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Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
Monday • Nov. 11, 2013 • Vol XII, Edition 73
Family Owned & Operated
Established: 1949
THOUSANDS DEAD
WORLD PAGE 21
SOUNDS FROM
THE STREETS
LOCAL PAGE 5
PHILIPPINES SUFFERS IN AFTERMATH OF TYPHOON
NINERS LOSE
TO PANTHERS
SPORTS PAGE 11
By Samantha Weigel
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Foster City is strategizing a long-term sustainability
plan to ensure it remains prevalent in the Peninsula retail
market and accommodates the variety of the city’s popula-
tion groups. The independent consulting firm Bay Area
Urban Economics presented a report about the challenges
the city faces and its retail potentials at a council meeting
Monday.
With the expansion of developments like the corporate
Gilead campus and Chess-Hatch master plans, there will
undoubtedly be more people in Foster City during the day.
Foster City is home to a large population from different
parts of Asia that has rapidly increased since 2000, accord-
ing to the report. The success of stores like Ranch 99 and
ABC in the city is proof of the demand for specialty stores,
Foster City
seeks new
shoppers
Council focuses on sustainable retail
development to draw ‘young digerati’
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The San Carlos City Council
may consider a significantly
reduced Transit Village project but
at least two members want the
vote put on pause until after the
newly elected member joins them
on the dais.
Vice Mayor Mark Olbert and
Councilman Matt Grocott both
believe incom-
ing councilman
C a m e r o n
Johnson rather
t h a n
Councilwoman
Karen Clapper,
who lost the
Nov. 5 elec-
tion, should
weigh in on the
controversial project because it
was a hot-but-
ton issue in the
city election.
“It was a big
factor for a
good number of
voters and,
while I don’t at
all dispute the
current council
has the legal
authority to make the decision, I
think it would be highly appropri-
ate and the right thing to wait,”
Olbert said.
Grocott, who has publicly called
the project too big for the loca-
tion around the existing train sta-
tion, agrees.
“It’s been enough of a campaign
issue that it’s respectful to the vot-
ers and to the candidates who
spent time studying the project,”
Grocott said.
For those who would argue
Clapper has spent ample time
readying for the vote, Grocott said
he would counter that she was in
that position because the council
put her there. The City Council
appointed Clapper to finish out
the term of the former mayor who
resigned.
She did not return multiple
Councilmen want to tableTransit Village vote
Reduced project now suggested; Olbert, Grocott want to wait until council reorganized
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The seeds of innovation have
sprouted success.
Two months after the San Mateo
County Parks Foundation part-
nered with crowdfunding firm
Citizinvestor, its plea for $5,400
to replant the endangered thorn-
mint at Edgewood Park has met its
goal.
“It’s great! Now on to the other
two projects,” said Julia Bott,
executive director of the founda-
tion, referencing the thornmint’s
two companion crowdfunding pro-
posals.
Citizinvestor is a civic engage-
ment platform for local govern-
ment projects and the parks foun-
dation hoped it was a novel way to
encourage the community to
invest in their green spaces.
Donors could pledge any amount
but were not charged unless the
given project reaches 100 percent
of its funding goal before the dead-
line ends.
The county’s parks have no ded-
icated source of funding and are
often first on the budgetary chop-
ping block. The crowdfunding
option is an alternative to tradi-
tional fundraising and gives
donors a more personal connec-
tion to specific needs.
The thornmint’s success means,
weather willing, biologists can
make use of the December 2013
seeding window and see the plants
flowering next spring.
“We know that the investment
that people have made has paid off
because the biologists will be
doing their work this winter, ”
Bott said.
Parks reach thornmint crowdsourcing goal
Endangered plant found only at county’s Edgewood Park will be replanted
See PLANT, Page 23
See TRANSIT, Page 18
See RETAIL, Page 18
Matt Grocott Mark Olbert
REUTERS
Vietnam veteran Jake Thorn, right, talks with Vicki Martinez, center, and Scott Mulligan, left, about his time in the military
in the middle of the 2,013 U.S. flags that are part of the Aurora Healing Fields, to honor veterans, during Veterans Day
weekend in Aurora, Ill. SEE PAGE 7
HONORINGVETERANS
Hubble spots strange
asteroid with 6 tails of dust
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. — This
is one strange asteroid.
The Hubble Space Telescope has
discovered a six-tailed asteroid in
the asteroid belt between the orbits
of Mars and Jupiter. Scientists say
they've never seen anything like it.
Incredibly, the comet-like tails
change shape as the asteroid sheds
dust. The streams have occurred over
several months.
A research team led by the
University of California, Los
Angeles, believes the asteroid, des-
ignated P/2013 P5, is rotating so
much that its surface is flying apart.
It's believed to be a fragment of a
larger asteroid damaged in a colli-
sion 200 million years ago.
Scientists using the Pan-STARRS
telescope in Hawaii spotted the
asteroid in August. Hubble picked
out all the tails in September.
The discovery is described in this
week's issue of Astrophysical
Journal Letters.
Michigan man wins
million-dollar lottery again
LANSING, Mich. — This guy has
all the luck.
Officials say Joseph Palmarchuk
won a $1.35 million lottery jackpot
Wednesday in Michigan' s Classic
Lotto 47 game. In the past few years,
Palmarchuk has also won a $1 mil-
lion lottery game in Tennessee.
Palmarchuk and wife Phillis moved
to Mecosta County, north of Grand
Rapids, in 2011. He says he likes to
buy lottery tickets that retailers put
aside as mistakes.
The Palmarchuks plan to hunt for a
condominium in a warm state to skip
Michigan winters.
After 46 years, man glad
stolen motorcycle found
OMAHA, Neb. — Donald DeVault
wonders what kind of memories his
Triumph motorcycle helped make in
the 46 years since it was stolen, and
he's looking forward to making more
of his own when it's returned.
The 73-year-old Omaha man
learned last week that California
authorities had recovered his 1953
Triumph Tiger 100 at the Port of Los
Angeles. The bike was about to be
shipped to Japan when U.S. Customs
& Border Protection agents who
checked the vehicle identification
number discovered the motorcycle
had been reported stolen in February
1967.
The bike was valued at $300 when
in 1967. The shipping documents
listed its value today at $9,000.
DeVault already has a Harley-
Davidson and a Kawasaki motorcycle
in his garage, so he plans to reserve
the Triumph for special rides.
DeVault said he's talked about the
motorcycle over the years whenever
he was around bikers. It had a couple
features unusual for Triumphs made
in the early 1950s, such as its hard-
tail frame.
DeVault recalls Marlon Brando rid-
ing a similar Triumph bike in the
movie "The Wild One," and after that
it seemed like everyone wanted to
ride a motorcycle.
But DeVault said he was already rid-
ing motorcycles by the time the
movie came out, and continued rid-
ing for much of his life.
What sold him on the Triumph was
the blue color and the name "Li'l
Blue Bitch" airbrushed on the side of
the gas tank.
Once he gets it back in a couple
weeks, DeVault plans to have some-
one restore the bike's name and paint
"46 Years Later" on the gas tank.
FOR THE RECORD 2 Monday • Nov. 11, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
800 S. Claremont St., Suite 210, San Mateo, CA 94402
Publisher: Jerry Lee Editor in Chief: Jon Mays
jerry@smdailyjournal.com jon@smdailyjournal.com
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As a public service, the Daily Journal prints obituaries of approximately 200 words or less with a photo one time on the date of the family’s choosing.To submit obituaries, email
information along with a jpeg photo to news@smdailyjournal.com.Free obituaries are edited for style, clarity, length and grammar. If you would like to have an obituary printed
more than once, longer than 250 words or without editing, please submit an inquiry to our advertising department at ads@smdailyjournal.com.
Actor Leonardo
DiCaprio is 39.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1918
Fighting in World War I came to an
end with the signing of an armistice
between the Allies and Germany.
“Old myths, old gods, old heroes have never
died.They are only sleeping at the bottom of our
mind, waiting for our call.We have need for
them.They represent the wisdom of our race.”
— Stanley Kunitz, American poet laureate (1905-2006)
Sen. Barbara Boxer
is 73.
NFL quarterback
Mark Sanchez is 27.
Birthdays
SAMANTHA WEIGEL/DAILY JOURNAL
Foster City will be holding a dedication ceremony for its new Veterans Honor Wall Saturday,Nov.16 at the Leo J.Ryan Memorial
Park. Family,friends and organizations established the wall to honor the brave men and women of Foster City who have served
in the armed forces. Ninety-eight plates have already been purchased and will be ready for the dedication ceremony.There
is still space available for those who wish to make a dedication for a veteran who is a current or former Foster City
resident or employee of the city. Applications are available at the Recreation Center.
Wall of honor
Veterans day: Mostly cloudy. Patchy
fog in the morning. Highs in the upper
50s. South winds 5 to 10 mph.
Monday ni ght: Cloudy. Lows in the
upper 40s. South winds 5 to 10 mph.
Tuesday: Mostly cloudy. Aslight chance
of rain in the morning. Highs in the lower
60s. Northeast winds 5 to 10
mph...Becoming northwest in the afternoon. Chance of
rain 20 percent.
Tuesday night: Mostly clear. Lows in the upper 40s.
Wednesday and Wednesday night: Mostly clear. Highs
in the lower 60s. Lows in the upper 40s.
Thursday: Sunny. Highs in the lower 60s.
Thursday night through Saturday: Mostly clear. Lows
in the upper 40s. Highs around 60.
Local Weather Forecast
In 1620, 41 Pilgrims aboard the Mayflower, anchored off
Massachusetts, signed a compact calling for a “body poli-
tick.”
In 1831, former slave Nat Turner, who’d led a violent insur-
rection, was executed in Jerusalem, Va.
In 1889, Washington became the 42nd state.
In 1909, President William Howard Taft accepted the recom-
mendation of a joint Army-Navy board that Pearl Harbor in
the Hawaiian Islands be made the principal U.S. naval sta-
tion in the Pacific.
In 1921, the remains of an unidentified American service
member were interred in a Tomb of the Unknown Soldier at
Arlington National Cemetery in a ceremony presided over
by President Warren G. Harding.
In 1932, a new tomb to house the remains of the Unknown
Soldier was dedicated at Arlington National Cemetery.
In 1942, during World War II, Germany completed its occu-
pation of France.
In 1960, South Vietnamese President Ngo Dinh Diem sur-
vived a coup attempt by army rebels. (However, he was over-
thrown and killed in 1963.)
In 1966, Gemini 12 blasted off from Cape Kennedy with
astronauts James A. Lovell and Edwin “Buzz” Aldrin Jr.
aboard.
In 1972, the U.S. Army turned over its base at Long Binh to
the South Vietnamese, symbolizing the end of direct U.S.
military involvement in the Vietnam War.
In 1987, following the failure of two Supreme Court nomi-
nations, President Ronald Reagan announced his choice of
Judge Anthony M. Kennedy, who went on to win confirma-
tion.
In other news ...
(Answers tomorrow)
MINCE HOBBY LAVISH ABSURD
Saturday’s
Jumbles:
Answer: When the young sheep fought over their
sleeping arrangements, it was — “BED-LAMB”
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
MOCAM
LAGEZ
RAWDOT
TALYEL
©2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
All Rights Reserved.
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Print your
answer here:
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are Lucky Charms,
No.12,in first place;Money Bags,No.11,in second
place; and Hot Shot,No.3,in third place.The race
time was clocked at 1:42.98.
4 7 0
41 42 51 57 65 7
Mega number
Nov. 8 Mega Millions
3 9 37 49 56 32
Powerball
Nov. 9 Powerball
3 6 12 15 33
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
2 4 5 8
Daily Four
3 7 5
Daily three evening
7 14 34 41 46 1
Mega number
Nov. 9 Super Lotto Plus
Jazz singer-musician Mose Allison is 86. Actress Bibi
Andersson is 78. Country singer Narvel Felts is 75.
Americana roots singer/songwriter Chris Smither is 69.
Rock singer-musician Vince Martell (Vanilla Fudge) is 68.
The president of Nicaragua, Daniel Ortega, is 68. Golfer
Fuzzy Zoeller is 62. Pop singer-musician Paul Cowsill (The
Cowsills) is 62. Rock singer-musician Andy Partridge
(XTC) is 60. Singer Marshall Crenshaw is 60. Rock singer
Dave Alvin is 58. Rock musician Ian Craig Marsh (Human
League; Heaven 17) is 57. Actor Stanley Tucci is 53. Actress
Demi Moore is 51. Actress Calista Flockhart is 49.
3
Monday • Nov. 11, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
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A
lthough gold had been taken out of
the streams around Virginia City in
1850, it didn’t create much excite-
ment in San Francisco immediately.
The gold tailings were worked when there
was water in the streams that ran east from
Mount Davidson, a peak from the Virginia
Range in western Utah Territory. As more
prospecting produced other catches of gold
tailings, word spread that there might be a
bonanza in the hot and forbidding area. A
few took the bait and they left after the gold
strike from Coloma panned out and they
were left high and dry in San Francisco.
In 1857, Henry Comstock lucked upon an
area where he and some others found some
gold and silver veins that were promising
for riches. Henry acquired the area after the
Grosh brothers died before filing claims.
Henry took over the cabin and land and
enlarged his holdings by claiming more
land around the cabin after hearing of a gold
strike at Gold Hill. The four miners that
found the gold, James Finney, John Bishop,
Aleck Henderson and Jack Yount, are given
credit for “rediscovering” what became to be
named the “Comstock Lode.”
It wasn’t until the spring of 1859 that two
miners, Peter O’Riley and Patrick
McLaughlin, staked a claim at the head of
the canyon by Gold Hill and made a larger
discovery of gold and a sticky blue mineral
that turned out to be silver.
The rush was on to become rich in the
fields of Mount Davidson. This strike would
not be the same type as the gold strike in
California turned out to be. Gold doesn’t
dissolve like silver therefore gold doesn’t
travel far from its source. Silver, however,
combines with other minerals and cannot be
panned out of water like gold is. The silver
in Nevada was deep in the ground and needed
to taken out by digging shafts that lead to
the silver ore. This costs a lot of money
and discouraged many would be miners
quickly. The big “money people” from other
places needed to be found to finance the sil-
ver operations.
The original miners who found the first
evidence of silver and gold quickly lost
their potential fortunes to men who knew
The silver kings of the Comstock
BELMONT
Suspi ci ous vehi cl e. A resident reported
an unfamiliar truck of Dekoven Avenue
before 5:24 p.m. on Sunday, Nov. 3.
Found propert y. A bicycle was found on
Twin Pines Lane before 3:39 p.m. on
Sunday, Nov. 3
Found propert y. Adebit card was found on
Twin Pines Lane before 7:53 a.m. on
Sunday, Nov. 3.
Vandalism. Afront yard was vandalized on
Arbor Avenue before 9:13 a.m. on Sunday,
Nov. 3.
Fraud. Awoman reported that she was a vic-
tum of credit card fraud and incurred a loss of
$2000 on Valegra Drive before 4:18 p.m. on
Wednesday, Oct. 30.
SAN CARLOS
Drunk in public. A person was detained
for drinking in public on the 100 block of
Kelton Avenue before 9:52 p.m. on Tuesday,
Nov. 5.
Burglary. Arobbery occurred on the 1300
block of Industrial Road before 9:58 a.m. on
Saturday, Nov. 2.
Burglary. A burglary was reported on the
1400 block of Cordilleras Avenue before
9:51 a.m. on Friday, Nov. 1.
Police reports
Monkeying around
An adult in a gorilla suit was following
children before hiding behind trees and
running up and down the street at the
intersection of Edgewood Road and
Somerset Street in Redwood City
before 7:40 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 31.
PHOTO COURTESY OF THE SAN MATEO COUNTY HISTORY MUSEUM
James Flood Victorian manor by Menlo Park.
See HISTORY, Page 23
4
Monday • Nov. 11, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Kerry Chan
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT
Woodstock, the summer of 1969.
Roughly two years after Santana is formed,
the band jams out on stage to more than half
a million wide-eyed spectators. The sound
of cheers fuse together with the wails of
electric guitars and the pounding of tim-
bales and conga drums. On that day, Santana
introduced Latin rock to a massive audience.
“It (Latin Rock) is when you incorporate
Afro Cuban rhythms like cha-cha, mambo,
meringue … and then throw a rock beat
behind it, with an organ, an electric guitar
and bass and drums,” said Rudy Ramirez, a
musician and ethnic studies professor at the
College of San Mateo.
For Ramirez, the emergence of Latin rock
and the widely popular debut of Santana was a
defining moment of acceptance for his cul-
ture.
“It was a moment for me where we were
born again Latinos, a proud moment,” said
Ramirez.
Today, a curly-haired Ramirez proudly
plays his Conga drums and uses his back-
ground as an educator to teach people about
the history of Latin rock and the impact it
has on society while entertaining audiences
with a mini concert. That will be on full dis-
play 7 p.m.-9 p.m. Nov. 13 when Ramirez
presents, “Sounds from the Streets,” with
live music by the Mission Street All-Stars
at the College of San Mateo. The event is a
historical and musical presentation on the
emergence of Latin Rock.
And what a history it is. Post World War
II, people of Mexican origin were divided;
either appearing to assimilating or trying
to assert and affirm their ethnic identity,
according to a study conducted by the UCLA
department of sociology, Ethnic identity
among the Mexican origin population. For
some first generation American Latinos like
Ramirez, the generation gap between them-
selves and their immigrant parents were
conflicted.
“They were foreigners and I was
American,” said Ramirez.
Young and caught between two cultures,
Ramirez chose not to speak Spanish and
refused to go out in public with his parents.
He straightened his naturally curly hair and
attempted to suppress any Latino traits. If
anyone asked if he was Latino, he defiantly
said, “No, I am American.”
In the 1960s, the majority of the popula-
tion was over 88 percent white, compared to
the 4 percent of Hispanics, according to the
U.S. Census Bureau.
“We were like the invisible people and it
was very easy to feel ashamed, I was very
much ashamed,” said Ramirez.
By the mid-60s, the civil
rights movement began to
affect the political climate of
the United States, especially in San
Francisco where a new culture was brewing.
The streets of the Mission District brought
together a culture of people from different
backgrounds, race and ethnicities that
embraced the notion of civil rights.
These times inspired the music that
Santana created, “it reflected the world
around them, the struggles, the joys, the
sorrows, the passion,” said Ramirez.
On Aug. 16, 1969, Santana played on a
600-acre milk farm, in Bethel, N.Y. and fol-
lowed up with its first debut album, “Sounds
from the Streets” which was recorded at
Pacific Recorders, a studio in San Mateo
now replaced with a Whirlpool and Spa
retailer.
“All of a sudden you have a rock band with
three Latinos who incorporate Latin
rhythms, Latin instruments … and
embraced by the world,” said Ramirez.
“Sounds from the Streets” is 7 p.m.-9
p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 13 at the College of
San Mateo Theatre Building 3, 1700 W.
Hillsdale Blvd., San Mateo. Proceeds from
this event will go to support the Milagro
Foundation, helping organizations that
work with children in the areas of education,
health and the arts. Sponsored by ASCSM,
Diversity in Action Group, Center for
Student Life and Leadership Development,
KCSM 91.1 FM, Campus Copy and Post and
the Bulldog Bookstore. Admission is $7 for
students/faculty/staff, $10 general. For
more information contact Rudy Ramirez at
ramirez@smccd.edu or (650) 574-6372.
5
Monday • Nov. 11, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
Sounds from the Streets, a tribute to Santana
CSM professor presents a musical history of Latin rock in America
KERRY CHAN/DAILY JOURNAL
Rudy Ramirez, ethnic studies professor at the College of San Mateo, plays music in his office.
He will be presenting a history of Latin rock and its impact on society Wednesday at the
college.The Mission Street All-Stars will also be playing live.
6
Monday • Nov. 11, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/STATE
By Martha Mendoza
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN JOSE, — The family of a
Silicon Valley engineer who
amassed one of the nation’s most
extensive historic military vehi-
cle collections is giving the
tanks, missile launchers and
armored vehicles to a
Massachusetts-based museum that
will preserve and display some of
them.
Until now, the $30 million fleet
of tanks has been refurbished and
housed in seven storage sheds on a
family estate up a winding, forest-
ed road above Silicon Valley; they
are visited only under privately
arranged tours.
But in a deal inked on July 4 and
announced Monday in honor of
Veteran’s Day, the 240 pieces have
been signed over to The Collings
Foundation, which preserves his-
torical military aircraft and now
plans to add a new military vehicle
museum at its Stow, Mass., head-
quarters.
Foundation director Rob
Collings said the organization
hopes to raise $10 million to
build the museum by auctioning
160 of the military vehicles in
August 2014. Eventually he
hopes visitors can learn U.S. his-
tory through a chronological walk
past the remaining 80 historic
military vehicles.
“They’ll start in the World War I
trenches and go forward through
time,” he said.
The collection was assembled
by Jacques Littlefield, a Stanford
University graduate who left
Hewlett Packard in the 1970s to
focus on collecting and restoring
military vehicles.
He acquired his first tanks in
1983, and by the mid-90s the col-
lection included examples from
almost all historically significant
land battles of the last half-centu-
ry, according to the nonprofit
Military Vehicle Technology
Foundation that currently is in
charge of the collection.
Before his death in 2009,
Littlefield acquired tanks and
armored vehicles from the U.S.,
Russia, Germany, England,
France, Switzerland,
Czechoslovakia and Israel.
There’s a Sherman tank and a
Striker tank destroyer.
The oldest armored military
vehicle in the collection is a
World War I era M1917 light tank.
While some are quite worn, many
have been meticulously restored.
Although proposals have been
made, there is currently no federal
historic military vehicle museum
in the U.S., and only a few signif-
icant private collections.
Bill Boller, president of the
Military Vehicle Technology
Foundation, said the Littlefield
family opted to give the collec-
tion to the Collings Foundation
so that more people could visit it.
“Unfortunately this is not the
best place in the world, location
and accessibility, for the general
public, authors, historians, the
defense industry, all the people
that want to take advantage of this
wonderful collection,” he said.
A peek inside the tanks offers
visitors a chance to appreciate
what soldiers go through, he said.
“They are a pragmatic reality, ”
he said. “If you ultimately value
the freedoms we have in the U.S.,
you understand and appreciate the
necessity and you have tremen-
dous admiration and respect for
those who put themselves in a
position to go ahead and do it.”
Many of the tanks and vehicles
have been popularized in recent
years through video games and
may be widely appreciated by a
younger audience.
SiliconValley tank collection heading east
Falcon found over summer
released after procedure
SAN MATEO — A falcon that was found
near San Francisco International Airport in
July was released this week from the
Peninsula Humane Society and SPCA facility
following a successful feather implant proce-
dure, officials said.
The peregrine falcon was found grounded
near SFO by a passerby in obvious need of
care on July 31 and the humane society deter-
mined the bird suffered mild head trauma, offi-
cials said.
Humane society workers provided stabiliz-
ing care and anti-inflammatory medication to
the falcon. The bird lost some of its flight
feathers, and the humane society called in
help to care for the falcon, which needed an
imp procedure to attach feathers, according to
officials.
Seven new feathers were added and the pro-
cedure took less than 30 minutes. The falcon
had excellent flight skills upon being
released Thursday, officials said.
BART trains delayed
after police activity
MILLBRAE — BART trains in San
Francisco ran up to 30 minutes behind sched-
ule due to police activity in Millbrae, a dis-
patcher said. The delays started at around 2:15
p.m. Sunday at the Millbrae Station on the
Pittsburg/ Bay Point line, which runs through
San Francisco to the East Bay, the dispatcher
said. BART police apprehended a person who
had trespassed onto the tracks near the sta-
tion, Lt. Terence McCarty said. As of 2:45
p.m.Sunday, East Bay-bound trains were
between 20 and 30 minutes behind schedule
and recovering from the delay, the dispatcher
said.
Local briefs
Geraldine Faye Forrester
Geraldine Faye Forrester passed away on
November 6, 2013. She was born on March 24,
1918, in Happy, Texas, to Levi Dixon Lockett
and Luna Davis Lockett, the baby in a family
of nine children. Gerry graduated from West
Texas State in 1940, one year after marrying
Frederick I. Forrester of Morse, Texas. Before
moving with her family to California in 1954,
she taught frst and second grade in several
small communities in the Texas Panhandle.
In South San Francisco, California, she taught
frst grade for more than 30 years, eventually becoming a reading specialist. She
loved teaching children how to read. After retiring and moving to Denton, Texas,
she and her husband organized the English as a Second Language ministry at
the First Baptist Church of Denton, working with international students from
the University of North Texas, their spouses and children. For several years
she and her husband continued this ministry for the Southern Baptist Home
Mission Board in the Pacifc Northwest, primarily teaching English Language
skills to immigrants from Eastern Europe. Gerry taught Sunday school for
adults for more than 50 years at various Baptist churches including First
Baptist of San Francisco, Foothill Baptist Church in Cupertino, First Baptist
Church of Denton and at Wilshire Baptist Church in Dallas.
Her husband, Frederick Forrester and son, Bill Frank Forrester, preceded
her in death. She is survived by her son Robert Forrester and his wife,
Jan Forrester, of Garland, Texas, grandchildren Kristen Streater of
Richardson, Texas, Matthew Forrester of Gibsonton, Florida and Heather
Forrester of Austin, Texas, three great grandchildren, Clark and Sarah
Streater and Kevin Forrester and several nieces and nephews.
A memorial service will be held, Wednesday, November 13 at 10:30 a.m.
at Wilshire Baptist Church (McIver Chapel). Offciant will be Dr. George
Mason. A graveside service was held at Lieb Cemetery in Morse, Texas,
November 9, 2013 at 2:30 p.m.
The family request in memory of Geraldine, memorial donations be made
to the Greif and Loss Center, Wilshire Baptist Church at 4318 Abrahams
Road, Dallas, Texas 75214.
Arrangements are under the direction of Denton Funeral Home in
Denton, Texas.
Obituary
Fire at recycling plant causes
large plume of black smoke
ERIK OEVERNDIEK/DAILY JOURNAL
A scrap yard fire in Redwood City caused thick black smoke Sunday afternoon.
REDWOOD CITY— Afire at a scrap metal
recycling facility near the Port of Redwood
City is under control, but firefighters remain
on remained on scene through the evening
to fully extinguish it, officials said.
While the fire at Sims Metal Management
at 699 Seaport Blvd. is not near any resi-
dential neighborhoods, the dark plume of
smoke has triggered air quality advisories
for residents in southern San Mateo County,
Santa Clara County and southern Alameda
County, according to Redwood City offi-
cials.The fire was reported at about 1:20
p.m. at Sims Metal Management, located in
the 600 block of Seaport Road, a San Mateo
County fire dispatcher said.
No evacuations were necessary, but resi-
dents in southern San Mateo County and
northern Santa Clara County who could
smell or see smoke were told to stay
indoors, close their windows and turn off
any systems that circulate outside air, emer-
gency officials said. The smoke was blow-
ing in a southwesterly direction, according
to Palo Alto fire officials.
The one-alarm fire was burning in an out-
door pile of scrap recyclables, the dispatch-
er said. The fire also sent smoke drifting
over Highway 101, according to the CHP.
NATION 7
Monday • Nov. 11, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The Department of Psychiatry is seeking
healthy, and psychiatric medication-free
depressed, and anxious participants between
55-110 years old who are right-handed and do
not have other major medical problems
(including thyroid problems) for an MRI study.
Participants will have 3 appointments at Stan-
ford University for a total of 8-10 hours.
Compensation: $150. Contact the Emotion
Aging Study at (650)-723-2795
For general information about oarticipants rights, contact 1-866-680-2906.
By Dan Sewell
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
DAYTON, Ohio — Paul Young rarely
talked about his service during World War II
— about the B-25 bomber he piloted, about
his 57 missions, about the dangers he faced
or the fears he overcame.
“Some things you just don’t talk about,”
he said.
But Susan Frymier had a hunch that if she
could journey from Fort Wayne, Ind., with
her 92-year-old dad for a reunion of his com-
rades in the 57th Bomb wing, he would open
up.
She was right: On a private tour at the
National Museum of the U.S. Air Force near
Dayton, amid fellow veterans of flights over
southern Europe and Germany, Young rattled
off vivid details of his plane, crewmates,
training and some of his most harrowing
missions.
“Dad, you can’t remember what you ate
yesterday, but you remember everything
about World War II,” his daughter said, beam-
ing.
When Young came home from the war,
more than 70 years ago, there were 16 mil-
lion veterans like him — young soldiers,
sailors and Marines who returned to work,
raise families, build lives. Over the decades,
children grew up, married, had children of
their own; careers were built and faded into
retirement; love affairs followed the path
from the altar to the homestead and often,
sadly, to the graveyard.
Through it all, the veterans would occa-
sionally get together to remember the great-
est formative experience of their lives. But
as the years wore on, there were fewer and
fewer of them. According to the Department
of Veteran Affairs, just a little over 1 million
remain. The ones who remain are in their 80s
and 90s, and many are infirm or fragile.
So the reunions, when they are held, are
more sparsely attended — yearly reminders
of the passing of the Greatest Generation.
—When veterans of the Battle of the
Bulge gathered in Kansas City this summer,
only 40 came, according to organizers,
down from 63 last year and 350 in 2004.
—Of the 80 members of Doolittle’s
Raiders who set out on their daring attack on
Japan in 1942, 73 survived. Seventy-one
years later, only four remain; they decided
this year’s April reunion in Fort Walton
Beach, Fla., would be their last, though they
met Saturday for a final toast in honor of
those who have gone before them.
—A half-century ago, when retired Army
First Lt. Frank Towers went to his first
reunion of the 30th Infantry Division —
soldiers who landed at the beaches of
Normandy and fought across France and
Germany — he was surrounded by 1,000
other veterans.
“Now if I get 50, I’m lucky,” said Towers,
who is working on plans for a reunion next
February in Savannah, Ga. “Age has taken
its toll on us. A lot of our members have
passed away, and many of them who are left
are in health situations where they can’t
travel.”
So why persist?
“It’s a matter of camaraderie,” Towers said.
“We spent basically a year or more together
through hell or high water. We became a
band of brothers. We can relate to each other
in ways we can’t relate to (anyone else). You
weren’t there. These guys were there. They
know the horrors we went through.”
WWII reunions poignant
for dwindling veterans
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
RIVERSIDE — An army of some 1,000
volunteers got a jump on Veterans Day
memorials this weekend when they began
placing American flags on every one of
Riverside National Cemetery’s 200,000
graves.
The effort began Saturday.
There was a momentary flash of panic
when volunteers realized they were running
about 300 to 400 flags short. But they
quickly located some more and got back to
work.
They say they are confident they will have
every grave adorned by Veterans Day on
Monday.
The Riverside Press-Enterprise reports
the tradition began in 2007 when a handful
of volunteers arrived at the veterans ceme-
tery on Memorial Day with 1,000 flags.
It has grown every year since.
200,000 graves at cemetery get flags
REUTERS
U.S.Army serviceman Jason Richmond,of Batavia,Ill.,walks through some of the 2,013 U.S. flags
that are part of the Aurora Healing Fields,to honor veterans,during Veterans Day weekend in
Aurora, Ill.
NATION 8
Monday • Nov. 11, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal,
a locally owned, award-winning daily newspaper on the
Peninsula has an opening for a Account Executive.
The position is responsible for developing new business
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The candidate will develop new business through a
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By Mark Sherman
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — One of the
most influential news outlets cov-
ering the Supreme Court sets up
shop on big decision days not in
the pressroom with other
reporters, but in the court’s cafete-
ria.
The justices themselves read the
award-winning SCOTUSblog, but
unlike other media it has no offi-
cial status in the marble court-
house.
This curious situation is attrib-
utable almost entirely to the
unusual, if not unique, circum-
stances that surround
SCOTUSblog publisher Tom
Goldstein. The 43-year-old lawyer
has made a career out of challeng-
ing the established way of doing
things, first among Supreme Court
advocates and more recently in its
pressroom.
Goldstein is in the position of
both making and reporting the
news.
He is not just the founder, owner
and publisher of SCOTUSblog,
named for the acronym for the
Supreme Court of the United
States. He also argues before the
court, comments on and analyzes
news on MSNBC and is quoted
widely in media accounts.
SCOTUSblog has gone from a
failed marketing ploy designed to
attract more business to the law
firm Goldstein started with his
wife, Amy Howe, to an indispen-
sable aid to Supreme Court
reporters and lawyers. The blog’s
Twitter account has 144,000 fol-
lowers.
The blog is so popular among
Supreme Court watchers that it is
now helping set the agenda for
coverage of the institution.
SCOTUSblog tries to steer clear
of conflicts by routinely acknowl-
edging when Goldstein’s firm is
involved in cases the blog writes
about. But the court itself is unsure
how to deal with this hybrid that
Goldstein created, a news outlet
that is owned by one of the court’s
own practitioners.
He wears, in his own words, “so
many hats” around the court that it
is hard sometimes to distinguish
one from another. The blog has
been reporting extensively on the
cases the court has heard this term.
Out of the 18 cases heard so far,
two were argued by Goldstein,
including one last week, and
another by law firm partner Kevin
Russell, also a SCOTUSblog con-
tributor.
Howe, a lawyer who has argued
before the court, now is a reporter
and editor for the blog. So far this
term, she has watched some argu-
ments from seats reserved for
lawyers, then written about cases
for the blog.
When the justices heard argu-
ments over gay marriage in
March, Goldstein listened to them
in a room set aside for lawyers,
then updated the blog’s followers
on Twitter.
Legal blog seeks recognition from high court
By Connie Cass
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — They are among our
most personal daily decisions: what to eat or
drink. Maybe what to inhale.
Now that the government’s banning trans
fat, does that mean it’s revving up to take
away our choice to consume all sorts of other
unhealthy stuff?
What about salt? Soda? Cigarettes?
Nah.
In the tug-of-war between public health
and personal freedom, the Food and Drug
Administration’s decision to ban trans fats
barely rates a ripple.
Hardly anyone defends the icky-sounding
artificial ingredient anymore, two decades
after health activists began warning
Americans that it was clogging their arteries
and causing heart attacks.
New York, Philadelphia, a few other local-
ities and the state of California already have
banned trans fat from restaurant food.
McDonald’s, Taco Bell and KFC dropped it
from their french fries, nachos and chicken
years ago.
The companies that fill grocery shelves
say they already have reduced their use of
trans fat by nearly three-fourths since 2005.
Growers are promoting new soybean oils
that they say will eliminate, within a few
years, the need for partial hydrogenation,
the process that creates trans fats still used
to enhance the texture of some pie crusts,
cookies and margarine.
Mostly, Americans’ palates have moved
on, and so have their arguments over what’s
sensible health policy and what amounts to
a “nanny state” run amok.
When they aren’t feuding over President
Barack Obama’s health care law, state politi-
cians are busy weighing the wisdom of
legalizing marijuana. Already 20 states and
the District of Columbia have authorized it
for medicinal use. Voters in Colorado and
Washington state approved smoking pot
just for fun.
Health policy: Trans fat ban
By Juan A. Lozano
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
HOUSTON — Celebratory gunshots fired at
a girl’s 18th birthday party triggered more
gunfire that left two people dead, two critical-
ly injured and nearly two-dozen injured in a
chaotic scene where people jumped from sec-
ond-floor windows to escape the shooting at a
suburban Houston home, authorities said
Sunday.
Harris County Sheriff Adrian Garcia said the
gathering Saturday night was openly promot-
ed using multiple social media sites, drew
more than 100 people, most of them 17- to
19-year-olds, and became a “birthday party
gone wild.”
He said it appears partygoers were dancing
in the home when someone armed with a pis-
tol shot into the air in celebration. In the
ensuing confusion, another person who was
armed began firing into the crowd, Garcia
said. Young people then streamed into the
narrow street to avoid the burst of gunshots
that followed shortly before 11 p.m.
Saturday.
Partygoer Shaniqua Brown — who said she
heard about the party through Instagram, a
photo-sharing app and website — told The
Associated Press it “was not rowdy at all.”
She said she first heard gunshots in the house
and they continued outside as people fled and
sought cover.
Authorities have given varying accounts of
the number of people injured, but they clari-
fied Sunday that 20 were hurt, with 16 suffer-
ing gunshot wounds and four others varying
injuries such as a fracture and twisted ankles
in the panic to flee.
The two people killed, one an 18-year-old
male and the other a 16-year-old female, were
students at Cypress Springs High School,
Garcia said.
Two high school students
killed in party shooting
OPINION 9
Monday • Nov. 11, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Letters to the editor
By Jerry Hill
O
n Nov. 11 each year, our
nation celebrates Veterans
Day, a day set aside to honor
the courage and sacrifices of our
nation’s veterans. This tribute is for
the more than 23
million current
American veterans
and to the count-
less millions more
who have made the
supreme sacrifice
throughout the
history of our
country.
Nov. 11 was first
observed in 1919 as “Armistice Day,”
to commemorate the Armistice
Agreement which ended World War I.
That war was considered so terrible that
it was mistakenly called “The war to
end all wars.” One generation later we
were fighting World War II. In 1954,
President Dwight D. Eisenhower broad-
ened the meaning of Armistice Day
when he officially designated it
Veterans Day, to recognize all those
who have served in the military.
Our nation is strong and secure
because of the dedication and courage
of our men and women in the uniform
of the U.S. Armed Forces. Our military
possesses advanced technology and
weapons of incredible power, but it is
the commitment of those who serve
that protects our freedoms and safe-
guards our country.
Our veterans represent the best of
America. They come from every walk
of life, every part of society. In their
military roles, they served selflessly,
away from family and loved ones, often
placed in harm’s way and ready to make
the ultimate sacrifice. They exemplify
the rich tapestry of our nation, the mul-
titude of cultures that make the United
States unique. Our veterans embody the
character of our communities, and they
have much to share
We express our thanks to all veterans
for their patriotism and their service.
As one example of all of our outstand-
ing veterans, I will refer to a man who
is, in my judgment, the quintessential
veteran. He is Chaplain Leo McArdle,
who has been named 2013’s Veteran of
the Year in the 13th California Senate
District.
McArdle served eight years in the
U.S. Army, including a tour of duty in
Vietnam. Now he is a volunteer with
many military and veterans’ organiza-
tions, groups that work to ensure that
our nation’s heroes receive military
honors befitting their rank and status.
As a chaplain, Leo provides comfort to
veterans and their families, especially
during times of separation or loss.
McArdle’s commitments are exemplary
in his devotion to our armed forces, our
veterans, our communities and our
nation. His values and actions are wor-
thy of emulation.
It is important that we take time on
Veterans Day to express our profound
gratitude to the millions of living
American veterans who have fought to
preserve our way of life. Through their
service, these men and women have
kept America secure against those who
would harm us throughout the years
We must let our veterans know that
they are appreciated, and that their
service and sacrifice will never be for-
gotten. Our veterans are deserving of
honor, for they have earned it. When
members of the armed services transi-
tion out of the military we acknowl-
edge our obligation to assist them as
they return to their homes and families,
and take their places in our communi-
ties. They are the quintessential
Americans.
Jerry Hill, D-San Mateo, represents the
Peninsula in the California Senate.
Expressing gratitude for our veterans Retirement party
for Susan Loftus
I
t was one of the best retirement parties I have ever
attended. No speeches. Just lots of people hugging
and saying “haven’t seen you in so long but you
look great” as many of the attendees were former city
employees and department heads. Most of the current staff
was there including a large number of police officers and
firemen. Also attending were Rich Napier, former head of
the City/County Associations of Government and current
head, Sandy Wong; Mike Garvey, former San Carlos city
manager; former San Mateo city manager Arne Croce and
wife Carole.
Everyone got to spend quality time with Susan Loftus,
San Mateo’s retiring city manager, who officially left
Nov. 1. There was a long line of well-wishers which
stretched the length of the City Hall atrium from the start
of the party at 5 p.m. to the conclusion shortly after 7
p.m. It reminded me of a wedding or funeral reception line.
Loftus manned the line the whole time without skipping a
beat, saying just the right
thing to each person who
wanted to give her a hug,
whisper in her ear or just
shake her hand. My guess
she was overwhelmed by
the number who came from
near and far to wish her
well.
***
Some of the well-wishers
included former Park and
Recreation director, Dick
Coleman, and his wife; Jim
Hardy, Foster City city
manager; John Root and
Tish Busselle, Leadership
San Mateo; Diane Croce
and Colleen Nolan, former
city manager aides; Norma Gomez, former city clerk and
assistant Pat Winans; former finance directors John de
Russy and Hossein Golestan; former community develop-
ment staff Bob Beyers, Lisa Grote, Laura Sniderman (now
Half Moon Bay city manager) and Robert Muehlbauer;
Cheryl Angeles, San Mateo Chamber of Commerce; Anne
LeClair, Convention and Visitors Bureau head; Cyndy
Simms, elementary school superintendent and Lory
Lawson, school board member; Ben Toy, Home
Association of North Central San Mateo president; former
fire chief Dan Belville and former police officer Ed Trucco.
Many members of the city’s boards and commissions
attended including Joe Goethals (newly elected council-
man), Joshua Hugg, Anna Kuhre, Greg St. Clair, Rick
Bonilla, Sherrie Taguchie, Dorothy Chow, Bertha Sanchez
and Diane Whitaker.
In addition to former city staff, former councilwomen
Jan Epstein, Carole Groom (now Supervisor Groom) and
yours truly mingled with the group. The only current
councilmember attending was Jack Matthews and his wife
Patricia. It seemed strange there were no other current
councilmembers there. They should have been. The offi-
cial good-bye to Loftus occurred at a previous council
meeting where there were speeches and resolutions galore.
But the retirement party showed what was best about the
city of San Mateo and why people like to work here. It
really was family and for many it was a homecoming.
Hopefully that special San Mateo mystique is not in dan-
ger of disappearing.
***
The good news is that the council has found a perfect
interim city manager in the experienced and seasoned
Public Works Director Larry Patterson. Patterson has held
that post since Arch Perry retired more than a decade ago.
He is well-liked and has a reputation for getting things
done. While the council will probably do a search, it
wouldn’t surprise many if Patterson ended up as the city’s
new manager. At one time, Patterson was a councilman in
Half Moon Bay where he suffered the slings of political
arrows. His day job was running a traffic consulting busi-
ness. His firm was often hired to do traffic studies for San
Mateo. That’s how he met then city manager Arne Croce
who picked him for Public Works even though Patterson
did not have the traditional engineering degrees. It turned
out to be a good pick.
***
Not too many surprises in the election results. As usual,
Burlingame has a cliff-hanger with just a few votes sepa-
rating Ricardo Ortiz and Russ Cohen, the third and fourth
contenders for City Council. For San Mateo City Council,
it was expected that Joshua Hugg might prevail but Joe
Goethals came in third behind the incumbents with Hugg a
distant fourth. All in all it was a good year for incum-
bents. More post mortems in next column.
Sue Lempert is the former mayor of San Mateo. Her column
runs every Monday. She can be reached at sue@smdailyjour-
nal.com.
Follow us on Twitter and Facebook:
facebook.com/smdailyjournal
twitter.com/smdailyjournal
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Guest
perspective
Please keep it real, Sue
Editor,
Sue Lempert’s comparison of Senator
Ted Cruz to Joe McCarthy in the Oct. 28
edition of the Daily Journal would be
laughable had it not been so pathetic.
Apparently, Lempert knows the pro-
gressive tactic of demonizing someone
with whom she disagrees with politi-
cally by the use of extreme rhetoric and
ridiculous juxtaposition. But her at-
tempts at belittling Cruz are juvenile.
Cruz doesn’t “look like” McCarthy, nor
does he have a “soprano” voice in
comparison to McCarthy’s .
Lempert’s presentation of history is
quite selective. She conveniently for-
gets the point that despite any errors
he made and his sometimes disagreeable
personality, McCarthy was correct in
asserting that the federal government
had been infiltrated by members of the
Communist Party USA, which was di-
rectly guided by the Soviet
government.
With her suggestion that Senator Cruz
“wants to bring down the country to
raise his ratings with the nutty fringe
on the right,” Lempert raises hyper-
bole to a high level. Again, Lempert
fails to mention that Cruz was correct in
warning that ObamaCare would be the
nightmare that it has become. In fact,
Ted Cruz has already established himself
as one of the most principled, honest
and intelligent members of Congress.
Instead of sounding her embarrassing,
nearly-hysterical alarm at “nutty” con-
servatives who simply seek to
preserve our constitutional republic and
personal freedoms and make govern-
ment smaller, more efficient and fiscally
responsible, Lempert would be best ad-
vised to worry about our president, who
has just been discovered to have delib-
erately and repeatedly lie over many
months to Americans about major as-
pects of his Affordable Care Act.
Jon Bryant
San Mateo
Ted Cruz as Joe McCarthy
Editor,
I’m part of the “nutty fringe” referenced
in Sue Lempert’s column “Don’t make
that call” (Oct. 28 edition of the Daily
Journal). Yes, some of us Libertarians live
in your backyard.
It appears Ms. Lempert’s got it wrong
about Joe McCarthy. Lies, like facts, are
“stubborn things.” The mischaracterization of
“McCarthyism” produces a perjorative charge
that has no basis in fact. If you are dubious
about this, may I refer you to a book that fi-
nally clears McCarthy’s name (M. Stanton
Evans’“Blacklisted by History: The Untold
Story of Joe McCarthy and His Fight Against
America’s Enemies.”) The fact is, there were
Soviet spies in the highest echelons of gov-
ernment. This was allowed by members of
Congress (can you guess which party?).
To compare Ted Cruz to Joe McCarthy
would be a compliment if one knows the
truth about the latter. Otherwise that com-
parison is fallacious and absurd.
Kathleen McCrea
Burlingame
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By Charles Babington
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — The health care law’s
seemingly endless problems are giving
congressional Republicans a much-needed
boost of energy, helping them to move past
the government-shutdown debacle and focus
on a theme for next year’s elections.
Republicans are back on offense, and
more quickly than many had expected, after
seeing their approval ratings plunge during
last month’s partial shutdown and worri-
some talk of a possible U.S. debt default.
They pillory administration officials at
Capitol Hill hearings. They cite the mil-
lions of people getting dropped by insurers
despite President Barack Obama’s promise
that it wouldn’t happen. They harp on the
program’s flawed enrollment process.
Now they’re relishing Obama’s apology
to those who are losing health insurance
plans he had repeatedly said they could
keep.
“If the president is truly sorry for break-
ing his promises to the American people,
he’ll do more than just issue a halfhearted
apology on TV,” Senate Minority Leader
Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., said in a state-
ment.
Republicans once pinned their health care
criticisms largely on computer glitches in
the application and enrollment process.
Today, they’re accusing Obama and con-
gressional Democrats of much worse,
including deceit and incompetence.
Conservative groups are pouring money
into ad campaigns reminding voters that
many Democrats had promised Americans
they could keep their current insurance poli-
cies if they wanted. In particular,
Republicans hope these efforts will help
them with women, who tend to vote
Democratic and often make health care deci-
sions for their families and in-laws.
In the 2014 elections, “this is going to
be a big issue, and it’s not going away, ”
said Daniel Scarpinato of the National
Republican Congressional Committee.
“Democrats who voted for Obamacare,” he
said, “are pretty desperately running around
with their hair on fire, trying to distance
themselves, which they’re not going to be
able to do.”
The White House says canceled policies
can be replaced with better coverage, some-
times at lower prices. What the administra-
tion doesn’t emphasize is that better cover-
age often costs more, and those looking for
new policies may not qualify for the tax
subsidies available under the new law.
Brad Dayspring, a spokesman for the
GOP’s top Senate campaign group,
acknowledged that Republicans took a hit
last month when an angry public blamed
them for the 16-day partial government
shutdown.
But now, he said, “there’s a spring in the
step” of party activists.
Potential congressional candidates “who
might have been 50-50 about running for
office might be a little more inclined” to
plunge in, he said. Best of all, Dayspring
said, the most vulnerable Democratic law-
makers have echoed Obama’s now-dis-
proven promises about insurance cancella-
tions and “most of them are on film doing
it.”
The conservative group American
Crossroads already is using such film clips
against Democratic Sens. Mark Begich of
Alaska, Mary Landrieu of Louisiana and Kay
Hagan of North Carolina, who face re-elec-
tion next year. The group is paying to place
the videos on Facebook and other sites.
Another conservative group, Americans
for Prosperity, says it will spend $2 million
in a new ad campaign tying Obama’s health
care law to Hagan and Landrieu.
Begich, Landrieu and Hagan were among
the 16 Democratic senators who met with
Obama on Wednesday, a day after two guber-
natorial elections highlighted the party’s
struggles with the health issue. Half of New
Jersey voters and 53 percent of Virginia
voters said they oppose the president’s
health law. The two Democratic gubernato-
rial nominees won 11 percent and 14 per-
cent of those voters, respectively.
Democrat Terry McAuliffe was elected in
Virginia, while Republican Gov. Chris
Christie cruised to re-election in New
Jersey.
Several of the Democratic senators cited
the program’s malfunction website when
they urged Obama to extend the enrollment
deadline for people to sign up for health
insurance.
Health law’s troubles give GOP a much-needed boost
By Jim Kuhnhenn
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — The government shut-
down may have affected October’s jobs
numbers. But not how you think.
For weeks, the White House had braced
for a dour report on hiring, with econo-
mists and aides lowering expectations and
blaming last month’s partial shutdown for
the inevitable bad news to come.
Then Friday’s numbers materialized:
Employers appeared to have ignored the
shutdown and hired away, to the tune of
204,000 jobs in October.
The shutdown, it seemed, had had no
effect.
Not so fast.
In the height of irony, the 16 days of fed-
eral worker furloughs and government dis-
ruptions may have helped, not hurt, the
improved jobs picture.
Typically, jobs numbers are announced
on the first Friday of the month. Because of
the shutdown, the Bureau of Labor
Statistics delayed the release of the jobs
numbers by one week to allow more time to
collect payroll and household data. That
extra time resulted in an above average
response rate for payroll data.
So, not to get hung up on numbers, but
the average participation rate by employ-
ers in payroll surveys for the nine months
before October was 76.4 percent. That
meant that in subsequent months, as more
data was collected, the hiring numbers were
adjusted, often upward.
In October, with an extra week to collect
data, the participation rate was 83.5 per-
cent, the highest ever.
A robust hiring number, to some econo-
mists, now felt slightly inflated.
“It seems that when the initial response
rate is high, the initial payroll number is
often, though certainly not always,
stronger than the prior trend,” Ian
Shepherdson, chief economist at Pantheon
Macroeconomics, wrote in a research note.
In other words, if the jobs numbers in
prior months were based on a lower partici-
pation rate, a stronger participation rate
would skew the number up.
“Tentatively, we think the effect of this
could explain all the overshoot in pay-
rolls,” Shepherdson wrote.
As a result, some economists are predict-
ing that when the October numbers are
updated, they might be in for a downward
revision and that November could yield a
lower number as well.
“Businesses may have inadvertently
counted employment for an extra
week,” said Mark Zandi, chief econo-
mist at Moody’s Analytics. “That could
juice up the number. That may mean that
we actually get surprised next month
with a much weaker number. ”
The shutdown had another effect on the
employment data.
Besides conducting a survey of employ-
ers, which gives data on actual hiring, the
government also surveys households to
determine the unemployment rate.
Furloughed federal employees were con-
sidered unemployed during the shutdown
and thus contributed to the increase in the
unemployment rate in October from 7.2
percent to 7.3 percent. Without the fur-
loughs, the unemployment rate would have
dropped.
Complicating things, some furloughed
employees were counted as still employed.
As a result, if they had been properly listed
as unemployed, the jobless rate for October
could have been higher than 7.3 percent.
But those are temporary anomalies and
they won’t affect the November unemploy-
ment rate.
The shutdown’s surprise effect on jobs numbers
<< Page 17, Sharks travel to
Canada,beaten by Winnipeg Monday, Nov. 11, 2013
TIME FOR CCS: VOLLEYBALL BRACKETS ANNOUCED; PAL CROSS COUNTRY CHAMPS ARE CROWNED >> PAGE 14
Injuries add up,
Panthers push
pass the Niners
By Janie McCauley
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO — First, tight end
Vernon Davis went down with a concussion.
Then it was standout rookie safety Eric Reid.
Perhaps more concerning for San
Francsico than a lackluster 10-9 defeat to
the Carolina Panthers on Sunday is the loss
of a key player from each side of the ball
along with a handful of
other injuries as the
reigning NFC champions
head into the season’s
stretch run.
With two tough road
games up next, too.
Drayton Florence inter-
cepted a pass by Colin
Kaepernick in the final
minute to seal it as the
Panthers snapped the
49ers’ five-game winning streak.
Coach Jim Harbaugh didn’t yet know
much about how Davis and Reid were doing.
“Just saw them in the locker room and
they seemed as good as could be expected,”
he said.
Still, both players will be put through a
concussion protocol involving several dif-
ferent steps and an evaluation once they
become symptom-free.
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
College of San Mateo running back
George Naufahu stood stoically near the
end zone after his team’s latest win with
seemingly the entire Bulldog Universe
wanting to congratulate him.
One by one, he shook hands, hugged
bodies and smiled.
You would have never noticed from him
demeanor the man had just made history.
From now on, Nov. 9 will be known as
“George Naufahu Day” at CSM after the
running back broke a 26-year-old school
record by rushing for 229 yards during the
Bulldogs’ 52-28 win over De Anza
College. Naufahu, the former San Mateo
High Bearcat, broke the mark on a four-
yard touchdown run in the fourth quarter —
part of 31-carry afternoon for big No. 9.
“To be honest, it hasn’t really kicked in
yet,” Naufahu said, taking a minute from
his salutations to speak with the media
after the game. “I just do what I had to do.
The offensive line did great. It just hasn’t
kicked in yet. All that matters to me is the
win right now. ”
Naufahu’s performance was a part of
another statistically dominating effort by
the Bulldogs. In beating the Dons, CSM
rushed for 449 yards while amassing a
total of 670. And if it wasn’t for a couple
of early miscues when the Bulldogs turned
the ball over early in the game, the margi n
of victory might have been greater.
“Staying disciplined [was the key],”
said CSM quarterback Casey Wichman,
who had another solid day under center for
the Bulldogs. “We just had to keep com-
peting and get the job done.”
Defensively, the Bulldogs put constant
pressure on a dynamic De Anza passing
attack that featured arguably the best
receiver tandem in the NorCal conference.
While the CSM defense bent to the tune of
346 yards passing, their greatest accom-
plishment came in containing those
receivers for the majority of the game —
that, and knocking De Anza quarterback
See 49ERS, Page 13
NY Giants rally in
win vs. the Raiders
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. — Despite
having their chances to turn things around,
the Oakland Raiders’ season is sinking
quickly.
Mired in a morass of failed execution, bad
special teams play, and hurt by Terrell
Thomas’ third-quarter interception that
turned into the go-ahead touchdown, the
Raiders lost a winnable
game, falling 24-20 to
the New York Giants.
“I’m very discouraged
and disappointed in the
outcome,” Raiders coach
Dennis Allen said. “I
thought we were well-pre-
pared. We were focused
and we came out to win a
game, and we didn’t get it
done.”
The Raiders didn’t win because they were
forced to settle for a field goal on the open-
ing possession of the third quarter despite
getting a first-and-goal at the 1. Then they
saw quarterback Terrell Pryor make a poor
game-changing throw later in the quarter.
Thomas returned the interception 65 yards
to set up a go-ahead 1-yard touchdown run
by Andre Brown, and the Giants won their
third straight game.
The Raiders (3-6) have lost 12 straight
games in the Eastern time zone since beat-
ing Pittsburgh in December 2009.
The Raiders’ season continued to crumble
after losing their second straight game to an
NFC East team, and third this season.
At least this one was much closer than last
week’s 49-20 embarrassment to the
Philadelphia Eagles. But no less frustrating.
“It was very winnable,” said Pryor, 11 for
See RAIDERS, Page 13
See CSM, Page 13
Naufahu sets new CSM rush record in win over De Anza
Jim Harbaugh
Dennis Allen
P
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SPORTS 12
Monday • Nov. 11, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BERKELEY, Calif. (AP) — Two-
time All-America guard Chelsea
Gray was pleasantly surprised. Her
repaired kneecap felt better than
expected in her first game back
from the injury.
Gray, who had surgery in March
after dislocating her right kneecap
in February, had 22 points, five
assists and a couple of steals in 31
minutes to lead No. 2 Duke past
No. 9 California 70-58 on Sunday.
“It’s a little sore,” she said. “A
little icing and I’ll be ready to go
again.”
Gray was playing in front of
friends and family. She hosted a
dinner for her teammates Friday
night in Manteca, about an hour’s
drive from Cal.
Gray had a complaint, though:
“No leftovers. I was hoping to
bring some back with me to eat
later but, nope, they ate all our
food.”
The Blue Devils also practiced at
St. Mary’s High in Stockton,
Gray’s former school.
“It was so much fun,” Duke
coach Joanne McCallie said. “It
was like a retreat at Chelsea’s
house. I didn’t think we were ever
going to leave.”
Tricia Liston added 15 points for
the Blue Devils, who opened the
season against a ranked opponent
for the first time in school history.
Richa Jackson had 13 on 6-of-7
shooting.
“I was proud of the gritty effort,”
McCallie said. “The first game is
always interesting. It’s a process
and not outcome-driven. The only
way to get better is to be put in
tough situations.”
Afure Jemeridge, Gray’s best
friend and teammate at St. Mary’s ,
scored 16 points to lead the
Golden Bears (1-1), who had won
15 straight regular-season games.
Brittany Boyd scored seven of her
13 points in the final 3 minutes.
Reshanda Gray added 10.
“We need to grow,” Cal coach
Lindsay Gottlieb said. “We’re not
as game-ready as we were at this
point last year because of youth
and players in new roles. This
exposed us in ways we can get bet-
ter. This was a chance to see the
highest level and to understand we
can play like that.”
California lost for only the sec-
ond time in a home nonconference
game under Gottlieb, who led the
Golden Bears to their first Pac-12
Conference title and first Final
Four last season.
The Bears were within nine with
7:09 remaining after watching
Duke build a 15-point edge. Less
than 3 minutes later, the Blue
Devils were up by 17.
Liston and Jackson had plenty
to do with the scoring spree.
“I wanted to stay attacking and
get to the basket,” Liston said.
Jackson’s 3-pointer with 5:47
remaining gave Duke its biggest
lead of the game at 17.
Duke recovered from an early
deficit to open a 12-point advan-
tage midway through the first half.
The Bears scored nine straight
points to draw to 24-23, though
that was as close as they got.
Jackson hit a short jumper with
just more than a minute to play to
put the Blue Devils ahead by five at
halftime.
“They have so many good play-
ers and she’ll come in and shoot
the ball,” Gottlieb said. “She
knows her role and she does it
well.”
The Blue Devils outrebounded
California 46-39, including 18-16
on the offensive boards. Elizabeth
Williams had 11 boards for Duke,
and Cal freshman Courtney Range
grabbed 10.
“They were more aggressive to
the ball than we were,” Gottlieb
said. “Off rebounds killed us. They
have a lot of veterans who make
plays.”
Duke freshman Oderah Chidom,
who grew up 10 minutes from the
Cal campus, played 7 minutes in
her debut.
Gray leads No. 2 Duke women past No. 9 Cal
SPORTS 13
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The Niners (6-3) hit the road next week for
New Orleans, then go to Washington.
“We’ll do what we do, bounce back,
regroup, refit and reorganize and come back
this week,” Harbaugh said.
Davis didn’t return after sustaining a con-
cussion in the second quarter, then Reid
went down on a helmet-to-helmet hit on
Mike Tolbert in the third. Earlier, Reid
recovered a fumble to give him five take-
aways in an already-stellar rookie season
that also includes three interceptions.
Graham Gano kicked a 53-yard field goal
with 10:05 remaining that held up as the
Panthers (6-3) twice shut down Kaepernick
on last-ditch drives with swarming defense.
DeAngelo Williams broke two tackles for
a 27-yard touchdown run late in the first half
that pulled Carolina within 9-7. Gano
missed wide left on a 48-yard field goal in
the third period, but came through later.
San Francisco got the ball back with 5:25
left at its 1, then again with 1:02 to go.
Phil Dawson kicked a season-best 52-yard
field goal among his three for the 49ers,
who failed to recover a pair of Carolina fum-
bles in the closing moments. Jonathan
Stewart fumbled and Mike Tolbert pounced
on the ball. Cam Newton recovered his own
bobble.
This was hardly the highly touted show-
down between 2011 No. 1 overall pick
Newton and Kaepernick, the sixth quarter-
back drafted that year, in the second round.
They roomed together during the scouting
combine.
Kaepernick went 11 for 22 for 91 yards
with an interception and was sacked six
times for a 42.0 passer rating. Newton was
only slightly better, going 16 of 32 for 169
yards, an interception and four sacks for a
52.7 rating.
“It’s unacceptable. We have a number of
weapons on offense. We just have to do a
better job of making it happen,” wide
receiver Anquan Boldin said. “Offensively,
we didn’t get it done. It’s all on us.”
For two teams that have been putting up
points at a prolific pace for the past month,
the defenses dictated this one. Frank Gore
had 16 carries for 82 yards, accounting for
most of San Francisco’s 151 total yards.
Dawson put San Francisco ahead on a 52-
yard field goal on the team’s opening drive,
then kicked second-quarter field goals of 43
and 25 yards.
26 for 122 yards. “We’re close. But we got a
blocked punt and an interception they took
down to the 4. You can’t win like that.
We’ve got to learn.”
Allen said his team was focused and deter-
mined to win a game after last week’s rout.
But they struggled at key times, especial-
ly settling for the 24-yard Sebastian
Janikowski field goal and a 20-14 lead when
they could have been up 10 points.
Rashad Jennings had an opening run on
first-and-goal, but it closed quickly. Pryor
threw an incompletion on the next two
downs, the last one from the 6 after a proce-
dure penalty against tackle Khalif Barnes.
“It’s frustrating,” said Jennings, who had
88 yards on 20 carries. “You want to think
you can punch it in. We’ve got a physical
bunch of players up front, so there’s no
excuses, starting with myself, not to get it
into the zone.
The error-prone Giants (3-6) handed the
Raiders their first 17 points on first-half
turnovers. But they got 115 yards rushing
by Brown in his first game of the season,
and another big defensive game to keep
their season alive.
The Raiders had just 213 yards of total
offense.
Despite that, Tracy Porter’s interception
return for a touchdown off Eli Manning put
the Raiders ahead 17-14 at the half.
Janikowski’s field goal capped the 14-play,
eight-minute drive early in the third quarter.
It should have been more, though. And it
cost the Raiders dearly.
Oakland got the ball back at the New York
48 following a 27-yard punt by Steve
Weatherford into a stiff breeze.
But Thomas, who missed the past two sea-
sons with ACL injuries, made the biggest
play of the game.
He stepped in front of Denarius Moore and
sped toward the end zone, avoiding a tackle
by Pryor inside the 20 before being tackled
by Andre Holmes.
“He made a good play,” Pryor said. “They
were in cover-2 and he faked like he was
going inside. I threw outside, and he went
out and made a great play. I saw him tuck in
and he gave me a fake. He did a good job.”
Brown, who broke his left leg for the sec-
ond time in less than a year in the preseason
finale, gave the Giants the lead from the 1-
yard line following a pass interference call.
Continued from page 11
49ERS
Continued from page 11
RAIDERS
USA TODAY SPORTS
San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick is sacked during his team’s 10-9 loss.
USA TODAY SPORTS
Oakland Raiders QBTerrell Pryor is taken down during his team’s loss to the New York Giants.
SPORTS 14
Monday • Nov. 11, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Jake Singler out of the contest and forcing
one of those receivers to assume the QB
position thus eliminating a big-play threat.
“We just had to level pressure,” said defen-
sive tackle Rika Levi. “We weren’t getting
enough pressure outside of the pocket to
make the quarterback step up. Our DBs were
getting lost in the scramble drill a bit. We
came out in the second half and they got a
couple plays but nothing to make us break.”
CSM jumped out to a big lead and had
ideas of putting the game away early. The
Bulldogs went up 21-7 at the end of one
quarter. On two of those touchdowns,
Wichman hooked up perfectly with receiver
Keven Kutchera for bombs of 45 and 53
yards. Sandwiched in between those scores
was a Wichman 39-yard touchdown run.
“I had a lot of time and I had a lot of room
to step into the pocket,” Wichman said of
his TD tosses. “My line did a good job up
front and Keven did a great job. Their guy
got beat every time on the double clutch
every time we ran that route. So, it was a
matter of executing.”
But CSM’s flaws in the game reared their
ugly head during that first half. The
Bulldogs had a hard time holding on to the
football. De Anza’s lone TD of the first peri-
od came on a 81-yard fumble recovery for a
touchdown. And on two other occasions,
drives were thwarted by the Bulldogs’
inability to hold on to the rock. It was those
mistakes that allowed the Dons to roar all
the way back to a 21-20 lead. AScott Agee
field goal gave CSM a slight 23-21 advan-
tage at recess.
“It just gave us more chances to play, ”
Levi said, joking a bit. “Offense turns the
ball over, we get a chance to make a high-
light tape.”
“This group, we all know we can get the
job done,” Wichman said. “We can’t hurt
ourselves. So, it’s not hard for me to get
everyone pumped up. All I have to say is,
we’ll get them next time.”
To right that ship, the Bulldogs turned to
Naufahu. And just like he has his entire
career, the running back responded by gain-
ing the tough yards. With CSM nursing that
two-point lead, the third quarter saw the
Bulldogs outscore the Dons 16-0 in the
period. Naufahu scored the first of those
touchdowns and, by the end of three peri-
ods, he had 197 yards rushing on 27 carries
for an average of 7.3 per touch. He also had
two catches for 19 yards.
“The coaches did a great job of seeing
what was working,” Naufahu said. “Our O
line executed. All I had to was run. It could
have been any of our running backs. I was
just the lucky one to be out there.”
The 39-21 lead increased with the
Bulldogs never really threatened again by
the Dons. CSM scored twice in the fourth,
the latter of which came on a thrilling 71-
yard pass from Wichman to Robert
Johnson. But it was Naufahu’s 4-yard touch-
down carry with 9:01 left in the game that
catapulted him into the record books and
will forever recognize him as one of CSM’s
all-time greats.
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
It’s been the Logan Marshall show the
entire prep cross country season in the
Peninsula Athletic League. So, during the
PAL championships at the Crystal Springs
course in Belmont, there was no reason to
believe the senior’s show would end any
other way but triumphantly.
Marshall of Half Moon Bay High School
closed out the PAL season with a dominat-
ing 15-second win on Saturday to become
the league’s individual champion. With him
at the helm, the Cougar boys managed a sec-
ond-place team finish. Marshall was one of
two boys to crack the 15-minute mark —
the other is PAL heir apparent Michael
Bereket.
Bereket’s 15:59 run through the course
was part of a 2, 3, 4, 5 and 8 finish for the
Carlmont Scots, who won yet another boys’
team championship.
Menlo-Atherton’s Zach Plante, El
Camino’s Gerardo Castro, Half Moon Bay’s
Graham Faust and Westmoor’s Anwar
Algahithy rounded out the PAL’s top 10 fin-
ishers.
After the Scots and Cougars, M-A was
third, Terra Nova was fourth and Westmoor
came in fifth.
Over on the girls’ side, it’s been a battle
between Menlo-Atherton and Half Moon
Bay the entire season. On Saturday, the
Bears won the championship war, placing
runners first, second, fourth, sixth and sev-
enth to capture the girls’ title by 28 points
over the Cougars.
Madeleine Baier continued her Runner of
the Year caliber season with a 14-second
victory over teammate Katie Beebe — both
are only sophomores. Half Moon Bay’s
Carmen Contreras finished third. Taylor
Fortnam (M-A) and Oma Skyrun (Aragon)
finished off the girls’ top five.
The Dons placed third as a team. Carlmont
was fourth and Mills finished fifth.
CCS VOLLEYBALL
BRACKETS ANNOUCNED
Menlo-Atherton girls’ volleyball took
the race for the PALtitle to the final day. And
despite losing out on the title on the final
day of the season, the Central Coast Section
recognized M-A’s potential by giving the
reigning Division I champions a No. 1
seed. M-A will host a quarterfinal match on
Saturday, Nov. 17 against either Cupertino
or Santa Teresa.
Also in Division I, No. 6 Carlmont will
take on No. 3 Salinas in a quarterfinal
matchup.
In Division II, PAL Bay Division champi-
on Woodside earned a No. 6 seed and will
host No. 11 Branham in first round action
Wednesday night. No. 12 Aragon will travel
to No. 5 Westmont for a chance to advance
to the quarterfinals against either
Presentation or Sobrato.
Division III has PAL taste all over the
place. No. 9 Terra Nova will have to travel
to Notre Dame-San Jose in first round action
Wednesday night. No. 7 Hillsdale has to do
a bit further and take on No. 10 Del Mar in
first round action. No. 3 Burlingame and No.
5 South San Francisco will wait until
Saturday to do the show doing. The Panthers
will travel north to Capuchino and take on
No. 6 Saratoga at 7 p.m. The Warriors will
go to No. 4 Aptos to begin their champi-
onship quest.
In Division IV, the Menlo Knights are
county’s other No. 1 seed. They’ll wait until
Sunday to host a quarterfinal match. That
game might be against No. 8 Notre Dame-
Belmont. The Tigers must first get past No.
9 King City on Wednesday at 7 p.m.
Sacred Heart Prep begins its Division IV
defense as the No. 6 seed. They’ll travel to
No. 11 Monte Vista Christian on
Wednesday. Awin means they’ll pack their
bags and head to No. 3 Soquel.
And finally, in Division V action, the
Gryphons of Crystal Springs Uplands are a
No. 4 seed. They’ll host No. 5 Thomas
Moore Saturday night at 7 p.m.
Continued from page 11
CSM
Marshall, Baier win PAL cross country titles
15
Monday • Nov. 11, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Speech-to-Speech (STS)
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STS Relay is for individuals with
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STS access numbers
English 866-988-4288
Español 866-288-7504
STS Training & Help Line* Available 9-5 PM PST
English 866-844-2626
*This number is available for use exclusively by California residents and individuals associated
with themwho wish to learn more about Speech-to-Speech service.
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Monday • Nov. 11, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SPORTS
by
ALL ELECTRIC SERVICE™
650-322-9288
FOR ALL YOUR ELECTRICAL NEEDS®
SERVICE CHANGES
SOLAR INSTALLATIONS
LIGHTING / POWER
FIRE ALARM / DATA
GREEN ENERGY
FULLY LICENSED
STATE CERTIFIED
LOCALLY TRAINED
EXPERIENCED
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ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
NATIONALCONFERENCE
EAST
W L T Pct PF PA
Dallas 5 4 0 .556 257 209
Philadelphia 5 5 0 .500 252 244
N.Y. Giants 3 6 0 .333 165 243
Washington 3 6 0 .333 230 287
SOUTH
W L T Pct PF PA
New Orleans 6 2 0 .750 216 146
Carolina 6 3 0 .667 214 115
Atlanta 2 7 0 .222 186 251
Tampa Bay 0 8 0 .000 124 190
NORTH
W L T Pct PF PA
Detroit 6 3 0 .667 238 216
Chicago 5 4 0 .556 259 247
Green Bay 5 4 0 .556 245 212
Minnesota 2 7 0 .222 220 279
WEST
W L T Pct PF PA
Seattle 9 1 0 .900 265 159
San Francisco 6 3 0 .667 227 155
Arizona 5 4 0 .556 187 198
St. Louis 4 6 0 .400 224 234
AMERICANCONFERENCE
EAST
W L T Pct PF PA
New England 7 2 0 .778 234 175
N.Y. Jets 5 4 0 .556 169 231
Miami 4 4 0 .500 174 187
Buffalo 3 7 0 .300 199 259
SOUTH
W L T Pct PF PA
Indianapolis 6 3 0 .667 222 193
Tennessee 4 5 0 .444 200 196
Houston 2 7 0 .222 170 248
Jacksonville 1 8 0 .111 115 291
NORTH
W L T Pct PF PA
Cincinnati 6 4 0 .600 234 186
Cleveland 4 5 0 .444 172 197
Baltimore 4 5 0 .444 188 189
Pittsburgh 3 6 0 .333 179 218
WEST
W L T Pct PF PA
Kansas City 9 0 0 1.000 215 111
Denver 8 1 0 .889 371 238
San Diego 4 5 0 .444 212 202
Oakland 3 6 0 .333 166 223
Thursday’sGame
Minnesota 34,Washington 27
Sunday, Nov. 10
Detroit 21, Chicago 19
Philadelphia 27, Green Bay 13
Jacksonville 29,Tennessee 27
Baltimore 20, Cincinnati 17, OT
St. Louis 38, Indianapolis 8
Seattle 33, Atlanta 10
N.Y. Giants 24, Oakland 20
Pittsburgh 23, Buffalo 10
Carolina 10, San Francisco 9
Denver 28, San Diego 20
Arizona 27, Houston 24
Dallas at New Orleans, 8:30 p.m.
Open: Cleveland, Kansas City, N.Y. Jets, New England
Monday, Nov. 11
Miami at Tampa Bay, 5:40 p.m.
NFL GLANCE
EASTERNCONFERENCE
ATLANTICDIVISION
W L Pct GB
Philadelphia 4 3 .571 —
Toronto 3 4 .429 1
Boston 3 4 .429 1
New York 2 4 .333 1 1/2
Brooklyn 2 4 .333 1 1/2
SOUTHEASTDIVISION
W L Pct GB
Miami 4 3 .571 —
Atlanta 3 3 .500 1/2
Charlotte 3 3 .500 1/2
Orlando 3 4 .429 1
Washington 2 4 .333 1 1/2
CENTRALDIVISION
W L Pct GB
Indiana 7 0 1.000 —
Cleveland 3 4 .429 4
Milwaukee 2 3 .400 4
Detroit 2 3 .400 4
Chicago 2 3 .400 4
WESTERNCONFERENCE
SOUTWESTDIVISION
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 6 1 .857 —
Houston 4 3 .571 2
Dallas 4 3 .571 2
Memphis 3 3 .500 2 1/2
New Orleans 3 4 .429 3
NORTHWEST DIVISION
W L Pct GB
Oklahoma City 5 1 .833 —
Minnesota 4 2 .667 1
Portland 4 2 .667 1
Denver 1 4 .200 3 1/2
Utah 0 7 .000 5 1/2
PACIFICDIVISION
W L Pct GB
Phoenix 5 2 .714 —
L.A. Clippers 4 3 .571 1
Golden State 4 3 .571 1
L.A. Lakers 3 4 .429 2
Sacramento 1 5 .167 3 1/2
Saturday’sGames
Toronto 115, Utah 91
Indiana 96, Brooklyn 91
Cleveland 127, Philadelphia 125,2OT
Boston 111, Miami 110
Atlanta 104, Orlando 94
L.A. Clippers 107, Houston 94
Memphis 108, Golden State 90
Dallas 91, Milwaukee 83
Portland 96, Sacramento 85
Sunday’sGames
San Antonio 120, New York 89
Oklahoma City 106,Washington 105, OT
Phoenix 101, New Orleans 94
Minnesota at L.A. Lakers, Late
Monday’sGames
San Antonio at Philadelphia, 4 p.m.
Memphis at Indiana, 4 p.m.
Atlanta at Charlotte, 4 p.m.
Orlando at Boston, 4:30 p.m.
Cleveland at Chicago, 5 p.m.
Toronto at Houston, 5 p.m.
Denver at Utah, 6 p.m.
Detroit at Portland, 7 p.m.
NBA GLANCE BCS STANDINGS
AH RB CMKM JS PW
1. Alabama 1 1 2 1 2 1
2. Florida St. 2 2 1 2 1 2
3. Ohio St. 4 4 4 6 5 3
4. Stanford 5 3 3 3 3 4
5. Baylor 3 6 5 7 4 8
6. Oregon 6 5 8 5 7 6
7. Auburn 8 8 6 4 8 5
8. Clemson 9 7 9 10 13 9
9. Missouri 7 10 7 8 9 7
10. South Carolina 10 9 12 13 10 12
11.Texas A&M 15 16 13 12 17 14
12. Oklahoma St. 14 20 18 - 22 25
13. UCLA 13 13 17 11 11 11
14. Fresno St. 17 17 11 25 12 13
15. N. Illinois 24 12 20 17 6 10
16. Michigan St. 18 21 15 22 23 22
17. UCF 16 11 14 19 16 16
18. Oklahoma 12 15 16 23 - 23
19. Arizona St. 11 23 10 9 18 15
20. Louisville - 18 - - - -
21. LSU - 19 - 16 21 21
22.Wisconsin 22 22 - 18 19 18
23. Miami (Fla.) 21 - 21 21 - 24
24.Texas 20 14 24 24 24 -
25. Georgia 19 24 22 15 25 20
Sixcomputer rankingsareusedtodeterminetheover-
all computer component. The highest and lowest
ranking for each team is dropped,and the remaining
four are added and divided to produce a Computer
Rankings Percentage. The six computer ranking
providers are Anderson & Hester, Richard Billingsley,
ColleyMatrix,KennethMassey,Jeff Sagarin,andPeter
Wolfe. Each computer ranking accounts for schedule
strength in its formula.
SPORTS 17
Monday • Nov. 11, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
·
USA TODAY SPORTS
The Sharks’ Dan Boyle, center, celebrates a goal with teammates during San Jose 5-4 loss.
USA TODAY SPORTS
Denver’s Peyton Manning tossed four touchdown passes in the Broncos’ latest win Sunday.
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WINNIPEG, Manitoba — Andrew Ladd
scored the tying goal with 1:43 remaining
in regulation and then delivered the
shootout winner to lift the Winnipeg Jets
over the San Jose Sharks 5-4 on Sunday
night.
Michael Frolik, Dustin Byfulgien and
Grant Clitsome also scored for the Jets.
Ladd had the lone goal in the tiebreaker.
Dan Boyle scored two power-play goals
for San Jose, but couldn’t beat Ondrej
Pavelec in the shootout. Pavelec stopped
Logan Couture, Tommy Wingels and Boyle.
Tomas Hertl and Wingels each had a goal
for the Sharks (10-2-5), who lost in a
shootout for the third time in their last four
games.
Ladd tied it late in the third period on a
quick shot from the left circle with Blake
Wheeler screening goalie Antti Niemi.
The Sharks took a 4-3 lead early in the
third period on a precise play, with
Couture’s no-look, backhand pass setting
up Boyle for an easy goal from point-blank
range.
Patrick Marleau appeared to have scored
the overtime winner for San Jose, but the
goal was disallowed when Wingels made
contact with Pavelec in the crease.
Niemi stopped 42 of 46 shots for the
Sharks, while Pavelec made 30 saves for
Winnipeg.
The Jets have won back-to-back games
for the first time since the first two this sea-
son.
The Sharks took a two-goal lead into the
first intermission despite being badly out-
played for much of the opening period. The
Jets, who scored four first-period goals
against Nashville on Friday night, were
buzzing around Niemi early, but the goalie
kept the game scoreless.
JAGUARS 29, TITANS 27
NASHVILLE — The Jacksonville Jaguars
are winless no more.
Maurice Jones-Drew and Jordan Todman
each ran for a touchdown, and the Jaguars
held off the Tennessee Titans 29-27 Sunday.
The Jaguars (1-8) scored the most points
in a game this season for first-year coach
Gus Bradley. They never trailed and forced
four turnovers they turned into 17 points.
The Titans scored twice in the final 4:15,
the last on a 14-yard TD pass by Ryan
Fitzpatrick to Delanie Walker with 40 sec-
onds left. But Johnathan Cyprien recovered
the onside kick to seal the victory, leaving
Tampa Bay as the only winless team. The
Buccaneers host Miami on Monday night.
On a day the Titans (4-5) held a moment of
silence for late owner Bud Adams, they lost
quarterback Jake Locker to an injured right
foot that had him on crutches and in a walk-
ing boot in the second half.
RAVENS 20, BENGALS 17, OT
BALTIMORE — Justin Tucker kicked a 46-
yard field goal with 5:27 left in overtime,
and the Ravens won after blowing a 17-
point halftime lead and giving up a touch-
down on the final play of regulation.
The tense victory ended a three-game skid
for the Ravens (4-5) and thrust them into a
second-place tie in the division, just one
game behind Cincinnati (6-4) in the loss
column. It was the defending Super Bowl
champions’ first victory since Oct. 6.
The Bengals have lost two straight in
overtime.
Cincinnati pulled even when A.J. Green
caught a desperation pass from Andy Dalton
for a 51-yard touchdown. Green positioned
himself behind the pack and caught the ball
after it flicked off the hand of Ravens safety
James Ihedigbo, who earlier had the first
two interceptions of his career.
BRONCOS 28, CHARGERS 20
SAN DIEGO — Peyton Manning threw for
330 yards and four touchdowns, three to
Demaryius Thomas, as he efficiently led the
Broncos in their first game since coach
John Fox had heart surgery.
Fox, who was released from the hospital
Friday, planned to watch the game on TV at
his offseason home in Charlotte, N.C., a
team spokesman said.
With interim coach Jack Del Rio in
charge, Manning kept the Broncos (8-1)
rolling. He threw touchdown passes of 11, 7
and 34 yards to Thomas on consecutive
drives spanning the second and third quar-
ters.
Julius Thomas had a 74-yard catch-and-run
on Denver’s first drive.
The Broncos’ scoring drives lasted 57 sec-
onds; 2 minutes, 27 seconds; 1:25; and
3:26.
Manning has thrown for 3,249 yards and
33 touchdowns in nine games. San Diego
fell to 4-5.
CARDINALS 27, TEXANS 24
GLENDALE, Ariz. — Carson Palmer threw
two touchdown passes and the Cardinals
sent the Texans to their franchise-record
seventh consecutive loss.
The Texans (2-7) were without coach Gary
Kubiak, who collapsed on the sidelines
against Indianapolis last Sunday night with
what was diagnosed as a mini-stroke.
Defensive coordinator Wade Phillips is fil l-
ing in as interim coach.
Arizona (5-4) scored on the game’s first
play when John Abraham knocked the ball
out of Case Keenum’s arm and Matt
Shaughnessy returned it 6 yards for a touch-
down.
Keenum threw three touchdown passes,
two on remarkable catches by Andre
Johnson.
J.J. Watt forced two fumbles, recovering
both for Houston. The second one set up
Johnson’s 5-yard TD catch that cut the lead
to three with 4:34 to play.
LIONS 21, BEARS 19
CHICAGO — Calvin Johnson had two
second-half touchdown receptions, Reggie
Bush rushed for 105 yards and Lions took
over first place in the NFC North.
Johnson broke Herman Moore’s franchise
record with his 63rd career touchdown recep-
tion with 2:22 to go, giving the Lions a 21-
13 lead with a 14-yard grab. He also had a
tiebreaking 4-yard TD reception on the first
drive in the third quarter.
Jets sink the SJ Sharks, 5-4
ACROSS THE NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE
18
Monday • Nov. 11, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
inquiries but with the remaining coun-
cilmembers split — both Mayor Bob
Grassilli and Councilman Ron Collins
do not favor a postponement —
Clapper may be left in the unique posi-
tion of herself determining if she or
Johnson will vote.
For his part, Johnson said he doesn’t
presume to tell the council what to do
but certainly has a preference.
“I would like the opportunity to
weigh in. We talked a lot about it in the
campaign and I heard a lot of concerns
about the proposal from residents so I
would like the opportunity,” he said.
But for Collins and Grassilli, the
time is now.
“I’m not inclined to wait. This is the
council that has seen this project all
the way through and this is the council
that should decide it,” Collins said.
When the Election Night returns
showed clearly that Johnson would
replace Clapper, Grassilli said he was
on “the opposite side” of the idea to
postpone.
The project was last proposed as 280
residential units spread over eight
buildings with four stories although
some of the top floors have already
been reduced by developer Legacy
Partners in response to community out-
cry. There is also 36,319 square feet of
commercial space, a transit center and
226 commuter parking spaces.
However, the council will be faced
Tuesday — assuming it goes forward
with a vote — with two alternatives
which makes changes such adding trees
and cutting stories off some buildings.
In the second alternative, the units will
drop to 265.
Ben Fuller, president of the Greater
East San Carlos group which has large-
ly opposed the project, said holding off
is the right move but he cites the need
for more answers rather than who will
be making the vote.
“There are so many more issues that
need to be dealt with and all of those
things take weeks and months. So if
they rush it through and don’t deal with
it we’re going to have a referendum,”
Fuller said, referencing his previously
announced plans to attack council
approval at the ballot box.
Fuller said proposed reductions are a
step in the right direction but are still
not enough to quell concerns over size,
density, shadowing and traffic.
“Let’s not rush it. Let’s work together
and continue what we’re doing,” he
said.
Grocott also has another suggestion
that may push out a decision — story
poles. He suggested them at the last
meeting as a way to illustrate the pro-
ject’s height and density but his enthu-
siasm wasn’t widely shared. He plans to
raise the idea again Tuesday.
“It’s a big project and I think people
deserve to be able to see what that
means through story poles. Let the
story poles tell the story if you will,”
he said.
Grocott said he even found a company
that will be able to install the large
poles using mechanical lifts despite the
developer and other city officials ques-
tioning the ability.
“Legacy just doesn’t want the public
to see the full size and scope,” he said.
The San Carlos City Council meets 7
p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 12 at City Hall, 600
Elm St., San Carlos.
michelle@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 102
Continued from page 1
TRANSIT
according to the report.
“The neighborhood need is paramount,
because those are the people who are going
to be in those shopping centers,”
Councilman Charles Bronitsky said.
The city will continue outreach efforts
through focus groups, sending out question-
naires and approaching businesses to gain a
sense of what the consumers’ needs are and
how to accommodate them through their
continued retail development efforts,
Bronitsky said.
There is also a stark increase throughout
the Bay Area of the 20 to 30 age group
known as the “young digerati,” Assistant
City Manager Steve Toler said. This new
tech-based population has unique customer
demands on which the city could capitalize.
Boutique retail stores, entertainment
opportunities and establishments that
could support eating and drinking were sug-
gested by the BAE.
The city is planning to sell the 15-acre
Foster Square space to the developer New
Home Company. Thirty-thousand square
feet of the area will eventually be used as
retail space, Bronitsky said. However, in
determining what kind of retail space to
implement, the future residential popula-
tion at the site must be considered, said
Councilman Art Kiesel. The rest of the space
will be primarily made up of senior hous-
ing, assisted living, memory care and
affordable housing units, Bronitsky said.
The retail space at Foster Square should
accommodate upcoming senior consumers,
Kiesel said.
In general, Foster City residents have
high levels of discretionary incomes yet
spend proportionally less than residents in
other parts of the county, according to the
report. The BAE established an individuals
disposable income spent per year in the sur-
rounding area is about $15,000, however
the city only experiences about $12,000,
Toler said.
“This is a significant opportunity for us.
But the disadvantage that we have here is
that we are pretty much built out,” Toler
said.
A significant concern is the “retail leak-
age” the city suffers, Toler said. The city is
losing income from sales tax as many resi-
dents travel elsewhere to shop, Toler said.
Due to the close proximity of the Hillsdale
and Bridgepointe shopping centers, Foster
City needs to figure out ways to keep con-
sumers in its taxable areas, Kiesel said.
Although Costco, Safeway, Orchard
Supply Hardware and other businesses at the
city’s Metro Center shopping center attract
customers, it’s in direct competition with
the Bridgepointe Shopping Center across
the border in San Mateo, Toler said.
“[Bridgepointe] is a great shopping cen-
ter for Foster City residents, but the city
doesn’t collect sales tax for it. It provides
great amenities, but the bottom line is not
every city can be everything for every-
body,” Toler said.
At the crossroads of State Route 92 and
Highway 101, the city has the opportunity
to become a regional draw, it just needs to
figure out how to market itself, Toler said.
One of the traditional difficulties the city
has with retail is because it doesn’t have a
main downtown or access to the El Camino
Real corridor and is off the beaten path,
Bronitsky said.
The report suggested the most viable
location for new retail development would
around the intersections of Foster City,
Shell and Edgewater boulevards described as
the “gravity side” of the retail area. It’s the
area where most residents and daytime work-
ers enter and exit as they pass through
town, Toler said.
Armed with the extensive data BAE pro-
vided in its 187-page report, the city will
now begin to evaluate its potential develop-
ment locations. The Charter Square owned
by West Lake Development stirred some
controversy at the meeting, Toler said. A
portion of the storefronts is unoccupied.
But the council will first focus on selling
the 15-acre Foster Square space at the Nov.
18 meeting.
samantha@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 106
Continued from page 1
RETAIL
Two-alarm house fire Saturday Night
SAN MATEO — Atwo-alarm fire caused major damage to
a home in San Mateo on Saturday night, according to the
fire department.
Firefighters responded to reports of fire at a two-story
house at 24 Warren Road at about 7:35 p.m., according to
the San Mateo Fire Department. First arriving units report-
ed a fully-involved structure fire and requested a second
alarm response, the fire department said.
Eight engines and 41 fire personnel responded to the
emergency. The fire was declared under control in about an
hour and a half, the department said. No residents were
home at the time.
Two firefighters suffered minor injuries and were take to
local hospitals for treatment, according to the fire depart-
ment. The blaze caused an estimated $700,000 in damage.
The cause remains under investigation.
Officials question
how two condors died
TEHACHAPI — State wildlife officials are trying to learn
how two endangered California Condors died after their bod-
ies were found last month in water tanks used by firefighters
in California’s Central Valley.
The Los Angeles Times reports the condors were discov-
ered last month in separate water tanks in the Tehachapi area,
about 100 miles north of Los Angeles.
Both have been sent to a forensics lab in Oregon to try to deter-
mine how they died. Because the condors number only about 100
in the wild, losing two in the same month is significant.
The first bird was discovered Oct. 2 after a tracking trans-
mitter that wildlife authorities had attached to it quit work-
ing. Kern County firefighters taking part in an earthquake
preparedness drill found the second one on Oct. 17.
Group: Transgender law repeal will qualify
SAN FRANCISCO — Opponents of a new California law
that gives transgender students certain rights say they have
collected enough signatures for an initiative that would
repeal the law.
Frank Schubert, the political strategist handling the sig-
nature gathering effort for conservative groups, said Sunday
that the group submitted 620,000 signatures to get the ini-
tiative on the November 2014 ballot. To qualify, at least
505,000 valid signatures must be submitted.
California is the first state to pass a law detailing the
rights of transgender K-12 students. One of the provisions
gives transgender students the choice of playing on either
boys or girls sports teams.
Gov. Jerry Brown signed the law, AB1266, in September.
The goal of the law is to reduce discrimination against
transgender students. But opponents argue the law violates
the privacy of non-transgender students.
Crash involving CHP patrol car
LIVERMORE — All lanes of Interstate Highway 580 in
Livermore have been cleared after a crash involving a
California Highway Patrol car blocked a portion of the road-
way for nearly two hours Sunday, an officer said.
The crash was first reported at about 9:25 a.m. on west-
bound Highway 580 near Greenville Road, CHPOfficer James
Evans said. Preliminary information indicated that a CHP
officer and an SUV had pulled over when a passing vehicle
struck the two vehicles that were stopped on the shoulder,
Evans said. At least one person suffered major injuries and
was life-lighted from the scene in a medical helicopter,
Evans said. The CHP officer was not injured. Two right lanes
remained blocked until about 11:10 a.m. on Sunday. The
crash remains under investigation by the CHP.
State briefs
DATEBOOK 19
Monday • Nov. 11, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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E
ach year, I devote a column or two to
animal welfare myths. There are
plenty of them, so never a shortage
of material. Can you guess which breed
makes our animal control officers the most
anxious? Chow Chows. Do you know what
percentage of dogs adopted from shelters
have been abused? I don’t, but I know it’s
small. However, if you listen to talk around
the dog park water cooler, you might have
the impression that most shelter dogs have
suffered abuse. What we see far more often is
dogs who have been neglected in terms of
socialization, exercise, training, grooming,
general health and attention. We do our best
to make up for that the moment they come
into our care! The national groups like HSUS
and ASPCA, which raise millions of dollars,
must share some of that wealth with local
shelters like PHS/SPCA. We haven’t received
a penny from them! Many people assume our
shelter animals have a set amount of time to
be adopted. Not true. PHS/SPCAanimals
remain available for adoption as long as it
takes us to find good homes. You can’t teach
an old dog new tricks, right? Of course you
can. Adopters enroll “experienced” dogs in
our classes all the time. And, our classes are
rewards-based. The “rub the dog’s nose in his
mess” approach is outdated and ineffective.
Dogs do not learn well when teaching
includes punishment. Fear-based learning
does not make for a well-adjusted, happy
dog. Since we handle all our area’s sick,
injured and orphaned wildlife, I’ll toss in a
wildlife myth. If you have an issue with
urban wildlife in your yard, a trapper can fix
it by hauling away the animal, right? Only if
that trapper shows you how to get rid of
whatever is attracting the wildlife. In almost
every case, it’s a source of food, water or
shelter you don’t realize you’re providing the
wild animals.
Scott oversees PHS/SPCA’s Adoption,
Behavior and Training, Education, Outreach,
Field Services, Cruelty Investigation,
Volunteer and Media/PR program areas and
staff from the new Tom and Annette Lantos
Center for Compassion.
By Derrik J. Lang
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES — The next generation
of gaming is nearly here, but what about
the generation after that one?
Sony and Microsoft are launching their
new super-powered consoles in the com-
ing weeks. However, gamemakers at last
week’s Game Developers Conference Next
in Los Angeles were already contemplat-
ing outside-the-box innovations — from
wearable controllers to illuminated living
rooms — that might follow the
PlayStation 4 and Xbox One.
Here’s a glimpse at five big ideas pon-
dered at GDC Next:
SEEING IS BELIEVING
While the virtual reality headset seemed
to go the way of the beeper in 1990s,
updated takes on that technology have
emerged that could make a big impact on
the way players view virtual worlds in the
future. Google Glass, Oculus Rift and
CastAR are already giving early adopters
a peek at images in 3D or projected in real
life — all without a TV screen.
TIME WARP
Games have long explored what’s phys-
ically impossible in the real world, like
instantly teleporting across space in the
first-person puzzler “Portal” or effortless-
ly bending time in the 2D platformer
“Braid.” With higher definition graphics,
new controllers and increased fidelity,
expect game designers to continue to
push the limits of make-believe reality.
IF YOU BUILD IT
The success of “Skylanders” and
“Disney Infinity” has proven gamers
want to merge physical and virtual
worlds. The next evolution for players
might be to create their very own toys or
accessories utilizing at-home 3D printing
technology. Imagine scanning an old-
school “Star Wars” figure, printing a new
version then sending it to a virtual galaxy
far, far away.
TOUCHY SUBJECTS
Touchscreens have revolutionized the
way users interact with devices, but their
slick surfaces don’t always make for the
best game controllers. Advancements in
technology that physically respond to
touch — called “haptic touch” — com-
bined with motion detection and aug-
mented reality could bring interfaces
imagined in “Iron Man” and “Minority
Report” to life.
REALITY CHECK
As handheld devices become more per-
vasive and projection technology is
more accessible, interactivity will likely
continue to leap off TV screens, as illus-
trated earlier this year by Microsoft’s
IllumiRoom project, a conceptual sys-
tem that combined a projector and Kinect
sensor to augment areas surrounding a TV
screen with dazzling projected visualiza-
t i ons.
A look at what next-next-gen games could offer
Attendees at the Game Developers Conference in L.A. discuss innovative technology.
20
Monday • Nov. 11, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Need $$$ for
Hol i day Shoppi ng?
DOMINICK’S
JEWELRY
905 Laurel St. San Carlos
650.593.1199
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Appra|sa| Serv|ces º Jewe|ry Repa|r
Keith Morton Strai n, a resident of
Nazareth Vista Assisted Living and Skilled
Nursing Facility in Belmont since 2004,
turned 103 Nov. 9, 2013.
Keith was born in South Dakota in 1910
and moved to Staples, Minn., where he grew
up. Keith
was a
hunt e r,
trapper, barber,
mink farmer, and ultimately worked for the
Northern Pacific and Burlington Northern
Railroad. He retired from the railroad in the
early 1970s and then moved to Arizona,
where he lived until moving to Nazareth
Vista Senior Community.
Births
Raymond and Angela Mercado, of
Redwood City, gave birth to a baby boy at
Sequoia Hospital in Redwood City Oct. 28,
2013.
Isaac and Guadalupe Mendoza, of
Redwood City, gave birth to a baby boy at
Sequoia Hospital in Redwood City Oct. 28,
2013.
Si mon Tan and Fei Yang, of Belmont,
gave birth to a baby girl at Sequoia Hospital
in Redwood City Oct. 28, 2013.
Roger and Yi n- Pi ng Fong, of Foster
City, gave birth to a baby girl at Sequoia
Hospital in Redwood City Oct. 29, 2013.
Stephen and Julie Lane, of Woodside,
gave birth to a baby girl at Sequoia Hospital
in Redwood City Oct. 30, 2013.
Brad and Tonya Saunders, of San
Mateo, gave birth to a baby girl at Sequoia
Hospital in Redwood City Nov. 1, 2013.
Benjamin and Jacquelyn Kopf, of
San Mateo, gave birth to a baby boy at
Sequoia Hospital in Redwood City Nov. 2,
2013.
Lauren and Mi chel l l e Landf i el d,
of Redwood City, gave birth to a baby
boy at Sequoia Hospital in Redwood
City Nov. 2, 2013.
James McKee and Monique
Robi ns on, of Portola Valley, gave birth to
a baby boy at Sequoia Hospital in Redwood
City Nov. 3, 2013.
Cezar and Lucicleide Petriuc, of San
Mateo, gave birth to a baby girl at Sequoia
Hospital in Redwood City Nov. 4, 2013.
Tiem Song and Kohan Lin, of Palo
Alto, gave birth to a baby girl at Sequoia
Hospital in Redwood City Nov. 4, 2013.
Samuel and Jacqueline Osborne, of
Fremont, gave birth to a baby girl at
Sequoia Hospital in Redwood City Nov. 5,
2013.
TOM JUNG
The Joy Life Club held its inaugural Charity Ball at the Green Hills Country Club in Millbrae on
Oct.4.Guests were treated to an exhibition of ballroom dancing by 9-year-old Angelica Lowe
and 11-year old-Tyler Li, two-time National Champions in the Pre-Teen category. Established
in 2009, the Joy Life Club offers assistance to cancer patients in the Mid-Peninsula area. Its
services are available in Cantonese, Mandarin, and English.
Young ballroom dancers
The Society of St. Vincent de Paul of San Mateo County (SVdP) hosted "Walk a Mile in My
Shoes," part of a national St. Vincent de Paul event to raise awareness and funds for the
underserved and forgotten in local communities. The Sept. 28 two mile walk along the Bay
Trail in Burlingame took place immediately after SVdP's annual Ozanam Liturgy and Awards
Brunch. Among those taking part in the walk were (left to right) Noelle Bianchi; SVdP
Executive Director Lorraine Moriarty; SVdP Board Member Ken Bianchi; and SVdP Director of
Development Jodie Penner.
Charity walk
WORLD 21
Monday • Nov. 11, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Jim Gomez
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
TACLOBAN, Philippines —Corpses hung
from trees, were scattered on sidewalks or
buried in flattened buildings — some of the
thousands believed killed in one Philippine
city alone by ferocious Typhoon Haiyan
that washed away homes and buildings with
powerful winds and giant waves.
As the scale of devastation became clear
Sunday from one of the worst storms ever
recorded, officials said emergency crews
could find more bodies when they reach parts
of the archipelago cut off by flooding and
landslides. Desperate residents raided gro-
cery stores and gas stations in search of
food, fuel and water as the government
began relief efforts and international aid
operations got underway.
Even in a nation regularly beset by earth-
quakes, volcanoes and tropical storms,
Typhoon Haiyan appears to be the deadliest
natural disaster on record.
Haiyan hit the eastern seaboard of the
Philippines on Friday and quickly barreled
across its central islands, packing winds of
235 kph (147 mph) that gusted to 275 kph
(170 mph), and a storm surge of 6 meters (20
feet).
Its sustained winds weakened to 133 kph
(83 mph) as it crossed the South China Sea
before approaching northern Vietnam,
where it was forecast to hit land early
Monday. Authorities there evacuated hun-
dreds of thousands of people.
Hardest hit in the Philippines was Leyte
Island, where regional Police Chief Elmer
Soria said the provincial governor had told
him there were about 10,000 dead, primarily
from drowning and collapsed buildings.
Most were in Tacloban, the provincial capi-
tal of about 200,000 people that is the
biggest city on the island.
Reports also trickled in indicating deaths
elsewhere on the island.
On Samar Island, Leo Dacaynos of the
provincial disaster office said 300 people
were confirmed dead in one town and another
2,000 were missing, with some towns yet to
be reached by rescuers. He pleaded for food
and water, adding that power was out and
there was no cellphone signal, making com-
munication possible only by radio.
Reports from other affected islands indi-
cated dozens, perhaps hundreds more deaths.
With communications still knocked out in
many areas, it was unclear how authorities
were arriving at their estimates of the num-
ber of people killed, and it will be days
before the full extent of the storm is known.
"On the way to the airport, we saw many
bodies along the street," said Philippine-
born Australian Mila Ward, 53, who was
waiting at the Tacloban airport to catch a
military flight back to Manila, about 580
kilometers (360 miles) to the northwest.
"They were covered with just anything - tar-
paulin, roofing sheets, cardboard." She said
she passed "well over 100" bodies.
In one part of Tacloban, a ship had been
pushed ashore and sat amid damaged homes.
Haiyan inflicted serious damage to at least
six of the archipelago's more than 7,000
islands, with Leyte, Samar and the northern
part of Cebu appearing to bear the brunt of
the storm. About 4 million people were
affected by the storm, the national disaster
agency said.
Video from Eastern Samar province's
Guiuan township - the first area where the
typhoon made landfall - showed a trail of
devastation. Many houses were flattened and
roads were strewn with debris and uprooted
trees. The ABS-CBN video showed several
bodies on the street, covered with blankets.
"Even me, I have no house, I have no
clothes. I don't know how I will restart my
life, I am so confused," an unidentified
woman said, crying. "I don't know what
happened to us. We are appealing for help.
Whoever has a good heart, I appeal to you -
please help Guiuan."
The Philippine National Red Cross said
its efforts were hampered by looters, includ-
ing some who attacked trucks of food and
other relief supplies it was shipping to
Tacloban from the southern port of Davao.
Tacloban's two largest malls and grocery
stores were looted, and police guarded a fuel
depot. About 200 police officers were sent
into Tacloban to restore law and order.
With other rampant looting reported,
President Benigno Aquino III said he was
considering declaring a state of emergency
or martial law in Tacloban. Astate of emer-
gency usually includes curfews, price and
food supply controls, military or police
checkpoints and increased security patrols.
The massive casualties occurred even
though the government had evacuated nearly
800,000 people ahead of the typhoon.
Aquino flew around Leyte by helicopter on
Sunday and landed in Tacloban. He said the
government's priority was to restore power
and communications in isolated areas and
deliver relief and medical assistance.
Challenged to respond to a disaster of such
magnitude, the Philippine government also
accepted help from abroad.
President Barack Obama said in a state-
ment that he and his wife, Michelle, were
"deeply saddened" by the deaths and damage
from the typhoon. He said the U.S. was pro-
viding "significant humanitarian assis-
tance" and was ready to assist in relief and
recovery efforts.
U.S. Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel
directed the Pacific Command to deploy
ships and aircraft to support search-and-res-
cue operations and fly in emergency sup-
plies.
Typhoon deaths climb into thousands in Philippines
REUTERS
Survivors stay in their damaged house after super Typhoon Haiyan, one of the most
powerful storms ever recorded killed at least 10,000 people in the central Philippines.
WORLD
22
Monday • Nov. 11, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Fer mere ìn|ermcIìen cc|| ó50·344·5200 º www.smdcì|yjeurnc|.cemJsenìershewccse
* While supplies last. Some restrictions apply. Events subject to change.
Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
Presented by Health Plan of San Mateo and The Daily Journal
Free Services include
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Senior
Showcase
Information Fair
Friday, November 15, 2013
9:00am to 1:00pm
Foster City Recreation Center
650 Shell Blvd., Foster City
Free Admission, Everyone Welcome
Senior Resources and Services from
all of San Mateo County —over 40
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ADM
ISSION
By Jamey Keaten
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
PARIS — When Iran appeared
close to a preliminary deal with
world powers over its nuclear pro-
gram, France stepped up to say:
Not so fast — a surprise move that
exposed divisions among the
United States and other Western
negotiators who had long been in
lockstep on the issue.
France, analysts say, was moti-
vated by factors including its tough
stand against the spread of nuclear
weapons, skepticism about
Tehran’s trustworthiness, and the
longstanding French tradition of
speaking out on the world stage.
Critics faulted France for alleged
grandstanding and seeking closer
ties with Iran’s foes.
After the Geneva talks ended
early Sunday with no deal, diplo-
mats including U.S. Secretary of
State John Kerry said that progress
was nonetheless made and negotia-
tions will continue Nov. 20. He
said the U.S. was “grateful” to the
French and shared some of their
concerns.
After the failure of European-led
talks with Iran over the nuclear
program in the mid-2000s — when
America gave Iran the silent treat-
ment — Paris has staked out a hard-
line stance. While President Barack
Obama has recently sought a break-
through, France has little to gain
politically from an accord, and that
gives Paris a freer hand to stick to
strategic and security concerns.
In Geneva, the U.S., Britain,
Germany, Russia, China and top
EU diplomat Catherine Ashton
were looking for initial caps on
Iran’s ability to make an atomic
bomb, while Tehran sought some
easing of sanctions stifling its
economy. But French Foreign
Minister Laurent Fabius broke the
near-uniform silence of the diplo-
mats during the talks by using
French radio to express reserva-
tions about Iran’s enrichment of
uranium and prospects of produc-
ing plutonium.
“You know, the French are very
irritating. When the Americans
absolutely want to do something,
the French have this terrible habit
of somewhat disagreeing,” said
analyst Francois Heisbourg of the
Foundation for Strategic Research
think tank in Paris. “We actually
have experience in dealing with the
Iranians directly. There used to be
negotiations between the
Europeans (and the Iranians)
between 2003 and 2005.”
“The Americans haven’t spoken
to the Iranians since 1979. And the
Americans are telling us how it
should be done,” Heisbourg said.
As for the Americans, “maybe they
just want a deal — it happens all
the time in history: People badly
want a deal and end up by negotiat-
ing against themselves.”
Kerry said the United States has
“serious and capable” experts who
have dealt with Iran for years.
“We are not blind, and I don’t
think we’re stupid,” he told NBC’s
Meet The Press on Sunday. “I think
we have a pretty strong sense of
how to measure whether or not we
are acting in the interests in our
country, and of the globe, and par-
ticularly of our allies, like Israel,
and Gulf states, and others in the
region.”
France has had deep ties to Iran
over the years, notably striking
business deals and hosting
reformist former Iranian President
Mohammad Khatami in the late
1990s — when the biggest stick-
ing point was whether to serve wine
at dinner. (It was not.)
France was a major partner of the
shah, and also harbored Ayatollah
Ruhollah Khomenei in exile before
he returned home to lead the Islamic
Revolution. Today, the outspoken
opposition group, the National
Council of Resistance of Iran, has
its base in the Paris suburbs.
The bite of sanctions against
Iran in recent years has left dan-
gling billions of dollars worth of
French investment there, including
from companies like oil giant Total
and car maker PSAPeugeot Citroen.
Meanwhile, France has been cozy-
ing up to rich Gulf states such as
Saudi Arabia, Iran’s regional archri-
val.
French out-tough U.S. over Iran nuclear program
By Josef Federman
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
JERUSALEM — Israel’s prime minister on Sunday
accused the international community of being too soft
on the Palestinians, saying the world must understand
that peace is a “two-way street.”
Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu made his com-
ments in the wake of heavy interna-
tional criticism for plans to build
thousands of new homes in Jewish
settlements in the West Bank and
east Jerusalem.
During a swing through the region
last week, U.S. Secretary of State
John Kerry said the construction,
planned in occupied lands claimed by
the Palestinians, raised questions
about Israel’s seriousness about
peace.
In an address to Jewish leaders from North America,
Netanyahu said that it was time for the world to turn a
critical eye on the Palestinians.
“It cannot be that the Palestinians are forever pam-
pered by the international community,” he said.
He claimed the world had ignored Palestinian incite-
ment and a refusal to accept Israel as a Jewish state, and
said the world has accepted half-hearted Palestinian
attempts to fight violence.
“It’s time that the international community, certain-
ly the serious members of the international communi-
t y, understand this is a two-way street, because peace is
not a one-way street and it won’t be,” he said.
Mohammed Ishtayeh, a Palestinian peace negotiator,
said accepting Israel’s demand to be recognized as the
Jewish homeland would undermine the rights of
Israel’s Arab minority as well as claims of Palestinian
refugees to lost properties in what is now Israel.
He said Israel has not made similar demands of other
parties and accused Israel of trying ‘to complicate the
negotiating track.’
Under heavy U.S. pressure, Israel and the
Palestinians agreed in July to resume peace talks for
the first time in nearly five years.
While they have set an April target date for reaching
a peace agreement, there has been no visible progress.
The Palestinians, along with the U.S. and the rest of
the international community, object to settlement
construction. They say that settling Jews in lands
where the Palestinians want to establish their state is a
sign of bad faith. More than 500,000 Israelis now live
in the West Bank and east Jerusalem, territories cap-
tured by Israel in the 1967 Mideast war and claimed by
the Palestinians.
With both sides skeptical about prospects for peace,
some voices in Israel have begun to call for an interim
agreement.
The Palestinians reject an interim deal that falls
short of their aspirations, fearing it will become per-
manent.
Kerry has said he remains committed to reaching a
full agreement and currently has no intention to seek
an interim deal.
Israel leader says world is
too soft on Palestinians
Benjamin
Netanyahu
DATEBOOK 23
Monday • Nov. 11, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
MONDAY, NOV. 11
Veterans Day Observance. 10:30
a.m. Golden Gate National Cemetery,
1300 Sneath Lane, San Bruno. There
will be a program with speakers. For
more information call 355-5533.
Chamber Music Society of San
Francisco. 1 p.m. Burlingame
Woman’s Club, 241 Park Road,
Burlingame. Student musicians will
be present; Natasha Makhijani and
Jory Fankuchen, violins; Clio Tilton,
viola, Samsum Van Loon, cello. Free.
For more information go to
www.burlingamemusicclub.net.
TUESDAY, NOV. 12
Making Miniature Books for
Holiday Gift Giving (Workshop). 1
p.m. to 3 p.m. Little House Activity
Center, 800 Middle Ave., Menlo Park.
Every Tuesday until Dec. 3. $25 for
each session and $10 for supplies. All
student should bring: cutting board
or other work surface, scissors, metal
edge ruler, bone folder, PVC glue,
large binder clips, 10 pages of text
weight paper such as parchment or
other copier or printer paper.
Leather, book board and other mate-
rials will be provided by instructor.
For more information call 326-2025
ext. 222.
Ten Ways To Reduce Inflammation
In The Body. 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.
Learn some easy ways to adjust your
diet to decrease inflammation and
improve your overall health.
Preregistration required. Free. To reg-
ister, call 726-3110 x 101.
WEDNESDAY, NOV. 13
RSVP deadline for Newcomers’
Club luncheon on Tuesday, Nov. 19
at noon. Luncheon will be held at
Shalazar Restaurant, 300 El Camino
Real, Belmont. Program includes
James, one of the Seek Recipients,
who will be speaking regarding
People to People Tours in Europe.
Mary Thompson, a Newcomer mem-
ber, will also discuss her role as his
mentor. Checks for $25 must be sent
to Janet Williams at 1168 Shoreline
Drive, San Mateo. For more informa-
tion call 286-0688 or email smart-
janester@gmail.com.
JVS Peninsula Orientation and
Enrollment Session. 10 a.m. to
noon. Peninsula Jewish Community
Center, 800 Foster City Blvd., Foster
City. Attendees will be provided with
an overview of the services, pro-
grams and resources that will sup-
port them in their job searches. Free.
Registration is required at
jvs.org/jeanine or by calling 415-
377-8763. For more information
email jcowan@jvs.org.
Canadian Women’s Club. 11 a.m.
The Basque Cultural Center, 1800
Railroad Ave., South San Francisco.
$35. Guests and gentlemen wel-
come. Reservation mandatory. For
more information go to canadian-
womensclub.org.
Sons in Retirement Monthly
Luncheon. Noon. Elks Lodge, 229 W
20 Ave., San Mateo. For more infor-
mation call 341-8298.
San Mateo Professional Alliance
Weekly Networking Lunch. Noon
to 1 p.m. Spiedo Ristorante, 223 E.
4th Ave., San Mateo. Free admission,
but lunch is $17. For more informa-
tion call 430-6500.
Teen Movie: ‘Man of Steel.’ 3:30
p.m. Belmont Library, 1110 Alameda
de las Pulgas, Belmont. A young itin-
erant worker is forced to confront his
secret extraterrestrial heritage when
Earth is invaded by members of his
race. 148 mins, PG-13. Free. For more
information email conrad@smcl.org.
Five Little Monkeys Burlingame
Grand Opening. 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. Five
Little Monkeys Store, 1111
Burlingame Avenue,
Burlingame.Festivities will include a
ribbon cutting with Burlingame
Mayor Ann Keighran, games, raffle,
scavenger Hunt, goody bags and
more! $2 per person or three for $5.
For more information call 342-4411.
Family Time with Storyteller John
Weaver. 5:30 p.m. Balsam Hill, 1561
Adrian Road, Burlingame. Adults and
children will be inspired by stories
that touch on the importance of
family during the holidays. Take a
break from the daily hustle and bus-
tle, settle in with some snacks and
enjoy traditional tales told with a
holiday twist. Free. For more infor-
mation call 863-5466.
Sounds of the Streets. 7 p.m. to 9
p.m. College of San Mateo Theater,
1700 W. Hillsdale Blvd., building 3.
Sounds from the Streets is a tribute
to Santana as well as a fundraiser for
Milagro Foundation which benefits
undeserved and vulnerable children
around the world. $10 general
admission, $7 for students. For more
information call 574-6372.
‘My Friends Can, Why Can’t I?’ 6:30
p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Foster City Teen
Center, 670 Shell Blvd., Foster City.
The Foster City Police Department
will present. This presentation will
have parents explore their own lev-
els of comfort with new freedoms
for your child and how to evaluate
‘tweens’ readiness for a new priv-
iledge. For more information, call
286-3395 or email
thall@fostercity.org.
‘Unacceptable Levels.’ Screening
of the award-winning documentary
in Redwood City. 6:30 p.m. Cinemark
Redwood Downtown 20, 825
Middlefield Road, Redwood City. For
more information call 369-4551.
‘Sounds from the Street.’ 7 p.m. to
9 p.m. College of San Mateo Theatre
Building 3, 1700 W. Hillsdale
Boulevard, San Mateo. Sounds from
the Streets is presented by CSM
Ethnic Studies Prof. Rudy Ramirez.
This is a historical and musical pres-
entation on the emergence of Latin
Rock. $10 general admission; $7 for
students, staff, or faculty. Free park-
ing the Beethoven Lot 2.
‘The Invisible War’ film screening
and panel discussion. 7 p.m. to 9
p.m. Sofia University, 1059 E.
Meadow Circle, Palo Alto. ‘The
Invisible War’ chronicles the epidem-
ic of rape within the U.S. military. Kay
Leinerman, Ed. D., an adjunct faculty
member at Sofia University and
Santa Clara University will facilitate
the discussion. Free. $5 suggested
donation. For more information
email events@sofia.edu.
Cold Feat (Club Fox Blues Jam). 7
p.m. Club Fox, 2209 Broadway,
Redwood City. $5. For more infor-
mation call 877-435-9849 or visit
www.clubfoxrwc.com.
THURSDAY, NOV. 14
HICAP Program on Medicare:
Overview of Medicare and
Prescription Part D. 1 p.m. Millbrae
Library, 1 Library Ave., Millbrae. The
HICAP (Health Insurance Counseling
and Advocacy Program) provides
free and objective information and
counseling about Medicare.
Information will be provided and
questions will be answered. Free. For
more information call 697-7607.
Off the Grid: Burlingame. 5 p.m. to
9 p.m. Broadway Caltrain Station on
California Drive and Carmelita Ave.,
Burlingame. There will be a 10-ven-
dor lineup. For more information call
415-274-2510.
An Evening with Author John
Christgau. 7 p.m. Belmont Library,
1110 Alameda de las Pulgas,
Belmont. John Christgau will read
from his new book, ‘Michael and the
Whiz Kids: A Story of Basketball, Race
and Suburbia in the 1960s.’ Free. For
more information email
conrad@smcl.org.
Pacifica Spindrift Players presents
‘Social Security,’ a comedy by
Andrew Bergman. 8 p.m. Muriel
Watkin Gallery, 1050 Crespi Drive,
Pacifica. Tickets are $10. Runs
through Nov. 24. For tickets call the
reservation line at 359-8002.
FRIDAY, NOV. 15
Senior Showcase Information Fair.
9 a.m. to 1 p.m., Foster City
Recreation Center, 650 Shell Blvd.,
Foster City. Senior services and
resources from all of San Mateo
County with more than 40
exhibitors. Refreshments, goody
bags, health screenings. Free servic-
es include kidney screening, flu
shots, document shredding (free for
seniors) and more. Presented by
Health Plan of San Mateo and the
Daily Journal. Free. For more infor-
mation call 344-5200.
Flu shots for seniors over 65. 9 a.m.
to 1 p.m., Foster City Recreation
Center, 650 Shell Blvd., Foster City.
Get your flu shot for free, even if you
don't have any insurance. (Kaiser and
other HMO members excluded.
Kaiser and other HMOs require you
to go to their specified providers.)
Provided by the San Mateo County
Pharmacists Association during the
Senior Showcase Information Fair.
Other free health services include
blood pressure check and consulta-
tion with pharmacists. For more
information call 344-5200.
Free kidney screening. 9 a.m. to 1
p.m., Foster City Recreation Center,
650 Shell Blvd., Foster City. The
Kidney TRUST will be providing free
screening for chronic kidney disease
(CKD) during Senior Showcase
Information Fair. The CKD screening
will be part of a health and wellness
fair being held for the local commu-
nity. Free. For more information call
(877) 444-2398.
Document shredding event. 9
a.m. to 1 p.m., Foster City Recreation
Center, 650 Shell Blvd., Foster City.
Miracle Shred will help protect your
identity. Shredding takes place at
the Senior Showcase Information
Fair. Shredding is free for seniors
over 62. All others $5 per bankers
box. For more information call 455-
1820.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
how to manage money, stocks and
banks. Four of these men became
known as the “Silver Kings of the
Comstock.”
These four Irishmen: John Mackay,
James Fair, James Flood and William
O’Brien formed the Consolidated
Virginia Mining Company to deal in
silver stocks and operation of mines
on the Comstock Lode.
James Flood and William O’Brien
were partners in a bar on Washington
Street in San Francisco. Flood appar-
ently got much inside information
about silver stocks from those who
frequented the bar and Flood made good
use of it. He became very rich and, in
1860, he and O’Brien formed a partner-
ship with Mackey and Fair. Fair was a
mine superintendent and Mackay a
mining engineer. This combination of
talents was able to develop the most
prosperous mine on the Comstock
and, by 1875, the mines under their
control were valued at $1 billion. The
output of the mines in the first six
months of 1875 averaged $1.5 million
monthly. After 1875, due to the heat
and the depth, the mines could not be
operated profitably and many shut
down.
Fair became an overnight million-
aire who started out as a Placer gold
miner in California and moved to the
silver fields of Nevada where he operat-
ed a stamp mill. He became a superin-
tendent in the Hale and Norcross Mine
in Virginia City, Nev. and also became
a partner with Mackey, Flood and
O’Brien. Although not well liked, he
made fortunes in silver mining, rail-
roads and San Francisco real estate. He
and Mackey founded the Nevada Bank
to compete with the Bank of
California run by William Ralston.
The Fairmont Hotel was built and
named in his honor by his daughters
Theresa Fair Oelrichs and Virginia Fair
Vanderbilt who built the hotel.
Flood had a rare genius for stock
manipulation. The situation at the
Comstock Lode was very fluid and
changed day by day. Silver veins are
hard to predict, much harder that gold
veins, and a rumor about value and
amount of silver was easily manipulat-
ed by stock brokers. Rumors about the
end of a silver vein could cause panic
in the streets and runs on banks.
Millionaires could be ruined on these
rumors, and others could make fortunes
in a few hours. Flood was not well
liked but he became one of the top 100
wealthiest Americans. With this
wealth, he built a mansion, the James
Flood Mansion, at 1000 California St.
and a extravagant “white cake”
Victorian mansion near Menlo Park.
Rediscovering the Peninsula by Darold
Fredricks appears in the Monday edi-
tion of the Daily Journal.
Continued from page 3
HISTORY
The annual plant — formal name
thornmint Acanthomintha duttonii —
is a “cute little guy” 2 to 4 inches high
with white and purple flowers and some
thorns, said biologist Christal
Niederer of the Creekside Center for
Earth Observation, who is working on
the project. The plant, which is on
both the federal and state endangered
species lists, was only ever identified
in San Mateo County and now is only
in a secret location in Edgewood Park.
This single population has been on
the decline for years, with an estimate
of more than 53,000 plants in 1994
dropping to only 249 individuals
counted in 2008. That year, the
restoration project began and by May
2011, the population hit 3,450. But
without seeding the last few years, the
number of plants again plummeted and
advocates hope the winter planting
will prove successful.
Funding for future years had been
identified but was not yet available
when the Citizinvestor project
launched in September. However, the
thornmint didn’t immediately grab
attention and only two people had
contributed $90. The project closed
with 37 investors reaching the $5,400
goal.
But Bott said she isn’t surprised it
succeeded because it had a smaller
pledge period, a smaller amount of
money to raise than the other two and
it was helped by several events target-
ing parks supporters like the Friends
of Edgewood.
Niederer said Citizinvestor helped
the effort because it cast the net wider
than the usual donors and also educated
the public that endangered species are
not just the lions and polar bears of
advertisements but also in their very
own backyard.
“As a society, we have placed value
on rare things which is why we have an
Endangered Species Act and
Environmental Quality Act. People
have decided we should try to protect
these things especially in a place like
this where we don’t need to do that
much work,” Niederer said. “And per-
sonally, I don’t think that nature is a
luxury. ”
The money is expected from
Citizinvestor in the next few weeks.
And as for those other two projects?
“Just stagnant,” Bott said.
The remaining proposals are an
investment to replace the fire rings at
Memorial Park and three months worth
of funding for the Bicycle Sunday pro-
gram. As of Friday, nine investors had
contributed $1,400 of a needed
$27,540 to outfit the park’s 60 camp-
sites with replacements of the current
old brick and heavy metal grill con-
struction. Roughly three weeks remain
to pledge. The bicycle program so far
has 26 investors pledging $1,625 of
the $10,800 needed. Amonth remains.
The challenge of drumming up sup-
port for the campfire sites is the tim-
ing, Bott said.
“We launched it at the end of the
camping season so it becomes a little
less urgent or timely. People aren’t
necessarily thinking about camping
right now,” she said.
Information on the remaining proj-
ects is at www.citizinvestor.com
michelle@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 102
Continued from page 1
PLANT
PHOTO COURTESY OF CITIZINVESTOR.COM
San Mateo thornmint seed collection at the U.C. Botanical Garden
COMICS/GAMES
11-11-13
WEEKEND’S PUZZLE SOLVED
PREVIOUS
SUDOKU
ANSWERS
Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 • La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifieds
Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifieds
Boggle Puzzle Everyday in DateBook


Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.
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ACROSS
1 Expected
4 Grant and Tan
8 IBM rival
11 German city
12 Office note
13 Ms. Hagen of films
14 Belly dance instruments
15 Eagerness
17 Dry spell
19 Tiny specks
20 Dawn goddess
21 Wood for floors
22 Sharp dresser
25 Desk drawer items
28 Pi follower
29 Experts
31 St. Louis team
33 Shakes up
35 — noire
37 Hearty laugh
38 Washed
40 Out of practice
42 NATO turf
43 Fleur-de- —
44 Bamboozles
47 Left empty
51 Relativity name
53 Apply gold leaf
54 Tissue layer
55 — majeste
56 Give off heat
57 — -Mex cuisine
58 Historic times
59 Jellyfish habitat
DOWN
1 Sullen
2 Loosen
3 Came next
4 Bombay nannies
5 Thaw
6 Singer — Sumac
7 Friendly gathering
8 Paris eve
9 Sundance Kid’s girl
10 Islets
11 Hunk’s asset
16 Weatherman Al
18 Spanish painter
21 Dump
22 Hoops nickname
23 Melville captain
24 Ms. Ephron
25 Bulrush or cattail
26 Sunbeams
27 Grime
30 10-4 buddy
32 Wild blue yonder
34 Worries a lot
36 Clapton or Sevareid
39 Disco dance
41 Applications
43 Bowling spots
44 Equinox mo.
45 Giza’s river
46 Black gemstone
47 Travel document
48 Clock reading
49 Charles Lamb
50 Banned bug spray
52 Always, to Byron
DILBERT® CROSSWORD PUZZLE
CRANKY GIRL®
PEARLS BEFORE SWINE®
GET FUZZY®
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 2013
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) — Changes at home will
inspire you to take on a new project. You may have to
work on your presentation skills. Improvements to your
methods will pay off handsomely.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) — Outsiders
won’t see things the same way you do. Stick close
to home and make significant changes that will
improve your life and your surroundings. Don’t get
angry; get moving.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) — Put your money on
the line. Indulge in a venture that could change the way
you live and the people you associate with. Reach for
the stars; they’re within your reach.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) — Learn from your
mistakes. New avenues or ideas now may not pay
off immediately, but given time you will find a way to
make them do so.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) — Call up friends or
make arrangements that favor love, romance or family
fun. Entertaining your peers or a client will boost your
professional and financial status.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) — Buckle down and make
every move count. Watch out for pitfalls or traps that
might land you in trouble. Keep a close watch over your
possessions and avoid excess.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) — Get into the swing of
things. Indulge in activities that allow you to show off.
Romance is on the rise, and specials plans on your part
will meet with a warm reception.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) — Make your daily
round carefully. Expect someone to lead you
astray or put blame on you. Protect your position
and your reputation. Honest communication will
help you avoid trouble.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) — Enjoy getting out and
taking part in activities and events that allow you to
use your skills and display your talents. Networking
will lead to an unusual but fruitful proposal.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) — Don’t hem or haw when
asked what you are up to. Keep your answers
concise and your questions direct. Dealing with
home improvements can be costly. Cut your losses
and don’t go over budget.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) — A problem or confusion
situation can be cleared up with honest and
freewheeling communication. Love is in the stars, as
well as a great deal of small but positive change.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) — Complete whatever job
you’ve been given without complaint. If you are feeling
restless and want to make a change, find a way to
alleviate impulsivity by staying physically active.
COPYRIGHT 2013 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
24 Monday • Nov. 11, 2013
THE DAILY JOURNAL
25 Monday • Nov. 11, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
DELIVERY
DRIVER
PENINSULA
ROUTES
Wanted: Independent Contractor to provide
delivery of the Daily Journal six days per week,
Monday thru Saturday, early morning.
Experience with newspaper delivery required.
Must have valid license and appropriate insurance
coverage to provide this service in order to be
eligible. Papers are available for pickup in down-
town San Mateo at 3:30 a.m.
Please apply in person Monday-Friday, 9am to
4pm at The Daily Journal, 800 S. Claremont St
#210, San Mateo.
GOT JOBS?
The best career seekers
read the Daily Journal.
We will help you recruit qualified, talented
individuals to join your company or organization.
The Daily Journal’s readership covers a wide
range of qualifications for all types of positions.
For the best value and the best results,
recruit from the Daily Journal...
Contact us for a free consultation
Call (650) 344-5200 or
Email: ads@smdailyjournal.com
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
110 Employment
CAREGIVERS, HHA, CNA’S
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY
15 N. Ellsworth Avenue, Ste. 201
San Mateo, CA 94401
PLEASE CALL
650-206-5200
Please apply in person from Monday to Friday
(Between 10:00am to 4:00pm)
You can also call for an appointment or
apply online at
www.assistainhomecare.com
ASSISTA
IN-HOME CARE
DISHWASHER WANTED
New San Carlos Restaurant, Johnston’s
Saltbox email Max@johnstonsaltbox.com
Call (512)653-1836
110 Employment
CAREGIVERS
2 years experience
required.
Immediate placement
on all assignments.
Call (650)777-9000
CRYSTAL CLEANING
CENTER
San Mateo, CA
Two positions available:
Customer Service/Seamstress;
Presser
Are you…..Dependable,
friendly, detail oriented,
willing to learn new skills?
Do you have….Good English skills, a
desire for steady employment and
employment benefits?
Immediate openings for customer
service/seamstress and presser
positions.
If you possess the above
qualities, please call for an
Appointment: (650)342-6978
DRY CLEANERS / Laundry, part time,
Saturday 7am to 4pm. Counter, must
speak English Apply LaunderLand, 995
El Camino, Menlo Park.
110 Employment
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
110 Employment
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
RETAIL JEWELRY SALES +
SALES MGR- (jewelry exp req)
Benefits-Bonus-No Nights!
650-367-6500 FX 367-6400
jobs@jewelryexchange.com
110 Employment
SEWER AUTHORITY MID-COASTSIDE
Collection Maintenance
Worker I/II D.O.Q.
(Salary: $3947 -$4798/mo. for Collection
Maintenance Worker I D.O.Q.)
(Salary: $4930- $5992/mo. for Collection
Maintenance Worker II D.O.Q.)
Sewer Authority Mid-Coastside (SAM),
located in the City of Half Moon Bay,
is accepting applications for the posi-
tion of Collection Maintenance Worker
I or II (depending on qualifications).
The Collection Maintenance Worker I is
an entry level maintenance position.The
Collection Maintenance Worker II is a
journey level maintenance position.
MININUM QUALIFICATIONS: Educa-
tion: Equivalent to completion of the 12th
grade. License: Possession of a valid
State of California Class C Driver’s Li-
cense. 6 months previous sewer collec-
tions systems experience desired.
APPLICATION DUE DATE: November
15, 2013 by 3:00 pm. Applications may
be submitted online, via email, delivered
in person, or via US Postal Service (must
be postmarked November 15, 2013).
HOW TO OBTAIN AN APPLICATION
AND JOB DESCRIPTION:
For an application and complete job de-
scription please visit SAM’s website:
www.samcleanswater.org, click on the
link to the left, “Employment Opportuni-
ties”, or you may phone 650-726-0124.
TAXI & LIMO DRIVER, Wanted, full
time, paid weekly, between $500 and
$700 cash, (650)766-9878
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258009
The following person is doing business
as: Growfit, 2682 Middlefield Rd., Unit P,
REDWOOD CITY, CA 94063 is hereby
registered by the following owner: JR Fit-
ness, LLC, CA. The business is conduct-
ed by a Limited Liability Company. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on 10/03/2013.
/s/ Joseph Callinan /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/09/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/21/13, 10/28/13, 11/04/13, 11/11/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258109
The following person is doing business
as: Roda’s Cakes, 425 N. El Camino Re-
al, Unit 310, SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Roda Sweis, LLC, CA. The business is
conducted by a Limited Liability Compa-
ny. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on .
/s/ Roda Sweis /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/16/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/21/13, 10/28/13, 11/04/13, 11/11/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258146
The following person is doing business
as: Saviz Boutique, 1199A Laurel St.,
SAN CARLOS, CA 94070 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Saviz
Kasravy, 745 Elm St., #3, SAN CARLOS,
CA 94070. The business is conducted by
an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on .
/s/ Saviz Kasravy /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/17/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/28/13, 11/04/13, 11/11/13, 11/18/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258149
The following person is doing business
as: Lakota Moon, 172 South Blvd., SAN
MATEO, CA 94402. is hereby registered
by the following owner: Jan Eastman,
315 Castiian Way, San Mateo CA 94402.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on.
/s/ Jan Eastman /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/21/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/04/13, 11/11/13, 11/18/13, 11/25/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258152
The following person is doing business
as: 1) NNCC Nursing, Inc, 2) Nanci’s
Neighborhood Care Connections, 15 In-
yo St., BRISBANE, CA 94005. is hereby
registered by the following owner: Nanci
Denmark, BRISBANE, CA 94005. The
business is conducted by a Corporation.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 09/11/2013.
/s/ Nanci Denmark /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/21/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/04/13, 11/11/13, 11/18/13, 11/25/13).
26 Monday • Nov. 11, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
The San Mateo Daily Journal,
a locally owned, award-winning daily newspaper on the
Peninsula has an opening for a Account Executive.
The position is responsible for developing new business
opportunities and maintaining those customers within the
San Mateo County and Santa Clara County area.
The candidate will develop new business through a
combination of cold calling, outdoor canvassing, net-
working and any other technique necessary to achieve
his or her goals
º The candidate will effectively, professionally and
accurately represent the Daily Journal’s wide range of
products and services which include print advertising,
inserts, internet advertising, social media advertising,
graphic design services, event marketing, and more.
º The candidate will manage their clients in a heavily
customer-focused manner, understanding that real
account management begins after the sale has been
closed.
º A strong work ethic and desire to succeed responsibly
also required.
Work for the best local paper in the Bay Area.
To apply, send a resume and follow up to
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Immediate
Opening
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Account
Executive
Job Requirements:
º 8ell print, digital and other mar-
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º B2B sales experience is preferred
º hewspaper and other media
sales experience desired but not
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º Work well with others
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Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
LEGAL NOTICES
Fictitious Business Name Statements, Trustee
Sale Notice, Alcohol Beverage License, Name
Change, Probate, Notice of Adoption, Divorce
Summons, Notice of Public Sales, and More.
Published in the Daily Journal for San Mateo County.
Fax your request to: 650-344-5290
Email them to: ads@smdailyjournal.com
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257941
The following person is doing business
as: Stephanie’s Cleaning Service, 1427
Gordon St. Apt. #9, REDWOOD CITY,
CA 94061. is hereby registered by the
following owner: Ramon Hernandez,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on.
/s/ Ramon Hernandez /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/04/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/04/13, 11/11/13, 11/18/13, 11/25/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258395
The following person is doing business
as: Homes of Faith, 1637 De Anza Blvd.,
SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Angelina M.
Encarnacion, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on.
/s/ Angelina M. Encarnacion /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/06/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/11/13, 11/18/13, 11/25/13, 12/02/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258411
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Skyline Produce, 137 San Mar-
co Ave. #5, 94402 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Jesus Sanchez
824 7th Ave., San mateo, CA 94402 and
Gerardo Herrera, same address. The
business is conducted by a General
Partnership. The registrants commenced
to transact business under the FBN on
12/0113.
/s/ Jesus Sanchez /
/s/ Gerardo Herrera /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/06/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/11/13, 11/18/13, 11/25/13, 12/02/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258366
The following person is doing business
as: Ellen Taverner Consulting, 739 El
Granada Blvd. HALF MOON BAY, CA
94019 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Ellen Taverner, same ad-
dress. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on.
/s/ Angelina M. Encarnacion /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/06/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/11/13, 11/18/13, 11/25/13, 12/02/13).
NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR
CHANGE IN OWNERSHIP OF
ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGE LICENSE
Date of Filing Application: Nov. 4, 2013
To Whom It May Concern:
The Name(s) of the applicant(s) is/are:
CHINA BEE, LLC
The applicant(s) listed above are apply-
ing to Department of Alcoholic Beverage
Control to sell alcoholic beverages at:
31 S. B St.
SAN MATEO, CA 94401
Type of license applied for:
41-On Sale Beer and Wine - Eating
Place
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
November 11, 2013
203 Public Notices
NOTICE OF Public Sale of Personal
Property
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that, pur-
suant to California Civil Code, Section
1993, et seq., the owners of the real
property located at the intersection of An-
nie Street and 92nd St., Daly City, CA,
and formally designated as APN
#006.188.030, will sell at public auction
on November 27, 2013, at the hour of
10:00 AM, the following personal proper-
ty: Approximately 8 extension cords of
unknown length; hoses; miscellaneous
paint buckets; 2 approximately 12' lad-
ders; 4 wheelbarrows; an approximately
20' trailer; one 10'-15' inoperable ski boat
with trailer; 4 locked sheds; 1 GMC “Ral-
ly” model white van, model year un-
known; miscellaneous metal and wooden
construction materials; 1 item believed to
be a portable generator; 1 tractor-trailer
containing miscellaneous construction
materials and personal effects. All pur-
chased property must be paid for in cash
only and be removed from the premises
at the conclusion of the sale at the ex-
pense of the highest bidder of each item.
(Published in the San Mateo Daily Jour-
nal, 11/11/13, 11/18/13).
210 Lost & Found
LOST AFRICAN GRAY PARROT -
(415)377-0859 REWARD!
LOST DOG-SMALL TERRIER-$5000
REWARD Norfolk Terrier missing from
Woodside Rd near High Rd on Dec 13.
Violet is 11mths, 7lbs, tan, female, no
collar, microchipped. Please help bring
her home! (650)568-9642
LOST GOLD Cross at Carlmont Shop-
ping Cente, by Lunardi’s market
(Reward) (415)559-7291
LOST JORDANIAN PASSPORT AND
GREEN CARD. Lost in Daly City, If
found contact, Mohammad Al-Najjar
(415)466-5699
LOST ON Sunday 03/10/13, a Bin of
Documents on Catalpa Ave., in
San Mateo. REWARD, (650)450-3107
LOST SET OF CAR KEYS near Millbrae
Post Office on June 18, 2013, at 3:00
p.m. Reward! Call (650)692-4100
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
REWARD!! LOST DOG - 15LB All White
Dog, needs meds, in the area of Oaknoll
RWC on 3/23/13, (650)400-1175
RING FOUND IN BURLINGAME CALL
TO IDENTIFY (description) Foster City
Police Department Property Section
(650)286-3300
294 Baby Stuff
BABY CAR SEAT AND CARRIER $20
(650)458-8280
HIGH CHAIR by Evenflo. Clean, sturdy,
barely used. $20 (650)726-4985
NURSERY SET - 6 piece nursery set -
$25., (650)341-1861
295 Art
ART PAPER, various size sheets, 10
sheets, $20. (650)591-6596
ART: 5 charcoal nude figures, unframed,
14” x 18”, by Andrea Medina, 1980s.
$40. 650-345-3277
RUB DOWN TYPE (Lettraset), hundreds
to choose from. 10 sheets for $10.
(650)591-6596
296 Appliances
2 DELONGHI Heaters, 1500 Watts, new
$50 both (650)520-3425
2 DELONGHI Heaters, 1500 Watts, new
$50 both (650)520-3425
296 Appliances
AMANA HTM outdoor furnace heat ex-
changer,new motor, pump, electronics.
Model ERGW0012. 80,000 BTU $50.
(650)342-7933
COIN-OP GAS DRYER - $100.,
(650)948-4895
ELECTRIC DRYER (Kenmore) asking
$95, good condition! (650)579-7924
GAS STOVE (Magic Chef) asking $95,
good condition! (650)579-7924
HAIR DRYER, Salon Master, $10.
(650)854-4109
HUNTER OSCILLATING FAN, excellent
condition. 3 speed. $35. (650)854-4109
KENMORE MICROWAVE Oven: Table
top, white, good condition, $40 obo
(650) 355-8464
LEAN MEAN Fat Grilling Machine by
George Foreman. $15 (650)832-1392
LG WASHER/ DRYER in one. Excellent
condition, new hoses, ultracapacity,
7 cycle, fron load, $600, (650)290-0954
MAYTAG WALL oven, 24”x24”x24”, ex-
cellent condition, $50 obo, (650)345-
5502
OSTER MEAT slicer, mint, used once,
light weight, easy to use, great for holi-
day $25. (650)578-9208
PRESSURE COOKER Miromatic 4qt
needs gasket 415 333-8540 Daly City
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
REFRIGERATOR - Whirlpool, side-by-
side, free, needs compressor,
(650)726-1641
ROTISSERIE GE, US Made, IN-door or
out door, Holds large turkey 24” wide,
Like new, $80, OBO (650)344-8549
SANYO MINI REFRIGERATOR- $40.,
(415)346-6038
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
298 Collectibles
1920'S AQUA Glass Beaded Flapper
Purse (drawstring bag) & Faux Pearl
Flapper Collar. $50. 650-762-6048
1940 VINTAGE telephone bench maple
antiques collectibles $75 (650)755-9833
1953 CHEVY Bel Air Convertible model.
Sun Star 1:18 scale.Blue. Original box.
$20 cash. (650)654-9252
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
2 VINTAGE Light Bulbs circa 1905. Edi-
son Mazda Lamps. Both still working -
$50 (650)-762-6048
2003 AMERICAN Eagle silver proof dol-
lar. Original velvet box and COA. $70
Cash. (650)654-9252
84 USED European (34), U.S. (50) Post-
age Stamps. Most pre-World War II. All
different, all detached from envelopes.
$4.00 all, 650-787-8600
AFGHAN PRAYER RUG - very ornate,
$100., (650)348-6428
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
AUTOGRAPHED GUMBI collectible art
& Gloria Clokey - $35., (650)873-8167
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23”, $50. OBO,
(650)754-3597
298 Collectibles
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
JAPANESE MOTIF end table, $99
(650)520-9366
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MARK HAMILL autographed Star Wars
Luke figure, unopened rarity. 1995 pack-
age. $75 San Carlos, 650-255-8716.
MEMORABILIA CARD COLLECTION,
large collection, Marilyn Monroe, James
Dean, John Wayne and hundreds more.
$3,300/obo.. Over 50% off
(650)319-5334.
MICHAEL JORDAN POSTER - 1994,
World Cup, $10., (650)365-3987
SCHILLER HIPPIE poster, linen, Sparta
graphics 1968. Mint condition. $600.00.
(650)701-0276
SILVER PIECE dollar circulated $30 firm
415 333-8540 Daly City
STAR WARS 9/1996 Tusken Raider ac-
tion figure, in original unopened package.
$5.00, Steve, SC, 650-255-8716
TATTOO ARTIST - Norman Rockwell
figurine, limited addition, $90.,
(650)766-3024
TEA POTS - (6) collectables, good con-
dition, $10. each, (650)571-5899
TRIPOD - Professional Quality used in
1930’s Hollywood, $99, obo
(650)363-0360
UNIQUE, FRAMED to display, original
Nevada slot machine glass plate. One of
a kind. $50. 650-762-6048
WORLD WAR II US Army Combat field
backpack from 1944 $99 SOLD!
300 Toys
‘66 CHEVELLE TOY CAR, Blue collecti-
ble. $12. (415)337-1690
LARGE ALL Metal Tonka dump truck.
as new, $25, SOLD!
PINK BARBIE 57 Chevy Convertible
28" long (sells on E-Bay for $250) in box
$99 (650)591-9769
RADIO CONTROL car; Jeep with off
road with equipment $99 OBO
(650)851-0878
STAR WARS R2-D2 action figure. Un-
opened, original 1995 package. $10.
Steve, San Carlos, 650-255-8716.
STAR WARS, Battle Droid figures, four
variations. Unopened 1999 packages.
$60 OBO. Steve, 650-255-8716.
TONKA DUMP Truck with tipping bed,
very sturdy Only $10 SOLD!
TONKA METAL Excavator independent
bucket and arm, $25 SOLD!
TOY - Barney interactive activity, musical
learning, talking, great for the car, $16.
obo, (650)349-6059
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
1920 MAYTAG wringer washer - electric,
gray color, $100., (650)851-0878
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14” x 21”, carved top, $45.,
(650)341-7890
ANTIQUE CRYSTAL/ARCADE Coffee
Grinder. $80. 650-596-0513
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE WASHING MACHINE - some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
BREADBOX, METAL with shelf and cut-
ting board, $30 (650)365-3987
MAHOGANY ANTIQUE Secretary desk,
72” x 40” , 3 drawers, Display case, bev-
elled glass, $500. (650)766-3024
303 Electronics
2 RECTILINEAR speakers $99 good
condition. (650)368-5538
303 Electronics
27” SONY TRINITRON TV - great condi-
tion, rarely used, includes remote, not flat
screen, $65., (650)357-7484
46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
APPLE Harmon Kardon speakers, sub-
woofer, one side rattles. In San Carlos,
$40, 650-255-8716.
AUTO TOP hoist still in box
$99.00 or best offer (650)493-9993
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
BLACKBERRY PHONE good condition
$99.00 or best offer (650)493-9993
DVD PLAYER, $25. Call (650)558-0206
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
IPHONE GOOD condition $99.00 or best
offer (650)493-9993
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
PHILLIPS ENERGY STAR 20” color TV
with remote. Good condition, $20
(650)888-0129
PIONEER STEREO Receiver 1 SX 626
excellent condition $99 (650)368-5538
SAMSUNG 27" TV Less than 6 months
old, with remote. Moving must sell
$100.00 (650) 995-0012
SANYO C30 Portable BOOM BOX,
AM/FM STEREO, Dolby Metal Tape
player/recorder, 2/3 speakers boxes, $50
650-430-6046
SET OF 3 wireless phones all for $50
(650)342-8436
SLIDE PROJECTOR Air Equipped Su-
per 66 A and screen $30 for all
(650)345-3840
SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with re-
mote good condition $99 (650)345-1111
304 Furniture
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
3 DRAWER PLATFORM BED Real
wood (light pine, Varathane finish). Twin
size. $50 (650)637-1907
8 DRAWER wooden dresser $99
(650)759-4862
ALASKAN SCENE painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
ANODYZED BRONZE ETEGERE Tall
banker’s rack. Beautiful style; for plants
flowers sculptures $70 (415)585-3622
ARMOIRE CABINET - $90., Call
(415)375-1617
AUTUMN TABLE Centerpiece unop-
ened, 16 x 6, long oval shape, copper
color $10.00 (650)578-9208
BBQ GRILL, Ducane, propane $90
(650)591-4927
BRASS DAYBED - Beautiful, $99.,
(650)365-0202
CABINET BLONDE Wood, 6 drawers,
31”x 61” x 18” , $45. (650)592-2648
CHANDELIER, ELEGANT, $75.
(650)348-6955
CHINA CABINET, 53” x “78” wooden
with glass. Good shape. $120 obo.
(650)438-0517
304 Furniture
CHINESE LACQUERED cabinet, 2
shelves and doors. Beautiful. 23 width 30
height 11 depth $75 (650)591-4927
CURIO CABINET 55" by 21" by 12"
Glass sides, door & shelves $95 OBO
(650)368-6271
DINETTE TABLE walnut with chrome
legs. 36”x58” with one leaf 11 1/2”. $50,
San Mateo (650)341-5347
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DRESSER - 6 drawer 61" wide, 31" high,
& 18" deep $50, (650)592-2648
DRESSERlarge, $55. Call
(650)558-0206
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
END TABLE, medium large, with marble
top. and drawer. $60 or best offer,
(650)681-7061
EZ CHAIR, large, $15. Call (650)558-
0206
FLAT TOP DESK, $35.. Call (650)558-
0206
HEADBOARD, QUEEN-SIZE,HALF-
MOON shape,decorated with small
stones,very heavy. Free to take away!
(650-342-6192)
I-JOY MASSAGE chair, exc condition
$95 (650)591-4927
KITCHEN CABINETS - 3 metal base
kitchen cabinets with drawers and wood
doors, $99., (650)347-8061
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
MATCHING RECLINER, SOFA & LOVE
SEAT - Light multi-colored fabric, $95.
for all, (650)286-1357
MIRRORS, large, $25. Call
(650)558-0206
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
NATURAL WOOD table 8' by 4' $99
(650)515-2605
OAK ENTERTAINMENT Cabinet/lighted,
mirrored,glass Curio Top. 72" high x 21"
deep x 35" wide. $95.00 (650)637-0930
OFFICE LAMP, small. Black & white
pen and paper holder. Brand new, in
box. $10 (650)867-2720
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PATIO TABLE with 4 chairs, glass top,
good condition 41” in diameter $95
(650)591-4927
PEDESTAL DINETTE 36” Square Table
- $65., (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL SINK $25 (650)766-4858
PORTABLE JEWELRY display case
wood, see through lid $45. 25 x 20 x 4 in-
ches. (650)592-2648.
PRIDE MECHANICAL Lift Chair, Infinite
postion. Excellent condition, owner’s
manual included. $400 cash only,
(650)544-6169
QUEEN SIZE Hide a Bed, Like new
$275, (650)245-5118
RECLINING CHAIR, almost new, Beige
$100 (650)624-9880
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
27 Monday • Nov. 11, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
304 Furniture
ROCKING CHAIR Great condition,
1970’s style, dark brown, wooden,
suede cushion, photo availble, $99.,
(650)716-3337
ROCKING CHAIR w/wood carving, arm-
rest, rollers, swivels $99, (650)592-2648
ROUND DINING table, by Ethan Allen,
sturdy good cond. $95 (650)726-4985
SEWING TABLE, folding, $20. Call
(650)558-0206
SHELVING UNIT from IKEA interior
metal, glass nice condition $50/obo.
(650)589-8348
SOFA 7-1/2' $25 (650)322-2814
SOFA PASTEL Strips excellent condi-
tion $99 (650)701-1892
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
STORAGE TABLE light brown lots of
storage good cond. $45. (650)867-2720
TEA / UTILITY CART, $15. (650)573-
7035, (650)504-6057
TEACART - Wooden, $60. obo,
(650)766-9998
TEAK BASE and glass cover cheese
holder. Great for holidays. $18.
(650)341-6402
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
TV CABINET, brown wood, 3 shelves, 2
doors, brass hardware, 34 3/8wx20
1/2dx28 3/8h good condition. $35
(650)347-5104
TV STAND brown. $40.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
TV STAND, with shelves, holds large TV,
very good condition. $90. (650)573-7035,
(650)504-6057.
WHITE 5 Drawer dresser.Excellent con-
dition. Moving. Must sell $90.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
WICKER DRESSER, white, 3 drawers,
exc condition 31 width 32 height 21.5
depth $35 (650)591-4927
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE” decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Three avail-
able, Call (650)345-5502
BRADFORD COLLECTOR Plates THAI
(Asian) - $35 (650)348-6955
CANDLEHOLDER - Gold, angel on it,
tall, purchased from Brueners, originally
$100., selling for $30.,(650)867-2720
COFFEE MAKER, Makes 4 cups $12,
(650)368-3037
COOKING POTS (3) with lids: 21/2 gal,
4 gal, 5 gal $20 for all. (650)574-3229
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
HOUSE HEATER Excellent condition.
Works great. Must sell. $30.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
ICE CREAM MAKER - Westbend 4 qt.
ice cream maker, brand new, $30,
(650)726-1037
KIRBY VACUUM cleaner good condition
with extras $90 OBO (650)345-5502
MANGLE-SIMPLEX FLOOR model,
Working, $20 (650)344-6565
OSTER BREAD maker (new) $45.,
(650)520-3425
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
306 Housewares
PUSH LAWN MOWER - very good
condition $25., (650)580-3316
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
STANDARD BATHROOM SET beige lid,
cover and mat. $10 (650)574-3229
TWO 21 quart canning pots, with lids, $5
each. (650)322-2814
VACUMN EXCELLENT condition. Works
great.Moving. Must sell. $35.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
VINTAGE VICTORIAN cotton lawn
dress, - $65. (650)348-6955
VINYL SHOWER CURTAIN beige /coral
/white floral on ivory, $10 (650)574-3229
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
LADIES GLOVES - gold lame' elbow
length gloves, size 7.5, $15. new,
(650)868-0436
PRO DIVER Invicta Watch. Brand new in
box, $60. (650)290-0689
WATCHES - Quicksilver (2), brand new
in box, $40 for both, (650)726-1037
308 Tools
12-VOLT, 2-TON Capacity Scissor Jack
w/ Impact Wrench, New in Box, Never
Used. $85.00 (650) 270-6637 after 5pm
6-8 MISC. TOOLS - used, nail tray with
nails, $15., (650)322-2814
BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269
CIRCULAR SAW, Craftsman, 10”, 4 long
x 20” wide. Comes w/ stand - $70.
(650)678-1018
CRACO 395 SP-PRO, electronic paint
sprayer.Commercial grade. Used only
once. $600/obo. (650)784-3427
CRAFTMAN JIG Saw 3.9 amp. with vari-
able speeds $65 (650)359-9269
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN 9" Radial Arm Saw with 6"
dado set. No stand. $55 (650)341-6402
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
ESSIC CEMENT Mixer, gas motor, $850,
(650)333-6275
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
LOG CHAIN (HEAVY DUTY) 14' $75
(650)948-0912
MAKITA 10" mitre saw with 100 tooth
carbon blade $60 SOLD!
PROFESSIONAL MORTAR BOX Like
New $25 (650)368-0748
PUSH LAWN mower $25 (650)851-0878
ROLLING STEEL Ladder10 steps, Like
New. $475 obo, (650)333-4400
TOOL BOX full of tools. Moving must
sell. $100.00 (650) 995-0012
309 Office Equipment
CANON COPIER, $55. Call
(650)558-0206
DESK - 7 drawer wood desk, 5X2X2.5'
$25., (650)726-9658
FILING CABINET, 4-drawer, letter $25
(650)341-8342
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20., (650)871-7200
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20.00 (650)871-7200
2 FLOWER pots with Gardenia's both for
$20 (650)369-9762
2 GALLON Sprayer sears polythene
compressed air 2 1/2 inch opening, used
once $10 San Bruno (650)588-1946
4 IN 1 STERO UNIT. CD player broken.
$20., (650)834-4926
70 BAMBOO POLES - 6 to 12ft. long
$40. for all can deliver, (415)346-6038
ADULT VIDEOS - (3) DVDs classics fea-
turing older women, $20. each or, 3 for
$50 (650)212-7020
Alkaline GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM - ,
PH Balance water, anti-oxident proper-
ties, new, $100., (650)619-9203.
ALUMINUM WALKER, Foldable with
wheels. $15 (650)756-7878
ALUMINUM WINDOWS - (10)double
pane, different sizes, $10. each,
(415)819-3835
ANTIQUE CAMEL BACK TRUNK -wood
lining. (great toy box) $99.,
(650)580-3316
ANTIQUE KILIM RUNNER woven zig
zag design 7' by 6" by 4' $99.,
(650)580-3316
ANTIQUE LANTERN Olde Brooklyn lan-
terns, battery operated, safe, new in box,
$100, (650)726-1037
ARTIFICIAL FICUS TREE 6 ft. life like,
full branches. in basket $55. (650)269-
3712
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
BABY BJORN Little Potty Ideal 4
travel/early training,(650)595-3933
BLUE/WHITE DUCK shaped ceramic
teapot, hand painted, made in China.
$18. (650)341-6402
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
BODY BY JAKE AB Scissor Exercise
Machine w/instructions. $50.00
(650)637-0930
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BREVILLE JUICE Maker multi speed
(Williams Somoma) never used $90
(650)994-4783
BRIEFCASE 100% black leather
excellent condition $75 (650)888-0129
BUFFET CENTERPIECE: Lalique style
crystal bowl. For entre, fruit, or dessert
$20 (415)585-3622
CHEESESET 6 small and 1 large plate
Italian design never used Ceramica Cas-
tellania $25. (650)644-9027
DOLLS: NEW, girl and boy in pilgrim
costume, adorable, soft fabric, beautifully
made. $30. 650-345-3277
DVD'S TV programs 24 4 seasons $20
ea. (650)952-3466
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good
condition $50., (650)878-9542
EXOTIC EROTIC Ball SF & Mardi gras 2
dvd's $25 ea. (415)971-7555
EXTENDED BATH BENCH - never
used, $45. obo, (650)832-1392
FOLDING MAHJHONG table with medal
chrome plated frame $40 SOLD!
FULL SIZE quilted Flowerly print green &
print $25 (650)871-7200
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
310 Misc. For Sale
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GOURMET SET for cooking on your ta-
ble. European style. $15 (650)644-9027
GRANDFATHER CLOCK with bevel
glass in front and sides (650)355-2996
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10),
(650)364-7777
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
HOT SANDWICH maker elec, perfect,
$9.95 (650)595-3933
HUMAN HAIR Wigs, (4) Black hair, $90
all (650)624-9880
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
IGLOO COOLER - 3 gallon beverage
cooler, new, still in box, $15.,
(650)345-3840
JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
K9 ADVANTIX - for dogs 21-55 lbs.,
repels and kills fleas and ticks, $60.,
(650)343-4461
KENNESAW ORIGINAL salute cannon
$30. (650)726-1037
LAMPSHADE - Shantung, bell shaped,
off white, 9” tall, 11” diameter, great con-
dition, $7., (650)347-5104
LANDSCAPE PICTURES (3) hand
painted 25" long 21" wide, wooden
frame, $60 for all 3, (650)201-9166
LAWN CHAIRS (4) White, plastic, $8.
each, (415)346-6038
LOW RIDER magazines 80 late 1999 all
for $80 SOLD!
LUGGAGE, BLACK Samsonite with roll-
ers, 3 compartments, condition clean,
never used. makeshift handle, $40
(650)347-5104
MANUAL LAWN mower ( by Scott Turf )
never used $65 (650)756-7878
MARTEX TOWEL SET (bath, hand,
face) - gold-colored - $15 (650)574-3229
MARTEX TOWEL SET (bath, hand.
face) - clay-colored - $15 (650)574-3229
MATCHING LIGHT SCONCES - style
wall mount, plug in, bronze finish, 12”Lx
5”W , $12. both, SOLD!
MEDICINE CABINET - 18” X 24”, almost
new, mirror, $20., (650)515-2605
MEN’S LEATHER travel bags (2), used
$25 each.(650)322-2814
MERITAGE PICNIC Time Wine and
Cheese Tote - new black $45
(650)644-9027
MIRROR 41" by 29" Hardrock maple
frame $90 OBO (650)593-8880
MODERN ART Pictures: 36"X26", $90
for all obo Call (650)345-5502
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
OUTDOOR GREENHOUSE. Handmade.
33" wide x 20 inches deep. 64.5 " high.
$70.00 (650)871-7200
OVAL MIRROR $10 (650)766-4858
PET CARRIER Excellent Condition Very
Clean Size small "Petaire" Brand
$50.00 (650)871-7200
PRINCESS PLANT 6' tall in bloom pot-
ted $15 (415)346-6038
PUNCH BOWL SET- 10 cup plus one
extra nice white color Motif, $25.,
(650)873-8167
QUEENSIZE BEDSPREAD w/2 Pillow
Shams (print) $30.00 (650)341-1861
310 Misc. For Sale
RED DEVIL VACUUM CLEANER - $25.,
(650)593-0893
REVERSIBLE KING BEDSPREAD bur-
gundy; for the new extra deep beds. New
$60 (415)585-3622
RICHARD NORTH Patterson 5 Hard-
back Books @$3.00 each (650)341-1861
ROGERS' BRAND stainless steel steak
knife: $15 (415)585-3622
SCARY DVD movies, (7) in cases, Zom-
bies, Date Movie, Labyrinth, in original
boxes. $10/all. (650)578-9208
SET OF 11 Thomas registers 1976 mint
condition $25 (415)346-6038
SF GREETING CARDS -(300 with enve-
lopes) factory sealed, $10 (650)365-3987
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48” x 69”
$70 (650)692-3260
SINGER SEWING machine 1952 cabinet
style with black/gold motor. $35.
(650)574-4439
SONY EREADER - Model #PRS-500, 6”,
$60., (650)294-9652
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
STERLING SILVER loving cup 10" circa
with walnut base 1912 $65
(650)520-3425
TRIVIAL PURSUIT - Master Game/Ge-
nus Edition. Has all cards. Mint condi-
tion. Asking $10. (650)574-3229
TWIN SIZE quilt Nautica, New. Yellow,
White, Black Trim “San Marino" pattern
$40 Firm (650)871-7200.
USB VEHICLE charger any mini USB
device $20 (650)595-3933
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WALKER - never used, $85.,
(415)239-9063
WEST AFRICAN hand carved tribal
masks - $25 (650)348-6955
WHEEL CHAIR asking $75 OBO
(650)834-2583
WOMEN'S LADY Cougar gold iron set
set - $25. (650)348-6955
XMAS DECORATIONS: 6 unique, hand
painted, jointed new toy soldiers, holding
musical instrument. $34. 650-345-3277
311 Musical Instruments
GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO -
Appraised @$5450., want $3500 obo,
(650)343-4461
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
LAGUNA ELECTRIC 6 string LE 122
Guitar with soft case and strap $75.
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
SHERMAN CLAY Player Piano, with 104
player rolls, $1000, (650)579-1259
UKULELE STILL in box unused, no
brand $35 (650)348-6428
312 Pets & Animals
BAMBOO BIRD Cage - very intricate de-
sign - 21"x15"x16". $50 (650)341-6402
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
100% COTTON New Beautiful burgundy
velvet drape 82"X52" W/6"hems: $45
(415)585-3622
ALPINESTAR MOTORCYCLE JEANS
Twin Stitched. Internal Knee Protection.
Tags Attached. Mens Sz 34 Grey/Blue
Denim $50.00 (650)357-7484
AUTHENTIC PERUVIAN VICUNA PON-
CHO: 56” square. Red, black trim, knot-
ted fringe hem. $99 (650)375-8044
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
HOODED ALL-WEATHER JACKET:
reversible. Outer: weatherproof tan color.
Iner: Navy plush, elastic cuffs. $15
(650)375-8044
INDIAN SARI $50 (650)515-2605
316 Clothes
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES DONEGAL design 100% wool
cap from Wicklow, Ireland, $20. Call
(650)341-8342
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES FUR Jacket (fake) size 12 good
condition $30 (650)692-3260
LADIES WINTER coat 3/4 length, rust
color, with fur collar, $30 obo
(650)515-2605
LADIES WOOL BLAZER: Classic, size
12, brass buttons. Sag Harbor. Excellent
condition. $18.00 (650)375-8044
LEATHER JACKET Classic Biker Style.
Zippered Pockets. Sturdy. Excellent Con-
dition. Mens, XL Black Leather $50.00
(650)357-7484
LEATHER JACKET, brown bomber, with
pockets.Sz XL, $88. (415)337-1690
LEATHER JACKETS (5) - used but not
abused. Like New, $100 each.
(650)670-2888
MENS JEANS (11) Brand names various
sizes 32,33,34 waist 30,32 length $100.
for all (650)347-5104
MENS WRANGLER jeans waist 31
length 36 five pairs $20 each plus bonus
Leonard (650)504-3621
MINK CAPE, beautiful with satin lining,
light color $75 obo (650)591-4927
NIKE PULLOVER mens heavy jacket
Navy Blue & Red (tag on) Reg. price
$200 selling for $59 (650)692-3260
PROM PARTY Dress, Long sleeveless
size 6, magenta, with shawl like new $40
obo (650)349-6059
SILK SCARF, Versace, South Beach
pattern 100% silk, 24.5”x34.5” made in
Italy, $75. $(650)591-6596
VICTORIA SECRET 2 piece nightgown,
off white, silk lace. tags attached. paid
$120, selling for $55 (650)345-1111
WHITE LACE 1880’s reproduction dress
- size 6, $100., (650)873-8167
WINTER COAT, ladies european style
nubek leather, tan colored, green lapel &
hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
WOMAN;S LEVI'S Jacket Pristine cond.,
faded Only $29 (650)595-3933
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10 labeled Du-
plex and is priced at $15 (650)574-4439
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10. Elie Tahari
new, never worn $25 (650)574-4439
317 Building Materials
(1) 2" FAUX WOOD WINDOW BLIND,
with 50" and 71" height, still in box, $50
obo (650)345-5502
30 FLUORESCENT Lamps 48" (brand
new in box) $75 for all (650)369-9762
70 SPREADER cleats, 1” x 8” for 8”
foundations. $25. (650)345-3840
BATHROOM VANITY, antique, with top
and sink: - $65. (650)348-6955
BRAND NEW Millgard window + frame -
$85. (650)348-6955
DRAIN PIPE - flexible, 3” & 4”, approx.
20’ of 3”, 40 ft. of 4”, $25.all,
(650)851-0878
ELECTRICAL MATERIAL - Connectors,
couplings, switches, rain tight flex, and
more.Call. $30.00 for all (650)345-3840
ONE BOX of new #1 heavy CEDAR
SHAKE shingles $14.00. SOLD!
PACKAGED NUTS, Bolts and screws,
all sizes, packaged $99 (650)364-1374
PVC - 1”, 100 feet, 20 ft. lengths, $25.,
(650)851-0878
USED LUMBER pieces 5 2x4's, 2 2x6's,
3 plywood sheets ALL $30.00
SOLD!
318 Sports Equipment
"EVERLAST FOR HER" Machine to
help lose weight $30., (650)368-3037
2 BASKETBALLS Spalding NBA, Hardly
used, $30 all (650)341-5347
2 SOCCER balls hardly used, $30 all
San Mateo, (650)341-5347
BOWLING BALLS. Selling 2 - 16 lb.
balls for $25.00 each. (650)341-1861
BUCKET OF 260 golf balls, $25.
(650)339-3195
CAMPER DOLLY, excellent condition.
Used only once. $150. SOLD!
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18” di-
meter, “Halex” brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
DL1000 BOAT Winch Rope & More,
$50., (650)726-9658
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
FISHERS MENS skis $35 (650)322-2814
GIRLS BIKE, Princess 16” wheels with
helmet, $50 San Mateo (650)341-5347
28 Monday • Nov. 11, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 Dinner for Mister
Ed
5 On-the-job extras
10 Cave feedback
14 Snow remover
15 Ice show site
16 D’back or Met
17 “East of Eden”
director Kazan
18 Popular half of a
45, usually
19 Time division on a
map
20 Five-time Super
Bowl winners
23 Do a librarian’s
chore
24 Last Greek letter
27 Pipeline product
28 “It’s all about the
beer” Dutch
brewer
31 Tweezer targets
34 Club for the
supersmart
35 Soccer goal
36 Weight training
units
37 “Miracle on 34th
Street” store
38 Stand up
39 Make the most of
40 Obama daughter
whose Secret
Service code
name is
“Rosebud”
41 Parcels (out)
42 Big name in
sneakers
44 Droop in the
middle
45 Ford flop
46 Insurance filings
50 Standard flown in
Ho Chi Minh City
55 Thug’s knife
57 Snow-block home
58 Prefix with cast
59 Not contaminated
60 34-Across
member
61 Soprano’s solo
62 Shoe inserts
63 Road curves
64 Headliner, or
symbol
associated with
20-, 28-, 37-, 42-
and 50-Across
DOWN
1 Opinion pieces
2 God of Islam
3 Fabric often
decorated with
pastoral scenes
4 Gulps down
5 Whole bunch
6 Guitarist Clapton
7 Start all over
8 Felt in one’s
bones
9 Swedish
automaker
10 Digestive protein
11 Tight, as families
12 Lady lobster
13 Find at the mine
21 “We Try Harder”
car rental chain
22 Chaplin
granddaughter
named for her
grandmother
25 V-formation
birds
26 Gets in the poker
game
28 Anne of “Donnie
Brasco”
29 One-named
“Orinoco Flow”
singer
30 Mag. edition
31 Groundbreaking
comic Lenny
32 Put down new
grass sections
33 Starts to shoot
34 The “m” in
E = mc
2
37 Make a dent in,
say
38 Rowing races
40 Actress Ward
41 Gander or
gobbler
43 Soft-pile fabric
44 Offshoots
47 Like neon and
xenon
48 Obama daughter
whose Secret
Service code
name is
“Radiance”
49 Mascara mishap
51 The Bee Gees’
“Gee”
52 Beast of fables
53 Spanish dessert
54 Partner of null
55 Coppertone letters
56 Shade of color
By C.C. Burnikel
(c)2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
11/11/13
11/11/13
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
318 Sports Equipment
GOTT 10-GAL beverage cooler$20.
(650)345-3840
KIDS 20" mongoose mountain bike 6
speeds front wheel shock good condition
asking $65 (650)574-7743
LADIES BOWLING SET- 8 lb. ball, 7 1/2
sized shoes, case, $45., (650)766-3024
LADIES STEP thruRoadmaster 10
speed bike w. shop-basket Good
Condition. $55 OBO call: (650) 342-8510
MENS ROLLER Blades size 101/2 never
used $25 (650)520-3425
POWER PLUS Exercise Machine $99
(650)368-3037
REI 2 man tent $40 (650)552-9436
SALMON FISHING weights 21/2 pound
canon balls $25 (650)756-7878
Say Goodbye To The 'Stick In
Style & Gear Up For a Super
Season!
49er Swag at Lowest Prices
Niner Empire
957C Industrial Rd. San Carlos
T-F 10-6; Sa 10 -4
ninerempire.com
(415)370-7725
SCHWINN 26" man's bike with balloon
tires $75 like new (650)355-2996
STATIONARY BIKE, Volt, Clean, $15
(650)344-6565
318 Sports Equipment
STATIONERY BIKE, $20. (650)573-
7035, (650)504-6057.
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
VINTAGE ENGLISH ladies ice skates -
up to size 7-8, $40., (650)873-8167
WET SUIT - medium size, $95., call for
info (650)851-0878
WO 16 lb. Bowling Balls @ $25.00 each.
(650)341-1861
322 Garage Sales
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
335 Rugs
THROW RUG, 8’ x 11’, black and gold.w/
fring, beautiful,clean. $50. SOLD!
335 Garden Equipment
CRAFTSMAN 5.5 HP gas lawn mower
with rear bag $55., (650)355-2996
LAWNMOWER - American made, man-
ual/push, excellent condition, $50.,
(650)342-8436
REMINGTON ELECTRIC lawn mower,
$40. (650)355-2996
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
CLASSICAL YASHICA camera
in leather case $25. (650)644-9027
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
VIVITAR ZOOM lens-28mm70mm. Filter
and lens cap. Original owner. $50. Cash
(650)654-9252
VIVITAR ZOOM lens. 28mm-210mm. Fil-
ter and lens cap. Original owner. $99.
Cash. (650)654-9252
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $99
(415)971-7555
345 Medical Equipment
MEDICAL EQUIPMENT - Brand new
port-a-potty, never used, $40., Walker,
$30., (650)832-1392
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
380 Real Estate Services
HOMES & PROPERTIES
The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
weekly Real Estate Section.
Look for it
every Friday and Weekend
to find information on fine homes
and properties throughout
the local area.
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom, New carpets,
new granite counters, dishwasher, balco-
ny, covered carports, storage, pool, no
pets. (650)595-0805
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49.-59.daily + tax
$294.-$322. weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator & A/C
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
FLEETWOOD ‘93 $ 3,500/offer. Good
Condition (650)481-5296
GMC '99 DENALI Low miles. This is
loaded with clean leather interior, nice
stereo too. Just turned 100k miles, new
exhaust and tires. Well taken care of. No
low ballers or trades please. Pink in hand
and ready to go to next owner.
(650)759-3222 $8500 Price is firm.
MERCEDES ‘06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
TOYOTA ‘00 CAMRY LE, 4 dr, auto,
clean title, smogged. 129K miles, $3,800.
(650)342-6342
VW ‘01 BEETLE, Turbo Sport, 97K
miles, auto, $5,800. (650)342-6342
625 Classic Cars
FORD ‘63 THUNDERBIRD Hardtop, 390
engine, Leather Interior. Will consider
$7,500 obo (650)364-1374
FORD ‘63 THUNDERBIRD Hardtop, 390
engine, Leather Interior. Will consider
$7,500 obo (650)364-1374
635 Vans
‘67 INTERNATIONAL Step Van 1500,
Typical UPS type size. $2500, OBO,
(650)364-1374
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
MOTORCYCLE GLOVES - Excellent
condition, black leather, $35. obo,
(650)223-7187
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAGS with
brackets and other parts, $35.,
(650)670-2888
655 Trailers
SMALL UTILITY TRAILER - 4’ wide, 6
1/2 ‘ long & 2 1/2’ deep, $500.obo,
(650)302-0407
670 Auto Service
GRAND OPENING!
Sincere Affordable Motors
All makes and models
Over 20 years experience
1940 Leslie St, San Mateo
(650)722-8007
samautoservices@gmail.com
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
BOX OF auto parts. Miscellaneous
items. $50.00 OBO. (650) 995-0012.
CAR TOWchain 9' $35 (650)948-0912
HONDA SPARE tire 13" $25
(415)999-4947
MECHANIC'S CREEPER vintage, Com-
et model SP, all wood, pillow, four swivel
wheels, great shape. $40.00
(650)591-0063
MECHANIC'S CREEPER vintage, Com-
et model SP, all wood, pillow, four swivel
wheels, great shape. $40.00
(650)591-0063
NEW BATTERY and alternator for a ‘96
Buick Century never used Both for $80
(650)576-6600
NEW, IN box, Ford Mustang aluminum
water pump & gasket, $60.00. Call
(415)370-3950
RUBBERMAID 2 Gallon oil pan drainers
(2). Never used tags/stickers attached,
$15 ea. (650)588-1946
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, 1
gray marine diesel manual $40
(650)583-5208
SHOP MANUALS for GM Suv's
Year 2002 all for $40 (650)948-0912
TIRE CHAIN cables $23. (650)766-4858
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
35 Years Experience
2001 Middlefield Road
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
29 Monday • Nov. 11, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Asphalt/Paving
NORTHWEST
ASPHALT REPAIR
Driveways, Parking Lots
Asphalt/Concrete
Repair • Installation
Free Estimate
(650)213-2648
Lic. #935122
Carpentry
D n’ J REMODELING
Finish Carpentry
• Windows • Doors •
• Cabinets • Casing •
• Crown Moulding •
• Baseboards •
• Mantels • Chair Rails •
(650)291-2121
Cabinetry
Carpets
COLEMAN'S
CARPET SERVICE
Green, Soap free,
Detergent Free Carpet Cleaning!
Dry in a few hours! $99.00!
2 Room minimum!
Call Gisele (510)590-7427
Contractors
WARREN BUILDER
Contractor & Electrician
Kitchen, Bathroom, Additions
Design & Drafting Lowest Rate
Lic#964001, Ins. & BBB member
Warren Young
(650)465-8787
Cleaning
Cleaning
Concrete
Construction
DEVOE
CONSTRUCTION
Kitchen & Bath
Remodeling
Belmont, CA
(650) 318-3993
O’SULLIVAN
CONSTRUCTION
(650)589-0372
New Construction, Remodeling,
Kitchen/Bathrooms,
Decks/ Fences
Licensed and Insured
Lic. #589596
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed • Insured • Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
VICTOR’S FENCES
and House Painting
•Interior •Exterior
Power Wash
•Driveways •Sidewalk •Houses
Free Estimates
(650)583-1270
or (650)808-5833
Lic. # 106767
Doors
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
Gardening
GENERAL
LANDSCAPE
MAINTENANCE
Commercial & Residential
Gardening
New lawn &
sprinkler installation,
Trouble shooting and repair
Work done by the hour
or contract
Free estimates
Licensed
(650)444-5887, Call/Text
glmco@aol.com
Flooring
SHOP
AT HOME
WE WILL
BRING THE
SAMPLES
TO YOU.
Call for a
FREE in-home
estimate
FLAMINGO’S FLOORING
CARPET
VINYL
LAMINATE
TILE
HARDWOOD
650-655-6600
Flooring
SLATER FLOORS
. Restore old floors to new
. Dustless Sanding
. Install new custom & refinished
hardwood floors
Licensed. Bonded. Insured
www.slaterfloors.com
(650) 593-3700
Showroom by appointment
Gutters
GUTTER
CLEANING
O.K.’S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutters
Down Spouts
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Roof & Gutter Repairs
Friendly Service
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
(650)556-9780
RAIN GUTTERS
• Gutters and downspouts,
• Rain gutter repair,
• Rain gutter protection (screen),
• Handyman Services
Free Estimates
(650)669-6771
(650)302-7791
Lic.# 910421
Handy Help
AAA HANDYMAN
& MORE
Repairs • Maintenance • Painting
Carpentry • Plumbing • Electrical
Contractor Lic. 468963 Since 1976
Bonded and Insured
All Work Guaranteed
(650) 995-4385
CONTRERAS
HANDYMAN
• Fences • Decks • Patios •
Power Washes • Concrete
Work • Maintenance •
Clean Ups • Arbors
Free Est.! $25. Hour
Call us Today!
(650)350-9968
(650)4581572
contreras1270@yahoo.com
FLORES HANDYMAN
Serving you is a privilege.
Painting-Interior & Exterior• Roof
Repair • Base Boards New Fence •
Hardwood Floors • Plumbing • Tile •
Mirrors • Chain Link Fence • Windows
Bus Lic# 41942
Call today for free estimate.
(650)274-6133
HONEST HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766
(650)740-8602
SENIOR HANDYMAN
“Specializing in Any Size Projects”
•Painting • Electrical
•Carpentry •Dry Rot
40 Yrs. Experience
Retired Licensed Contractor
(650)201-6854
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
•Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
•Refinish
•High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
by Greenstarr
Chris’s Hauling
Licensed Bonded and Insured
Since 1985 License # 752250
www.yardboss.net
º Yard c|ean up - att|c,
basement
º Junk meta| remova|
|nc|ud|ng cars, trucks and
motorcyc|es
º 0emo||t|on
º 0oncrete remova|
º Fxcavat|on
º Sw|mm|ng poo| remova|
&
Tom 650.355.3500
Chris 415.999.1223
CHAINEY HAULING
Junk & Debris Clean Up
Furniture / Appliance / Disposal
Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo
Starting at $40& Up
www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
Landscaping
Landscaping
by Greenstarr
º 0omp|ete |andscape
ma|ntenance and remova|
º Fu|| tree care |nc|ud|ng
hazard eva|uat|on,
tr|mm|ng, shap|ng,
remova| and stump
gr|nd|ng
º 8eta|n|ng wa||s
º 0rnamenta| concrete
º Sw|mm|ng poo| remova|
Tom 650. 355. 3500
Licensed Bonded and Insured
www.yardboss.net
Since 1985 License # 752250
Moving
Bay Area
Relocation Services
Specializing in:
Homes, Apts., Storages
Professional, friendly, careful.
Peninsula’s Personal Mover
Commercial/Residential
Fully Lic. & Bonded CAL -T190632
Call Armando (650) 630-0424
Painting
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Quality Work, Reasonable
Rates, Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
MK PAINTING
Interior and Exterior,
Residental and commercial
Insured and bonded,
Free Estimates
Peter McKenna
(650)630-1835
Lic# 974682
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
NICK MEJIA PAINTING
A+ Member BBB • Since 1975
Large & Small Jobs
Residential & Commercial
Classic Brushwork, Matching, Stain-
ing, Varnishing, Cabinet Finishing
Wall Effects, Murals, More!
(415)971-8763
Lic. #479564
Plumbing
30 Monday • Nov. 11, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Plumbing Remodeling
HARVEST KITCHEN
& MOSAIC
Cabinets * Vanities * Tile
Flooring * Mosaics
Sinks * Faucets
Fast turnaround * Expert service
920 Center St., San Carlos
(650)620-9639
www.harvestkm.com
Tree Service
Tree Service
Hillside Tree
Service
LOCALLY OWNED
Family Owned Since 2000
• Trimming Pruning
• Shaping
• Large Removal
• Stump Grinding
Free
Estimates
Mention
The Daily Journal
to get 10% off
for new customers
Call Luis (650) 704-9635
Tile
BELMONT TILE &
FOLSOM LAKE TILE
Your local tile store
& contractor
• Tile • Mosaics
• Natural Stone Countertops
• Remodeling
Free Estimates
651 Harbor Blvd.
(near Old County Road)
Belmont
650.421.6508
www.belmontile.com
M-Sa 8:30 am - 5 pm
CASL# 857517
CUBIAS TILE
• Entryways • Kitchens
• Decks • Bathrooms
• Tile Repair • Floors
• Grout Repair • Fireplaces
Call Mario Cubias for Free Estimates
(650)784-3079
Lic.# 955492
Window Washing
EXTERIOR
CLEANING
SERVICES
- window washing
- gutter cleaning
- pressure washing
- wood restoration
- solar panel cleaning
(650)216-9922
services@careful-clean.com
Bonded - Insured
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
Attorneys
• BANKRUPTCY •
Huge credit card debit?
Job loss? Foreclosure?
Medical bills?
YOU HAVE OPTIONS
Call for a free consultation
(650-363-2600
This law firm is a debt relife agency
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Dental Services
MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER
Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken
(650)697-9000
15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA
Food
GET HAPPY!
Happy Hour 4-6• M-F
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
GRAND OPENING
BASHAMICHI
Steak & Seafood
1390 El Camino Real
Millbrae
www.bashamichirestaurant.com
JACK’S
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
NEW ENGLAND
LOBSTER CO.
Market & Eatery
Now Open in Burlingame
824 Cowan Road
newenglandlobster.net
LIve Lobster ,Lobster Tail,
Lobster meat & Dungeness Crab
Food
PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA
Because Flavor Still Matters
365 B Street
San Mateo
www.sfpanchovillia.com
VEGETARIAN
BAMBOO GARDEN
Lunch & Dinner
Only Vegetarian Chinese
Restaurant in Millbrae!
309 Broadway, Millbrae
(650)697-6768
Financial
RELATIONSHIP BANKING
Partnership. Service. Trust.
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
Half Moon Bay, Redwood City,
unitedamericanbank.com
San Mateo
(650)579-1500
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
WESTERN FURNITURE
Grand Opening Sale
Everything Marked Down !
601 El Camino Real
San Bruno, CA
Mon. - Sat. 10AM -7PM
Sunday Noon -6PM
We don't meet our competition,
we beat it !
Guns
PENINSULA GUNS
(650) 588-8886
Handguns.Shotguns.Rifles
Tactical and
Hunting Accessories
Buy.Sell.Trade
360 El Camino Real, San Bruno
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
Health & Medical
DENTAL
IMPLANTS
Save $500 on
Implant Abutment &
Crown Package.
Call Millbrae Dental
for details
650-583-5880
EYE EXAMINATIONS
579-7774
1159 Broadway
Burlingame
Dr. Andrew Soss
OD, FAAO
www.Dr-AndrewSoss.net
NCP COLLEGE OF NURSING
& CAREER COLLEGE
Train to become a Licensed
Vocational Nurse in 12 months or a
Certified Nursing Assistant in as little
as 8 weeks.
Call (800) 339-5145 for more
information or visit
ncpcollegeofnursing.edu and
ncpcareercollege.com
PAIN & STRESS RELIEF
$29 UP
Weight loss, Migraine, Stroke,
Fatigue, Insomnia, PMS, HBP,
Cough, Allergies, Asthma,
Gastrointestinal, Diabetes
(650)580-8697
Acupuncture, Acupressure Herbs
1846 El Camino Real, Burlingame
Accept Car & work injury, PPO
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
STUBBORN FAT has met its match.
FREEZE Your Fat Away with
COOLSCULPTING
Bruce Maltz, M.D.
Carie Chui, M.D.
Allura Skin & Laser Center, Inc.
280 Baldwin Ave., San Mateo
(650) 344-1121
AlluraSkin.com
Insurance
AANTHEM BLUE
CROSS
www.ericbarrettinsurance.com
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
Insurance
AFFORDABLE
HEALTH INSURANCE
Personal & Professional Service
JOHN LANGRIDGE
(650) 854-8963
Bay Area Health Insurance Marketing
CA License 0C60215
a Diamond Certified Company
HEALTH INSURANCE
All major carriers
Collins Insurance
Serving the Peninsula
since 1981
Ron Collins
650-701-9700
Lic. #0611437
www.collinscoversyou.com
PARENTI & ASSOCIATES
Competitive prices and best service to
meet your insurance needs
* All personal insurance policies
* All commercial insurance policies
* Employee benefit packages
650.596.5900
www.parentiinsurance.com
1091 Industrial Rd #270, San Carlos
Lic: #OG 17832
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
est. 1979
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues, Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
ASIAN MASSAGE
$45 per Hour
Present ad for special price
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
ENJOY THE BEST
ASIAN MASSAGE
$40 for 1/2 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
851 Cherry Ave. #29, San Bruno
in Bayhill Shopping Center
Open 7 Days 10:30am- 10:30pm
650. 737. 0788
Foot Massage $19.99/hr
Free Sauna (with this Ad)
Body Massage $39.99/hr
Hot StoneMassage $49.99/hr
GRAND OPENING
SEVEN STARS
DAY SPA
615 Woodside Road Redwood City
(650)299-9332
Body Massage $60/hour
$40/half hour,
$5 off one hour w/ this ad
Open Daily 9:30 AM to 9:30 PM
Massage Therapy
RELAX
REJUVENATE
RECHARGE
in our luxury bath house
Water Lounge Day Spa
2500 S. El Camino
San Mateo
(650)389-7090
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes • Multi-family •
Mixed-Use • Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Real Estate Services
VIP can help you with all of your
real estate needs:
SALES * LEASING * MANAGEMENT
Consultation and advice are free
Where every client is a VIP
864 Laurel St #200 San Carlos
650-595-4565
www.vilmont.com
DRE LIC# 1254368
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living
Care located in
Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
&
Burlingame Villa
- Short Term Stays
- Dementia & Alzheimers
Care
- Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
NAZARETH VISTA
Best Kept Secret in Town !
Independent Living, Assisted Living
and Skilled Nursing Care.
Daily Tours/Complimentary Lunch
650.591.2008
900 Sixth Avenue
Belmont, CA 94002
crd@belmontvista.com
www.nazarethhealthcare.com
Travel
FIGONE TRAVEL GROUP
(650) 595-7750
www.cruisemarketplace.com
Cruises • Land & Family vacations
Personalized & Experienced
Travel Service
Family Owned & Operated
Since 1939
CST#100209-10
31
Monday • Nov. 11, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
We believe you deserve the right doctor. With
doctors located in cities throughout San Mateo
County, Mills-Peninsula, part of Sutter Health,
makes it easier than ever to find the care you need,
close to home. It’s one more way we plus you.
During open enrollment, make sure you choose a
health plan that gives you access to Mills-Peninsula
doctors and hospital.
1-800-4-SUTTER
TheDoctorForYou.com/MPHS
32 Monday • Nov. 11, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL

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