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Language Arts: Literary Devices 2

Learning Objectives:
Students will learn to identify the many literary devices used by authors. Students will transfer their ability to identify literary devices into real world application, using them to recognize, identify, interpret and/or analyze elements of text.

Essential Questions:
What are literary devices? How can literary devices be used to better understand an authors purpose in writing text?

Enduring Understanding:
Literary devices refers to any specific aspect of literature, or a particular work, which we can recognize, identify, interpret and/or analyze.

More information can be found at http://www.roanestate.edu/owl/elementslit.html

Vocabulary:
Allegory Antagonist Anthropomorphism Blank verse Characterization Climax Context Conflict Dialogue Dramatic irony Exposition Figurative language Foil Foreshadowing Hyperbole Iambic pentameter Imagery Mood Irony (a.k.a. Situational irony) Metaphor Motif Onomatopoeia Oxymoron Paradox Parallelism Personification (I) Personification (II) Plot Point-of-view Protagonist Repetition Setting Simile Speaker Structure Symbolism Theme Tone Tragedy Tragic hero/tragic figure Tragic flaw Verbal irony

Materials:
Literary Device Example Organizer Harry Potter Literary Devices Adventure Game Literary Devices Flick-it Game board

Agenda:
Bell Ringer Students will use the Literary Device Example Organizer to provide examples of specific literary devices and explain how they knew their examples were correct. Background Knowledge Building Students will play an educational game called Literary Devices Flick-it Game, helping them to both identify answers for themselves and to evaluate the answers given by their opponent. Whole Class Concept Review Students will review their use and understanding of literary devices by playing a classroom-wide review game called Harry Potter Literary Devices Adventure Game. Extended Practice - Homework: Study for Literary Device Assessment

Sources:
http://literary-devices.com/frontpage?page=8 http://www.waygook.org/index.php?wwwRedirect

Literary Device Example Organizer


Literary Term
Example: Simile comparison using like or as. Alliteration Alliteration is the repetition of a consonant sound at the beginning of words. sweet smell of success Assonance Repetition of similar vowel sounds followed by different constant sounds in words that are close together. mellow wedding bells Connotation The various feelings, images, and memories that surround a word make up its connotation. thrifty versus penny- pinching Foreshadowing Foreshadowing is the use of hints or clues to suggest what will happen later in literature. builds suspense preparing the reader for events Early in the movie, at a simple visit to the store, the car wont start. Later in the movie, when the star attempts to escape danger, the car wont start. Idiom An idiom or idiomatic expression refers to a construction or expression in one language that cannot be matched or directly translated word-forword in another language. a bee in her bonnet

Example
The boy was as quick as a fox.

Notes
(How I knew)
The speed of the boy is being compared to the speed of a fox, using like or as.

Literary Term
Imagery Words and phrases, called images, help a reader mentally experience what the characters in the literary selection are actually experiencing. green, tepid water Metaphor A metaphor compares two unlike things that have something in common. The comparison is made without the use of like or as. The sun is a flower

Example

Notes
(How I knew)

Onomatopoeia The use of words to imitate sounds is called onomatopoeia. bang, pop, hiss, sizzle
Oxymoron contradictory terms are combined. deafening silence Parallelism Use of similar or identical language, structures, events or ideas in different parts of a text. Personification Inanimate objects or abstract concepts are given human qualities. The rain danced. Repetition The use of a specific word, phrase, or structure repeated several times, usually in close proximity, to emphasize a particular idea. Symbolism The use of specific objects or images to represent abstract ideas. A symbol must be tangible (visible) while the idea it represents must be abstract or universal. Doves symbolize peace.

Literary Devices Flick-it Game board


Define the term Idiom 1 point Give an example of Personification 1 point Free Space Give an example of Figurative language 2 points Free Space Give an example of Oxymoron 1 point Define the term Parallelism 1 point Give an example of Parallelism 1 point Give an example of Repetition 1 point Define the term Foreshadowing 1 point Give an example of Metaphor 1 point Give an example of Alliteration 1 point Give an example of Protagonist 1 point Define the term Metaphor 1 point Give an example of Irony 1 point Give an example of Structure 2 points Define the term Onomatopoeia 1 point Give an example of Exposition 2 points Define the term Assonance 2 points Give an example of Oxymoron 1 point Define the term Repetition 1 point Give an example of Onomatopoeia 1 point Give an example of Point-of-view 2 points Give an example of Foreshadowing 1 point Free Space

1 point Give an example of Imagery 1 point Define the term Connotation 2 points Give an example of Alliteration 1 point Define the term Oxymoron 2 points

2 points Give an example of Parallelism 1 point Give an example of Symbolism 1 point Give an example of Hyperbole 2 points Give an example of Connotation 1 point

4 points Define the term Personification 1 point Define the term Symbolism 1 point Give an example of Metaphor 1 point
1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Place a penny in the designated spot at the bottom of the page. Aim your penny at one of the squares on the game board and lightly flick it into one of the squares. You must follow the directions given in that square in order to earn a point. If your penny lands between two squares, choose the square that contains the largest part of the penny. If your penny goes off of the game board, your opponent gets your point and you lose your turn.

Place your penny here

Literary Devices
Write a story about an event that happened to you last school year. Use three of the literary devices we have learned about in your story. Highlight your use of literary devices and make a note on the side of the page labeling which device it is.