Sample Original Lesson Plan using ISLES, research based, learning strategies Name Jennifer Langston Date Taught

TBD Lesson Title: Strengths and Weaknesses? Note: Portions of this lesson are taken directly from Teacher's Curriculum Institute. (2010). Social
Studies Alive; America's Past. In Chapter 17, The Diverse Peoples of the West (pp. 231-241). Pal Alto, CA: Teacher's Curriculum Institute.

Grade Level: Fifth Subject/Content Area(s): Social Studies Subject/Content Area(s): English Language Arts & Social Studies Common Core Standards or North Carolina Essential Standards:  SS 5.H.1 Analyze the chronology of key events in the United States. o 5.H.1.3 Analyze the impact of major conflicts, battles and wars on the development of our nation through Reconstruction.  CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.5.1 Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text  CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.5.2 Determine two or more main ideas of a text and explain how they are supported by key details; summarize the text.  CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.5.3 Explain the relationships or interactions between two or more individuals, events, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text based on specific information in the text.  CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.5.1 Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (oneon-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 5 topics and texts, building on others‟ ideas and expressing their own clearly. o CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.5.1b Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions and carry out assigned roles. o CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.5.1c Pose and respond to specific questions by making comments that contribute to the discussion and elaborate on the remarks of others. o CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.5.1d Review the key ideas expressed and draw conclusions in light of information and knowledge gained from the discussions Lesson Objective: The students will listen to narratives explaining 3 different battles in the American Revolution and in groups of 4, in a literature circle type format with pre-determined roles, will discuss, infer and decipher the information presented. One student from the group, the reporter, will present a summary their group‟s discussions with clarity and connections based on the instructions given (attached). The student will then choose a battle and create a personal letter from a soldier‟s (either Patriot or British) point of view after it occurred with clarity and connections based on the attached rubric. Assessment Strategy: The students will be monitored during group discussions to insure their progression with the topic(s) and will complete a graphic organizer within their group summarizing, clarifying and connecting key information based on their predetermined roles. The student will choose a battle and create a personal letter from a soldier‟s (either Patriot or British)

Sample Original Lesson Plan using ISLES, research based, learning strategies point of view after the battle occurred with clarity and connections and will be assessed based on the attached rubric. Instructional Modifications: The classroom in which this lesson was created serves two groups of students in a block schedule format. Therefore, each block group is predominately homogeneous in skill level and this lesson is written specifically for the lower level group of students and thus reflects a pre-determined grouping of students for the literature circle activity. For the higher block group of students, this element will be removed and the students will be allowed to create their own groups and determine their own role. There are a few students in each block group who will need intense monitoring with the literature circle, which explains the philosophy of completing one battle in the Teacher Input, as a class group prior to the students doing it in their groups during the Guided Practice. The teacher will circulate room to monitor and enhance discussion with higher order questions to promote higher-level thinking and processing. List of Materials:  Computer with internet access attached to SmartBoard*  Smart Board *In the absence of a SmartBoard, modify lesson to accommodate a LightBox, document camera or transparency)  Copies of descriptions for Literature Circle Roles which includes „thinking space‟ for writing their thoughts during discussion (attached) including: o Recorder o Connector o Reporter o Word Grabber  Copies for each student of Personal Letter assignment instructions and rubric (attached); students will attach copy to their letter.  Strengths and Weaknesses Graphic Organizer (attached)  Pages 65-68 and 102- 105 (Sheinkin, 2005) (scan of pages attached)  Pre-loaded YouTube video http://www.youtube.com/v/CK2Btk6Ybm0 Extremely important! Teacher must use this link to show video to the students, and ideally will pre-load before lesson start, as it this link will load the video full screen without comments. Video comments on YouTube are dynamic and appropriateness cannot be controlled and must be used guardedly. Again, the link included is SPECIFICALLY designed to show the video in full screen format and not show comments.  This lesson was created with the assumption that students have completed sections 13.1 – 13.8 in their textbook/digital curriculum and have recorded notes on these sections in their workbook. It is with this knowledge that the students will complete the Focus and Review activity; therefore, the teacher may want to use this as a guide to help her/him with this section. (Teacher's Curriculum Institute, 2010) Classroom Management Strategies:  J. Langston will use the Holloman/Yates BPL and Glasser theories in speaking with students and facilitating, promoting and enhancing classroom discussions. (i.e., I like how you‟re thinking that through, Let‟s listen how Jane is connecting this thought, John‟s group is following directions nicely and is having some wonderful discussions I am excited to hear their summary, etc.)

Sample Original Lesson Plan using ISLES, research based, learning strategies   When circulating around the room, J Langston will give a slight touch on the student‟s back to help them know she‟s there, but also to solidify the above bullet comments. In response to misbehavior or disruptive behavior J Langston will use complete „I messages‟ such as, When you are talking in your groups and I‟m interrupted before I‟m finished talking, I find it hard to explain the directions clearly and it makes me distracted and frustrated because I want you to do well. During group work, the students will be given specific roles in which to approach their discussions. One of the 4 roles will be listed on the top of their paper along with „thinking space‟ for writing their thoughts for each battle. (attached) J Langston will also direct the students to do their very best and through questioning and prompting help the student(s) think farther and deeper during the group work activity.

ISLES 2 Strategies Grouping- Think-Pair-Share: Focus and review Graphic Organizer: Teacher Input and Guided Practice Procedures: 1. Focus and Review (This lesson was created with the assumption that students have completed sections 13.1 – 13.8 in their textbook/digital curriculum (Teacher's Curriculum Institute, 2010) and have recorded notes on these sections in their workbook. It is with this knowledge that the students will complete the following Focus and Review activity)  Load the blank Strengths and Weaknesses Graphic Organizer onto SmartBoard (attached). Tell students, “Let‟s review a few things we‟ve studied about the Patriots and the British. I want you to spend about 2 minutes thinking independently about what some of the British‟s strengths and weaknesses were and what some of the Patriot‟s strengths and weaknesses were. (Think-Pair-Share) Then, when it‟s time, I‟ll prompt you to spend another 2 or 3 minutes discussing your thoughts with your table mates” (Think-Pair-Share)  After the 4-5 minutes has elapsed, facilitate a brief review discussion which should include various parts of their text(Think-Pair-Share). Record the students‟ thoughts on the Strengths and Weaknesses Graphic Organizer. With questioning, be sure to direct students to several of the key facts listed below that will specifically connect the Teacher Input and Guided Practice to the Focus and Review: British Strength British Weakness Patriot Strength Patriot Weakness Strong, 270 ships, 200 Hard to get supplies to Had loyal privateers No ships of their own of which were built land because ships so that helped them get during the war big supplies easily. These small boats maneuver Well trained and paid Unmotivated and Confident in the cause Untrained and eager to return home they were fighting for volunteer and highly motivated 48,000 British and an Only 8,000 to 24,00 additional 30,000 soldiers were in active German mercenaries. military at any given time in the war 3,000 Miles from This was their home home and unfamiliar and they were VERY with the territory familiar with the

Sample Original Lesson Plan using ISLES, research based, learning strategies territory Fought and Offensive Fought and Offensive Fought a defensive Fought a defensive war war war war Had been trained to Had been trained to Used tactics, tricks fight their enemy face fight their enemy face and such to one-up to face to face their enemy. Were refused food by Were supported by many towns-people many towns-people and were generally and the cause was disliked generally supported In the following sections, the students will be asked to connect which strength or weakness was a factor in the battle. The color-coded sections in the matrix reflect the following connections: Connects specifically to Bunker Hill portion of Teacher Input Connects specifically to Trenton portion of Guided Practice Connects specifically to Moore‟s Creek Bridge in Guided Practice Connects specifically to Home Alone clip in Focus and Review  Play Pre-loaded YouTube video http://www.youtube.com/v/CK2Btk6Ybm0 (2.10 minutes) Extremely important! Teacher must use this link to show video to the students, and ideally will pre-load before lesson start, as it this link will load the video full screen without comments. Video comments on YouTube are dynamic and appropriateness cannot be controlled and must be used guardedly. Again, the link included is SPECIFICALLY designed to show the video in full screen format and not show comments. Ask the students, “Who has seen this movie?” and facilitate a brief discussion of various parts of the movie. With questioning, direct students to several key facts that connect this movie to the American Revolution: o How did Kevin, an 8 year old boy defeat the 2 Wet Bandits? o We‟ve talked before about how the American Patriots were fighting a defensive war, and the British were fighting an offensive war. How is that similar to Kevin‟s struggles with the Wet Bandits? o When Kevin says, “This is my house and I have to defend it” do you think he gained confidence with that statement? o How could such a large army, with such strengths lose the war? o Did one side‟s strengths become another side‟s weakness? Let‟s see.

2. Statement of Objective: Today we are going to look at 3 battles and look at each side‟s weakness and strengths during the battle. We will work in groups to discuss and decide if one side‟s weakness became another side‟s strength in these battles. Then we will think about how that affected the soldiers. 3. Teacher Input:  Review the matrix. Discuss the different British strengths and connect which in fact became a Patriot weakness in battle. Discuss the different Patriot strengths and connect which in fact became a British weakness in battle. Ask higher order questions similar to below:

Sample Original Lesson Plan using ISLES, research based, learning strategies o You learned in chapter 13 how the American Revolution was like an unequal tug of war. Looking at these British strengths, make a distinction between ones that might have become a weakness for the Patriots. (Applying) Use the completed matrix above (as it is more in order than assumedly the created one in class will be) to help guide students to several connections. Use the SmartPen if need be to draw connecting lines if need be.  Now, let‟s specifically discuss the contrast between these (understanding) Well trained and paid Unmotivated and Confident in the cause Untrained and eager to return home they were fighting for volunteer and highly motivated o Which would you select as the most important strength here? (Evaluating)  Load the scanned pages, 65-68 (Sheinkin, 2005),on the SmartBoard. Read the narrative on pages 65-68, stopping at the next to the last paragraph of 67.  Facilitate a discussion about the text and in doing so, help the students “Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text” o Peter Brown was one of how many Patriots? How many British were there? o What was the purpose of Colonel Prescott saying “Don‟t fire till you see the whites of their eyes?” That sounds like a sort-of figure of speech, what exactly does that mean? How else might you say that? (Understanding) o What words in this narrative pop-out at you? o What conclusions can you draw from this information? Do you think this battle made the Patriot‟s more confident despite their loss? (Creating)  Read the last paragraph of the selection on page 68 (Sheinkin, 2005) o What connection can you make now, would you change your thoughts on which you would select as the most important strength here? (Evaluating)  Divide the students into groups and pass out role sheets. Graphic Organizer Review each role, connecting what was just read to each role. o For instance, the Word Grabber might notice how Francis Rawdon used “poured in so heavy a fire upon us…never saw a sharper action” or how the author adds interest with word phrases like “hiking uphill through thick grass, carrying 125 pounds…under blazing sun” or figurative language like “could stand toe-to-toe” o The Connector should focus on looking at the matrix and seeing how this connects – For instance, the narrative says the British were “marching in nice neat rows (making themselves easy targets) because the generals considered that the most „honorable‟ way to fight” which exemplifies how the British‟ training (strength) became a weakness. It is the goal of the Connector to help his group determine if one‟s strength became the other‟s weakness. o Finally, the Recorder writes all these thoughts down, and summarizes what their group‟s thoughts were. He might bring a few words to the class from the Word Grabber, a connection or two from the Connector, and use the Recorder to help him and his group decide what he‟ll say. 4. Guided Practice:  Direct the student‟s attention to the thinking space on the bottom of their role page and encourage them to write their thoughts in this space. Explain that you‟re going to read information about another battle, one in North Carolina at Moore‟s Creek Bridge.

Sample Original Lesson Plan using ISLES, research based, learning strategies Explain that they‟ll need to listen and respond in their groups based on their role like we did previously. Ask for questions to ensure understanding.  Load narrative about Moore‟s Creek Bridge, attached (National Park Foundation, 2013). Read the narrative and then direct the students to discuss the battle in their groups based on their roles. Circulate room constantly and ask questions for students to extend their thinking. Allow the students approximately 8-10 minutes to discuss. o Allow the Reporter in each group to discuss their group‟s thoughts and whether or not the group determined if one‟s strength became the other‟s weakness. Had been trained to Had been trained to Used tactics, tricks fight their enemy face fight their enemy face and such to one-up to face to face their enemy.  Load the scanned pages,102-105 (Sheinkin, 2005),on the SmartBoard. Read the narrative and then direct the students to complete discuss the battle in their groups based on their roles. Circulate room constantly and ask questions for students to extend their thinking. Allow the students approximately 8-10 minutes to discuss. o Allow the Reporter in each group to discuss their group‟s thoughts and whether or not the group determined if one‟s strength became the other‟s weakness. 3,000 Miles from This was their home home and unfamiliar and they were VERY with the territory familiar with the territory

5. Independent Practice:  Pass out the assignment sheet, A Personal Letter Home. Read the instructions: o Pretend you are a soldier in one of the battles we discussed. Write a letter home with a personal reflection from this perspective after the battle was over. You may choose to write as a British or Patriot, but your letter should be clear as to which you are. You must connect something from the discussion in class or from your group discussions of the battle and a British or Patriot strength or weakness that you, the soldier, experienced or understood. Use the rubric below as your guide and attach it to your letter for grading.  Ask for questions for understanding. NOTE: Depending on classroom format, this may be assigned for homework. At which point the sharing of one‟s letter would be done the next day and thus the closure would follow.  Allow students time to complete their letter and turn it in. Allow time for volunteers to share their letter with the class. 6. Closure: Today we learned how sometimes one‟s weakness can become a strength for an opponent. Desire, motivation and passion can overcome many obstacles and the biggest and strongest opponent isn‟t always the winner. Supporting Documents: Below are all supporting documents listed in this lesson. Please note, if you click the image a PDF will appear, multiple pages may exist and are not seen in the image.

Sample Original Lesson Plan using ISLES, research based, learning strategies

Sample Original Lesson Plan using ISLES, research based, learning strategies

Sample Original Lesson Plan using ISLES, research based, learning strategies

Sample Original Lesson Plan using ISLES, research based, learning strategies

Sample Original Lesson Plan using ISLES, research based, learning strategies

Sample Original Lesson Plan using ISLES, research based, learning strategies

Sample Original Lesson Plan using ISLES, research based, learning strategies

Sample Original Lesson Plan using ISLES, research based, learning strategies

Works Cited National Park Foundation. (2013, February). MOORES CREEK NATIONAL BATTLEFIELD. Retrieved from National Park Foundation: http://www.nationalparks.org/explore-parks/moorescreek-national-battlefield

Sample Original Lesson Plan using ISLES, research based, learning strategies Sheinkin, S. (2005). King George What Was His Problem? . Harrisonburg, VA: Roaring Book Press. Teacher's Curriculum Institute. (2010). Social Studies Alive; America's Past. In Chapter 13, The American Revolution (pp. 172-181). Pal Alto, CA: Teacher's Curriculum Institute.

Sample Original Lesson Plan using ISLES, research based, learning strategies Reflection—Answer these questions after you teach your lesson plan 1. Student Performance: How did the students react to the lesson? Did they learn the material? How do you know? 2. Teacher performance: Reflect on how well you delivered instruction. What went well and what did not? Why? What would you change? What would you keep the same? 3. Describe your Classroom Management for this lesson plan. What classroom management strategy (ies) did you use for this lesson plan? Describe the strategy (ies) and discuss how the students reacted to the strategy. Did the strategy (ies) work? How do you know? What additional classroom management issue(s) do you need to address in your next lesson plan?

Send your Progress Report completed by Clinical Teacher through Blackboard under Assignments.