Sample Original Lesson Plan using ISLES, research based, learning strategies Name Jennifer Langston Date Taught

TBD Lesson Title: Who Are You? Note: Portions of this lesson are taken directly from Houghton Mifflin . (2006). Hougton Mifflin Reading North Carolina: Expeditions Theme 5 One Land, Many Trails. Boston: Houghton Mifflin. Grade Level: Fifth Subject/Content Area(s): English Language Arts Common Core Standards or North Carolina Essential Standards:  CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.5.1 Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text  CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.5.2 Determine two or more main ideas of a text and explain how they are supported by key details; summarize the text.  CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.5.1 Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (oneon-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 5 topics and texts, building on others‘ ideas and expressing their own clearly. o CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.5.1b Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions and carry out assigned roles. o CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.5.1c Pose and respond to specific questions by making comments that contribute to the discussion and elaborate on the remarks of others. o CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.5.1d Review the key ideas expressed and draw conclusions in light of information and knowledge gained from the discussions Lesson Objective: The student will analyze, compare and contrast Slow and other boys of his time based information in the provided text A Boy Called Slow using a Venn Diagram graphic organizer then repeat the same process with their lives, including at least 4 total points with no less than one in each section of the organizer. Assessment Strategy: The students will be monitored during teacher led and group discussions to insure their progression with the topic(s), will complete a Venn Diagram graphic organizer as a class group summarizing, analyzing, clarifying and connecting key information from the text that denote similarities and differences (compare and contrast) then will report and discuss those findings as a class. The students will use a Venn Diagram graphic organizer to do the same with their life and will include at least 4 total points with no less than one in each section of the organizer. The students will be asked questions listed in the Teacher Input and Guided Practice which appear in part on a formative assessment of the entire work with this text, but connect specifically with Slow‘s differences and similarities of his peers. Instructional Modifications: The classroom in which this lesson was created serves two groups of students in a block schedule format. Therefore, each block group is predominately homogeneous in skill level and this lesson is written specifically for the low to average level group of students. This lesson is written with the assumption that the students have read A Boy Called Snow in its entirety and is used to help with connection and review of the material to

Sample Original Lesson Plan using ISLES, research based, learning strategies better prepare for the high order questions in their upcoming formative assessment of the entire work with this text. List of Materials:  White Board  White Board Circles used to make Venn Diagrams on board  Sticky Notes  Pen  Clean sheet of notebook paper (students should have in their binders) to draw a Venn Diagram to use in the Independent Practice. Instructional Modification: If necessary, provide a pre-made worksheet for students. Graphic Organizer – (Assigned Island)  Reading Book Houghton Mifflin . (2006). Hougton Mifflin Reading North Carolina: Expeditions Theme 5 One Land, Many Trails. Boston: Houghton Mifflin.  This lesson was created with the assumption that students have read A Boy Called Slow in its entirety. Description of the Classroom Management Strategies you plan to use:  J. Langston will use the Holloman/Yates BPL theories in speaking with students and facilitating, promoting and enhancing classroom discussions. (i.e., I like how you‘re thinking that through, Let‘s listen how Jane is connecting this thought for us, John’s group is following directions nicely and is having some wonderful discussions I am excited to see what they‘ve written on their sticky notes, etc.)  During Think-Pair-Share, the students will be given specific instructions in which to approach their discussions. They will be provided sticky notes which will be used as ‗thinking paper‘ to record their thoughts and ensure proper facilitation of their thoughts and discussions. These notes will be placed by the students in the correct area of the Venn Diagram on the board.  When appropriate, the questions/instructions will be written on the white board to eliminate what theorist Fred Jones‘ calls ‗Helpless Handraisers‖. Procedures:  Focus and Review (This lesson was created with the assumption that the students have read A Boy Called Slow in its entirety. It is with this knowledge that the students will complete the following Focus and Review activity) Lead the students in the following discussion: We‘ve read and talked about the story A Boy Called Slow. What is your opinion of the naming custom followed by the Lakota Sioux? Do you think that Slow is a good name for the son of Returns Again? Do you think such a custom would work in the modern world? (Ask ―Why?‖ or ―Tell me more about what you‘re thinking‖ at the end of each question if not getting a full explanation.)  Statement of Objective: Today we are going to talk more about the naming custom followed by the Lakota Sioux and see if it would be a good practice for us to follow in our society.

Six-step lesson plan format—ELEM 4525  Teacher Input: During the TI, Guided Practice and Independent Practice the students, as a class, will use a Venn Diagram graphic organizer to sort their thoughts and information ISLES Strategy, Organizers Island – (Assigned Island) During the TI and Guided Practice the students will be directed to Think-Pair-Share ISLES Strategy, Grouping Strategies Island to discuss and analyze their thoughts and information in preparation to share those thoughts with the class. a. In our culture a child is usually named shortly after birth and that name typically stays the same throughout their life. In the Lakota Siox culture, we read that each child is given a name long after they are born and sometimes, like in Slow‘s case, the name changes. Let‘s talk about how these names were given. b. Ask the students to think of a Lakota Sioux type name for a few of the following celebrities, spend about 5 minutes. Use guided questions to be sure that the children fully understand the concept. For instance, a good name for Justin Bieber would be ―girl catcher‖ or ―hair sweeps to the side‖. Michael Phelps could be ―gold on neck‖ or ―man as fish‖. Help them become creative. o Justin Bieber o Bruno Mars o Lebron James o Michael Phelps o Harry Potter o Selena Gomez

c. Place the circles on the white board into a Venn Diagram (or have them already in place prior to the lesson‘s start). Guide the students in an in depth review of one or two of the celebrities discussed, finding solid justification for the names suggested. For instance, Justin Beiber sings well, but so do many others. He dances well, but so do many others. He is a girl heart-throb, but so are many others. Very few celebrities, if any, constantly sweep their head to the side like he does thus justifying the name ―hair sweeps to the side‖ which would be unique to him. Michael Phelps has many teammates that swim well and train hard. Many other people are Olympians or work for companies as endorsers. But nobody has as many total gold medals as he does thus justifying the name ―gold on neck‖ which would be unique to him. (Write the celebrity‘s name on the top of one of the circles and other people on the top and briefly organize the students‘ thoughts into the appropriate circles.) d. Ask the students if they think either of these people would have had the same name 15 years ago, 10 years ago or 5 years ago? It is well known that Michael Phelps began swimming at a very early age and he played around at the pool and often got into trouble for mischief. Would the name we just gave him have been appropriate then? e. Explain to the students that these progressions are core to the naming custom of the Lakota Sioux. Have the students turn to page 471 in their text, stopping to briefly discuss if needed. Read the sentence aloud ―It was the custom in those days to give a childhood name. Such names came from the way a child acted.‖ Have the students turn to page 472 in their text, stopping to briefly discuss if needed. Read the sentences below aloud ―If he had tried to swallow everything he could get a hold of – as was the case with one of his

Six-step lesson plan format—ELEM 4525 cousins – they might have called him ―Hungry Mouth‖. ―Perhaps, his mother thought, if he were quick in his movements and always watching things they might call him Mouse‖ ―It was simply the way he was. Every action he took was slow. ―Slon-he,‘ his father said. ‗That is the name for our son.‖ f. Ask the students to think about the following question (taken directly from their unit test) using their book as a guide: How does Slow show that he understands his father’s words “The best way to gain the respect of your people is to be both brave and wise”? Then ask, Do you think this custom was taken seriously? Think-Pair-Share. After 1-2 minutes has elapsed, ask the students to choose a table mate and discuss the question. Think-PairShare After 1-2 minutes has elapsed, ask several students to share. Think-Pair-Share Guided Practice: Erase the information in the circles on the white board and pass out the sticky note pads to the table groups. Write the following on the top of the circles: Slow - Other Boys. a. Ask the students to think about the following question (taken directly from their unit test) using their book as a guide: What examples does the author provide to demonstrate how the boy earns the name “Slow”? Think-Pair-Share. After 1-2 minutes has elapsed, ask the students to choose a table mate and discuss the question. Instruct them to write at least one example on their sticky note paper. Think-PairShare After 1-2 minutes has elapsed, ask several students to share what‘s written on their sticky note. Then direct those students to place their note on the board in the ‗Slow‘ circle or in the both section if appropriate. Think-Pair-Share b. Ask the students to think about the following question using their book as a guide: What things do we know about the other boys in Slow’s village? Think-Pair-Share. After 1-2 minutes has elapsed, ask the students to choose a table mate and discuss the question. Instruct them to write at least one example on their sticky note paper. Think-Pair-Share After 1-2 minutes has elapsed, ask several students to share what‘s written on their sticky note. Then direct those students to place their note on the board in the ‗Other Boys‘ circle or in the both section if appropriate. Think-PairShare. c. Ask the students to think about the following question using their book as a guide: How is Slow different than other boys his age? (taken directly from their unit test) Think-Pair-Share. After 1-2 minutes has elapsed, ask the students to choose a table mate and discuss the question. Instruct them to write at least one example on their sticky note paper. Think-Pair-Share After 1-2 minutes has elapsed, ask several students to share what‘s written on their sticky note. Then direct those students to place their note on the board in the ‗Other Boys‘ circle. Think-Pair-Share. d. Ask the students to think about the following questions using their book as a guide: Slow’s name changes – what is his new name? (taken directly from their unit test) Why do you think he was given this name? What even led to him being given this new name? (taken directly from their unit test) Does it fit him now? Why Think-PairShare. After 1-2 minutes has elapsed, ask the students to choose a table mate and discuss the question. This time; however, tell them they can just discuss not write on

Six-step lesson plan format—ELEM 4525 note. Think-Pair-Share After 1-2 minutes has elapsed, ask several students to share the pair‘s thoughts. Think-Pair-Share.  Independent Practice: a. Ask the students to get out a clean sheet of notebook paper and draw a Venn Diagram. Write on the top of one circle their name and on the other; other boys. Using the graphic organizer direct the students to organize facts about their life to create a Lakota Sioux name for themselves in the same way we did for the celebrity and Slow. Tell them to include at least 4 total points with no less than one in each section of the organizer. (Instruction modification: If necessary write these instructions on the board) Ask the students to share their names and reasoning if time permits. Closure: Today we talked about the naming custom followed by the Lakota Sioux. Do you think this practice reflects who the person is better than how we name people now? Do you think this practice would be practical in our society? Do you think your name will always be what you selected today?