P. 1
Pontianak Orange

Pontianak Orange

|Views: 231|Likes:
Published by christinehalim
history and desctription of pontianak orange
history and desctription of pontianak orange

More info:

Published by: christinehalim on Aug 13, 2009
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

11/10/2013

pdf

text

original

PONTIANAK ORANGE

Juicy and sweet and renowned for its concentration of vitamin C, no wonder
Oranges are one of the most popular fruits in the world.

Oranges

originated thousands of years ago in Asia, in the region from southern China to Indonesia from which they spread to India. Orange trees began to be grown in the Caribbean Islands in the late 15th century after Christopher Columbus brought the seeds there on his second voyage to the New World. Currently, the countries that are some of the largest commercial producers of oranges include the United States, Brazil, Mexico, Spain, China and Israel. Oranges are an excellent source of vitamin C. They are also a very good source of dietary fiber. In addition, oranges are a good source of B vitamins including vitamin B1 and folate as well as vitamin A, calcium and potassium. Among a large number of orange varieties around the world, Indonesia has a well known Orange variety called Pontianak Orange. Pontianak Orange (citrus nobilis var. microcarpa) is a thin skin and smooth gleam orange. Cultivated on the Borneo island of Indonesia, this orange is the pre-eminent commodity in West Kalimantan. Well-known by Indonesians for its distinct flavor and sweetness, it is known to originate in West Kalimantan since 1936. Pontianak is the capital city of West Kalimantan and commonly refers to a female vampire in Malay folklore. This orange is not actually originated in Pontianak city; it’s originally cultivated in the Tebas district, 300 kilometers north of the Pontianak city. In this region the sweet "Pontianak oranges" are grown, and the orange gardens can be seen all along the road leading to Sambas. Dozens of hectares with several thousands of orange trees line the road from Pemangkat to Sambas. There’s a local says “Tebas punye jeruk, Pontianak punye name" (“Tebas has the oranges, Pontianak has the name”).

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->