadership al-
lowed a vote.
“The question is how do you get it to
the floor to receive that up or down vote,”
Baldwin said, floating the possibility of a
discharge petition or a package sent over
by the Senate. “There are certainly other
[possibilities], but those are the main ve-
hicles and we’ve got to push to have one of
those be the way it gets before the body.”
According to Human Rights Cam-
paign Vice President Fred Sainz and
Freedom to Work founder and President
Tico Almeida, a possible route could be
to attach ENDA to the Defense Authori-
zation bill, much as was done with hate-
crime legislation.
“There’s no denying that the speaker
is very powerful,” Sainz said. “He’s said
that he’s not prepared to bring ENDA to a
floor vote so we’ll have to figure out other
ways to get it there.”
But while lawmakers and advocates
continue to explore strategies for the
House, a focus remains on how dynam-
ics could change after a successful Senate
vote.
“Should we be successful that would
be a huge factor in enhancing the con-
versation in the House,” said Sen. Jeff
Merkley (D-Ore.), ENDA’s lead Senate
sponsor. “At this moment it’s a theoretical
conversation and I don’t think the House
is likely to take this up unless they feel
there is a pathway for enactment. And
once the Senate has acted, there is such a
pathway and I think the conversation will
intensify in the House.” l
NOVEMBER 7, 2013 METROWEEKLY.COM
the House leadership’s hand to bring the
Violence Against Women Act (VAWA),
which included LGBT protections, to the
floor earlier this year as a potential strate-
gy on ENDA. Stating Democrats made the
issue “too hot to handle” in public, Pelosi
told reporters she would hope a similar
situation would play out with ENDA.
“I would think it would be ‘once
burned, twice learned,’ and that they
would, shall we say, save some time by
taking it right to our committee and to the
floor,” Pelosi said. “Ending discrimination
is what we are all about as Americans, and
we should not have discrimination in the
workplace because of gender identity.”
“As the Senate
places our nation

ON THE
DOORSTEP
OF
HISTORY,
the House
Republican
leadership is
standing in the
way of progress.”
– House Minority Leader
Nancy Pelosi
7 METROWEEKLY.COM NOVEMBER 7, 2013
LGBTNews
8
We realize that until all equality is ad-
dressed, we will be leaving too many of
our LGBT neighbors and friends behind.”
McBride, a transgender woman who
serves on the board of Equality Delaware
and a former intern for the Gay & Lesbian
Victory Fund, says many millennials see
the causes of employment discrimina-
tion and marriage equality as “foregone
conclusions” that will eventually come
to pass. Instead, they’ve focused their ef-
forts on other issues, adopting a broader
push for human rights writ large.
Dan Furmansky, a Silver Spring-based
LGBT and social-justice activist with a
résumé long enough to age him beyond
the millennial cohort, agrees that the
progress in recent years, particularly with
regard to marriage equality, has led some
leading LGBT organizations to treat mar-
riage as “the end-all and the be-all.” But
Furmansky says the younger generation
of LGBT activists is more focused on
day-to-day concerns, such as the preva-
lence of hate crimes, the accessibility
of high-quality health care and jobs for
transgender people, discrimination in
employment and housing, and what is be-
ing taught in public schools – not just fo-
cusing on the existence of the LGBT com-
munity or bullying, but the availability of
comprehensive sexual education.
“A lot of people who are sympathetic
to us and are with us on the issue of mar-
by John Riley
T
HEY’VE BEEN CALLED THE
“Me Generation” by Time
magazine. They’re steeped
in social media and technol-
ogy. They’re possibly the most educated
generation, according to Pew Research.
They’ve been called racially and ethni-
cally diverse, severely underemployed
and so deep in student loan debt that
Forbes magazine says they’ll have to work
into their 70s before they can even con-
sider retiring. But “millennials” – those
born in the 1980s and 1990s, according to
Merriam-Webster – particularly those in
the LGBT community, aren’t interested
in fighting intergenerational wars or re-
litigating past fights for equality. Rather,
they’re trying to focus on “bigger picture”
issues that emphasize social justice.
“Our generation is coming at LGBT
rights from an interesting perspective,”
says Sarah McBride, a 22-year-old special
assistant for LGBT progress at the liberal-
leaning think tank Center for American
Progress. “We’re demographically dif-
ferent, but we also have different issues.
We’re more likely to see an understand-
ing of the intersectionality of equality,
looking at the issues affecting people of
color, immigrants, low-income families.
riage don’t always understand the broad-
er issues affecting the community,” he
says. “They need more education to make
them aware of those.”
Both McBride and Furmansky will sit
on a panel of activists at a Nov. 13 event at
the University of Maryland, College Park,
hosted by UMD’s School of Public Policy,
titled “After Marriage: Defining LGBT
Equality for the Millennial Generation,”
where they hope to delve more deep-
ly into some of these issues. Jermaine
Lewis, an artist and community activist,
and Michele Prince, a doctoral student
in UMD’s Department of Women’s Stud-
ies, are also scheduled to sit on the panel,
moderated by UMD’s Mindy Wu.
Furmansky acknowledges the feelings
of some in the LGBT movement that the
amount of money funneled into marriage-
equality fights could have been used to
address other needs, such as being used
to lobby more effectively on behalf of an
Employment Non-Discrimination Act, or
the troubling increase in new HIV infec-
tions among younger gay and bisexual
men who are too far removed from the
AIDS crisis of the 1980s and ’90s.
“But let’s not make marriage equality
a scapegoat for why we haven’t gotten
further,” he says. “Marriage equality has
helped advance more understanding and
acceptance of the LGBT community. The
larger issue we should address is: How
best can we leverage the resources we can
get our hands on?”
Both McBride and Furmansky see
distinctly greater acceptance of people
of varying sexual orientations or gender
identities within the LGBT community
among the millennial generation, though
both acknowledge that some sub-groups,
such as transgender people, may still feel
invisible within the larger movement.
“I think you see, across economic and
racial backgrounds, a push for inclusion
of bi, transgender or intersex people,”
McBride says. “It’s definitely better than
it has been in the past, even though we
still have work to do for those groups.”
McBride also says the LGBT move-
ment needs to start bridging economic
and educational divides within the com-
munity, reaching out to youth who don’t
pursue higher education, those of lower
socioeconomic standing and, particularly,
homeless youth.
Furmansky sees a similar need, though
he says LGBT national organizations have
begun making inroads into more margin-
alized groups by speaking out on issues
such as mass incarceration of people of
color, voting rights, racial discrimination,
NOVEMBER 7, 2013 METROWEEKLY.COM
Millennials Moving Beyond Marriage
Activists point to broader view of social justice for an
up-and-coming LGBT generation
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9 METROWEEKLY.COM NOVEMBER 7, 2013
LGBTNews
10
lennials need to learn how to support and
exert pressure on elected officials who
will work to resolve those problems or
stand up for the community by holding
politicians or those in positions of power
accountable.
“I’m optimistic,” says McBride,
“but we have yet to prove whether our
actions, our beliefs, will turn into tan-
and even so-called “stand your ground”
gun laws.
“We should be concerned about social
justice for all people,” he says.
McBride says the biggest challenge
LGBT millennials will face is taking their
rhetoric and translating it into direct ac-
tion on the varied issues affecting mem-
bers of the community. She adds that mil-
gible results.”
The panel discussion, “After Marriage: De-
fining LGBT Equality for the Millennial
Generation,” will be held Nov. 13 at 5 p.m.
in the Public Policy Atrium of Van Munch-
ing Hall, University of Maryland, College
Park. For more information, contact James
Stillwell at jstill@umd.edu. l
NOVEMBER 7, 2013 METROWEEKLY.COM
Sculpture Dedicated in Memory of
Whitman-Walker Clinic
“Pillar of Fire” honors health care providers who faced the challenges of the
early days of D.C.’s HIV/AIDS epidemic
by John Riley
T
HE JBG COMPANIES, A RE-
al-estate development firm,
dedicated a piece of public
art Monday afternoon to the
Whitman-Walker Clinic and the health
workers who provided care to patients
during the early years of the HIV/AIDS
pandemic. The new tribute sits on a par-
cel of land at 14th and S Streets NW, where
the Whitman-Walker Clinic once stood.
The sculpture, “Pillar of Fire,” was
designed by Frederick, Md.-based artist
William Cochran and is inspired by an an-
cient tale of a pillar of fire that once led
a lost people through the desert at night.
Specific design elements honor the birth
of the clinic and specialized care given to
each patient. John Coventry assisted Co-
chran with lighting and technical assis-
tance for the sculpture.
“The title comes from this notion that
when we get scared, as humans, we tend to
bring out these old, dark myths of the Old
Testament God that punishes people for
sin and things that don’t make any sense.
It’s darkness,” Cochran said in remarks
at the Nov. 4 dedication ceremony. “And
a place like Whitman-Walker has to work
uphill against that to bring dignity and
compassion to people caught up in a ter-
rible situation. It’s the first responders that
we have to focus on in a crisis if we want
to understand the best and highest that hu-
mans are capable of. That’s why this piece
is a celebration. The ‘pillar of fire’ refers
to the health care workers at Whitman-
Walker, who did, in a moment of history,
something so incredible that it can be an
example for all of us, for the ages.”
Surrounded by employees of the JBG
Companies and Whitman-Walker Health,
the community health center that has
since supplanted its Whitman-Walker
Clinic predecessor, Councilmember Jim
Graham (D-Ward 1), who served as the
executive director of the Whitman-Walk-
er Clinic from 1984 to 1999, praised JBG
for dedicating the sculpture to the early
responders in the fight against HIV and
AIDS, noting, “A lesser developer would
have cared less about this.” Graham also
invoked the memory of all the patients
and health care providers who have died
in the passing years, holding a moment of
silence in their honor.
“This is a celebration of the human
spirit,” Graham said. “Because the human
spirit that worked in this building, that
worked with individuals who, very often,
were very poor and facing what was then
thought to be a terminal illness – and was,
in fact a terminal illness – who had no re-
sources, no support system, very little in
the way of friends and supporters, often
abandoned by their family, abandoned by
their employers. They came to this build-
ing as a place of hope and response.”
In a short statement, David Chalfant,
the director of development for Whit-
man-Walker Health, recited the words of
Martin Luther King Jr.: “Darkness cannot
drive out darkness; only light can do that.
Hate cannot drive out hate; only love can
do that.”
“When I first came to Whitman-Walker
in 1992, working with Councilman Gra-
ham, then Executive Director Jim Graham,
I learned about a love and a compassion for
people, who, sometimes people wouldn’t
even touch them, and there was love, and
there was compassion, and there was car-
ing in this building, in this community.”
“And back in ’92, we talked about ho-
listic health care – treating the whole per-
son, not just the disease,” Chalfant con-
tinued. “And here we are in 2013, talking
about patient-centered medical homes,
treating the whole person, not just their
illness. … Today, Whitman-Walker has
grown not only into a place that delivers
some of the best HIV care in the city, but
some of the best primary care anywhere.
The great thing about Whitman-Walker is
it’s not just a place on a map. It’s a com-
mitment to quality and excellence in care,
and we’re very proud to be able to deliver
that today, whether you’re gay or straight
or HIV-positive or HIV-negative.” l
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Cochran (L-R), Graham, JBG’s James Nozar, Chalfant
marketplace
11 METROWEEKLY.COM NOVEMBER 7, 2013
12 NOVEMBER 7, 2013 METROWEEKLY.COM
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 8
WEEKLY EVENTS
METROHEALTH CENTER offers free, rapid HIV
testing. Appointment needed. 1012 14th St. NW,
Suite 700. 202-638-0750.
ANDROMEDA TRANSCULTURAL HEALTH
offers free HIV testing, 9-5 p.m., and HIV
services (by appointment). 202-291-4707,
andromedatransculturalhealth.org.
BET MISHPACHAH, founded by members of the
GLBT community, holds Friday night Shabbat
services followed by “oneg” social hour. 8-9:30 p.m.
Services in DCJCC Community Room, 1529 16th St.
NW. betmish.org.
GAY DISTRICT holds facilitated discussion for
GBTQ men, 18-35, first and third Fridays. 8:30 p.m.
The DC Center, 1318 U St. NW. 202-682-2245,
gaydistrict.org.
GAY MARRIED MEN’S ASSOCIATION (GAMMA)
is a peer-support group that meets in Dupont Circle
every second and fourth Friday at 7:30 p.m. gay-
married.com or GAMMAinDC1@yahoo.com.
HIV TESTING at Whitman-Walker Health,
Elizabeth Taylor Medical Center, 1701 14th St. NW,
9 a.m.-5 p.m. 202-745-7000, whitman-walker.org.
PROJECT STRIPES hosts LGBT-affirming social
group for ages 11-24. 4-6 p.m. 1419 Columbia Road
NW. Tamara, 202-319-0422, layc-dc.org.
SMYAL’S REC NIGHT provides a social
atmosphere for GLBT and questioning youth,
featuring dance parties, vogue nights, movies and
games. catherine.chu@smyal.org.
SMYAL offers free HIV Testing, 3-6 p.m., by
appointment and walk-in, for youth 21 and younger.
Youth Center, 410 7th St. SE. 202-567-3155,
testing@smyal.org.
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 9
CAPITAL AREA GAY & LESBIAN CHAMBER OF
COMMERCE presents “g.life: One Day in DC, All
Things LGBT.” 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Marriott Wardman
Park Hotel, 2660 Woodley Road NW. Free.
caglcc.org.
ADVENTURING outdoors group hikes 12 miles
on Billy Goat Trail near Great Falls, Md. Bring
beverages, lunch, bug spray, sturdy boots, $2 fee.
Carpool 8:30 a.m. from Tenleytown Metro. Devon,
202-368-3379. adventuring.org
WEEKLY EVENTS
ANDROMEDA TRANSCULTURAL HEALTH
offers free HIV testing, 9-5 p.m., and HIV
services (by appointment). 202-291-4707 or
andromedatransculturalhealth.org.
BET MISHPACHAH, founded by members of the
LGBT community, holds Saturday morning Shabbat
The DULLES TRIANGLES Northern Virginia social
group meets for happy hour at Sheraton in Reston,
11810 Sunrise Valley Drive, second-floor bar, 7-9
p.m. All welcome. dullestriangles.com.
HIV TESTING at Whitman-Walker Health. The
Elizabeth Taylor Medical Center, 1701 14th St. NW,
9 a.m.-5 p.m. At the Max Robinson Center, 2301
MLK Jr. Ave. SE, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Call 202-745-
7000. Visit whitman-walker.org.
IDENTITY offers free and confidential HIV testing
in Gaithersburg, 414 East Diamond Ave., and in
Takoma Park, 7676 New Hampshire Ave., Suite 411.
Walk-ins 2-6 p.m. For appointments other hours,
call Gaithersburg, 301-300-9978, or Takoma Park,
301-422-2398.
SMYAL offers free HIV Testing, 3-5 p.m., by
appointment and walk-in, for youth 21 and younger.
202-567-3155 or testing@smyal.org.
WOMEN’S LEADERSHIP INSTITUTE for young
LBTQ women, 13-21, interested in leadership
development. 5-6:30 p.m. SMYAL Youth Center,
410 7th St. SE. 202-567-3163,
catherine.chu@smyal.org.
US HELPING US hosts a Narcotics Anonymous
Meeting, 6:30-7:30 p.m., 3636 Georgia Ave. NW.
The group is independent of UHU. 202-446-1100.
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 7
BOOKMEN DC, informal men’s gay-literature
group, discusses Tinderbox: How the West Sparked
the AIDS Epidemic and How the World Can Finally
Overcome It by Craig Timberg and Daniel Halperin.
7:30 p.m. Tenleytown Library, 4450 Wisconsin Ave.
NW. All welcome. bookmendc.blogspot.com
WEEKLY EVENTS
METROHEALTH CENTER offers free, rapid HIV
testing. Appointment needed. 1012 14th St. NW,
Suite 700. 202-638-0750.
ANDROMEDA TRANSCULTURAL HEALTH
offers free HIV testing, 9-5 p.m., and HIV services
(by appointment). Call 202-291-4707, or visit
andromedatransculturalhealth.org.
DC AQUATICS CLUB (DCAC) practice session
at the Takoma Aquatic Center, 7:30-9 p.m. Visit
swimdcac.org.
DC LAMBDA SQUARES gay and lesbian square-
dancing group features mainstream through
advanced square dancing at the National City
Christian Church, 5 Thomas Circle NW, 7-9:30 p.m.
Casual dress. 301-257-0517, dclambdasquares.org.
Metro Weekly’s Community Calendar highlights important events in
the D.C.-area LGBT community, from alternative social events to
volunteer opportunities. Event information should be sent by email to
calendar@MetroWeekly.com. Deadline for inclusion is noon
of the Friday before Thursday’s publication. Questions about
the calendar may be directed to the Metro Weekly office at
202-638-6830 or the calendar email address.
LGBT
Community
Calendar
marketplace
13 METROWEEKLY.COM NOVEMBER 7, 2013
services, 10 a.m., followed by kiddush luncheon.
Services in DCJCC Community Room, 1529 16th St.
NW. betmish.org.
BRAZILIAN GLBT GROUP, including others
interested in Brazilian culture, meets. For location/
time, email braziliangaygroup@yahoo.com.
DC AQUATICS CLUB (DCAC) practice session at
Marie Reed Aquatic Center, 2200 Champlain St.
NW. 8-9:30 a.m. swimdcac.org.
DC FRONT RUNNERS running/walking/social
club welcomes all levels for exercise in a fun and
supportive environment, socializing afterward.
Meet 9:30 a.m., 23rd & P Streets NW, for a walk; or
10 a.m. for fun run. dcfrontrunners.org.
DIGNITY NORTHERN VIRGINIA sponsors Mass
for LGBT community, family and friends. 6:30 p.m.,
Immanuel Church-on-the-Hill, 3606 Seminary
Road, Alexandria. All welcome. dignitynova.org.
DC SENTINELS basketball team meets at Turkey
Thicket Recreation Center, 1100 Michigan Ave. NE,
2-4 p.m. For players of all levels, gay or straight.
teamdcbasketball.org.
GAY LANGUAGE CLUB discusses critical
languages and foreign languages. 7 p.m. Nellie’s,
900 U St. NW. RVSP preferred.
brendandarcy@gmail.com.
IDENTITY offers free and confidential HIV testing
in Takoma Park, 7676 New Hampshire Ave., Suite
411. Walk-ins 12-3 p.m. For appointments other
hours, call 301-422-2398.
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 10
BURGUNDY CRESCENT, a gay volunteer
organization, helps at DC Central Kitchen. To
participate, visit burgundycrescent.org.
WEEKLY EVENTS
DC AQUATICS CLUB (DCAC) practice session at
Takoma Aquatic Center, 300 Van Buren St. NW.
9-10:30 a.m. swimdcac.org.
LGBT-inclusive ALL SOULS MEMORIAL
EPISCOPAL CHURCH celebrates Low Mass at 8:30
a.m., High Mass at 11 a.m. 2300 Cathedral Ave. NW.
202-232-4244, allsoulsdc.org.
BETHEL CHURCH-DC progressive and radically
inclusive church holds services at 11:30 a.m. 2217
Minnesota Ave. SE. 202-248-1895, betheldc.org.
DIGNITY WASHINGTON offers Roman Catholic
Mass for the LGBT community. 6 p.m., St.
Margaret’s Church, 1820 Connecticut Ave. NW. All
welcome. Sign interpreted. dignitynova.org.
14 NOVEMBER 7, 2013 METROWEEKLY.COM
15 METROWEEKLY.COM NOVEMBER 7, 2013
UNIVERSALIST NATIONAL MEMORIAL
CHURCH, a welcoming and inclusive church. GLBT
Interweave social/service group meets monthly.
Services at 11 a.m., Romanesque sanctuary. 1810 16th
St. NW. 202-387-3411, universalist.org.
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 11
WEEKLY EVENTS
METROHEALTH CENTER offers free, rapid HIV
testing. No appointment needed. 11 a.m.-7 p.m. 1012
14th St. NW, Suite 700. 202-638-0750.
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12
LATINO GLBT HISTORY PROJECT screens
Vidas Diversas documentary about LGBT youth
in Nicaragua. 6:30-8:30 p.m. Empoderate Youth
Center, 3055 Mt. Pleasant St. NW.
latinoglbthistory.org.
GAY & LESBIAN ACTIVISTS ALLIANCE (GLAA)
holds monthly Policy Roundtable: “Help Us Build
on Victory.” Free; all welcome. 7 p.m., Room 120,
John A. Wilson Building, 1350 Pennsylvania Ave.
NW. 202-667-5139, glaa.org.
METROPOLITAN COMMUNITY CHURCH OF
WASHINGTON, D.C. services at 9 a.m. (ASL
interpreted) and 11 a.m. Children’s Sunday School at
11 a.m. 474 Ridge St. NW. 202-638-7373,
mccdc.com.
NATIONAL CITY CHRISTIAN CHURCH, inclusive
church with GLBT fellowship, offers gospel
worship, 8:30 a.m., and traditional worship, 11 a.m. 5
Thomas Circle NW. 202-232-0323,
nationalcitycc.org.
RIVERSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH, a Christ-centered,
interracial, welcoming-and-affirming church, offers
service at 10 a.m. 680 I St. SW. 202-554-4330,
riverside-dc.org.
ST. STEPHEN AND THE INCARNATION, an
“interracial, multi-ethnic Christian Community”
offers services in English, 8 a.m. and 10:30 a.m., and
in Spanish at 5:15 p.m. 1525 Newton St. NW.
202-232-0900, saintstephensdc.org.
UNITARIAN CHURCH OF ARLINGTON, an
LGBTQ welcoming-and-affirming congregation,
offers services at 10 a.m. Virginia Rainbow UU
Ministry. 4444 Arlington Blvd. uucava.org.
UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST CHURCH OF
SILVER SPRING invites LGBTQ families and
individuals of all creeds and cultures to join the
church. Services 9:15 and 11:15 a.m. 10309 New
Hampshire Ave. uucss.org.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL UNITED CHURCH OF
CHRIST welcomes all to 10:30 a.m. service, 945 G
St. NW. firstuccdc.org or 202-628-4317.
FRIENDS MEETING OF WASHINGTON meets for
worship, 10:30 a.m., 2111 Florida Ave. NW, Quaker
House Living Room (next to Meeting House on
Decatur Place), 2nd floor. Special welcome to
lesbians and gays. Handicapped accessible from
Phelps Place gate. Hearing assistance.
quakersdc.org.
HOPE UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST welcomes
GLBT community for worship. 10:30 a.m., 6130 Old
Telegraph Road, Alexandria. hopeucc.org.
INSTITUTE FOR SPIRITUAL DEVELOPMENT,
God-centered new age church & learning center.
Sunday Services and Workshops event. 5419 Sherier
Place NW. isd-dc.org.
LUTHERAN CHURCH OF REFORMATION invites
all to Sunday worship at 8:30 or 11 a.m. Childcare is
available at both services. Welcoming LGBT people
for 25 years. 212 East Capitol St. NE.
reformationdc.org
METROPOLITAN COMMUNITY CHURCH OF
NORTHERN VIRGINIA services at 11 a.m., led by
Rev. Onetta Brooks. Children’s Sunday School, 11
a.m. 10383 Democracy Lane, Fairfax. 703-691-0930,
mccnova.com.
16
LGBTCommunityCalendar
NOVEMBER 7, 2013 METROWEEKLY.COM
WEEKLY EVENTS
A COMPANY OF STRANGERS, a theater chorus,
meets 7:30-9:30 p.m. A GLBTA and SATB looking
for actors, singers, crew. Open Hearth Foundation,
1502 Massachusetts Ave. SE. Charles,
240-764-5748. ecumenicon.org.
ANDROMEDA TRANSCULTURAL HEALTH
offers free HIV testing, 9-5 p.m., and HIV
services (by appointment). 202-291-4707,
andromedatransculturalhealth.org.
ASIANS AND FRIENDS weekly dinner in Dupont/
Logan Circle area, 6:30 p.m. afwash@aol.com,
afwashington.net.
DC AQUATICS CLUB (DCAC) practice session at
Takoma Aquatic Center, 300 Van Buren St. NW.
7:30-9 p.m. swimdcac.org.
DC FRONT RUNNERS running/walking/social
club serving greater D.C.’s LGBT community and
allies hosts an evening run/walk.
dcfrontrunners.org.
THE GAY MEN’S HEALTH COLLABORATIVE
offers free HIV/STI screening every 2nd and 4th
Tuesday. 5-6:30 p.m. Rainbow Tuesday LGBT
Clinic, Alexandria Health Department, 4480 King
St. 703-321-2511, james.leslie@inova.org.
Whitman-Walker Health’s GAY MEN’S HEALTH
AND WELLNESS/STD CLINIC opens at 6 p.m.,
1701 14th St. NW. Patients are seen on walk-in basis.
No-cost screening for HIV, syphilis, gonorrhea and
chlamydia. Hepatitis and herpes testing available
for fee. whitman-walker.org.
HIV TESTING at Whitman-Walker Health. D.C.:
Elizabeth Taylor Medical Center, 1701 14th St.
NW, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. At the Max Robinson Center,
2301 MLK Jr. Ave. SE, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. For an
appointment call 202-745-7000. Visit
whitman-walker.org.
THE HIV WORKING GROUP of THE DC CENTER
hosts “Packing Party,” where volunteers assemble
safe-sex kits of condoms and lube. 7 p.m., Green
Lantern, 1335 Green Court NW. thedccenter.org.
IDENTITY offers free and confidential HIV testing
in Gaithersburg, 414 East Diamond Ave., and in
Takoma Park, 7676 New Hampshire Ave., Suite 411.
Walk-ins 2-6 p.m. For appointments other hours,
call Gaithersburg at 301-300-9978 or Takoma Park
at 301-422-2398.
KARING WITH INDIVIDUALITY (K.I.) SERVICES,
at 3333 Duke St., Alexandria, offers free “rapid” HIV
testing and counseling, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. 703-823-4401.
SMYAL offers free HIV Testing, 3-5 p.m., by
appointment and walk-in, for youth 21 and younger.
Youth Center, 410 7th St. SE. 202-567-3155,
testing@smyal.org.
SUPPORT GROUP FOR LGBTQ YOUTH ages 13-21
meets at SMYAL, 410 7th St. SE, 5-6:30 p.m. Cathy
Chu, 202-567-3163, catherine.chu@smyal.org.
METROHEALTH CENTER offers free, rapid HIV
testing. Appointment needed. 1012 14th St. NW,
Suite 700. 202-638-0750.
US HELPING US hosts a support group for black
gay men 40 and older. 7-9 p.m., 3636 Georgia Ave.
NW. 202-446-1100.
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 13
BIG GAY BOOK GROUP meets to discuss Mary
Ann in Autumn by Armistead Maupin. 7 p.m. 1155 F
St. NW, Suite 200. biggaybookgrop@hotmail.com.
AFTER MARRIAGE: DEFINING LGBTQ
EQUALITY FOR THE MILLENNIAL GENERATION
panel discussion. 5-6:30 p.m. Public Policy Atrium,
Van Munching Hall, University of Maryland,
College Park campus. lgbts.umd.edu.
THE LAMBDA BRIDGE CLUB meets for Duplicate
Bridge. 7:30 p.m. Dignity Center, 721 8th St. SE. No
reservations, all welcome. For partners, call
703-407-6540.
WEEKLY EVENTS
METROHEALTH CENTER offers free, rapid HIV
testing. No appointment needed. 11 a.m.-7 p.m. 1012
14th St. NW, Suite 700. 202-638-0750.
ANDROMEDA TRANSCULTURAL HEALTH
offers free HIV testing, 9-5 p.m., and HIV
services (by appointment). 202-291-4707,
andromedatransculturalhealth.org.
AD LIB, a group for freestyle conversation, meets
about 7:45 p.m., covered-patio area of Cosi, 1647
20th St. NW. All welcome. Jamie, 703-892-8567.
DC AQUATICS CLUB (DCAC) practice session at
Marie Reed Aquatic Center, 2200 Champlain St.
NW. 8-9:30 p.m. swimdcac.org.
HISTORIC CHRIST CHURCH offers Wednesday
worship 7:15 a.m. and 12:05 p.m. All welcome.
118 N. Washington St., Alexandria. 703-549-1450,
historicchristchurch.org.
IDENTITY offers free and confidential HIV testing
in Gaithersburg, 414 East Diamond Ave. Walk-
ins 2-7 p.m. For appointments other hours, call
Gaithersburg at 301-300-9978.
HIV TESTING at Whitman-Walker Health. D.C.:
Elizabeth Taylor Medical Center, 1701 14th St. NW,
9 a.m.-6 p.m. At the Max Robinson Center, 2301
MLK Jr. Ave. SE, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. 202-745-7000,
whitman-walker.org.
PRIME TIMERS OF DC, social club for mature gay
men, hosts weekly happy hour/dinner. 6:30 p.m.,
Windows Bar above Dupont Italian Kitchen, 1637
17th St. NW. Carl, 703-573-8316; or Bill,
703-671-2454.
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 14
BURGUNDY CRESCENT, a gay volunteer
organization, helps at Food & Friends. To
participate, visit burgundycrescent.org. l
17 METROWEEKLY.COM NOVEMBER 7, 2013
18 NOVEMBER 7, 2013 METROWEEKLY.COM
19 PURCHASE YOUR PHOTO AT WWW.METROWEEKLY.COM/SCENE/
scene
scan this tag
with your
smartphone
for bonus scene
pics online!
SMYAL’s Fall Brunch
Sunday, November 3
Mandarin Oriental
PHOTOGRAPHY BY
CHRISTOPHER CUNETTO
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21 METROWEEKLY.COM NOVEMBER 7, 2013
marketplace
22 NOVEMBER 7, 2013 METROWEEKLY.COM
NOVEMBER 7, 2013
VOLUME 20 / ISSUE 28
PUBLISHER
Randy Shulman
EDITORIAL
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
Randy Shulman
ART DIRECTOR
Todd Franson
MANAGING EDITOR
Will O’Bryan
POLITICAL EDITOR
Justin Snow
STAFF WRITER
John Riley
CONTRIBUTING EDITORS
Rhuaridh Marr, Doug Rule
SENIOR PHOTOGRAPHER
Ward Morrison
CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS
Christopher Cunetto, Julian Vankim
CONTRIBUTING ILLUSTRATORS
Scott G. Brooks, Christopher Cunetto
CONTRIBUTING WRITERS
Daniel Burnett, Christian Gerard,
Brandon Harrison, Chris Heller, Troy Petenbrink,
Richard Rosendall, Kate Wingfield
EDITOR EMERITUS
Sean Bugg
WEBMASTER
David Uy
MULTIMEDIA
Aram Vartian
ADMINISTRATIVE / PRODUCTION ASSISTANT
Julian Vankim
ADVERTISING & SALES
DIRECTOR OF SALES
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© 2013 Jansi LLC.
23
ABOUT FIVE
years into Barack
Obama’s social-
istic — or fascis-
tic, depending on
which side of the
bed congressional
Republicans woke
up on this morning
— reign of terror
imposing homosexuality on the good
people of America, we have enough evi-
dence to see what bacchanalian horrors
have been wreaked upon our nation.
So far we’ve had a bunch of really
fancy weddings; a competition between
gays and lesbians to see who can come
up with the most ridiculously charming
and over-the-top marriage proposals;
same-sex spouses enjoying shopping
privileges on military bases; and vari-
ous gay and lesbian servicemembers
flooding Facebook with out-and-proud
status updates.
This isn’t exactly the End Times I
learned about at vacation Bible school.
It’s not the best time to be heading
up the Chicken Little branch of anti-gay
zealotry. After decades of dire warnings
of the collapse of civilization when same-
sex couples received marriage licenses,
the most alarming thing we’ve seen is the
sheer number of items those couples put
on their Pottery Barn registries.
We were told by hate-spewing harri-
dans like Elaine Donnelly that the repeal
of Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell would trig-
ger a mass exodus of heterosexual sol-
diers from the military, leaving behind a
skeleton crew of homosexuals too busy
throwing orgies to protect our nation.
Last I checked, the Army, Navy, Air
Force and even the Marines were still
intact and doing their jobs. I have no
firsthand knowledge, but given that I’ve
received no Facebook invitations to a
barracks orgy I have to assume that the
latter hasn’t come to pass either.
So America’s anti-gay contingent
finds itself in the uncomfortable posi-
tion of going to war with the apocalypse
they got, not the one they think we
deserve.
That’s why the current debate over
ENDA feels rather dry and anticlimac-
tic now that we’re serving openly in the
military and getting married in droves.
I’m not saying the fight isn’t worth-
while — the freedom to work is just
as integral to our full equality as is our
freedom to serve and to marry. I am
saying that the philosophical battle has
been won as Republican leaders who
technically oppose it are increasingly
pantomiming arguments to placate a
shrill and shrinking base.
Of course, the level of hatred and
doomsaying once directed at gays and
lesbians won’t disappear, it’ll just find a
new target. More specifically, it will tar-
get transgender people. We’ve always
had to deal with the social-conservative
“bathroom brigade,” the deep-seated
fear that masses of burly men are await-
ing the moment they can legally throw
on a skirt and harass women in public
restrooms. That brigade is only going
to get louder.
As with their anti-gay arguments,
their anti-trans arguments are built on
lies and stoked on fears. But the ones
who should really be afraid aren’t social
conservatives, but transgender people,
especially the young. Anti-trans activists
have long been willing lie; right now in
Colorado they’re taking it a step further
by simply making up stories of bathroom
“harassment” and actively destroying the
life of a 16-year-old trans girl.
The argument over ENDA may feel
like we’re at the end of a long road, but
for many of us there’s still a long way
to go.
Sean Bugg is the editor emeritus of
Metro Weekly. He can be reached at
seanbugg@gmail.com. Follow him on
Twitter at @seanbugg. l
It’s the ENDA the World
(as We Know It)
A lack of divine wrath over marriage won’t stop hate
mongers, they’ll just focus their hate on trans people
LGBTOpinion
by Sean Bugg
METROWEEKLY.COM NOVEMBER 7, 2013
IN POLITICAL
advocacy, as in
statecraft, purity is
a luxury an effective
practitioner cannot
afford.
The tea party’s
aggressive push for
ideological purity
has yielded a GOP
at war with itself and incapable of gov-
erning. Destructive stunts like the $24
billion federal shutdown championed by
Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas) have strength-
ened Democrats’ chances of retaining
control of the Senate, while primary chal-
lenges to Republican incumbents from
the right in red states promise an influx
of new bomb throwers in the upper
chamber come 2015. This will accelerate
the GOP’s decline as a national party.
The LGBT left often pursues its own
ideological purity, as if right-minded-
ness were self-implementing, and as if
punishing imperfect allies magically pro-
duced better and winning candidates.
Advancing policy goals in a diverse soci-
ety requires overcoming differences. The
“easy gets” are already with us; we need
imagination and perseverance, not rage
nor a sense of inevitability.
Some on the left insist that there
should be no government secrets. They
are living in Never Never Land. The for-
eign governments condemning American
surveillance are merely envious. (Espio-
nage, after all, is a French word.) There
is a big difference between combating
excessive secrecy and abolishing secrecy
altogether. With a need for some secrecy
in a dangerous world, declassification can-
not be decided by an Edward Snowden.
Absolute opposition to any and all secrecy
book, Double Down, “I’m really good
at killing people.” But Obama did not
campaign for his Nobel Peace Prize as
Jimmy Carter did. And he has shown
flexibility that George W. Bush did not.
He has ended, prevented and limited
wars, whereas his 2008 opponent, John
McCain, was bullish on new invasions.
Obama has the same cool temperament
that served President Kennedy well dur-
ing the Cuban Missile Crisis, when one
wrong move could have incinerated the
world. Obama is no Dennis Kucinich,
but has proved a sober and resolute com-
mander in chief.
His Former Holiness Benedict XVI
was bent on enforcing doctrinal purity
within the Catholic Church even as its
membership in the West shrank and his
bishops’ scolding letters were read to
increasingly empty pews. The bishops’
refusal to respect church-state separa-
tion, as seen in their relentless efforts to
make the civil law conform to Catholic
doctrine on abortion and homosexuality,
implies a different America than the one
they inhabit. They appear convinced that
an American theocracy would somehow
be cut to their measure despite their
minority status.
But Benedict is retired. Last week,
the Roman church under Pope Fran-
cis did something almost unheard of: It
sought the opinions of the laity. Instead
of just another lecture, the leader of a
2,000-year-old organization that claims a
divine mandate is choosing consultation.
If Francis can deal with the fact that
his followers are not sheep but humans
able to think for themselves, those with
no hereditary hotline to heaven can learn
from his humility. None of us has all the
answers.
Richard J. Rosendall is a writer and
activist. He can be reached at
rrosendall@starpower.net. l
relegates advocates to the margins.
Anti-war activists in their purity
often ignore the prophet Jeremiah’s
“Men cry ‘Peace, peace,’ when there is
no peace.” Barack Obama takes a more
pragmatic view, as shown in October
2002 when he said, “I am not opposed to
all wars. I’m opposed to dumb wars.” As
president, he has been rather hawkish.
His recent threat to attack Syria, which
24
LGBTOpinion
A Pox on Purity
Absolutes and perfection are extremes best suited
to fantasy
by Richard J. Rosendall
NOVEMBER 7, 2013 METROWEEKLY.COM
“The foreign
governments
condemning
American
surveillance
are merely
envious.
(Espionage, after all,
is a French word.)
I criticized, led to a diplomatic opening
and the supervised destruction of Syria’s
chemical weapons, now underway. The
drone strike that killed Pakistani Taliban
leader Hakimullah Mehsud last Friday
was a blunt answer to Dick Cheney’s
sniping claim that “our adversaries out
there no longer fear us.” To be sure, dead
adversaries no longer fear anything.
The pacifists will decry the presi-
dent’s comment, reported by Mark Hal-
perin and John Heilemann in their new
marketplace
25 METROWEEKLY.COM NOVEMBER 7, 2013
26 NOVEMBER 7, 2013 METROWEEKLY.COM
On Tap
INTERVIEW BY DOUG RULE
PHOTOGRAPHY BY TONY POWELL
On Tap
Maurice Hines toasts his late brother Gregory and other
stars who helped him move through a life in the limelight
METROWEEKLY.COM NOVEMBER 7, 2013 27
M
AURICE HINES DOESN’T REMEMBER HOW OLD HE WAS WHEN
he first performed as a tap dancer on The Tonight Show Starring Johnny
Carson alongside his brother Gregory and his father, Maurice Sr.
“I never go by age. Age is just a number, so I never really talk about age,”
Hines says. “But it was around 1961. I was still in high school, I think.”
By that point, the New York-native Hines had already made his Broadway debut: He
appeared with his brother in the forgotten 1954 musical The Girl In Pink Tights, with cho-
reography by Agnes de Mille (Oklahoma!). Though “the Hines kids” had already performed
at The Apollo Theater, “I had never seen all these dancers, and all the singers — it was a
bigger show,” he says. “And I’ve loved it ever since. I love going to the theater, I love the
immediacy of it.”
In recent years Hines has worked on various shows paying tribute to pioneering Afri-
can-American entertainers, including several at Arena Stage and MetroStage, where he’s
set to direct and choreograph his Ella Fitzgerald bio-musical, Ella, First Lady of Song, start-
ing in January. (It’s a follow-up of sorts to his Josephine Baker-focused show, Josephine
Tonight, presented at that Alexandria venue in 2012.) But right now, the pioneer in the
spotlight is Hines himself, with his new autobiographical show, Maurice Hines Is Tappin’
Thru Life. Hines developed the show, directed by Jeff Calhoun (Newsies) in a production
starting at Arena Stage next week, chiefly as a way to pay tribute to his late brother, who
died 10 years ago.
The show’s title reflects the kick-start that tap dancing gave Harlem-based Hines in
show business. At the encouragement of an uncle, Hines’s mother took her oldest son to
see a neighborhood dance instructor, who immediately signed him up for classes. “I did
seven pirouettes at 5 years old,” Hines recalls, joking, “I might need to drop down to six
now, but I can still do my pirouettes.”
A song-and-dance man for half a century now, Hines credits his success to the many
great artists he and his brother worked with during their formative years. He also credits
“the great, great pioneering men that don’t get enough due” for first allowing black artists
to shine on the small screen, from Ed Sullivan to Merv Griffin to most significantly Johnny
Carson, who had Hines, Hines & Dad — featuring papa Hines as drummer and sidekick —
on several dozen times.
“If it wasn’t for Johnny Carson, we wouldn’t have the career that we have,” Hines says
matter-of-factly. “After we did all those shows, we had every main room in the world.”
28 NOVEMBER 7, 2013 METROWEEKLY.COM
METRO WEEKLY: How did you come up with the idea for this show
to begin with?
MAURICE HINES: I happened to be reading an article on tap, and
they didn’t mention my brother’s name! And I said, well, that’s
very wrong, because Gregory even went to Washington and got
National Tap Dance Day [enacted by Congress in 1989], besides
being the great tap dancer that he is. I got upset. So I said, I got to
do something about this. How soon they forget, because he had
recently passed away, I think a year before.
The act I was doing before, I would just start talking about
Gregory, ’cause I wanted to feel his presence with me. And it
evolved from there. I did some shows in Florida, in Boca Raton,
and added some pictures that my mother had. And the audience
loved it! I did a little longer version in Boston. And Jeff Calhoun
came up there, and he said, “This is spectacular. The audience
loves it, and they love the story.” I tell stories about Gregory and
I working with Judy Garland
and Ella Fitzgerald and Frank
Sinatra — all these great peo-
ple. So Jeff has evolved it into
something even bigger. So
that’s really how it all started.
It’s as simple as that. Just me
making sure that people don’t
forget my brother.
MW: So you share memories
you have of working and
hanging out with famous and
important people, many from
when you were just a toddler
or young adult over a half-century ago. You must have an excep-
tional memory to be able to do that.
HINES: Well, a lot of the memories I tell in the show, I don’t want
to reveal them too much, because they were very important
and I want the audience to hear them for the first time from
the stage. But the one I really love is the one on Judy Garland.
Because when we met her, we didn’t really meet her until
she actually walked on the stage. We did a number with her,
but her choreographer did the number standing in for her [in
rehearsal]. We said, “Will we ever meet Ms. Garland before we
do the number?” And he said, “No. She doesn’t rehearse. She’ll
just come on.” And so, when Gregory and I did the number, she
just jumped on the stage. She said, “Hi, I’m Judy Garland!” And
I said, “Hey, Judy, I’m Maurice. This is my brother Gregory.”
And then we did the number. And she just fell in love with us,
because we were so – you know, we were so natural. Nothing
frightened us. We had been doing it since we were little kids.
Even though it was Judy Garland — we were thrilled to meet
her – we knew what we were supposed to do professionally. And
she was the ultimate professional. We had a great time with her.
MW: Do you keep a diary? How do you remember all the details?
HINES: No, no, I never kept a diary. All the stuff that I talk about
in the show I remember. My brother always said that I have the
best memory – which I do. I remember every little detail.
MW: How old were you when you actually started?
HINES: I was 5 and Gregory was 3.
MW: And you’re telling me that you absolutely remember details of
things that happened to you when you were that young?
HINES: Yes I remember, sure. I remember teaching Gregory to
tap. I remember when we first started. I remember our first
show at the Winter Garden Theatre in the Bronx. And of course
my mother kept all these wonderful pictures of us, and so that
always triggers memories. And that’s in the show also. We have
a lot of pictures of us when we were little and we were starting
out. And pictures of us with Ella Fitzgerald, and people like that.
Nat King Cole. Meeting Frank Sinatra and Dean Martin.
We think [stars] today are great, but believe me, when you
meet Sinatra — actually meet Sinatra – and you meet Judy Gar-
land, and you work with Ella Fitzgerald, and you know Lena
Horne…. These kids don’t come close to them. [Laughs.] They
might be good for today, but when you actually meet those
greats, it’s beyond anything you ever imagined. It’s sort of like
they really were special. A gift from God — he had just touched
them. He really had. And they’re the reason I’m on the stage,
because I learned from them.
MW: You’re saying today’s stars are not as talented?
HINES: No. There are a few. I think Gladys Knight said it best. She
was on The Queen Latifah Show, and she happened to mention
Sammy Davis Jr. People know the name, but if you never saw
Sammy at his peak, no one could do what he did.
There’s nobody around that could ever do all of
that. Nobody! And she mentioned that. She said,
“I was very lucky to play in Las Vegas with the
Pips and be around the Sammy Davises and the
Lena Hornes.” No, these kids, they don’t come
close. Michael Jackson, yes. But Michael also
studied Sammy Davis Jr. He saw Sammy. Once
you see that greatness, it makes you try to come
up to that.
The only one I think — and I see her as
part of that generation — is Tina Turner. Tina
Turner is spectacular. Beyoncé is okay. But she
ain’t no Tina Turner! I mean when you see Tina
Turner, it’s a different story. And even Beyoncé will tell you that.
Beyoncé’s a talented girl, but there’ll never be another Tina. And
Aretha [Franklin] — those women could sing, baby. They didn’t
lip-sync songs. They sing ’em.
MW: So there’s nobody new that you would say even comes close to
the greats of previous generations?
HINES: No. One of my great idols, Harry Belafonte, he was unbe-
lievable live. He would walk out on the stage and get a standing
ovation before he opened his mouth! You don’t see that today. I
was there! I saw it! Instant rapport. I’ve seen all the tricks and
the pyrotechnics they do, but I don’t see [natural ability].
I think one of today’s great voices is Oleta Adams. Do you
hear her records? Do you see her? No. Anita Baker is not even
recording. One of the great voices! What do we have now, when
you think about it, compared to those girls?
MW: We have Adele.
HINES: [Silence.]
MW: Also, Bruno Mars. He doesn’t do much for you?
HINES: Yes, he does, actually. I bought his CD. I do like him. I
think he’s an original. There are some singers today. I’m not talk-
ing about that so much. I’m talking about this thing when you’re
onstage. Ella Fitzgerald said, “If you can’t do it with just a piano,
get out the business.” She didn’t need all the things blowing up,
and all that. James Brown did all that stuff. James Brown was
a great performer, so they didn’t need hit records. Tina said, “I
don’t need hit records. I have an audience in Europe. I’ll sell out
arenas, stadiums! I don’t have to have a hit record every time
I open my mouth.” Those are great performers. People know
they’re going to get a great show.
One I think is a wonderful artist is Bruce Springsteen. Fabu-
lous! Gifted people. That’s what I’m about. I think you find a lot
in the theater, though. They’re more in the theater. Because we
have to learn our craft. We can’t lip-sync. We got to do eight
“There should be more
African-American, Hispanic,
Asian choreographers.
BECAUSE THEY’RE ASIAN
DOESN’T MEAN THEY
CAN’T DO HIP-HOP
if they want to.”
29 METROWEEKLY.COM NOVEMBER 7, 2013
shows a week. So the theater artists, like Audra McDonald,
Norm Lewis, Brian Stokes Mitchell – we’re doing eight shows a
week. We can’t be jiving out there. So the theater people I always
have great respect for. You can do a concert, and then you’re off
for four or five days. Not in the theater, baby! You got a matinee
on Wednesday. You better be singing.
You know who I love, speaking of new? I love Lady Gaga.
Because underneath all that she can really play piano, and she
can really sing. And you know who her idol is, don’t you? She
said it on the HBO special she did from Madison Square Garden.
Her idol was in the audience, and she wanted to make sure they
knew it wasn’t Madonna, see. I was surprised, too. She said, ‘I
was in musical theater in college and my idol is sitting in the
audience right now. It’s Liza Minnelli.’ And Liza Minnelli stood
up. Right away I knew, by watching Lady Gaga, I said this girl is
not just no little frivolous thing here. She has a base, and the base
is talent, and her idol was Liza Minnelli. Who was, of course, at
her peak, spectacular.
MW: Although a lot of Lady Gaga’s success is due to shock value.
HINES: Well, she’s smart. She said, “Listen. I don’t have Aretha
Franklin’s sound. I don’t have a rock voice.” She probably said,
“They ain’t going to listen to me unless I come out and do crap
freaky things, and then I can do my performance art thing. But I
got to get them first. Now how do I get them? Madonna set the
template, although Madonna don’t have no voice. I got a voice,
so I’ll come out in a meat dress, and then they’ll listen to my
music. And I’ve got interesting things to say, but they’ll never
hear it if I don’t get their attention.” Smart! Smart! She’s living in
show business today. That’s why I’m a huge fan of hers. Because
she’s not just an entertainer, she’s a smart woman. And she was
right. They wouldn’t take her just singing straight-ahead at the
piano, like she does in the middle of her act. She sits at her piano
and plays a wonderful ballad. She sings her ass off.
MW: On the topic of theater, do you have any concerns about the
high price of tickets to Broadway relative to the old days?
HINES: Yes. Oh, yes! I was very vocal about it when it first hap-
pened. I think they made
it an elitist thing to do. It’s
very disheartening for me.
Very disheartening. That’s
why I like doing regionals,
because the ticket prices are
lower. Certainly I get paid
less, though naturally I want
to get paid more like any-
body else. But I do region-
als because it opens up a
venue for people to come see
the show. And that’s what
you want. You want them
to come see the show. So I
do it.
MW: You’re still working
occasionally on Broadway
though?
HINES: Oh, yeah. They want
this to come to Broadway. But
I like touring. I’ve always liked
it. I like being on the road.
But I like being on the road
because the ticket prices are
still cheaper than Broadway.
MW: How long have you had
this strong connection, this bond with D.C. theater?
HINES: I did Guys and Dolls [at Arena] about 15 years ago. It’s
really since then. I used to go down and see friends of mine that
would do shows there [at Arena]. I fell in love with the theater
in the round there.
So when Charles Randolph-Wright said, “Maurice, they
want me to do Guys and Dolls.” I said, “I’ll do Nathan Detroit
[the lead].” And that’s how it started. I love the D.C. audiences.
They’re very, very warm. Certain cities are not. You have to
warm them up. I know the tricks to get an audience, all perform-
ers do. But I don’t have to do tricks [in D.C.]. I just come out and
I say, “Hi!” And they say “Hi” right back! They do. [Laughs.] It’s
wonderful. That’s why we love to do what we do. Otherwise we
might as well be in a rehearsal studio. You do it for the audience.
MW: When did you get the notion to do these shows paying tribute
to pioneering African-American entertainers, such as the Duke
Ellington revue Sophisticated Ladies or the Eubie Blake revue
Eubie!?
HINES: Sophisticated Ladies had been done on Broadway. Gregory
did it on Broadway and then I took over for him when he went to
L.A. And then we did Eubie! together. And then there were a lot
of people paying tribute to the giants and the people who came
before us. So it was a no-brainer. I mean, Duke Ellington’s music
says it all right by itself, it doesn’t need anybody. But you have
creative people who put the music together, put it in a certain
form, like Charles Randolph Wright did for Sophisticated Ladies
in Washington, and it was a phenomenon.
I do shows for everybody. I don’t like niche marketing. My
show is for everybody. White, black, Hispanic, Asian. It’s every-
body. That’s how I grew up, and that’s what Sophisticated Ladies
was, that’s what Eubie! was, that’s what [his MetroStage show
about] Ella Fitzgerald is. Everybody loved Ella. So I do shows
like that. My show is for everybody. It’s not niche marketing.
And I make sure that the marketing people know that.
MW: You haven’t paid tribute to anyone specifically gay, have you?
HINES: No, I don’t think in terms of that. I think in terms of an
30 NOVEMBER 7, 2013 METROWEEKLY.COM
audience. I don’t say, oh, this isn’t for a gay audience. See, once
again, I don’t label. I’m not about labeling. I don’t see why we
have to. That’s like saying, oh, Maurice is a black person. I’m a
person! I’m not a black person!
MW: But you are gay. When did you come out exactly?
HINES: I came out when I came out the womb. [Laughs.] It never
occurred to me that I was in anything. I was always just Mau-
rice. I am who I am. If you want to perceive me as gay, or you
want to put a label on me, that’s you. I put the label on myself,
which is, I’m Maurice. It’s that simple. I was always proud to be
that, if you want to label it, I was proud to be gay, I was proud
to be black. Nothing ever changed my whole life. My whole life.
MW: When did you tell your parents? Were they okay?
HINES: They always knew. [Laughs.] We didn’t talk about it. In
those days in the ’50s, you didn’t talk about, but they always
knew. We didn’t go through any big thing about it. Furthermore,
we were in show business and we were around a lot of gay
people, and nobody called anybody gay in show business. They
were their names.
MW: Gregory wasn’t gay, right?
HINES: No. I know a lot of guys were hoping he was gay. [Laughs.]
He would go to the gay clubs with me. It was funny, because
guys would come up, “I knew your brother was gay.” And I’d
say, “Now why would you say that? You don’t know nothing.
If I went to a straight club, would that automatically make me
straight? Don’t talk stupid.” I can’t stand stupid people. If I went
to a straight club, I’m still Maurice Hines. Gay! We had no sexual
hang-ups. Our parents were fantastic people, there’s no doubt
about it.
MW: But when you were a young adult – or even just a decade
ago – the idea of getting married to another man, that wasn’t even
thought of, much less allowed.
HINES: No, I didn’t think of that. And I don’t think of that so
much. I don’t like to ape other [things]. I don’t put it down
for other people, if that’s what they want. But to me, that was
like wanting to be straight when I was growing up. I think it’s
romantic. I’m a romantic man.
I don’t want anybody to stop me from doing anything. Any-
thing I chose to do, as long as it doesn’t hurt anybody, don’t stop
me. Don’t say you can’t do this because you’re gay. No, no, no.
I think it’s a very romantic thing to do — to fall in love and get
married. But it was always like, well that’s what straight people
do. I understand all of the other ramifications about your part-
ner being in the hospital, and all of that. And the joint taxes.
That’s all important.
I had a lover for 16 years. He was an attorney and a great man,
a great man. We raised our daughter. We did it all. We didn’t say,
“Oh, look what we’re doing.” I don’t know if everybody should
know about it. No! It’s our personal business. It’s very important
to have a personal life. If you don’t, then you have no life at all.
That’s how we approached it, anyway. And my daughter is fine
— in D.C., getting her master’s. A fabulous girl! Cheryl Davies.
MW: How old is she?
HINES: She’s 30. We adopted her when she was under a year old.
I was diapering. I loved it.
MW: For the record, you’ve never actually been legally married?
HINES: No, no, no. We didn’t legally marry. We were just
together. As far as our minds were concerned, we were. We
were together for 16 years. We didn’t need validation. I’m very
like that. I don’t need anybody else’s validation – for anything. I
get validation on the stage with the audience, me pleasing them,
which is my job. But that’s the only validation that I look for.
MW: Are you in a relationship now?
HINES: No. It would take a very special man. I need someone
who’s a star in his own right, in whatever he’s doing. That’s very
rare. I’ve only found it the once. Silas was a great attorney, and
he knew it, so it made no difference what I was.
MW: Did you grow up in a really liberal or progressive-thinking
household?
HINES: Oh, yeah! Well, we were in show business. See, the big-
otry and prejudice was not among show people. You might get
it among producers. Certainly not directors. Mostly producers.
They’d go, “There are too many blacks in the show.” That hap-
pened in the ’50s and ’60s on Broadway.
I still see it in the ballet world. I don’t see black male ballet
dancers handling the white ballerinas. I don’t see that. Still the
“old world” runs the ballet. And as far as operas, there aren’t
that many romantic leads that are African-American. That’s a
little behind. That’s always surprised me. Because in my world,
in show business, the dance world, as far as jazz and Broadway,
all the kids in the dance world want to know is, can you dance?
Can you partner?
But then you have to deal with the board of directors, espe-
cially of ballet companies. Do you see a lot of black dancers at
the ballet?
MW: No, usually one, maybe. If you’re lucky.
HINES: Exactly. Maybe one. And certainly no male ones.
MW: Actually there is with The Washington Ballet now. The
Washington Post profiled him recently.
HINES: Oh, how wonderful! I didn’t know that. That’s great to
see. Well, they’re growing up. They’ve gotten a little behind.
[Laughs.]
MW: More broadly, what’s your take on the state of dance and
choreography today?
HINES: I think the state is good, but we need more diversity in
choreography, we really do. And I’ve said this for Broadway,
too. Garth Fagan, he’s African-American, he did The Lion King.
That’s over 10 years old. Sergio Trujillo, who did Memphis and
of course Jersey Boys, is Hispanic. But we don’t have that many
African-American choreographers. Bill T. Jones, but Bill T.
Jones is an entity unto himself. He has his own company. But
there isn’t that much diversity. There should be more African-
American, Hispanic, Asian choreographers. Because they’re
Asian doesn’t mean they can’t do hip-hop if they want to.
MW: I just read that The Lion King is now the highest-grossing
Broadway show of all time.
HINES: I hadn’t heard that, but it wouldn’t surprise me.
MW: And yet you’re saying that choreographer hasn’t been hired to
do much since?
HINES: Well, Garth Fagan, he has his own dance company. But I
haven’t seen any other Broadway show he’s doing. And he cer-
tainly should have been offered one. When you make that kind
of money, obviously you’re good at it. But I don’t see his name in
any other shows.
MW: And reality TV shows like Dancing With The Stars, do you
feel like that is good or bad for the dance community?
HINES: I don’t look at reality TV. I’m not interested in reality TV.
I like So You Think You Can Dance, I enjoy that. And I have great
respect for people who want to try to dance and try to get bet-
ter. But I’m only interested when it’s really great. And some of
them are good. But I don’t like reality shows. The reality shows
you’re talking about [competition shows], that’s different. Real-
ity shows, that’s looking at somebody else’s life. I have a life! I’m
living my life. Why would I want to watch somebody live their
life? It’s boring. I have mine. [Laughs.] Sit up and watch some
housewives beat each other up? Ew. It’s horrible.
31 METROWEEKLY.COM NOVEMBER 7, 2013
MW: And it just creates this realm of talentless fake celebrities.
HINES: Oh, exactly! Apropos of that – I’ll never forget it – I was
at the Lincoln Theatre, and we had closed, and I was still there.
And a show was coming in. They had all these wonderful artists
who had been around and found a niche for themselves, really
great singers. I think Chanté Moore was in it. Really wonderful
singers. Who was the star of it? This woman Mimi, or Neci, or
somebody from The Real Housewives of Atlanta. [Editor’s Note:
NeNe Leakes.] Do you know her? She was billed over all these
people who had been working all their lives! She was first billed!
I said, “Ugh! Well, no, I’m not going for that.” All she was on, she
was on the Atlanta housewives show. That’s all she did, and she
got billed over these wonderful artists who
had been working all their lives to get better.
That doesn’t say that much about them, but it
says a lot about us as a society, what we want
to buy. I’m not going for it. I don’t go for it,
I’m sorry.
MW: Even some of my friends I consider smart
and discerning, that’s what they like to watch
and talk about.
HINES: That’s what they watch! Oh no, I get it.
I just don’t play the game. You can play the
game if you want, but if you ask me, “Did you
see that?” I’ll say no. So what are we going
to talk about? ’Cause I didn’t see it. [Laughs.]
MW: You talked about how you don’t do niche marketing, but that
sort of calculation does seem particularly pronounced today.
HINES: Yes, I agree with that. They have these marketing tools,
these marketing firms. Niche building. What? What are you
talking about? That’s why I love Queen Latifah, because she did
a jazz album. I have great respect for her. She started in the rap
world, and then all of a sudden she’s doing Chicago. Even though
it was a movie it was still a Broadway show. And then she did a
jazz album. She did a great version of a song by Pheobe Snow,
“Poetry Man.” She did wonderful. I have to give it to her. Go,
Queen Latifah! She was, “Don’t limit me.” That’s what she was
saying. “Just because you think you know what I do….” That’s
the kind of performer that I like.
MW: But she has declined to come out publicly.
HINES: Well, she’s doing it on her terms. But that’s her personal
business. Again, her personal business!
MW: Well, gay people struggle. I mean, you didn’t. But a lot of gay
people do struggle. And seeing a famous, openly gay person might
help a young girl struggling to accept her own sexuality.
HINES: Yes, they do struggle. I joined a group when I was in
L.A. specifically to be on the phones and talk to gay youth, with
whatever problems. I’ve done that. And I get it. But it’s still her
personal business. She chooses when she does that. And that’s
every person’s right. And if she chose not to, it’s still her right.
That’s my opinion on that.
MW: I neglected to ask if you have other siblings.
HINES: No. It was just Gregory and I. So it’s very lonely for me.
That’s why this show is wonderful ’cause I bring him onstage
with me, I dance with him as if he’s next to me. And I talk a lot
about my mother and father, and my mother and father are gone
too. So I feel lonely without them. We started as a family team,
and for me to be without them is lonely. I can’t help it. But this
is a good way for me to keep them with me. That’s what I love.
MW: And you’re also performing the show with two pairs of tap
brothers, John and Leo Manzari and Max and Sam Heimowitz.
That must remind you of all the time you spent working with
Gregory, and help with the loneliness.
HINES: Oh, of course! Oh, it definitely does. It’s less lonely when
we’re all onstage together. Oh, it’s just heaven, it’s just heaven.
I can feel my brother there. And because they’re brothers too,
they get it.
MW: The last thing I want to ask you I’m asking last, because I
don’t know how you’ll answer it. You talked about how you don’t
really like to talk about age, but at least according to Wikipedia, it
suggests you’re turning 70 this year.
HINES: Yeah, I don’t really discuss it. I never discuss my age.
Wikipedia has it. Fine. It is what it is. But it’s not something that
I discuss. I find all of that boring.
MW: But when you have your birthday, do you go out and cel-
ebrate?
HINES: No, I don’t. I don’t cel-
ebrate. I’m a loner, basically.
Especially now that my imme-
diate family is gone. I would
celebrate with them of course
— my brother and my mother
and father. But, no, I don’t really
celebrate it. I do celebrate with
my daughter. We may go to din-
ner. But other than that, no.
MW: Even milestones, like reach-
ing 70, you don’t really celebrate
those either?
HINES: Yeah, but they’re mine. They’re personal things! [Laughs.]
I know it’s hard for you. But they’re mine! It’s my personal busi-
ness, my personal life. [Laughs.] I’ll give you an example. When
my brother passed away, I did an article with The New York
Times. They called me up. And [the reporter] was young. And he
actually said, “How come we didn’t know that your brother had
cancer?” And I said, “Because it was none of your business. It was
a family matter.” He said, “You know, you’re right. We’re so used
to now knowing everybody’s business.”
Why would my brother say, “Oh, look everybody, I have can-
cer.” Wouldn’t that be silly?
MW: Not silly. I mean, the idea is that if people come out about hav-
ing cancer, it might encourage others to get screenings more often.
Or just help others living with cancer to see that they’re not alone.
HINES: But, again, that’s a personal choice. So that’s what I was
telling him. So if Gregory had chosen to do that, I would have
respected that too. But he chose to [be private]. If he wanted to,
he would have! But clearly he said, “This is my personal busi-
ness. And this is for my family.” My grandmother used to say
that’s called being “grown.” That’s from the old-timers. Like
being “grown up.” Making personal choices, that’s being grown.
Not being told what to do by other people. When you’re really
grown, then you make choices for yourself. As long as you’re not
hurting anybody, then you make choices. And that’s not to be
discussed if you choose not to discuss it.
MW: So people who see you on your birthday, as Wikipedia lists it
— Dec. 13 — I guess they shouldn’t come up to you and say ‘Happy
Birthday’ or acknowledge it.
HINES: Sure they should! They can do anything they want. That’s
their personal business, if they choose to do that. That’s not for
me to tell them don’t you do that. No. Again, it’s all about per-
sonal business. And I’ll be just as gracious as I always am and say,
“Thank you so much!”
Maurice Hines Is Tappin’ Thru Life opens Friday, Nov. 15, at 8
p.m., and runs to Dec. 29 at Arena Stage, 1101 6th St. SW. Tickets
are $50 to $99. Call 202-488-3300 or visit arenastage.org. l
“It would take
a very special man.
I NEED SOMEONE
WHO’S A STAR IN
HIS OWN RIGHT,
in whatever he’s doing.
That’s very rare.”
32 NOVEMBER 7, 2013 METROWEEKLY.COM
NOVEMBER 7 - 14, 2013
SPOTLIGHT
5TH ANNUAL FALLFRINGE FESTIVAL
The Capital Fringe Festival offers an off-season
best-of-the-fest, bringing back seven favorite shows
from this year’s July festival, and six production
companies from past seasons, which have created
new works specifically for fallFRINGE, running the
next two weekends. Among those on tap: Mickle
Maher’s There Is a Happiness That Morning Is,
a show by WSC Avant Bard about two William
Blake scholars who must publicly apologize for an
inappropriate display of affection on the campus
green — in rhyming couplets no less; Tia Nina’s
Pitching’ the Tent, a mind-bending, gender-mashing
rock-and-roll show; and Brynn Tucker’s A Guide to
Dancing Naked, a mash-up of monologue and dance
Compiled by Doug Rule
LAHTI’S PRIDE
Emmy-winning actress Christine Lahti makes her
Signature Theatre debut
I
N DUSTIN LANCE BLACK’S 2011 PLAY 8, CHRISTINE
Lahti played one of the lesbians who sued the state of Cali-
fornia over Proposition 8’s denial of same-sex marriage. “Of
course the outcome was fantastic,” Lahti says, referring less to the
play – which was only staged twice as well as broadcast via You-
Tube – than about the overturning of Prop. 8 earlier this year. “It
was really, really an amazing day when the Supreme Court ruled
that,” she says. “It was just extraordinary.”
Lahti is probably best known for her Emmy-winning role as
feminist cardiac surgeon Dr. Kate Austin on TV’s Chicago Hope
from the 1990s. Though right now she’s in Shirlington playing
the lead in Paul Downs Colaizzo’s Pride in the Falls of Autrey Mill.
“It’s one of the greatest roles I’ve ever been fortunate enough
to bring to life,” Lahti says about playing Carly in this Signature
Theatre production directed by Michael Kahn. “There’s a lot
of complexity to Carly,” says Lahti, “but she’s also a victim of, I
think, suburban patriarchy, where men leave and go to work and
these housewives are left alone all day and are not really granted,
I think even today, first-class citizenship. So there’s a kind of
disrespect and a sense of being devalued that this woman has.”
A native of Michigan, Lahti says, “I was one of those kids who
kind of felt like I was born to be an actor.” And despite varied TV and film work, which includes an Oscar-nominated sup-
porting turn in Jonathan Demme’s 1984 film Swing Shift, theater is her preference. “I just love the give and take with the
audience,” she says. “And if the part is complex and the writing is really good, I grow every night in different ways.”
— Doug Rule
Christine Lahti appears in Pride in the Falls of Autrey Mill until Dec. 8 at Signature Theatre, 4200 Campbell Ave., Arlington.
Call 703-820-9771 or visit signature-theatre.org.
as the local D.C. actor discusses how music helped
her with self-acceptance. To Nov. 17. Fort Fringe,
607 New York Ave. NW. Tickets are $20, or $15
with a 2013 Fringe button. Call 866-811-4111 or visit
capitalfringe.org.
CYNDI LAUPER
It’s hard to believe, but the LGBT champion and pop
icon Cyndi Lauper turned 60 this year, and her solo
debut album She’s So Unusual turned 30. But instead
of merely basking in the accomplishments of all that,
as well as her recent Best Musical Score Tony Award
for Kinky Boots, Lauper has been on tour, playing
through that 1983 album in its entirety. Wednesday,
Nov. 13, at 8 p.m. Warner Theatre, 513 13th St. NW.
Tickets are $33 to $73. Call 202-783-4000 or visit
warnertheatredc.com.
ELTON JOHN
The gay piano man will perform “All The Hits”
on his first arena tour in eight years, in support of
The Diving Board, produced by T Bone Burnett and
featuring songs written by John and longtime lyricist
Bernie Taupin. The new set isn’t very inspiring — on
purpose. “It’s a record by a 66-year-old man. It’s not
a record by a 26-year-old guy who made ‘Rocket
Man,’” John told students at a recent concert at the
University of Southern California, as reported by
Rolling Stone. “It’s full of mature songs and songs
that are reflective. There’s no ‘Philadelphia Freedom’
on it. I’ve changed.” At least Rolling Stone also noted
that John “roared” through songs, both old and new
— and “shook the room” performing “Philadelphia
Freedom.” So at least he’s still got some rocket fuel on
tap. Thursday, Nov. 14, at 8 p.m. Verizon Center, 601
F St. NW. Tickets are $39 to $169. Call 202-628-3200
or visit verizoncenter.com.
33 METROWEEKLY.COM NOVEMBER 7, 2013
34
FUEGO FLAMENCO IX
GALA Theatre’s flamenco festival kicks off its
ninth year this weekend with a premiere piece by
gay choreographers Edwin Aparicio and Aleksey
Kulikov, who were legally married last June. One
Plus One explores the themes of individuality and
collaboration inherent in the couple’s relationship.
Aparicio, who is the co-founder and artistic director
of GALA’s Fuego Flamenco, presents the piece
through his namesake company Flamenco Aparicio
Dance Company. Aparicio will dance alongside
Norberto Chamizo, Genevieve Guinn and Anna
Menendez, and the performance includes singers
Amparo Heredia and Hector Marquez, guitarist
Richard Marlow and percussionist Behzad Habibazi.
It also includes the couple’s new choreography to
the hit gay-affirmative pop song “Same Love” by
Macklemore and Ryan Lewis. Friday, Nov. 8, and
Saturday, Nov. 9, at 8 p.m., and Sunday, Nov. 10, at
2 p.m. Fuego Flamenco IX runs to Nov. 17. GALA
Theatre, 3333 14th St. NW. Tickets are $35, or $60
for a discounted festival ticket. Call 202-234-7174 or
visit galatheatre.org.
I AM MY OWN WIFE
Rep Stage presents Doug Wright’s 2004 Pulitzer
Prize- and Tony-winning one-man show, based on
the true story of German transvestite Charlotte von
Mahlsdorf. Rep Stage’s producing artistic director
Michael Stebbins takes on the challenge of playing
all 40 characters in the show for this production.
Now to Nov. 17. The Horowitz Center’s Studio
Theatre at Howard Community College, 10901 Little
Patuxent Parkway, Columbia, Md. Call 443-518-1500
or visit repstage.org.
IF/THEN
Idina Menzel stars in this pre-Broadway musical
from the creators of Next to Normal: composer Tom
Kitt, writer and lyricist Brian Yorkey and director
Michael Greif. LaChanze and Anthony Rapp are
among the co-stars for this big budget new musical,
which is getting its one and only pre-Broadway
tryout right here at the National Theatre, which has
a good track record of helping get musicals ready
for Broadway success, such as West Side Story. Now
in previews. Runs to Dec. 8. National Theatre, 1321
Pennsylvania Ave. NW. Tickets are $53 to $203. Call
202-628-6161 or visit nationaltheatre.org.
MATTHEW BOURNE AND NEW ADVENTURES
Renowned British choreographer Matthew Bourne
— best known for his all-male version of Swan
Lake — returns with his company New Adventures
to present his latest re-imagining of a ballet
classic, Sleeping Beauty, which in Bourne’s hands
becomes a gothic romance and supernatural love
story. Opens Tuesday, Nov. 12, at 7:30 p.m. To Nov.
17. Kennedy Center Opera House. Tickets are $30 to
$120. Call 202-467-4600 or visit kennedy-center.org.
STRATHMORE’S MUSEUM SHOP AROUND
Strathmore’s annual Museum Shop Around is one of
the best and certainly most convenient places in town
for finding unique, arty holiday gifts. Next weekend,
18 museums will be represented at the event selling
memorabilia and merchandise — everything from
beautiful scarves and sweaters from the Textile
Museum, handcrafted glass and wood items from
The Shop at Strathmore, plants and seedlings from
the Washington National Cathedral’s Herb Cottage,
and architecturally minded toys and trinkets from
the National Building Museum. Each museum is
given its own space – often its own room – in
Strathmore’s historic Mansion. That’s enough room
for most shops to display as much as 40 percent of
their regular inventory. The mansion also offers a
café with food and drink available throughout the
Sippy Sisters: Previous 1K Wine Walk
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Washington Wine Academy marries wine and beer for its latest
1K walk in Crystal City
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ETWEEN THE RECENT AIDS WALK WASHINGTON AND THE
Marine Corps Marathon, quite a few spectators might be inspired to
move their feet. But if the thought of a marathon – or even a fun run
or 5-kilometer walk – still seems a bit much, the Washington Wine Academy
might have just the ticket. Actually, make that a passport.
Evolving since it began three years ago, the academy is set to offer the latest
iteration of its famously popular tasting walks. The weekend of Nov. 16 and
17, pick up your tasting passport – beer or wine, please, no substitutions – and
hit the indoor raceways of the Shops at Crystal City for the “Vintage 1K Wine
(or Beer) Walk,” offering a circuit of tasting stations of more than 20 wines or
brews, a few bites courtesy of local restaurants, and water stations to keep rac-
ers in peak form, all leading up to a DJ-fueled finish line.
“Nowhere in the country is this being done,” says Jim Barker, president and
founder of the Washington Wine Academy, who pondered such an offering
for years before making it a reality thanks to the support of the Crystal City
Business Improvement District (BID) and Vornado/Charles E. Smith, which
manages the retail space. “It’s a great partnership.”
Barker adds that as a nonprofit entity, the cost of a $40 tasting passport –
stamped at each station along the 1-kilometer route – helps the Wine Academy
of Washington offer scholarships to area professionals in the wine and beer
industry. Even those merely trekking this tippling trail, however, are bound to
learn plenty about either beer or wine. Among the wines, offerings represent
five states and seven countries. Among the beers, the selections range from
Japan’s Hitachino Nest Beer White Ale to DuClaw’s Devil’s Milk out of Bal-
timore.
A word of warning, however, to those on the fence: “My goal is to sell out
before the event,” says Barker. “Saturday, for sure.” — Will O’Bryan
The Vintage 1K Wine (or Beer) Walk is Saturday and Sunday, Nov. 16 and 17,
with heats starting every 30 minutes between 1 and 5 p.m., entirely within the
Shops at Crystal City, Arlington. “Passports,” either beer or wine, cost $40. To
purchase and to reserve a start time, visit washingtonwineacademy.org.
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event, including hot apple cider. Thursday, Nov.
14, through Sunday, Nov. 17, starting at 10 a.m.
The Mansion at Strathmore, 5301 Tuckerman Lane,
North Bethesda. Tickets are $9. Call 301-581-5100 or
visit strathmore.org.
FILM
BLUE IS THE WARMEST COLOR
Abdellatif Kechiche’s intimate French drama about
young lesbians earned an NC-17 rating from the
MPAA, and not without reason: A New York Times
review says the film features a minutes-long sex
sequence that “is longer and more literal than
anything you are likely to encounter outside of
pornography.” But that critic, A.O. Scott, also called
the film “glorious” — and at this year’s Cannes
festival, the jurors took the unprecedented step
of awarding the Palm D’Or to Kechiche and his
two lead actresses, Adele Exarchopoulos and Lea
Seydoux, a testament to their work in tandem. Now
playing. AFI Silver Theatre, 8633 Colesville Road,
Silver Spring. Tickets are $9 to $12. Call 301-495-
6720 or visit afi.com/Silver.
DALLAS BUYERS CLUB
Loosely based on a true story, Matthew McConaughey
plays an HIV-positive man who smuggled alternative
medicines into America in an attempt to save his life.
Jean-Marc Vallée directs the film that features Jared
Leto as McConaughey’s sidekick, Rayon, and a cast
that also includes Jennifer Garner. Opens Friday,
Nov. 8. Area theaters. Visit fandango.com.
DIAL M FOR MURDER 3D
Alfred Hitchcock’s 1954 classic Dial M For Murder
gets the 3D treatment in a new 4K digital restoration
presented by the American Film Institute’s Silver
Theatre. The film stars Ray Milland, Grace Kelly
and Robert Cummings star as, respectively, a jealous
husband seeking to murder his unfaithful wife
and her mystery writer former fling. Now playing
to Thursday, Nov. 14. AFI Silver Theatre, 8633
Colesville Road, Silver Spring. Tickets are $9 to $12.
Call 301-495-6720 or visit afi.com/Silver.
THE ROCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW
Landmark’s E Street Cinema offers screenings of
Richard O’Brien’s camp classic, billed as the longest-
running midnight movie in history. Landmark’s
showings all come with a live cast, meaning it’s even
more interactive than usual. Friday, Nov. 8, and
Saturday, Nov. 9, at midnight. Landmark’s E Street
Cinema, 555 11th St. NW. Call 202-452-7672 or visit
landmarktheatres.com.
THOR: THE DARK WORLD
Game of Thrones director Alan Taylor steers this
superhero sequel back to Thor’s fantasy roots. Be
prepared for a lot of dialogue about “Asgard” and
“bifröst” and “Svartalfheim” in The Dark World, and
much less of the humor Chris Hemsworth displayed
in The Avengers. Opens Friday, Nov. 8. Area theaters.
Visit fandango.com.
STAGE
36 VIEWS
Constellation Theatre Company offers this intricate,
intelligent drama about the impossible search for
the truth by Naomi Iizuka that involves a Japanese
pillow book that may or may not be ancient, and
the search for authenticity provokes an erotic game
of hide-and-seek among six ambitious individuals.
Allison Arkell Stockman directs the show. To Nov.
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The Choral Arts Society pays tribute to JFK with Verdi’s Requiem
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LREADY THIS FALL THERE HAVE BEEN SEVERAL LOCAL PER-
formances of Verdi’s Requiem. The beloved masterwork, as Scott Tuck-
er puts it, “is often presented kind of as a museum piece.”
But not so with Tucker’s Choral Arts Society of Washington. “We’re trying
to present it in a way that is relevant to our context right now,” Tucker says
about the piece, which factors into a season-opening program, Legacy and Life,
commemorating the 50th anniversary of John F. Kennedy’s assassination. Verdi
wrote the piece 140 years ago to honor the legacy of Italian poet and novelist
Alessandro Manzoni. “He wrote it because one of his national heroes died,”
Tucker says. “[We’re] taking Verdi’s intent to nationally honor one of our own,
and put that in an American context.”
Choral Arts has tasked visual producer Bonnie Nelson Schwartz to create a
montage of images and videos of Kennedy to be played while soloists, the chorus
and the orchestra perform Verdi’s Requiem. That will be preceded by Take Him,
Earth, a new piece by Pulitzer Prize-winning composer Steven Stucky, which
was written to honor Kennedy and features texts associated with the 35th
president. “It’s not as huge and grand as the Verdi Requiem is. It’s a little more
intimate,” Tucker says about Stucky’s short piece.
“I have felt very free to take the organization in the direction that I feel is
most appropriate artistically,” says Tucker, who is only in his second season
as Choral Arts’s artistic director, filling the big shoes left by the organization’s
founder Norman Scribner. Tucker assumed the position after teaching choral
music for 17 years at Cornell University.
Tucker considers Legacy and Life an example of how he intends to lead the
organization. “This concert itself is a way of saying I honor the great master-
works, but I also believe that any arts organization is responsible to keep looking
at things in a fresh way,” he says. “I’m not at all afraid to present masterworks
just as they are, on their own, but I also believe that it’s worthwhile to constantly
ask the question: Why are we doing this? And what’s its value? What are we try-
ing to say?” — Doug Rule
The Choral Arts Society of Washington performs Legacy and Life Sunday,
Nov. 10, at 4 p.m., at the Kennedy Center Concert Hall. Tickets are $15 to $75.
Call 202-467-4600 or visit kennedy-center.org.
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24. Source, 1835 14th St. NW. Tickets are
$45. Call 202-204-7760 or visit
constellationtheatre.org.
APPROPRIATE
Woolly Mammoth Theatre Company presents
Branden Jacobs-Jenkins’s audacious comic drama in
which the estranged members of a family return to
Arkansas, and their crumbling old plantation home,
to settle the accounts of their recently deceased
patriarch. Of course, while there they’ll discover
a gruesome relic leading to a family secret. Liesl
Tommy directs. To Dec. 1. Woolly Mammoth, 641 D
St. NW. Tickets range from $35 to $72.50. Call 202-
393-3939 or visit woollymammoth.net.
CABARET MACABRE
Happenstance Theater returns to Round House Silver
Spring with what has become an annual Halloween
tradition. Now in its fourth year, Cabaret Macabre
features melodramatic music played live and a
stitched-together Gothic romance — think Edward
Gorey and Victorian nightmares — performed by
local actors including Mark Jaster, Sabrina Mandell,
Alex Vernon and Gwen Grastorf. Closes this Sunday,
Nov. 10. Round House Theatre-Silver Spring, 8641
Colesville Road, Silver Spring. Tickets are $20. Call
240-644-1100 or visit roundhousetheatre.org.
CROSSING
Signature Theatre presents the world premiere
of a new pop musical from local composer and
lyricist Matt Conner, the writer behind the musical
Nevermore, and book writer Grace Barnes. Eric
Schaeffer directs Crossing, which explores the stories
of eight people from different decades who come
together at a train station, all searching — for hopes
and dreams, for new beginnings, for answers. Now
to Nov. 24. Signature Theatre, 4200 Campbell Ave.,
Arlington. Call 703-820-9771 or visit signature-
theatre.org.
DANCE OF THE HOLY GHOSTS
Baltimore’s Center Stage offers a production of
Marcus Gardley’s acclaimed play, a poetic family
drama set in the key of the blues and focused on a
reunion between a blues man grandfather and his
estranged grandson. To Nov. 17. Center Stage, 700
North Calvert St., Baltimore. Call 410-986-4000 or
visit centerstage.org.
LOVE IN AFGHANISTAN
Arena Stage presents this world premiere drama
from Charles Randolph-Wright about an Afghan
interpreter and a hip-hop artist who find improbably
find love amidst war. Lucie Tiberghien directs.
To Nov. 17. Kogod Cradle at the Mead Center for
American Theater, 1101 6th St. SW. Tickets are $40
to $105. Call 202-488-3300 or visit arenastage.org.
MIES JULIE
As part of its internationally focused STC Presents
Series, the Shakespeare Theatre Company presents
Yael Farber’s unflinching, contemporary adaptation
of August Strindberg’s Miss Julie, the 1888 parable
of class and gender now set in a remote, South
African estate 18 years after apartheid. A hit at the
2012 Edinburgh Festival Fringe, the production is by
the Baxter Theatre Centre at the University of Cape
Town in association with the South African State
Theatre. Opens Saturday, Nov. 9, at 8 p.m. To Nov.
24. Lansburgh Theatre, 450 7th St. NW. Tickets are
$60. Call 202-547-1122 or visit
shakespearetheatre.org.
PRIDE IN THE FALLS OF AUTREY MILL
Michael Kahn directs Christine Lahti in this drama
about the toxic qualities of suburbia, a world
premiere from Paul Downs Colaizzo, who created
quite a sensation with his last show at Signature,
2012’s Really Really. Shakespeare Theatre Company’s
Michael Kahn, who just made a splash directing
Studio Theatre’s Torch Song Trilogy, hopes for a
repeat directing this show at Signature. To Dec. 8.
Signature Theatre, 4200 Campbell Ave., Arlington.
Call 703-820-9771 or visit signature-theatre.org.
ROMEO AND JULIET
HHHHH
Folger’s Romeo and Juliet is a dark, despairing
descent into “fair Verona,” featuring a workmanlike
set by Meghan Raham that doesn’t even allow for a
true, grand Juliet balcony in the Capulet household.
And then there’s Laree Lentz’s mostly drab costumes
for the characters to wear, certainly for the play’s two
leads. Seriously, there’s not much to look at here. At
least there’s nothing drab in the acting on display —
to say nothing of Shakespeare’s patently great way
with words and wordplay. Both Michael Goldsmith
as a hyper-charged Romeo and Erin Weaver as a
determined Juliet win you over as the tragedy’s star-
crossed lovers, while Signature Theatre star Sherri
L. Edelen steals the show as the sweet, sassy, “say it
like it is” Nurse. To Dec. 1. Folger Theatre, 201 East
Capitol St. SE. Tickets are $30 to $72. Call 202-544-
7077 or visit folger.edu. (Doug Rule)
SHAKESPEARE FOR MY FATHER
The noted Broadway actress Kathleen Chalfant
stars in a staged reading of Lynn Redgrave’s Tony-
nominated play Shakespeare for my Father at the
Folger Shakespeare Library, which inspired the
play in the first place: Redgrave wrote it 22 years
after Folger invited her to present an evening of
Shakespeare and family anecdotes. Presented in
association with the Davis Performing Arts Center
at Georgetown University, the staged reading comes
as part of Folger’s exhibition Here is a Play Fitted.
Monday, Nov. 11, at 7:30 p.m. Folger Theatre, 201 East
Capitol St. SE. Tickets are $25. Call 202-544-7077 or
visit folger.edu.
SHAKESPEARE’S KING JOHN
Currently a roaming Arlington-based theater
company after losing its residency at Artisphere,
WSC Avant Bard returns for its 24th season, kicking
off with one of the few plays by the bard that
the company has never produced. Ian Armstrong
plays the title role in King John, a real-world
Game of Thrones that goes beyond the villain of
the Robin Hood legend and the Magna Carta to
reveal a struggling, enigmatic monarch. To Nov. 27.
Theatre on the Run, 3700 South Four Mile Run Drive,
Arlington. Tickets are $45. Call 703-418-4808 or visit
wscavantbard.org.
SISTER ACT
The Kennedy Center offers a run during the national
tour of this crowd-pleasing musical based on the hit
film and featuring original music by Alan Menken
(Beauty and the Beast, Little Shop of Horrors). Ta’Rea
Campbell takes on the Whoopi Goldberg-popularized
lead role, while the role of uptight Mother Superior
goes to Hollis Resnik, who you may remember from
her Helen Hayes Award-winning tour-de-force turn
as the Old Lady in Shakespeare Theatre Company’s
Candide a few seasons back. Closes this Sunday, Nov.
10. Kennedy Center Opera House. Tickets are $39 to
$125. Call 202-467-4600 or visit kennedy-center.org.
THE ARGUMENT
Theater J offers a production of Alexandra Gersten-
Vassilaros’s play about a 40-something couple
whose relationship is rocked by pregnancy — and its
corollary, abortion. Susan Rome, James Whalen and
Jefferson A. Russell star in a production led by Shirley
Serotsky. To Nov. 24. The Aaron & Cecile Goldman
Theater, Washington, D.C.’s Jewish Community
Center, 1529 16th St. NW. Tickets are $30 to $55. Call
202-518-9400 or visit washingtondcjcc.org.
THE NIGHT WATCHER
Two-time Obie Award winner and Tony Award
nominee Charlayne Woodard performs her rich
and powerful one-woman show on motherhood —
something that has technically escaped the actress.
This Studio Theatre production is directed by Bart
DeLorenzo. To Nov. 17. Studio Theatre, 1501 14th
St. NW. Tickets are $39 to $59. Call 202-332-3300 or
visit studiotheatre.org.
THE WOMAN IN BLACK
Just in time for the season’s darker days, Keegan
Theatre presents Stephen Mallatrat’s adaptation of
Susan Hill’s chiller, focused on a lawyer who engages
a skeptical young actor to help him tell his terrifying
story and exorcise the fear that grips his soul — but
instead the distinction between make-believe and
reality begins to blur. Colin Smith and Mark A.
Rhea direct Rob Leembruggen and Matthew Keenan.
Now to Nov. 30. Andrew Keegan Theatre (formerly
Church Street Theater), 1742 Church St. NW. Tickets
are $35. Call 703-892-0202 or visit
keegantheatre.com.
COMMUNITY THEATER
HERE. AND NOW
The African-American Collective Theater (ACT)
presents a pre-holiday performance of founding
artistic director Alan Sharpe’s family drama about
a middle-aged male couple with two sons whose
relationship is tested by personal crisis. Here. And
Now is Sharpe’s 10th full-length play focused on
contemporary black gay life in the nation’s capital.
Sunday, Nov. 10, at 5 p.m. The Fellowship Hall of
Wesley United Methodist Church, 5312 Connecticut
Ave. NW. Tickets are $10. Call 202-966-5144 or visit
instantseats.com.
MUSIC
ANOUSHKA SHANKAR
While Anoushka Shankar was recording Traces of
You her legendary father, the late Ravi Shankar, died,
and that result colors the set, but in a hopeful, not
mournful way. Shankar’s half-sister, Norah Jones,
even shows up to sing on a couple songs on the world-
pop set. The Washington Performing Arts Society
presents an area concert in support of the set. Friday,
Nov. 15, at 8 p.m. Lisner Auditorium, The George
Washington University, 730 21st St. NW. Tickets are
$20 to $40. Call 202-994-6851 or visit lisner.org.
BALTIMORE SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
The BSO reprises a popular program from a few
years ago, with Marin Alsop leading the BSO and the
Baltimore Choral Arts Society women’s chorus in a
performance of Holst’s majestic The Planets, a sonic
celestial showpiece enhanced by dramatic lighting
and theatrical effects. Violinist Leila Josefowicz
also joins to perform Stravinsky’s exhilarating Violin
Concerto. Thursday, Nov. 7, at 8 p.m., and Sunday,
Nov. 10, at 3 p.m. Joseph Meyerhoff Symphony Hall,
1212 Cathedral St., Baltimore. Tickets are $34 to $70.
Call 410-783-8000 or visit bsomusic.org.
BOHEMIAN CAVERNS JAZZ ORCHESTRA
Every Monday night the 17-piece jazz orchestra
performs a variety of music from the big band
repertoire — including pieces by Duke Ellington,
Count Basie, Billy Strayhorn and Maria Schneider,
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LUCIE ARNAZ
Next up getting the spotlight as part of Broadway
legend Barbara Cook’s cabaret series at the Kennedy
Center is Lucie Arnaz, who made her Broadway
debut in 1979 with They’re Playing Our Song and has
appeared in many stage shows around the country
since. Name sounds familiar right? It should: It’s a
merger of Lucille Ball and Desi Arnaz, since Lucie
Arnaz is, in fact, Lucy and Desi’s daughter. Friday,
Nov. 8, at 7:30 p.m. Kennedy Center Opera House.
Remaining tickets are $45. Call 202-467-4600 or
visit kennedy-center.org.
MACKLEMORE & RYAN LEWIS
Straight allies Macklemore & Ryan Lewis put their
LGBT and marriage-equality support in song, and
even registered a hit with the tinkling piano, tearfully
sweet “Same Love” featuring vocals by lesbian singer
Mary Lambert and raps by Macklemore, born Ben
Haggerty, ticking off nearly every way our culture
slights being gay. “Same Love” follows on last
year’s charming and fun breakout hit “Thrift Shop”
featuring singer Wanz and its dance hit follow-up
“Can’t Hold Us” featuring singer Ray Dalton — both
of which topped the Billboard Hot 100. Impressive
feats, especially considering that Macklemore &
Ryan Lewis are independent artists, not part of
a major label. The band’s 2012 set The Heist also
reached the No. 2 spot on the main Billboard album
chart and has been certified Gold. Now comes the
tour in support, also featuring well-regarded hip-
hop acts Big K.R.I.T. and Talib Kweli (formerly
of Black Star with Mos Def). Talib Kweli and Big
K.R.I.T. open. Monday, Nov. 18, at 7:30 p.m. Verizon
Center, 601 F St. NW. Tickets are $34.50 to $52.50.
Call 202-628-3200 or visit verizoncenter.com.
MAVIS STAPLES
“I’ll Take You There” all right: The legendary R&B
and gospel singer Mavis Staples, who got her start
with the family group the Staple Singers and helped
soundtrack the civil rights movement, comes to
town in her debut performance at the University
of Maryland Clarice Smith Center. Friday, Nov. 8,
at 8 p.m. Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center’s
Ina and Jack Kay Theatre, University of Maryland,
University Boulevard and Stadium Drive, College
Park. Tickets are $50. Call 301-405-ARTS or visit
claricesmithcenter.umd.edu.
MEG HUTCHINSON
A Boston-based folk singer often compared to Mary
Chapin Carpenter, Meg Hutchinson has opened
for Catie Curtis at the Barns at Wolf Trap. She
returns to the area for a performance at the Eastern
Market nonprofit spot Corner Store Arts as part
of a tour supporting her new album Beyond That.
Sunday, Nov. 17, at 8 p.m. Corner Store Arts, 900
South Carolina Ave. SE. Tickets are $15 in advance
or $20 at the door. Call 202-544-5807 or visit
cornerstorearts.org.
METRIC
The Canadian band Metric should be a bigger
sensation, if only the musical hype machine was
as precise as this electronic-rock band’s namesake
measurement system – not to mention its sound.
We’re talking tight songs, like the best of punk and
post-punk, but elongated through subtle shifts and
turns as drawn from electronica and club music. One
minute you’ll hear the influence of Blondie, the next
U2, and the next Goldfrapp. And lead singer Emily
Haines woos you with her charming, regular-girl
voice, and her turns of phrases, many of which are
darker than you’d expect. The band returns to the
area as an opening act for another female-fronted,
club-inspired rock band, Paramore. Saturday, Nov.
9, at 7:30 p.m. Patriot Center at George Mason
plus originals from band members — at its namesake
venue. Founded by baritone saxophonist Brad Linde
and club owner Omrao Brown, features some of
D.C.’s best jazz musicians, including Linde and
trumpeter Joe Herrera, who co-direct. Performances
at 8 and 10 p.m. every Monday. Bohemian Caverns,
2001 11th St. NW. Tickets are $10. Call 202-299-0800
or visit bohemiancaverns.com.
CHARLI XCX
Charli XCX has a husky voice and a spunky style
that often puts you in mind of Marina and the
Diamonds. Or a less gimmicky Gwen Stefani. Or
a more restrained Nicki Minaj. But Charli XCX is
also the lead songwriter behind the mega-hit from
Marina’s opening act on tour last year, Icona Pop,
the Capital Pride headlining Swedish female duo.
Yes, that’s right, Carlotte Aitchison is the one most
responsible for the punky-pop gem “I Don’t Care (I
Love It).” So if you like that hit — and who didn’t,
at least at one point — you should check out her
noteworthy debut album True Romance and also see
her in a reprise of a show she gave in June at U Street
Music Hall. She’s a dynamo up there. Saturday, Nov.
16. Doors at 6 p.m. U Street Music Hall, 1115A U
St. NW. Tickets are $20. Call 202-588-1880 or visit
ustreetmusichall.com.
ENSO STRING QUARTET
For its debut performance as part of the Kennedy
Center’s Fortas Chamber Music series, this young,
Grammy-nominated, New York-based quartet offers
a preview of its upcoming recording String Quartets
of the Great Opera Masters - Verdi, Puccini and R.
Strauss. Tuesday, Nov. 12, at 7:30 p.m. Kennedy
Center Terrace Theater. Tickets are $32. Call 202-
467-4600 or visit kennedy-center.org.
HIATUS KAIYOTE
Over the summer this buzzed-about Australian band
performed at Merriweather Post Pavilion as part
of the Summer Spirit Festival, sharing the same
stage as kindred spirit Erykah Badu, among others.
Now, with a stop at U Street Music Hall as part
of its proper debut U.S. tour, the band offers a
more intimate showcase for its thoroughly trippy
jazz-soul sound, something like a cross between
Badu and Sade. You can’t often make out what lead
singer and guitarist Nai Palm says in her lyrics, but
you’ll become entranced by her voice and jazz vocal
stylings all the same. Friday, Nov. 8, at 7:30 p.m. U
Street Music Hall, 1115A U St. NW. Tickets are $20.
Call 202-588-1880 or visit ustreetmusichall.com.
JASON MORAN AND THE BANDWAGON
Jazz pianist Jason Moran, the artistic advisor for
jazz at the Kennedy Center, leads his trailblazing
trio The Bandwagon featuring bassist Tarus Mateen
and drummer Nasheet Waits. Saturday, Nov. 9, at
7:30 and 9:30 p.m. Kennedy Center Terrace Gallery.
Tickets are $26 to $30. Call 202-467-4600 or visit
kennedy-center.org.
LEELA JAMES
Last year this great, gritty, big-voiced R&B singer,
known for a signature guttural growl, released
Loving You More…In The Spirit of Etta James. And
if any contemporary singer most conjures thoughts
of the late Etta, it’s the same-surnamed — though
unrelated — Leela. Birchmere has now snagged
James for one of only three concerts in advance
of a new album due in early 2014 and featuring
new single “Say That” with Anthony Hamilton.
Thursday, Nov. 14, at 7:30 p.m. The Birchmere, 3701
Mount Vernon Ave., Alexandria. Tickets are $35.
Call 703-549-7500 or visit birchmere.com.
University, 4400 University Drive, Fairfax. Tickets
are $37.65 to $61.45. Call 703-993-3000 or visit
patriotcenter.com.
THE FOUR BITCHIN’ BABES
Founded by Christine Lavin and counting Patty
Larkin and Julie Gold among its alumnus, this
folky cabaret group returns for its annual show
at the Birchmere, where the band recorded its
first album. This time around, the funny foursome
— Sally Fingerett, Deirdre Flint, Debi Smith and
Marcy Marxer — offer a show based on its recent
recording Mid Life Vices.” Saturday, Nov. 9, at 7:30
p.m. The Birchmere, 3701 Mount Vernon Ave.,
Alexandria. Tickets are $35. Call 703-549-7500 or
visit birchmere.com.
WICKED JEZABEL
Pauline Anson-Dross’s popular lesbian all-covers
party-rock band Wicked Jezabel has been rocking
— as well as raising money for various good causes
— for nearly a decade now. Now they return to the
live-music haven JV’s Restaurant to help kick off a
weekend of activities celebrating the Falls Church
mainstay’s 66th anniversary. Friday, Nov. 8, at 9:30
p.m. JV’s Restaurant. 6666 Arlington Blvd., Falls
Church. Call 703-241-9504 or visit jvsrestaurant.
com or wickedjezabel.com.
DANCE
JONAH BOKAER WITH DANIEL ARSHAM
The groundbreaking choreographer Jonah Bokaer
teams up acclaimed visual artist Daniel Arsham to
create a unique multidisciplinary piece. Occupant
focuses on movement in relationship to built spaces,
objects, lighting and other media, creating illusions
in stage space. Friday, Nov. 8, and Saturday, Nov.
9, at 8 p.m., and Sunday, Nov. 10, at 3 p.m. Atlas
Performing Arts Center, 1333 H St. NE. Tickets are
$33.50 in advance or $38.50 at the door. Call 202-
399-7993 or visit atlasarts.org.
SILK ROAD DANCE COMPANY
This Maryland-based dance company offers a
hometown show, an evening “Gala Dance Concert”
after a day of dance workshops as part of the Silk
Road Dance Festival. Including international
guest artists, the program features rare dance
traditions from Iran and several ’stans: Uzbekistan,
Afghanistan, Tajikistan and Kazakhstan. Saturday,
Nov. 9, at 8 p.m. Joe’s Movement Emporium, 3309
Bunker Hill Road, Mount Rainier, Md. Tickets are
$20 in advance or $25 at the door. Call 301-699-1819
or visit joesmovement.org or silkroaddance.com.
THE SUZANNE FARRELL BALLET
The world-renowned, Kennedy Center-based
company of George Balanchine’s most celebrated
muse returns with two mixed repertory programs,
including company premieres Romeo and Juliet, with
choreography by Paul Mejia set to Tchaikovsky’s
Romeo and Juliet Fantasy Overture, and Balanchine’s
Pas de Dix. The Kennedy Center Opera House
Orchestra accompanies. Remaining performances
are Thursday, Nov. 7, through Sunday, Nov. 10, at
7:30 p.m. Also Saturday, Nov. 9, and Sunday, Nov. 10,
at 1:30 p.m. Kennedy Center Eisenhower Theater.
Tickets are $29 to $84. Call 202-467-4600 or visit
kennedy-center.org.
NOVEMBER 7, 2013 METROWEEKLY.COM
COMEDY
JON LOVITZ
The Saturday Night Live alum and character actor,
known for Big and A League of Their Own, returns to
Arlington for another weekend run of his standup.
Friday, Nov. 8, and Saturday, Nov. 9, at 7:30 and
10 p.m. Arlington Cinema N’ Drafthouse, 2903
Columbia Pike, Arlington. Tickets are $30. Call 703-
486-2345 or visit arlingtondrafthouse.com.
READINGS
DORIS KEARNS GOODWIN
The Bully Pulpit tells the decades-long and
complicated friendship of Theodore Roosevelt and
William Howard Taft, with a focus on the epic
moment in 1912 when the two engaged in a brutal
fight for the presidency. Celebrity historian Doris
Kearns Goodwin talks about this century-old battle
in her new book and a signing event co-presented by
Politics & Prose. Tuesday, Nov. 12, at 7 p.m. Lisner
Auditorium, The George Washington University,
730 21st St. NW. Tickets are $35, or $50 to include
a copy of the book; $60 for two tickets and the book.
Call 202-994-6851 or visit lisner.org.
JAMES L. SWANSON WITH SAM DONALDSON
End of Days: The Assassination of John F. Kennedy is
an edge-of-your-seat tale about the day America lost
its 35th president, written by the author of a similar
recounting about the 16th president, Manhunt: The
12-Day Chase for Lincoln’s Killer. Swanson will sign
books after a discussion led by former ABC News
anchor Sam Donaldson. Tuesday, Nov. 12, at 7 p.m.
Ford’s Theatre, 511 10th St. NW. Tickets are free.
Call 800-982-2787 or visit fordstheatre.org.
JOHN MOELLER
Dining at the White House - From the President’s
Table to Yours recounts John Moeller’s rise from
small-town Lancaster, Pa., to a remarkable 13 years
working as White House chef for three presidents
and their families — George H.W. Bush, William
Jefferson Clinton and George W. Bush. The book
includes recipes that Moeller prepared at the White
House with chef notes for the home cook. The
White House Historical Association hosts this
book signing. Thursday, Nov. 14, at 11 a.m. The
Shop on President’s Square, 1610 H St. NW. Visit
DiningAtTheWhiteHouse.com.
GALLERIES
A DAY LIKE NO OTHER:
THE 1963 MARCH ON WASHINGTON
A Day Like No Other: Commemorating the 50th
Anniversary of the March on Washington features 42
black-and-white images plus a video demonstration
of 50 additional images commemorating the
250,000 people who participated in one of the
largest nonviolent demonstrations for civil rights
that America has ever witnessed. Through March 1.
Graphic Arts Galleries in the Library of Congress’s
Thomas Jefferson Building, 10 First St. SE. Call 202-
707-8000 or visit loc.gov.
A DEMOCRACY OF IMAGES
A Democracy of Images offers a survey of
photography in America, tracing its evolution from a
purely documentary medium to a full-fledged artistic
genre. The exhibit marks the 30th anniversary of
the museum’s pioneering photography collection,
and its title was inspired by Walt Whitman, who
believed that the then-young art form matched
the democratic spirit of America. Through Jan. 5.
39 METROWEEKLY.COM NOVEMBER 7, 2013
40
sometimes surprising changes made to the texts;
Othello, Romeo and Juliet and Midsummer Night’s
Dream are examined in Here Is A Play Fitted.
Through Jan. 12. Folger Theatre, 201 East Capitol St.
SE. Call 202-544-7077 or visit folger.edu.
HISTORY IN THE MAKING:
100 YEARS AFTER THE ARMORY SHOW
New York’s controversial 1913 Armory Show, the
first major modern art exhibition in the U.S., was
controversial, but among other things it had a
transformative effect on this museum’s namesake
founder, reflected by the acquisitions Duncan
Phillips made in the decades afterward. Through
Dec. 1. The Phillips Collection, 1600 21st St. NW.
Tickets are included in museum admission, which
costs $12. Call 202-387-2151, ext. 247, or visit
phillipscollection.org.
HUMAN, SOUL & MACHINE:
THE COMING SINGULARITY!
Baltimore’s American Visionary Art Museum opens
its 19th original thematic yearlong exhibition this
weekend. Human, Soul & Machine is a playful
examination of the serious impact of technology on
our lives, as seen through the eyes of more than 40
artists, futurists and inventors in a hot-wired blend
of art, science, humor and imagination. Through
August 2014. American Visionary Art Museum, 800
Key Highway, Baltimore. Call 410-244-1900 or visit
avam.org.
IAN SKLARSKY: BLIND CONTOUR DRAWINGS
Vastu, 14th Street’s high-end home-furnishings
store, invites a small number of emerging artists each
year to display work on its walls, as curated by local
artist Brian Petro. Right now the focus is on New
York-based artist Ian Sklarsky, whose work centers
on drawing lines with minimal glances at the paper,
creating cohesive images using only one line from
point A to point B. Now through Dec. 8. Vastu, 1829
14th St. NW. Call 202-234-8344 or visit vastudc.com
or iansklarsky.com.
JOHN F. SIMON JR.:
POINTS, LINES AND COLORS IN SUCCESSION
As part of its Intersections series, the Phillips
Collection presents in its house stairwell John
F. Simon Jr.’s four-part installation, which
incorporates drawing, software and computer-
generated fabrication, all inspired by the progression
of movement in the natural world. Through Feb.
9. The Phillips Collection, 1600 21st St. NW.
Tickets are $12. Call 202-387-2151, ext. 247, or visit
phillipscollection.org.
LIVING ARTFULLY: AT HOME WITH
MARJORIE MERRIWEATHER POST
“Living Artfully” transports visitors to Marjorie
Post’s grand estates of the 1950s and 1960s through
multimedia presentations, audio tours, jewelry and
apparel displays, and decorative art and furniture
collections. Through Jan. 12. Hillwood Museum,
4155 Linnean Ave. NW. Tickets are $15. Call 202-
686-5807 or visit HillwoodMuseum.org.
MAKE SOME NOISE: STUDENTS AND
THE CIVIL RIGHTS MOVEMENT
Pegged to the 50th anniversary of the March on
Washington and just one of several exhibitions at the
Newseum marking the occasion, Make Some Noise:
Students and the Civil Rights Movement explores
the new generation of student leaders that emerged
in the 1960s to fight segregation and fight for civil
rights. John Lewis, now a U.S. representative from
Georgia, and Julian Bond, a former chair of the
NAACP, are among the leaders highlighted here.
Smithsonian American Art Museum, 1st Floor West,
8th and F Streets NW. Free. Call 202-633-1000 or
visit americanart.si.edu.
A NEW AGE OF EXPLORATION:
NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC AT 125
As part of an organization-wide toast to the first
125 years, the National Geographic Museum offers
a visual and interactive exhibition celebrating
modern exploration by featuring some of the most
iconic moments from the institution and its bedrock
magazine. Entered through an archway made of
hundreds of issues of National Geographic magazine,
the exhibition in the complex’s 17th Street gallery
features the work of National Geographic explorers,
photographers, scientists and journalists — everyone
from Jacques Cousteau to James Cameron — and is
sponsored by GEICO, with the North Face a sponsor
of giveaways and events throughout its run. Through
June. National Geographic Museum, 1145 17th St.
NW. Tickets are $11. Call 202-857-7588 or visit
ngmuseum.org.
CREATING THE IDEAL HOME, 1800-1939
Housed in the same building as Constitution Hall, the
D.A.R. Museum offers a new exhibit exploring the
evolution of household comfort and conveniences,
and how American inventors patented all sorts of
laborsaving and leisure-providing home devices,
from the vacuum and the washing machine to the
telephone and television. Through Aug. 30, 2014.
D.A.R. Museum, 1776 D St. NW. Admission is free.
Call 202-879-3241 or visit dar.org/museum.
GENOME: UNLOCKING LIFE’S CODE
Thanks to the work of the decade-long, $3 billion
Human Genome Project, human society has
gained much greater insight into our bodies and
our health. Scientists have identified genes that
contribute to disease, stoking hope for ways to treat
or eradicate cancer among many other ailments.
This new Smithsonian exhibition, which will travel
the country later next year, explores the work and
growth in sequencing technology that helped spark
this medical and scientific revolution. Through
September 2014. National Museum of Natural
History, 10th Street and Constitution Avenue NW.
Call 202-633-1000 or visit mnh.si.edu.
GRAND PROCESSION:
DOLLS FROM THE DIKER COLLECTION
“Grand Procession: Dolls from the Charles and
Valerie Diker Collection” features the work of five
female artists from Plains and Plateau tribes. The
exhibition includes 23 colorful and meticulously
detailed dolls originally created as both toys and
teaching tools in their communities. Through Jan.
5, 2014. National Museum of the American Indian,
Independence Avenue and 4th Street SW. Call 202-
633-1000 or visit nmai.si.edu.
HATS OFF TO DR. SEUSS!
P&C Art Galleries in Old Town offers a stop for the
national touring exhibition of the fantastical private
hat collection of, as well as additional “secret art”
pieces created by, Theodor Seuss Geisel, better
known to everyone as Dr. Seuss. Hats Off to Dr.
Seuss! is part of a celebration in honor of the 75th
anniversary of Dr. Seuss’s second book The 500 Hats
of Bartholomew Cubbins. Through Nov. 18. P&C Art
Galleries, 212 King St., Alexandria. Call 703-549-
2525 or visit pcart.com or drseussart.com.
HERE IS A PLAY FITTED
The Folger Shakespeare Library’s latest exhibition
focuses on play texts as performance scripts,
highlighting broad shifts in the theatrical production
of Shakespeare’s plays over the centuries and the
Through 2015. Newseum, 555 Pennsylvania Ave.
NW. Tickets are $21.95 for general admission. Call
888-NEWSEUM or visit newseum.org.
NOT ALONE: THE POWER OF RESPONSE
Subtitled Letters of Support to the Parents of
Matthew Shepard Following His Murder, this special
Ford’s Theatre exhibit featuring a selection of the
nearly 10,000 cards and letters sent to Judy and
Dennis Shepard after their gay son was murdered,
considering the larger themes of empathy,
community response and personal responsibility.
Part of Ford’s Lincoln Legacy Project and running
in conjunction with its great stage production of
The Laramie Project. Extended to Dec. 8. Leadership
Gallery at Ford’s Theatre’s Center for Education and
Leadership, 514 10th St. NW. Call 800-982-2787 or
visit fordstheatre.org.
ONE LIFE: MARTIN LUTHER KING JR.
One Life: Martin Luther King Jr. features historic
photographs, prints, paintings and memorabilia,
mostly drawn from the National Portrait Gallery’s
extensive collection, tracing the trajectory of King’s
career. Through June 1. National Portrait Gallery,
8th and F Streets. NW. Call 202-633-8300 or visit
npg.si.edu.
OUR AMERICA:
THE LATINO PRESENCE IN AMERICAN ART
Drawn entirely from the museum’s pioneering
collection of Latino art, most of which was acquired
in the past few years, this exhibition features works
in all media by 72 leading modern and contemporary
artists. To March 2. Smithsonian American Art
Museum, 8th and F Streets NW. Call 202-633-1000
or visit americanart.si.edu.
OVERDRIVE:
L.A. CONSTRUCTS THE FUTURE, 1940-1990
Organized by L.A.’s J. Paul Getty Museum, this
exhibition traces the city’s transformation into
an internationally recognized destination with its
own design vocabulary, canonized landmarks and
coveted way of life. Through March 10. National
Building Museum, 401 F St. NW. Tickets are $8. Call
202-272-2448 or visit nbm.org.
PALACES FOR THE PEOPLE
“Palaces for the People: Guastavino and America’s
Great Public Spaces” pays tribute to Rafael
Guastavino Sr., arguably one of the most influential
architectural craftsmen working in America a century
ago, designing tiles in New York’s Grand Central
Terminal, the Baird Auditorium of the National
Museum of Natural History and the Washington
National Cathedral, among other venues. Through
Jan. 20. National Building Museum, 401 F St. NW.
Call 202-272-2448 or visit nbm.org.
PORTENT
A new exhibition at Alexandria’s Athenaeum, Portent
presents a series of artworks visually reflecting on or
representing the magnitude of natural events, from
volcanoes to high tide to wildfires. Curator Twig
Murray included paintings by Sukey Bryan, Freya
Grand and Amy Marx, silverpoints by Kate Kertz
and photography by Ryan McCoy. Through Dec. 8.
The Athenaeum, 201 Prince St., Alexandria. Call 703-
548-0035 or visit nvfaa.org.
REVOLUTIONS: SONGS OF SOCIAL CHANGE
Offering a comparative look at two dramatic periods
of civil strife — 1860 through 1865 and 1960 through
1965 — and the music they inspired, from “The Battle
Hymn of the Republic” to “Blowing In The Wind.”
Through Jan. 5. Virginia Historical Society, 428
North Boulevard, Richmond. Call 804-358-4901 or
visit vahistorical.org.
NOVEMBER 7, 2013 METROWEEKLY.COM
SHUNGABOY:
DC PAINTINGS AND OTHER WORKS
A New York artist of Japanese ancestry, Shungaboy
coined his name in homage to the centuries-old
Japanese erotic-art genre known as “shunga.”
Shungaboy presents a collection of his male
figurative drawings done as part of the Make
Sketch Sessions at D.C.’s gay-owned, male-nude-
focused Vitruvian Gallery, as well as others from
similar drawing groups in New York and Colorado.
Through Nov. 16. Vitruvian Fine Arts Gallery, 734
7th St. SE, 2nd Floor. Suggested donation of $5. Visit
vitruviangallery.com.
THROUGH A DIFFERENT LENS
Touchstone Gallery presents exhibitions by two
member artists focused on their visions of what they
see: Trés Lucid Dreams, a spectral journey depicting
the archetypes of humanity; and Betsy Forster’s Soul
Food, mixed-media paintings showing Forster’s deep
connection to nature and to the land itself. Through
Nov. 24. Touchstone Gallery, 901 New York Ave.
NW Call 202-347-2787 or visit
touchstonegallery.com.
VAN GOGH: REPETITIONS
The first exhibition of Vincent Van Gogh in
Washington in over 15 years, Repetitions offers a
fresh look at the artistic prowess of Vincent Van
Gogh through an examination of roughly 30
paintings alongside related drawings and technical
photographs. Through Jan. 26. The Phillips
Collection, 1600 21st St. NW. Tickets are $12. Call
202-387-2151, ext. 247, or visit phillipscollection.org.
WESTEN MUNTAIN: LOVESONG
Color-reduction prints based on a series of
photographs taken by the artist Westen Muntain,
based in Falls Church. Through Jan. 4. Mezz Gallery
at Artisphere, 1101 Wilson Blvd., Arlington. Call 703-
875-1100 or visit artisphere.com.
WINDOW TO WASHINGTON
“Window to Washington: The Kiplinger Collection
at HSW” is an exhibition at Washington’s Carnegie
Library that traces the development of the nation’s
capital from a sleepy Southern town to a modern
metropolis, as documented through the works
of artists. The Historical Society of Washington,
D.C., exhibition was made possible by a donation
from the Kiplinger family. It’s also an early step
in a reorganization effort by the society, which
has struggled to revive ever since its short-lived
effort a decade ago to run a City Museum of
Washington proved too ambitious. Open Mondays
and Wednesdays, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., and
Thursdays, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. The Historical Society
of Washington, D.C., at the Carnegie Library, 801
K St. NW. Call 202-393-1420 or visit historydc.org
YOGA: THE ART OF TRANSFORMATION
The Sackler Gallery presents the world’s first
exhibition about yoga’s visual history, featuring
sculptures, paintings, photographs, books and films
from 25 museums and private collections around the
world, all exploring how the discipline’s meanings
have changed over time. Now to Jan. 26, 2014.
Arthur M. Sackler Gallery, 1050 Independence Ave.
SW. Call 202-633-4800 or visti asia.si.edu. l
41 METROWEEKLY.COM NOVEMBER 7, 2013
FOR MORE OUT ON THE TOWN LISTINGS
PLEASE VISIT
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42
T
HERE’S NO QUESTION
Lady Gaga has deliv-
ered some classic pop
singles since she burst
onto the scene five years ago with
her first No. 1 single, “Just Dance.”
She’s made her mark on the music
industry, and imitators have fol-
lowed in her wake. She changed
the direction of pop music. Her
attention-seeking antics, although
wearing thin lately, have gener-
ally been amusing and have kept
her in the spotlight she so obvi-
ously craves. Lady Gaga has been
a valuable ally in the fight for
LGBT rights, and has a sincere
and meaningful relationship with
her fans. Unfortunately her new
album Artpop, out next week, is
a major disappointment. Gaga set
up a promise she was unable to
fulfill by relentlessly hyping the
album for months. She’s revved
and stoked expectations to such
a feverish level that any artist
would be hard-pressed to deliver.
In that context, Artpop is nothing
short of a fiasco, a barely average
modern pop/dance album at best,
light on originality, imagination
and heart, replete with vapid lyr-
ics and almost completely devoid
of strong melodic hooks.
The album isn’t really about
fully developed, strongly com-
posed material. It’s more about
Gaga herself, and the various
themes and sounds that inhabit
Gaga-world. Evidently someone
forgot to remind the artist that at
some point there actually should
be, you know, good songs. Art-
pop offers nothing approaching
kinetic, whip-smart classics like
“Bad Romance” or “Poker Face.”
“Born This Way” may be a brazen
theft of “Express Yourself,” but
it is undeniably catchy and its
message of acceptance was a posi-
tive force on society. Nothing like
that to be found here. Lady Gaga’s
music has always been highly
derivative, but she’s previously
shown the ability to weave a wide
swath of influence into some great
material. That magical alchemy is
largely absent on Artpop. Maybe it
was the pressure of following up
such an iconic album as Born This
Way. Maybe there were too many
ideas and too much material with
no clear direction. Gaga has said
in interviews that dozens of songs
were recorded for this project,
and the album had a protracted
gestation as she and her produc-
tion team searched for that magic
combination of songs and sounds.
Maybe the commercial stakes
were so high that “too many cooks
in the kitchen” ended up steriliz-
ing the album in a frantic attempt
to deliver a product that would
keep Gaga’s mega-empire rolling.
Whatever path led to its creation,
the end result is a hot mess.
The lead single “Applause”
was the first sign of trouble. It
was adequate, perhaps, as an
album track — it’s not horrible
by any means. But as the leadoff
single for one of the year’s most
anticipated albums? Surprisingly
weak. Yet, after hearing the entire
album, it’s now easy to under-
stand why “Applause” was cho-
sen. It’s clearly the best track on
the album.
Gaga and her production team
and label apparently couldn’t
figure out what the second sin-
gle should be, first announcing
“Venus” then deciding on the
absolutely forgettable duet with
R. Kelly, “Do What U Want.”
Even with the album’s release
date approaching, it’s clear there
is no direction to the project.
There are some cool sounds
on “Aura,” especially at the begin-
ning, but the lyrics are mind-
numbingly banal, and the main
chorus melody isn’t strong enough
to carry what is otherwise one of
the better songs on the album. For
a song with such a provocative
title, “Sexxx Dreams” is remark-
Artpop is a barely average modern pop/dance album at best, light on
originality, imagination and heart
Barely there: Lady Gaga
LADY GAGA
Artpop
HHHHH
$11.99
Interscope Records
Available Nov. 11
Gagging Over Gaga
CHRIS GERARD MUSIC
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NOVEMBER 7, 2013 METROWEEKLY.COM
S
ophie, are you okay?”
Phillip asks at the end
of The Argument. Alex-
andra Gersten-Vassi-
laros’s 90-minute drama is about
an unexpected pregnancy and a
woman’s right to choose. It’s not
revealing too much to say here
that the play doesn’t end well. Is
it even possible to have a happy
ending when an unwanted preg-
nancy is involved?
Surely it is, but The Argument,
at Theater J, is only interested in
exploring that hot-button issue
so far. The ultimate goal is to
provoke broader thoughts and
conversations about how all too
easy it is for humans to become
intractable in opinions and deci-
sions, and how quickly love can
turn to hate — particularly when
a short-term issue is allowed to
run roughshod over long-term
goals and desires. In that way, the
play speaks to even those patrons,
including gay men, who by default
don’t have to worry firsthand
about causing an unwanted preg-
nancy. Anyone who’s ever been in
a long-term relationship will no
doubt see bits and pieces of them-
selves reflected here.
We first meet Sophie and
Phillip on their very first night
together, having left a party drunk
to get intimate at Phillip’s spa-
cious studio apartment. The two
40-somethings spend that first
night together, and seemingly
most nights after for the next 10
blissful months. We start to see
cracks here and there in the rela-
tionship, as the partners’ differ-
ences start to emerge, but it isn’t
until Phillip learns that Sophie is
pregnant that a dark cloud forms
and heated discussion begins.
Maybe things would have turned
out better if only Sophie and Phil-
lip had broached the subject of
parenting before the piss hit the
home-pregnancy test. And, really,
the problem at its base, as ever, is a
lack of communication and empa-
thy even between two people who
seem made for each other.
The Argument might prove
to be too unsettling for some,
but even those dismayed by the
story’s soured relationship and
unresolved conflict in the end
will admire the work of the two
lead actors cast by director Shir-
ley Serotsky. It seems impossi-
ble not to fall for and side with
Susan Rome as Sophie, played
with full heart, but also full head.
But James Whalen doesn’t take
the easy out and play Phillip as
unlikeable or monstrous. In fact,
aside from minor flaws with the
play’s exact turn of events, the
only real hiccup is the minor role
of Herb, a relationship therapist
Sophie hires as a last-ditch effort.
Jefferson A. Russell does what he
can to make the part funny, dead-
panning in psychological jargon
and gibberish. But it doesn’t pro-
voke real laughter or even lighten
the mood in a way I think Ger-
sten-Vassilaros intended. Instead,
the result is to make a joke out of
the idea that therapy could work
in this case. And Sophie’s choice
is as unwinnable as ever.
IT’ D BE OVERSELLING
things to say the choices made
in Crossing add up to a winning
new musical. But composer and
lyricist Matt Conner and librettist
Grace Barnes have sparked inter-
est. They’ve devised an uncon-
ventional and clever conceit for
their latest collaboration, now in
its world premiere at Signature
Theatre.
Crossing focuses on the chance
meetings of eight people from dif-
ferent walks of life, all waiting
on the platform at a train station.
Actually, we’re talking impossi-
ble chance meetings, since every
character comes from a different
decade over the past two centu-
ries of American history. There’s
The Argument is an unsettling look at unexpected pregnancy, while
Crossing is a less-than-memorable new musical
Rome (L) and Whalen in playwright’s conception: The Argument
THE ARGUMENT
To Dec. 2
Theater J
theaterj.org
CROSSING
To Nov. 24
Signature Theatre
signature-theatre.org
43
Sophie’s Choice
DOUG RULE STAGE
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METROWEEKLY.COM NOVEMBER 7, 2013
MUSIC
continued from page 42
44 NOVEMBER 7, 2013 METROWEEKLY.COM
the slave woman seeking a better, freer
life via the Underground Railroad; the
young Army recruit and his mother as
he sets off for overseas fighting in World
War I; and the wanderlust backpacker
from a high-tech today. And then there’s
the oddly placed Nova Y. Payton as an
“Unknown Woman,” who interacts with
the characters as they share their stories
and struggles and engage each other.
Director Eric Schaeffer has assembled
a strong cast with many familiar faces
from the Signature stable — from Tracy
Lynn Olivera to Chris Sizemore to Flor-
ence Lacey — performing perfectly pleas-
ant but largely forgettable songs all about
universal themes of struggling, searching,
sensing. They do the best they can to add
life to the production, which is a bit too
straightforward and stilted for its own
good. The train never reaches the station
before the play ends. You can’t help wish
for more action in this intermission-less
show — even just a hint of an argument, or
budding passion, between two characters
would help. Mostly, we’re left waiting and
wanting. l
ably pedestrian, throwaway pop. “Venus”
has a certain funky appeal, but it doesn’t
have a hook strong enough to make it
really work. The title-track seems promis-
ing at first, but ultimately grows dull and
lifeless. “Swine” is a bit edgier than the
rest of the album and could possibly be
salvaged by some good remixes. “Fash-
ion!” is Gaga’s dip into the combination
of modern electronic pop and retro R&B
that Daft Punk, Robin Thicke and Justin
Timberlake have already done far better.
“Dope” is Pink-lite, and Gaga’s oddly over-
wrought vocal performance is off-putting.
She doesn’t have the vocal chops to make
it work. “Gypsy” is one of the stronger
tracks, and it’s tucked away near the end
— but it sounds like every other pop-dance
song that’s been pumped out by the record
industry machine in the last five years.
Like the rest of Artpop, it will ultimately
erase itself from the world’s collective
consciousness.
There is no depth of feeling or spirit of
experimentation on Artpop — it’s all gim-
micks and half-hearted stabs at a variety
of styles. There is no cohesion, unity or
purpose. There isn’t even much fun. If this
album had been released by a no-name
pop singer who wasn’t one of the world’s
biggest stars it would be met largely with
an epic shrug. l
T
HE CHROMEBOOK IS AN INTRIGUING CONCEPT. IT IS, IN SOME WAY,
Google’s attempt to reinvent the netbook for the modern masses. Offering a
cheap, light laptop form factor and a limited set of capabilities, it echoes the un-
derpowered and underwhelming, but utterly portable, netbooks that flooded the
market in the late ’00s. This time around Google isn’t forcing a full-fat desktop OS onto a
processor that can’t handle it. Here, Chromebooks run Chrome OS, a custom-built system
based on Linux, which essentially turns every core function of a laptop into a Web app.
Google’s Chrome browser is the key here, and its litany of Web-enabled services allow-
ing it to partially emulate the requirements of a standard Windows or OSX-running laptop.
Document editing, PowerPoints and spreadsheets? Present in Google Docs. Cloud storage
in Google Drive replaces a large, expensive hard drive. Need to watch videos and look at
images? Chrome OS allows for this outside of its browser, one of the few functions per-
formed that don’t require opening said browser. Really, every basic need that a user could
have for a laptop is here — write a Word document and save it to Google Drive. Surf You-
Tube in HD, enjoy your social networks, download apps and games to play, watch movies
and TV shows. Everything you can do in your browser is here, and most basic consumption
tasks are catered for.
Don’t expect any hardcore gaming, or to edit HD video or create elaborate graphics
in Photoshop. This is very much not a desktop OS. If anything, it’s closer to its Android
cousin in functionality. Which begs the question: If you have a laptop, and you have a tab-
let, why would you buy a Chromebook? In short, you wouldn’t. But that’s not to say others
shouldn’t.
The Chromebook in question here is HP’s Chromebook 11. A slim, light device, it retails
for $279. That’s it. That’s cheaper than almost any other laptop, and more so than most
RHUARIDH MARR
similarly sized tablets. It’s made
of glossy plastic, in piano black
or white, with the latter featuring
either red, blue, yellow or green
inserts.
It’s a completely sealed device
— there are no holes except for
the USB ports, power port and the
headphone socket — which means
no fans spinning inside. The
Chromebook doesn’t need them,
there are no moving parts. It has
a Samsung-made dual-core Exy-
nos processor, and 16GB of flash
storage. No hard drive, no fans,
no noise or added weight. Pick it
up — you can carry the Chrome-
book comfortably in one hand —
and you’ll likely be surprised at
just how little it weighs. The all-
plastic build won’t win over any
MacBook users, but it doesn’t feel
like it’ll fall apart at the first drop,
either — though that glossy plastic
loves fingerprints.
Open it up, and you’re greeted
by an 11-inch, 1366x768 IPS dis-
play, surrounded by a matte plastic
border and topped with a camera
— for use with Google Hangouts,
naturally. It’s a decent screen,
offering 400-nits of brightness
and some very useable viewing
angles. The low resolution isn’t
a huge concern at this size, but it
certainly lacks in comparison to
higher-res screens or even 1080p
Android tablets, which share its
16:9 aspect. YouTube videos play-
ing at 720p will look just fine, as
will most websites and your Face-
book photos — though the low
resolution means you’ll need to
scroll much more while reading a
normal webpage.
Given its laptop aspirations,
the Chromebook naturally fea-
tures a full QWERTY keyboard
and touchpad. The former is a
surprisingly decent affair. They
keys are big, matte and reason-
ably spaced given the confines of
the dimensions, though it took
me a couple of days to adjust to
a respectable typing speed with
minimal mistakes — though this
may have more to do with coming
from a 17-inch laptop than any-
thing else. The keys have a decent
amount of travel, but they’re not
as comfortable to type on for ex-
tended periods of time. (I’m writ-
ing this review on the Chrome-
TECHNOCRAT
The HP Chromebook is charming, inexpensive and well-made, but it
certainly isn’t for everyone
45
Lesser Laptop
METROWEEKLY.COM NOVEMBER 7, 2013
46 NOVEMBER 7, 2013 METROWEEKLY.COM
book 11 and I can feel fatigue setting in
already.) Windows users will be pleased to
know that many of the standard Windows
keyboard shortcuts are here, so you won’t
lose any timesaving key presses. There
are a couple of odd omissions, however.
The caps-lock key has been replaced by a
search key, though it can be used as a caps-
lock key by pressing alt and search. The
biggest gripe, though, is the lack of a delete
key. It’s a small thing, but I really began to
miss it in the first few days, particularly
while adjusting to the keyboard’s size.
The touchpad is less of a success. It’s a
shame, really, as it’s a very decent size, and
the palm rests on either side are gener-
ous. However, using the touchpad for fine
controls — such as navigating the small
buttons in our website-editing software,
or scrolling over drop-down lists while
browsing — is an exercise in frustration.
The touchpad itself is matte plastic, but
with a coating that manages to be slippery,
yet also allows your finger to drag and skip
as you swipe over it. It’s such a bizarre
user experience, not aided by the jittery
nature of the cursor or the lag found when
using multi-touch gestures. Two-finger
scrolling was constantly jumpy, regardless
of content — though, two-finger taps to
right-click always registered immediately.
The touchpad’s mediocre responses made
long periods of use, particularly for work,
a very irritating experience. I longed for
my proper laptop.
And, really, that’s the key here — the
Chromebook isn’t a laptop. Full-fat Win-
dows machines leave it in the dust for
accomplishing work. My Surface tablet,
even, allows for greater multitasking and
much better productivity. The Chrome-
book 11’s dual-core processor can’t hold
up to everything you’d normally throw at
it — YouTube, Google’s own product, was
slow to load and occasionally just refused
to work. However, the Chromebook really
does excel at one thing: mobile work. I
took it with me on a typical day — a morn-
ing meeting, during which it browsed
through our online planning software and
multiple websites; followed by several
hours in Starbucks working on articles,
writing emails and occasionally browsing
the Internet. By 6 p.m., the Chromebook
still had 9 percent battery left, and was op-
timistically stating it would survive for a
further 32 minutes. My laptop would have
bitten the dust hours before without a
charger. Similarly, I took the Chromebook
with me to the barber, and as I waited for
my haircut, sat down and wrote a good
portion of this review. The instant-on re-
sume and featherly weight allows for the
kind of functionality we take for granted
in tablets and smartphones.
Another caveat: If you have a tablet,
you have the kind of instant usage that
the Chromebook touts, and modern tab-
lets will run rings around it in terms of
performance. If you have a laptop and a
tablet, you don’t need the Chromebook.
If you don’t have a laptop and will only
use it for document editing and email,
the Chromebook starts to make sense —
except that for $50 more, Microsoft will
sell you an ASUS Vivobook with Win-
dows 8 and an 11.6-inch touchscreen in
its Microsoft Store. The Chromebook
can’t come close to offering the breadth
of capabilities of Windows 8 — and at
$329 the Vivobook isn’t hideously ex-
pensive in comparison.
Google and HP tout the Chromebook
11 as a laptop for everyone. No, it isn’t. As
a first laptop for a school student, yes. A
simple-to-use Internet device for an older
person, yes. As a mobile solution for those
who need to do simple work on the move,
yes. For everyone else with a tablet, a small
laptop or who needs to do something
more intensive than write a document or
browse the Internet, the Chromebook 11
comes up short. To market it as a laptop
is a slight fallacy on Google’s part. Chrome
OS just isn’t deep enough to warrant the
term, and the Chromebook 11 is too un-
derpowered to accomplish anything more
than basic Web browsing and apps. It’s a
charming, very inexpensive, well-made
evolution of the oft-criticized netbooks
of the late ’00s — but it certainly isn’t for
everyone. l
I
KNOW THE DRILL. I’VE GONE THROUGH IT. YOU WONDER HOW MANY
people are going to be there. You wonder how big the people are who go there. You
wonder how fit and trim the person on the treadmill or bike next to you is going to
be – and how they might size you up.
It intensifies the entire trip to the gym. Sweaty palms, stomach-turning and thousand-
mile-stares are the symptoms I experience.
These feelings, for me, last through the first few visits. I walk in and, like any pretend
meat-head, puff my chest up right before the doors open. I don’t want to appear out of
place, after all. My voice may get a bit deeper, though it’s already plenty deep by way of
genetics. Doesn’t mean I don’t try to over-compensate.
You can always pick me out the first few weeks at the gym. I’ll wear a hoodie, head-
phones in my ears and a slight scowl on my face. The “Don’t talk to me, I’m in the zone”
look, I call it. I don’t walk too close to the cardio machines. (Those people are in the zone
– don’t want to disturb that.) And I avoid taking full-on stares in the mirror, regardless of
how badly I want to look. If someone is on a machine I need, I’ll take a break instead of
asking to work-in. I do all of this in an effort to avoid possible social interaction when I feel
the most vulnerable – after years
of attending public gyms.
What I find curious about the
whole situation, regardless of how
many times I go through it, is that
I still feel the same at every new
gym. Just last night I decided to
go to a gym closer to my 9-to-5
instead of my regular spot near
my home. And I went through the
same routine. As I made my way
to the free-weights area of the
gym, it dawned on me: I’ve never
had a single issue at a gym. No dis-
agreements, awkward meetings
or judgmental stares. For what it’s
worth, I’ve barely had conversa-
tions with anyone in the gym. So
why do I let this stuff worry me so
much every time?
As the days of frequenting a
particular gym continue, I notice
the same people, day-in and day-
out. It starts to become a far more
comfortable environment, and
there is a notable change in my
demeanor. The hoodie is gone
and the scowl is replaced by my
grins when I complete or fail at
something challenging. The gym
becomes more of a sanctuary than
a nightmare. Instead of noticing
all of the people that are bigger,
stronger and faster, I begin to
notice those who are simply try-
ing their hardest. These people
are rarely the ones in the best
shape. They are typically the
newbies. They’re busting their
behinds on the stationary bike or
benching 115 pounds, but you can
tell they’re trying, and that’s the
important part.
Moral of the story, plain and
simple, is don’t let the insecuri-
ties of being in a gym stop you
from going. Everyone starts
somewhere. I’ve seen all shapes
and sizes walk in, and have
been impressed by the courage
and drive of them all. Maybe it’s
because I feel the same way when
I walk into a new gym, but I know
what it takes to open those doors
for the first, second and hun-
dredth time. The best part? The
sooner you start, the sooner you
become a regular. l
While a gym might be intimidating, the
anxieties are all your own
47
Gym Jitters
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METROWEEKLY.COM NOVEMBER 7, 2013
BRANDON HARRISON
HEALTH & FITNESS
NIGHT
LIFE
49 METROWEEKLY.COM
M
THURSDAY, 11.07.13
9 1/2
Happy Hour: 2 for 1 on any
drink, 5-9pm • Multiple
TVs showing movies,
shows, games, football on
Sundays • Expanded craft
beer selection • No cover
ANNIE’S/ANNIE’S
UPSTAIRS
4@4 Happy Hour,
4pm-7pm • $4 Small
Plates, $4 Stella Artois,
$4 House Wines, $4
Stolichnaya Cocktails, $4
Manhattans and Vodka
Martinis
DC EAGLE
Boys Night Out/3-Way
Thursdays • Bring Your
Buddies – when two
friends buy drinks, yours
are free, rail or domestic
• Club Bar: DC Boys of
Leather
FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR
Crazy Hour, 4-8pm •
Karaoke, 9pm
GREEN LANTERN
Shirtless Men Drink Free,
10-11pm
JR.’S
$3 Rail Vodka Highballs,
$2 JR.’s drafts, 8pm to
close • Top Pop Night
NELLIE’S SPORTS BAR
Beat The Clock Happy
Hour — $2 (5-6pm), $3
(6-7pm), $4 (7-8pm) •
Buckets of Beer $15 •
Drag Bingo
NUMBER NINE
Happy Hour: 2 for 1 on any
drink, 5-9pm • No Cover
ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS
All male, nude dancers •
Shirtless Thursday • DJ
Tim E in Secrets • 9pm •
Cover 21+
LISTINGS
Destinations on page 58
FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR
Crazy Hour, 4-8pm •
Karaoke, 9pm
JR.’S
Buy 1, Get 1,
11pm-midnight • Happy
Hour: 2-for-1, 4-9pm • $5
Coronas, $8 Vodka Red
Bulls, 9pm-close
NELLIE’S SPORTS BAR
DJ Matt Bailer • Videos,
Dancing • Beat The Clock
Happy Hour — $2 (5-6pm),
$3 (6-7pm), $4 (7-8pm) •
Buckets of Beer $15
NUMBER NINE
Open 5pm • Happy Hour:
2 for 1 on any drink, 5-9pm
• No Cover
PHASE 1
DJ Styalo • Dancing •
$5 cover
PHASE 1 OF DUPONT
1415 22nd St. NW
For the Ladies • DJ Rosie
• Doors at 9pm • 21+
FRIDAY, 11.08.13
9 1/2
Open at 5pm • Happy
Hour: 2 for 1 on any drink,
5-9pm • Friday Night
Videos with resident
DJ Shea Van Horn • VJ
• Expanded craft beer
selection • No cover
ANNIE’S
4@4 Happy Hour, 4-7pm •
$4 Small Plates, $4 Stella
Artois, $4 House Wines,
$4 Stolichnaya Cocktails,
$4 Manhattans and Vodka
Martinis • Upstairs open
5-11pm
DC BEAR CRUE
@Town • Bear Happy
Hour, 6-11pm • $3 Rail,
$3 Draft, $3 Bud Bottles •
Free Pizza, 7pm • Hosted
by Charger Stone • No
cover before 9:30pm • 21+
DC EAGLE
New Happy Hour Specials,
$2 off regular prices,
4-9pm • Club Bar: Men
of SigMa
PW’S SPORTS BAR
9855 Washington Blvd. N
Laurel, Md.
301-498-4840
Drag Show in lounge •
Half-price burgers and
fries
TOWN
Drag Show starts at
10:30pm • Hosted by
Lena Lett and featuring
Tatianna, Shi-Queeta-
Lee, Jessica Spaulding
Deverreoux and Ba’Naka •
Doors open at 10pm • For
those 21 and over, $5 from
10-11pm and $10 after
11pm • For those 18-20,
$10 all night • 18+
ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS
All male, nude dancers
• Ladies of Illusion with
host Kristina Kelly, 9pm •
Cover 21+
SATURDAY, 11.09.13
9 1/2
Open at 5pm • Happy
Hour: 2 for 1 on any
drink, 5-9pm • VJ Dean
• Expanded craft beer
selection • No cover
DC EAGLE
$2 Off for Men with Club
Mugs, Leather Vests,
Harnesses or Chaps •
Club Bar: Potomac MC
FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR
Diner Brunch, 10am-3pm
• Crazy Hour, 4-8pm
• Karaoke and/or live
entertainment, 9pm
JR.’S
$4 Coors, $5 Vodka
highballs, $7 Vodka Red
Bulls
NELLIE’S
Guest DJs • Zing Zang
Bloody Marys, Nellie Beer,
House Rail Drinks and
Mimosas, $4, 11am-5pm •
Buckets of Beer, $15
NUMBER NINE
Open 5pm • Happy Hour:
2 for 1 on any drink, 5-9pm
• No Cover
PHASE 1
Dancing, 9pm-close
PHASE 1 OF DUPONT
For the Ladies • DJ Rosie
• Doors at 9pm • 21+

PW’S SPORTS BAR
9855 Washington Blvd. N
Laurel, Md.
301-498-4840
Karaoke in the lounge •
Charity Bingo with Cash
Prizes 3rd Sat. of Every
Month
TOWN
Steve Grand Performs Two
Sets • DJ Drew G • Drag
Show starts at 10:30pm
• Hosted by Lena Lett
and featuring Tatianna,
Shi-Queeta-Lee, Jessica
Spaulding Deverreoux and
Ba’Naka • For those 21
and over, $8 from 10-11pm
and $12 after 11pm
ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS
All nude male dancers,
9pm • Miss Ziegfeld’s
Formers Show • Ladies
of Illusion with host
Ella Fitzgerald, 9pm •
DJ Steve Henderson in
Secrets • DJ Spyke in
Ziegfelds • Doors 8pm •
Cover • 21+
SUNDAY, 11.10.13
9 1/2
Happy Hour: 2 for 1 on any
drink, 5-9pm • Multiple
TVs showing movies,
shows, games, football on
Sundays • Expanded craft
beer selection • No cover
DC EAGLE
New Happy Hours
Specials: $2 off rail and
domestic, 4-9pm • DC
Eagle Buffet: Roast Pork
Loin, Red Potatoes, BBQ
Chicken, Veggies, Dessert,
$10, 5pm
FIREPLACE
Skyy Vodka, $3 • $5 cover
with $1 off coupons
51
For addresses, phone numbers and locations of individual clubs, bars, parties,
and special events, please refer to our Destinations on page 58.
M
METROWEEKLY.COM NOVEMBER 7, 2013
scene
scan this tag
with your
smartphone
for bonus scene
pics online!
17th Street High Heel Race
Tuesday, October 29
PHOTOGRAPHY BY
TODD FRANSON &
WARD MORRISON
FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR
Champagne Brunch
Buffet, 10am-3pm •
Crazy Hour, 4-8pm •
Drag Show hosted by
Destiny B. Childs featuring
performances by a rotating
cast, 9pm • No cover •
Karaoke follows show
JR.’S
Sunday Funday • Liquid
Brunch • Doors open at
1pm • $2 Coors Lights &
$3 Skyy (all favors), all
day and night
NELLIE’S
Drag Brunch, hosted by
Shi-Queeta-Lee, 11am-3pm
• $20 Brunch Buffet •
House Rail Drinks, Zing
Zang Bloody Marys, Nellie
Beer and Mimosas, $4,
11am-close • Buckets of
Beer, $15
NUMBER NINE
Open 5pm • Happy Hour:
2 for 1 on any drink, 5-9pm
• No Cover
ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS
Miss Ziegfeld’s 2014
Pageant honoring Alondra
Sancheez • All male,
nude dancers • Decades
of Dance • DJ Tim-e in
Secrets • Doors 8pm •
Cover 21+
MONDAY, 11.11.13
9 1/2
Open at 5pm • Happy
Hour: 2 for 1 on any
drink, 5-9pm • Multiple
TVs showing movies,
shows, games, football on
Sundays • Gay Spelling
Bee hosted by Brett •
Expanded craft beer
selection • No cover
ANNIE’S
4@4 Happy Hour, 4-7pm •
$4 Small Plates, $4 Stella
Artois, $4 House Wines,
$4 Stolichnaya Cocktails,
$4 Manhattans and Vodka
Martinis
DC EAGLE
Open 4pm • Monday
Night Football • $1 Drafts
- Bud and Bud Light
FREDDIE’S
Crazy Hour, 4-8pm •
Karaoke, 9pm
JR.’S
Happy Hour: 2-for-1, 4-9pm
• Showtunes Songs &
Singalongs, 9pm-close •
DJ Jamez • $3 Drafts
NELLIE’S SPORTS BAR
Beat The Clock Happy
Hour — $2 (5-6pm), $3
(6-7pm), $4 (7-8pm) •
Buckets of Beer $15 •
Poker Texas Hold’em, 8pm
NUMBER NINE
Open 5pm • Happy Hour:
2 for 1 on any drink, 5-9pm
• No Cover
PW’S SPORTS BAR
9855 Washington Blvd. N
Laurel, Md.
301-498-4840
Buzztime Trivia
competition • 75 cents off
bottles and drafts
52 NOVEMBER 7, 2013 METROWEEKLY.COM
TUESDAY, 11.12.13
9 1/2
Safe Word: Gay Spelling
Bee, 8pm • Open at 5pm
• Happy Hour: 2 for 1
on any drink, 5-9pm •
Multiple TVs showing
movies, shows, games,
football on Sundays •
Expanded craft beer
selection • No cover
ANNIE’S
Happy Hour, 4-7pm • $4
Stella Artois, $4 House
Wines, $4 Stolichnaya
Cocktails, $4 Manhattans
and Vodka Martinis
DC EAGLE
Open 4pm • $2 Rail and
Domestic, All Day • Free
Pool till 9pm
FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR
Crazy Hour, 4-8pm •
Karaoke, 9pm
JR.’S
Underground (Indie Pop/
Alt/Brit Rock), 9pm-close
• DJ Wes Della Volla •
2-for-1, all day and night
NELLIE’S SPORTS BAR
Beat The Clock Happy
Hour — $2 (5-6pm), $3
(6-7pm), $4 (7-8pm) •
Buckets of Beer $15 •
Karaoke
NUMBER NINE
Open 5pm • Happy Hour:
2 for 1 on any drink, 5-9pm
• No Cover
PW’S SPORTS BAR
9855 Washington Blvd. N
Laurel, Md.
301-498-4840
75 cents off bottles and
drafts • Movie Night
WED., 11.13.13
9 1/2
Open at 5pm • Happy
Hour: 2 for 1 on any
drink, 5-9pm • Multiple
TVs showing movies,
shows, games, football on
Sundays • Expanded craft
beer selection • No cover
ANNIE’S
Happy Hour, 4-7pm • $4
Stella Artois, $4 House
Wines, $4 Stolichnaya
Cocktails, $4 Manhattans
and Vodka Martinis
DC EAGLE
Open 4pm • Wooden
Nickels Redeemable
• 2 Nickels get Rail or
Domestic • Highwaymen
TNT host Hot Jock Night
• Hot Jock Contest at
Midnight • Men in Jocks
Drink Free at Club Bar,
10-11pm
FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR
Crazy Hour, 4-8pm • Drag
Bingo, 8pm • Karaoke,
10pm
GREEN LANTERN
Happy Hour Prices,
4pm-Close
53 METROWEEKLY.COM NOVEMBER 7, 2013
54 SEE PHOTOS FROM THIS EVENT AT WWW.METROWEEKLY.COM/SCENE
JR.’S
Trivia with MC Jay
Ray, 8pm • The Queen,
10-11pm • $2 JR’s Drafts
& $4 Vodka ($2 with
College I.D./JR’s Team
Shirt)
NELLIE’S SPORTS BAR
Beat The Clock Happy
Hour — $2 (5-6pm), $3
(6-7pm), $4 (7-8pm) •
Half-Price Burger Night
• Buckets of Beer $15 •
SmartAss Trivia, 8pm
NUMBER NINE
Open 5pm • Happy Hour:
2 for 1 on any drink, 5-9pm
• No Cover
PW’S SPORTS BAR
9855 Washington Blvd. N
Laurel, Md.
301-498-4840
Free Pool • 75 cents off
Bottles and Drafts
ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS
All male, nude dancers •
New Meat Wednesday DJ
Don T • 9pm • Cover 21+
THURSDAY, 11.14.13
9 1/2
Happy Hour: 2 for 1 on any
drink, 5-9pm • Multiple
TVs showing movies,
shows, games, football on
Sundays • Expanded craft
beer selection • No cover
ANNIE’S/ANNIE’S
UPSTAIRS
4@4 Happy Hour,
4pm-7pm • $4 Small
Plates, $4 Stella Artois,
$4 House Wines, $4
Stolichnaya Cocktails, $4
Manhattans and Vodka
Martinis
DC EAGLE
Bring Your Buddies –
when two friends buy
drinks, yours are free, rail
or domestic • Club Bar:
Beltway Bears
FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR
Crazy Hour, 4-8pm •
Karaoke, 9pm
GREEN LANTERN
Shirtless Men Drink Free,
10-11pm
JR.’S
$3 Rail Vodka Highballs,
$2 JR.’s drafts, 8pm to
close • Top Pop Night
NELLIE’S SPORTS BAR
Beat The Clock Happy
Hour — $2 (5-6pm), $3
(6-7pm), $4 (7-8pm) •
Buckets of Beer $15 •
Drag Bingo
NUMBER NINE
Happy Hour: 2 for 1 on any
drink, 5-9pm • No Cover
ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS
All male, nude dancers •
Shirtless Thursday • DJ
Tim E in Secrets • 9pm •
Cover 21+
55 METROWEEKLY.COM NOVEMBER 7, 2013
FRIDAY, 11.15.13
9 1/2
Open at 5pm • Happy
Hour: 2 for 1 on any drink,
5-9pm • Friday Night
Videos with resident
DJ Shea Van Horn • VJ
• Expanded craft beer
selection • No cover
ANNIE’S
4@4 Happy Hour, 4-7pm •
$4 Small Plates, $4 Stella
Artois, $4 House Wines,
$4 Stolichnaya Cocktails,
$4 Manhattans and Vodka
Martinis • Upstairs open
5-11pm
DC BEAR CRUE
@Town • Bear Happy
Hour, 6-11pm • $3 Rail,
$3 Draft, $3 Bud Bottles •
Free Pizza, 7pm • Hosted
by Charger Stone • No
cover before 9:30pm • 21+
DC EAGLE
New Happy Hour Specials,
$2 off regular prices,
4-9pm • Club Bar: Men
of Onyx
FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR
Crazy Hour, 4-8pm •
Karaoke, 9pm
JR.’S
Buy 1, Get 1,
11pm-midnight • Happy
Hour: 2-for-1, 4-9pm • $5
Coronas, $8 Vodka Red
Bulls, 9pm-close
NELLIE’S SPORTS BAR
DJ Matt Bailer • Videos,
Dancing • Beat The Clock
Happy Hour — $2 (5-6pm),
$3 (6-7pm), $4 (7-8pm) •
Buckets of Beer $15
NUMBER NINE
Open 5pm • Happy Hour:
2 for 1 on any drink, 5-9pm
• No Cover
PHASE 1
DJ Styalo • Dancing •
$5 cover
PHASE 1 OF DUPONT
1415 22nd St. NW
For the Ladies • DJ Rosie
• Doors at 9pm • 21+
PW’S SPORTS BAR
9855 Washington Blvd. N
Laurel, Md.
301-498-4840
Drag Show in lounge •
Half-price burgers and
fries
TOWN
Drag Show starts at
10:30pm • Hosted by
Lena Lett and featuring
Tatianna, Shi-Queeta-
Lee, Jessica Spaulding
Deverreoux and Ba’Naka •
Doors open at 10pm • For
those 21 and over, $5 from
10-11pm and $10 after
11pm • For those 18-20,
$10 all night • 18+
ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS
All male, nude dancers
• Ladies of Illusion with
host Kristina Kelly, 9pm •
Cover 21+ l
56 NOVEMBER 7, 2013 METROWEEKLY.COM
57 PURCHASE YOUR PHOTO AT WWW.METROWEEKLY.COM/SCENE/
58 NOVEMBER 7, 2013 METROWEEKLY.COM
DESTINATIONS
m mostly men w mostly women m&w men and women r restaurant l leather/levi
d dancing v video t drag cw country western gg go-go dancers o open 24 hours s sauna
BARS & CLUBS
MARYLAND
CLUB HIPPO
1 West Eager Street
Baltimore, MD
(410) 547-0069
THE LODGE
21614 National Pike
Boonsboro, MD
(301) 591-4434
PW’S SPORTS BAR
9855-N Washington, Blvd.
Laurel, MD
(301) 498-4840
VIRGINIA
FREDDIE’S
BEACH BAR
555 South 23rd Street
Crystal City, VA
(703) 685-0555
Crystal City Metro
m&w r
V3 LOUNGE
6763 Wilson Blvd.
Falls Church, Va.
301-802-8878

HRC
ACTION CENTER
& STORE
1633 Connecticut Ave. NW
(202) 232-8621
Dupont Circle Metro
DELTA ELITE
3734 10th Street NE
(202) 529-0626
Brookland Metro
m d
THE FIREPLACE
22nd & P Streets NW
(202) 293-1293
Dupont Circle Metro
m v
FUEGO
Aqua
1818 New York Ave. NE
m&w d t
GLORIOUS
HEALTH CLUB
2120 W. VA Ave. NE 20002
(202) 269-0226
m o s
GREEN LANTERN
1335 Green Court NW
(behind 1335 L St.)
(202) 347-4534
McPherson Square Metro
m l
JR.’S
1519 17th Street NW
(202) 328-0090
Dupont Circle Metro
m v
LACE
2214 Rhode Island Ave. NE
(202) 832-3888
w r d
MOVA
2204 14th Street NW
(202) 629-3958
U Street / Cardozo Metro
D.C.
18th & U
DUPLEX DINER
2004 18th Street NW
(202) 265-7828
Dupont Circle Metro
r
9:30 CLUB
815 V Street NW
(202) 265-0930
U Street / Cardozo Metro
BACHELOR’S MILL
1104 8th Street SE
(202) 546-5979
Eastern Market /
Navy Yard Metro
m d
COBALT/30 DEGREES
17th & R Street NW
(202) 462-6569
Dupont Circle Metro
m d t
CREW CLUB
1321 14th Street NW
(202) 319-1333
McPherson Square Metro
m o s
DC EAGLE
639 New York Ave. NW
(202) 347-6025
Convention Center /
Gallery Place /
Chinatown Metro
m l
NELLIE’S
SPORTS BAR
900 U Street NW
(202) 332-6355
U Street / Cardozo Metro
m&w r
NUMBER NINE
1435 P Street NW
Dupont Circle Metro
PHASE 1
525 8th Street SE
(202) 544-6831
Eastern Market Metro
w d
PHASE 1 of DUPONT
1415 22nd Street NW
(Formerly Apex)
Dupont Circle Metro
w m d
REMINGTON’S
639 Pennsylvania Ave. SE
(202) 543-3113
Eastern Market Metro
m cw d v
TOWN
2009 8th Street NW
(202) 234-TOWN
U Street/Cardozo Metro
m d v t
ZIEGFELD’S /
SECRETS
1824 Half Street SW
(202) 863-0670
Navy Yard Metro
m d v t gg
RETAIL
59 METROWEEKLY.COM NOVEMBER 7, 2013
m mostly men w mostly women m&w men and women r restaurant l leather/levi
d dancing v video t drag cw country western gg go-go dancers o open 24 hours s sauna
Grand Style
60
Generating hype as “the first openly gay male country star” has
been as much of a surprise to Steve Grand as anyone
NOVEMBER 7, 2013 METROWEEKLY.COM
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TEVE GRAND HAS
been hyped as “the
first openly gay male
country star.” But
while it has helped the singer-
songwriter generate significant
attention in almost no time, Grand
says the title isn’t entirely accurate.
“I don’t quite think of it as
country music,” says Grand. “There
are definitely elements of country
in it, but it’s also rock and pop. The
whole ‘country’ label has really
been a surprise to me.”
Grand started generating buzz
— and the country label — over
the summer after his first song,
“All-American Boy,” went viral
on YouTube, where it’s racked
up nearly 2.5 million views. The
video depicts a gay teen making
an unwanted pass at his straight
best friend — a theme some have
criticized as outdated, but one that
Grand says has caused “many
people to reach out to me to say
how my song and my video and
my story, how that’s all connected
with them.” It also resonated
enough to earn Grand profiles on
CNN and Good Morning America,
not to mention numerous requests
to perform all across the country.
“I’ve been to more cities in the last
two months than I’ve been in my
whole life,” says the 23-year-old
Chicago-based musician, who will
perform at Town Danceboutique
this Saturday, Nov. 9.
It was piano jazz that first
inspired Grand to music in the
first place. “I was very inspired by
Charlie Brown and the character
Schroeder, who would play his
piano,” he says. “I started making
all these cardboard pianos. So my
parents quickly caught on and got
Grand Style
Steve Grand performs Saturday,
Nov. 9, at 10:30 p.m. downstairs
and after midnight upstairs, at
Town Danceboutique, 2009 8th
NW. Cover is $8 before 11 p.m., or
$12 after. Call 202-234-TOWN or
visit towndc.com.
an old upright.” By the time he was
13, Grand was writing songs to
address his feelings as a budding
gay teenager, something that his
parents tried to discourage by
sending him to Christian camp.
“They sent me there with the hope
that I would be cured and would
not be gay anymore,” he explains,
adding, “It’s not what people think
of as conversion therapy. There
was a lot of things about God
and definitely being gay wasn’t
encouraged, but it wasn’t really the
focus of our therapy sessions.” (His
family has since come around.)
Two months ago Grand, who
is hoping to have an album out by
spring, released a second song,
“Stay,” which has garnered over
500,000 views on YouTube. “In the
story, I’ve got the guy, so it has a
happy ending like everyone wants,”
Grand jokes. (An interesting
tidbit: The guy in the video is D.C.
resident and JR.’s bartender
Jayson Smith.)
How about in real life, has he got
the guy? Grand declines to reveal
his relationship status: “That’s
pretty much the one thing I don’t
talk about.” l

We are already working on [a] new advertising concept that will be
much more open and much more inclusive.”
— LUCA VIRGINIO, speaking for Barilla pasta. The 130-year-old company came under intense criticism for Chairman
Guido Barilla’s September comments about the company’s advertising, with Barilla saying he
“would never make a spot with a homosexual family.”
(Reuters)

So long as the law remains silent on the workplace rights of gay and lesbian Americans,
we as a nation are effectively consenting to discrimination
against them.

— Apple CEO TIM COOK, in an opinion piece for The Wall Street Journal, calling on Congress to support the
Employment Non-Discrimination Act (ENDA).
(The Wall Street Journal)
“I just didn’t want to be a lesbian.
I’d never met one for a start and I just thought they were strange and that they hated men and they were very serious.

— Actress PORTIA DEGENERES, née de Rossi, speaking candidly about her struggles with her sexuality. The Australian star of
Ally McBeal and Arrested Development came out publicly in 2005 and married Ellen DeGeneres in 2008. Her full interview
will air on The Conversation with Amanda De Cadenet on LifeTime, Nov. 10.
(News.com.au)
“It’s offensive. It’s wrong. And it needs to stop,
because in the United States of America, who you are and who you love should never be a fireable offense.

— President BARACK OBAMA, in a Nov. 3 opinion piece for The Huffington Post, in which he urged Congress to pass ENDA.
(The Huffington Post)
“They want people to question whether I am gay.
Allow me to save them the trouble with a simple, honest answer: Yes, I am. But why should it matter?

— Rep. MIKE MICHAUD (D), confronting the “whisper campaigns, insinuations and push-polls” regarding his sexuality.
Michaud publicly came out Tuesday, Nov. 4, in a newspaper column, in which he stated that his sexuality should have
no impact on his campaign for governor of Maine.
(Bangor Daily News)
62 NOVEMBER 7, 2013 METROWEEKLY.COM

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