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November 21, 2013

November 21, 2013

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The Delphos Herald
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Published by: The Delphos Herald on Nov 21, 2013
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‘The BIG O’ talks agriculture at NPAC, p4

Telling The Tri-County’s Story Since 1869


A former Delphos police sergeant and businessman died Wednesday. Thomas F. McCabe, 70, of Delphos, passed away peacefully Wednesday morning at his residence surrounded by his loving family. McCabe retired after 27 years of service as a police officer for the city of Delphos. He was one of the first sergeants on the Delphos Police Department. He was the co-owner of Photography by Mac. Tom had a passion for taking portraits and pictures of all kinds. See full obituary on page 2.

Businessman, former cop dies


SJ Hall of Fame

The Delphos St. John’s Hall of Fame will induct its 10th class on Dec. 1 in the All Saints Building at St. John’s Schools. Following Mass, a free brunch will be held in the All Saints Building beginning at 12:30 p.m. The induction ceremony will begin at approximately 1:45 p.m. The event is free and open to the public but reservations are required to attend the brunch. Send reservations to Hall of Fame, PO Box 112, Delphos OH 45833, email to rebbeskotte@woh.rr.com or call 419692-0752. Deadline for reservations is Friday.

entrances to the school. “The estimates from Indiana Hardware came in less than the $10,000 grant,” DELPHOS — An Mangas said. “We’ll have Ottoville teacher’s ingenuity those installed as soon as will serve to make students possible. We also have the safer in his district. Jim new MARCS radios for the Brown fashioned wooden buses and they are being probraces for classroom doors grammed and we’ll get the that slide over the door training done.” handle with 2-x-4’s on both The radios will allow for sides to hug the door frame contact between bus drivers to prevent it from being and the school in the event opened from the outside by the power goes out and the an intruder. phones go down and if cell High School Principal Jon phone reception is interruptThorbahn demonstrated the ed. It is also a direct line to the Putnam County Sheriff’s Office. The board approved a resolution authorizing Ottoville Local Schools to participate in the State of Ohio Cooperative Purchasing Program. Mangas said the district is looking at purchasing a Gator from John Deere, who is a member of the cooperative. “If we join the cooperative for $100, we can get $1,500-$1,700 off the Gator,” Mangas said. “That’s a pretty good return on $100.” Before the close of the meeting, Mangas presented outgoing school board member Craig Byrne with a wooden bell commemorating his service to the board. “Craig was really the Ottoville Superintendent Scott Mangas, left, presents thrust behind our outdoor lab outgoing board of education member Craig Byrne with and that is doing very well a wooden bell to commemorate his service to the board. and is an asset to the district,” Mangas said. Byrne’s replacement is Marilyn Calvelage.

BY NANCY SPENCER Herald Editor nspencer@delphosherald.com

Principal shares safety innovation
device for the school board Wednesday evening. The device was tested during a recent lockout drill at the school. “This is a simple idea that works really well,” Thorbahn said. “We will test it again over Thanksgiving break and really try to get the door open. That way we have some time to fix the door if anything happens.” Superintendent Scott Mangas said he received the final quotes for key-card entry and camera/speaker systems for the two main

Thursday, November 21, 2013

Delphos, Ohio

OSU’s Roby to declare for NFL draft, p7

Ottoville High School Principal Jon Thorbahn explains a simple device fashioned by an Ottoville teacher to slide over door handles during a lockdown in the school. Thorbahn said the school’s custodian has been working on a few modifications and the devices were tested during a recent lockdown drill and proved effective. The devices will be placed in every classroom. (Delphos Herald/Nancy Spencer) Byrne served four years on the board. His replacement is Marilyn Calvelage. In the High School Report, Thorbahn announced parent/ teachers conferences will take place Monday evening and all day Tuesday. Thorbahn a l s o announced the student council-run Toys for Tots drive will get underway once students return from Thanksgiving break. The school will host a Community Blood Drive from noon to 6 p.m. on Dec. 27. Student-athletes were commended for their postseason honors. In girls soccer, Monica Sarka was named First-Team PCL; Alena Horstman and Courtney Von Sossan, Second Team; and Danielle Trenkmap, Lexi Wannemacher and Carly Kortokrax, Honorable Mention. Scholar-Athletes are Horstman and Trenkamp. In district honors, Sarka was second team; and Horstman and Von Sossan were Honorable Mention. See SAFETY, page 10

Fort Jennings band director Warnecke to retire
BY STEPHANIE GROVES Staff Writer sgroves@delphosherald.com

FORT JENNINGS — Board members accepted the upcoming retirement/resignation of the school’s Band Director, Rose Mary Warnecke, during the board meeting Wednesday night. Warnecke will continue St. John’s selling through the 2014/15 school year under the Arlington playoff tickets Victory Lap Clause and her rehire date will The St. John’s Athletic Department is selling tickets take place at the regular board meeting on March 19, 2014. for its Region 24 final verHigh School Principal Nicholas Langhals sus Arlington (kickoff 7 p.m. Saturday) at Lima Stadium said the school was very lucky to have Mrs. Warnecke back for one more year. in the high school office “The band had a successful trip (Disney) from 7:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. and 7-7:30 p.m. today; and and there have been a lot of good comments,” Langhals added. “Mrs. Warnecke and the 7:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Friday. band members did a fine job representing the All tickets (adults and students) are $7 pre-sale and school.” Langhals reported on Race to the Top $9 at the gates (which open at Lima Stadium at 6 p.m.). and said they just completed a meeting with the area representative, Nancy Allison, and Van Wert Tip-Off completed a survey meeting all goals and Classic moved up The opening round of the Van Wert Girls Basketball Tip-Off Classic will be played tonight, with Ottoville vs. Crestview at 6 p.m. and Wayne Trace playing Van Wert in the second game.


expectations. “Everything is on schedule,” Langhals affirmed. “There have been talks of a fifth year to finish up things on a state level and no information about money for the district.” Board members approved Todd Hoehn as Putnam County League (PCL) basketball tournament manager and Rob Warnecke as the assistant tournament manager for the games which will be hosted by Fort Jennings High School. Members also approved the five-year forecast as submitted. “We make best-guess estimates and predictions we can,” Langhals stated. Board members approved the return of the advance of $185.60 back to the General Fund from the Title II-A Fund. In addition, members approved amending estimated receipts/appropriations where the receipts were greater than anticipated revenues, less than anticipated revenues, or not included in the original budget. The next school board meeting will be held in the library at 7:30 p.m. on Dec.18.

Great American Smokeout today
Information submitted The American Cancer Society marks the Great American Smokeout on the third Thursday of November each year by encouraging smokers to use the date to make a plan to quit, or to plan in advance and quit smoking that day. By quitting — even for one day — smokers will be taking an important step towards a healthier life – one that can lead to reducing cancer risk. This year, we’re celebrating quitters and their supporters with a series of fun characters designed for social sharing on Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest. We’ve also got lots of other resources and information to help you quit for good. Tobacco use remains the single largest preventable cause of disease and premature death in the US, yet about 43.8 million Americans still smoke cigarettes — nearly 1 in every 5 adults. As of 2010, there were also 13.2 million cigar smokers in the US and 2.2 million who smoke tobacco in pipes — other dangerous and addictive forms of tobacco. Why quit? The health benefits of quitting start immediately from the moment of smoking cessation. Quitting while you are younger will reduce your health risks more but quitting at any age can give back years of life that would be lost by continuing to smoke. How does your body recover after certain amounts of time? 20 minutes — Your heart rate and blood pressure drop. 12 hours — The carbon monoxide level in your blood drops to normal. 2 weeks to 3 months — Your circulation improves and your lung function increases. 1-9 months — Coughing and shortness of breath decrease; cilia start to regain normal function in the lungs, increasing the ability to handle mucus, clean the lungs and reduce the risk of infection. 1 year — The excess risk of coronary heart disease is half that of a continuing smoker. 5 years — Risk of cancer of the mouth, throat, esophagus and bladder are cut in half. Cervical cancer risk falls to that of a non-smoker. Stroke risk falls to that of a non-smoker after 2-5 years. See SMOKE, page 10

Rain likely today and tonight. Highs around 50 and lows in the mid 40s. See page 2.


Obituaries State/Local Agriculture Community Sports Classifieds Television World briefs

2 3 4 5 6-7 8 9 10

Do Right MC donates to Christmas Project
Members of the Do-Right Motorcycle Club recently made their annual donation to the Delphos Community Christmas Project. Participating in the presentation of $1,200 are, from left, Do-Right Dee Helms, Community Christmas Project representative Tina Link, and Do Rights Jared “Tiny” Fisher, Don Ardner Sr. and Carol Boop. (Delphos Herald/Nancy Spencer)

2 – The Herald

Thursday, November 21, 2013


For The Record
Sentencings Justin Diltz, 59, Delphos, was sentenced to 15 months prison on each of two counts of trafficking heroin, each a felony of the fourth degree. The sentences were ordered to be served concurrently and he was given credit for four days jail already served. Drew Kenny, 20, Van Wert, was sentenced on possession of drugs, a felony of the fifth degree; and trafficking drugs, also a felony of the fifth degree. His sentence was three years community control concurrently, up to six months at The WORTH Center, 30 days jail, 200 hours community service, substance abuse assessment and treatment, three years intensive probation, driver’s license suspended six months, ordered to pay restitution $460 to law enforcement, pay court costs and pay partial appointed counsel fees. A nine-month prison term on each count, concurrent, was deferred pending completion of community control. He was remanded to jail for transfer to The WORTH Center. Arraignments James Yoder, 19, Dalton, entered a not guilty plea to failure to stop after an accident, a felony of the fifth degree. He was released on a surety bond and a pretrial was scheduled for Dec. 11. Jeremy Paige, 29, Van Wert, entered a plea of guilty to a bill of information filed by the prosecutor’s office charging him with criminal damaging, a misdemeanor of the second degree. A previous charge of vandalism was dismissed for his plea. The court ordered a pre-sentence investigation and set sentencing for Dec. 11. He was released on a surety bond. Probation violation Colt Morris, 26, Lima, admitted to violating his probation by leaving the Alvis House program without permission, having a positive drug test and by associating with a prohibited person. He was sentenced to prison for 42 months with credit for 347 days already served. Plea changes Robert Keipper, 18, Van Wert, was changed his plea to guilty on two counts of breaking and entering, each a felony of the fifth degree. Two counts of burglary were dismissed for his plea. The court ordered a pre-sentence investigation and set sentencing for Jan. 8. His surety bond was continued. Kelli Pontius, 26, Van Wert, changed her plea to guilty to illegal assembly or possession of chemicals for the manufacture of drugs, a felony of the third degree. A charge of illegal manufacture of drugs was dismissed for her plea. The court ordered a pre-sentence investigation and set sentencing for Jan 8. Her surety bond was continued.


The Delphos Herald
Nancy Spencer, editor Ray Geary, general manager Delphos Herald, Inc. Don Hemple, advertising manager Lori Goodwin Silette, circulation manager The Delphos Herald (USPS 1525 8000) is published daily except Sundays, Tuesdays and Holidays. The Delphos Herald is delivered by carrier in Delphos for $1.48 per week. Same day delivery outside of Delphos is done through the post office for Allen, Van Wert or Putnam Counties. Delivery outside of these counties is $110 per year. Entered in the post office in Delphos, Ohio 45833 as Periodicals, postage paid at Delphos, Ohio. 405 North Main St. TELEPHONE 695-0015 Office Hours 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Fri. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to THE DELPHOS HERALD, 405 N. Main St. Delphos, Ohio 45833
Vol. 144 No. 114

Elizabeth J. Elwer
Nov. 27, 1934Nov. 19, 2013 Elizabeth J. Elwer, 78, of Fort Jennings, died at 7:45 p.m. Tuesday at St. Rita’s Medical Center. She was born Nov. 27, 1934, in Fort Jennings to Gilbert “Gip” and Wilma (Giesken) Luebrecht. Her mother preceded her in death in 1936. Her father remarried Agnes Rayman, who truly raised Elizabeth as her own. Gilbert and Agnes also preceded her in death. On Dec. 29, 1956, she married Gale Edward Elwer, who survives in Fort Jennings. Other survivors include two sons, Gary (Diane) Elwer of Eustis, Fla., and Gregory (Tammy) Elwer of Roswell, Ga.; three daughters, Linda (Mark) Wihl of Tracy, Colo., Diane Elwer of Grand Junction, Colo., and Sandra (John) Macias of Sacramento, Calif.; a sister, Shirley (Joseph) Mesker of Fort Jennings; three brothers, Dennis (Sandra) Luebrecht, Donald (Nancy) Luebrecht and Duane (Sharon) Luebrecht of Fort Jennings; eight grandchildren; and two great-grandchildren. She was also preceded in death by a sister, Marilyn (Robert) Heitmeyer. Mrs. Elwer was a nurse and a homemaker. She was a member of St. Joseph’s Catholic Church in Ft. Jennings and St. Christopher ’s in Hobe Sound, Fla. She enjoyed traveling as an Air Force wife and visiting with her children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren whom lived throughout the country. She was an avid euchre player. She also enjoyed working out, painting and other crafts. Mass of Christian burial will begin at noon on Saturday at St. Joseph Catholic Church, the Rev. Charles Obinwa officiating. Burial will be in the church cemetery. Friends may call from 2-8 p.m Friday at Harter and Schier Funeral Home and one hour prior to the Mass Saturday at the church. Preferred memorials are to St. Rita’s Hospice or Putnam County Home Healthcare. To leave condolences, visit harterandschier.com.

Thomas F. McCabe

Feb. 12, 1943-Nov. 20, 2013

One Year Ago Delphos Optimist club past president Michael Friedrich Associated Press was presented with the “President’s Citation” for Outstanding Optimist Club member 2011-12. During Friedrich’s presiToday is Thursday, Nov. 21, dency, he led the local group to honor club status. He was prethe 325th day of 2013. There sented with the citation by last year’s Delphos Optimist Club are 40 days left in the year. president, Harry Flanagan. Today’s Highlight in History: 25 Years Ago - 1988 On Nov. 21, 1973, President Lisa Sadler, Nikki Wellmann, Kristi Klausing and Tammy Richard Nixon’s attorney, J. Stemen were special award winners when St. John’s volleyball Fred Buzhardt, revealed the team held its awards banquet Sunday at the Little Theatre. existence of an 18-1/2-min- Sadler was recognized for having the highest serving percentute gap in one of the White age for the varsity. Wellmann won the Blue Jay hustle award House tape recordings related for the varsity. Klausing had the highest serving percentage for to Watergate. the reserve team. Tammy Stemen received the hustle award. On this date: Stan Wiechart will officially retire as a platoon chief fireIn 1789, North Carolina fighter of the Delphos Fire Department Nov. 27, after 25 years became the 12th state to ratify of service. Starting with the department in September 1962 as the U.S. Constitution. a Kelly man or a swing shift worker, Wiechart said he worked In 1861, Judah Benjamin, every Saturday and Sunday like that for 2 1/2 years. In February who had been acting 1966, he was taken on as a regular firefighter. Confederate Secretary of War, Ottoville evened its record at 1-1 with a 58-43 win over was formally named to the post. Lincolnview Saturday at Ottoville. Melanie Miller led the Big In 1920, the Irish Republican Green with 16 points. Terri Hilvers added 15. The Big Green Army killed 12 British intel- held a big edge in rebounding 44-23. Darla Taylor of Ottoville ligence officers and two aux- pulled down a game-high 17 rebounds. Cheryl Klima had nine iliary policemen in the Dublin and Hilvers and Miller had eight each. area; British forces responded by raiding a soccer match, kill50 Years Ago – 1963 ing 14 civilians. Seven hunters returned Tuesday from Michigan after In 1922, Rebecca L. Felton an unsuccessful deer hunting expedition. Making the trip of Georgia was sworn in as the to Michigan were Kenny Looser, Dick Kaskel, Rev. John first woman to serve in the U.S. Quenneville, Rev. Thomas Gorman, Gene Hayes, Ray Pohlman Senate. and Steve Dickman. Kaskel said they passed up several good In 1931, the Universal hor- doe shots the first two days because they wanted bucks but ror film “Frankenstein,” star- they were unable to get close enough to get a shot at a buck. ring Boris Karloff as the monStudents who assisted during the recent pancake day, sponster and Colin Clive as his cre- sored by the Lions Club, were guests at the Delphos Lions ator, was first released. Club meeting Tuesday evening at NuMaude’s Restaurant. In 1934, the Cole Porter They are Denny Moore, Bob Kimmet, Paul Looser, Denny musical “Anything Goes,” star- Carder, Bob Carder and Gary Grubenhoff. ring Ethel Merman as Reno Mrs. Melford Will and Mrs. Arthur Williams were welSweeney, opened on Broadway. comed into the Senior Chapter of the Child Conservation In 1942, the Alaska Highway League during a meeting of the chapter held Tuesday evening was formally opened. in the home of Mrs. Don May, North Canal Street. Mrs. W. B. In 1969, the Senate voted Bowersock served as co-hostess. The program for the evening down the Supreme Court was a book review given by Mrs. William Broaddus. nomination of Clement F. Haynsworth, 55-45, the first 75 Years Ago – 1938 such rejection since 1930. The Delphos Jefferson cage forces will open the 1938In 1974, bombs exploded at 39 season Tuesday night at Union. Coach Kurth announced a pair of pubs in Birmingham, that the Jefferson varsity squad starting lineup will probably England, killing 21 people. be Thompson and Mericle at forward, Dunlap at center, Van (Six suspects were convicted of Meter and Foster as guard. The reserve team lineup will probthe attack, but the convictions ably be Seymour and Eversole at forwards, Fuller at center and of the so-called “Birmingham Osmun and Link or Miller at guards. Six” were overturned in 1991.) See ARCHIVES, page 10



Thomas F. McCabe, 70, of Delphos, passed away peacefully Wednesday morning at his residence surrounded by his loving family. His Family…. He was born Feb. 12, 1943, in Lima, to William F. and Rita (Tegenkamp) McCabe, who preceded him in death. On April 29, 1967, he married Kathy (Metzger) McCabe, who survives in Delphos. Tom is also survived by three daughters, Kimberly McCabe, Pamela (Travis) Miller and Jodi (Brian Sellers) Bennett, all of Delphos; five grandchildren, Treyton Miller, MaKya Miller, Tanzen Miller, Lane Bennett and Alonnah Sellers; and a brother, James McCabe of Maumee. He was also preceded in death by a sister, Nancy Agler. His Legacy…. Tom retired after 27 years of service as a police officer for the city of Delphos. He was one of the first sergeants on the Delphos Police Department. He was the co-owner of Photography by Mac. He was a 1961 graduate of St. John’s High School and a graduate of London Ohio Police School. He was certified from several police and photography schools. Tom was a member of St. John the Evangelist Catholic Church, the Fraternal Order of Police Lodge 62, Eagles Aerie 471 and NAPP. Tom enjoyed his Sundays listening to Elvis music and spending time with his family. He also enjoyed traveling with family and friends and was a well-known patron of Jim’s Restaurant. Tom had a passion for taking portraits and pictures of all kinds. His Farewell Services.… Mass of Christian Burial will begin at 10 a.m. Saturday at St. John the Evangelist Catholic Church, the Rev. Charles Obinwa officiating. Burial will follow in St. John’s Cemetery. Visitation will be from 2-8 p.m. Friday at Strayer Funeral Home, where a Fraternal Order of Police Service will be held at 3 p.m. and a Parish Wake Service will be held at 7:30 p.m. Memorial contributions.… Memorials may be made to St. John’s Parish Foundation and St. Rita’s Hospice. Online condolences may be shared at www.strayerfuneralhome.com.

The Delphos Herald wants to correct published errors in its news, sports and feature articles. To inform the newsroom of a mistake in published information, call the editorial department at 419-695-0015. Corrections will be published on this page.


EDINGER, Nancy, 76, memorial service will be held at 11 a.m. Saturday at the First United Brethren in Christ Church, with Pastor Jody Harr officiating. Calling hours are 9-11 a.m. Saturday prior to the service. Interment will follow at a later date of Maple Grove Cemetery in Bluffton. Preferred memorials are to the First United Brethren in Christ Church.


Wheat Corn Soybeans

WEATHER FORECAST Tri-county Associated Press TODAY: Rain likely. Highs around 50. South winds 5 to 15 mph. Chance of rain 60 percent. TONIGHT: Rain likely. Lows in the mid 40s. South winds 5 to 10 mph. Chance of rain 70 percent. FRIDAY: Rain likely. Highs in the lower 50s. West winds 5 to 10 mph shifting to the northwest 10 to 15 mph in the afternoon. Chance of rain 70 percent. FRIDAY NIGHT: Mostly cloudy with a slight chance of rain and snow through midnight. Then partly cloudy with a chance of flurries after midnight. Colder. Lows around 30. Northwest winds 5 to 15 mph. Chance of measurable precipitation 20 percent. SATURDAY: Partly cloudy. Chance of flurries in the morning. Then chance of snow showers in the afternoon. Highs in the mid 30s.


$6.17 $3.87 $12.70

The Fort Jennings State Bank

Fort Jennings Location

CLEVELAND (AP) — These Ohio lotteries were drawn Wednesday: Classic Lotto 13-17-22-25-28-47, Kicker: 5-8-1-6-5-9 Estimated jackpot: $52.2 million Mega Millions Estimated jackpot: $181 million Pick 3 Evening 5-0-4 Pick 3 Midday 2-8-0 Pick 4 Evening 7-9-4-0 Pick 4 Midday 7-2-7-0 Pick 5 Evening 0-6-1-3-8 Pick 5 Midday 9-4-7-7-7 Powerball 04-18-23-32-45, Powerball: 7 Rolling Cash 5 17-20-25-26-29 Estimated jackpot: $166,000



Thursday, November 21, 2013

The Herald – 3

November is National Home Humane Society Care and Hospice Month
to host gamers on Saturday
Information submitted


Cloverdale seeks assistance, donations in clean up
Information submitted CLOVERDALE — All contractors must register with the Village of Cloverdale. Registration will be held from noon-1 p.m. today and Friday at the Town Hall, 210 Mahoning St., Cloverdale. Volunteers are needed and asked to meet at St. Barbara’s Parish Hall (corner of Plank Road and Main Street) at 9 a.m. today and Friday. Dress for the weather. Donations are being accepted for the following items: rakes, trash bags, snow shovels, moving boxes and five-gallon buckets. Donations can be dropped off at the Oak Haven Residential Care Center, 152 Main St., Cloverdale. The Putnam County Long Term Recovery Task Force, a county-wide groups of local and regional agencies and organizations created to provide assistance to those involved in disaster, has established the Nov. 17 Recovery Fund. One hundred percent of monies donated to this Task Force remain local as the mission of the LTRTF is “placing recovery resources in the hands of those who need it most.” Donations may be made at any Putnam County Huntington Bank or Fort Jennings State Bank. For a tax deductible donation, checks may be mailed to the Nov. 17 Recovery Fund at PO Box 472, Ottawa, OH 45875. From Putnam County EMA: Persons with homes impacted by the storms on Sunday are asked to call the Putnam County EMA office to report damages by calling 419538-7315. The office is open 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday.

Health care moving to home as baby boomers age
Information submitted Every November, Community Health Professionals joins home health and hospice agencies nationwide to celebrate National Home Care and Hospice Month, honoring healthcare employees and raising awareness of in-home health services available to local residents. Private duty home care provides nonmedical assistance for seniors and disabled clients, allowing them to stay at home amidst familiar surroundings and possessions, which has a positive effect on psychological well-being. Skilled home healthcare (visiting nurses) is a specific form of home care that is physician-ordered and performed by registered nurses and therapists. Hospice care focuses on relieving symptoms and pain management for patients diagnosed with a terminal illness. Community Health Professionals provides each of these core services to Allen, Putnam and Van Wert County residents, plus adult day care and inpatient hospice services. In coming years, home care and hospice are poised to play a key role. A wide range of forces is joining to drive care toward home and community-based services. Based on demography and dollars, experts agree that the destiny of health care lies in the home. The first of the 78 million baby boomers turned 65 last year, and the rest of the boomers will reach their golden years in the next two decades, making health care dollars grow even scarcer. As the “silver tsunami” sweeps on, the most important trend in health care is the shift from hospitals and nursing homes to home care, from treatment to proactive monitoring and care. However in coming decades, there will

LIMA — The Humane Society of Allen County is pleased to announce that a video game tournament will be held Saturday with bracket assignments/checkin at 11:30 a.m. and play beginning at noon. The event will include a “Call of Duty: Ghost” two versus two person teams for death-match elimination and a John Madden Football single-person elimination bracket with a random three-team choice option. Both games will be played on PlayStation 3 systems. Register in advance for $20 for “Call of Duty: Ghost” or for $25 on game day. Don’t have a teammate? Single players will be assigned to a team. For Madden Football preregistration is $10 or $15 on game day. All proceeds benefit the Humane Society of Allen County. Prizes will be awarded to the top three players for “Call of Duty: Ghost” and the top two for Madden Football. Snacks and drinks will be available. For information, please contact the shelter during open hours noon-4:30 p.m. Wednesdays at 419991-1775 or Game Day Coordinator Ted Spencer by email at tspencer76.ts@ gmail.com or phone/text at 419-302-0825.

be even fewer family caregivers, according to a recent report from AARP. The study states that potential caregivers will be in much shorter supply starting in 2026 when the first boomers turn 80. The causes of this impending care gap lie in well-known trends including longer life spans, smaller families, more divorces among those 50 and older, more people who never had children, and rising rates of disability associated with the obesity epidemic. The number of frail older people over 65 is also expected to increase from 11 million in 2010 to 18 million in 2030, the report notes. The percentage of frail older people who are childless is expected to rise from 14 to 18 percent during this period, and the ratio of frail, older people who have only one or two adult children is expected to increase from 38 to 49 percent. Most of these aging boomers will want to remain in their homes, but they may not be able to count on their families for longterm care when it’s needed. Technology will help close the gap. Telehealth and activity monitors available now promote out-of-hospital care for chronic patients, solutions for healthy aging and help patients to self-manage their care. But technology will never replace the human touch. “Nurses, aides, social workers and volunteers are the heart of home health and hospice care,” said Brent Tow, CHP president and CEO. “They are more than caregivers for their patients. They also become friends, and almost family.” And that intimate, one-to-one care is another reason why home care is poised to a key role in health care in coming years. Community Health Professionals offers a complete range of home health and hospice services throughout northwest and west central Ohio. Home health, hospice and related services can begin with a phone call to 419-695-1999 in Delphos. Or visit www.ComHealthPro.org to learn more.

Columbus Grove hosts Christmas in the Park
Information submitted COLUMBUS GROVE — Christmas in the Park in Columbus Grove will be held Dec. 1 at Memorial Park. Santa arrives at 6 p.m. followed by the lighting of the Christmas lights in the park, horse-drawn carriage rides, singing and musical entertainment, Tap On Wood Dancers, treats from Santa, cookies, hot chocolate, hot chili soup, hot dogs and pictures with Santa. The event is free and the public is welcome. For each non-perishable food item donated to the Lord’s Pantry, you will be entered to win a 2014 Columbus Grove family pool pass. The evening is sponsored by the Village of Columbus Grove, Fire Department and Chamber of Commerce.

Allen Co. Historical Society to host holiday dinners
Information submitted ALLEN COUNTY — The Allen County Historical Society will host two Holiday Dinners in the 1893 Victorian MacDonell House. The house will be fully decorated for the holidays. The dinners, catered by Ann Ross, will be Dec. 13 and 14. Hors d’oeuvres will be served at 6:30 p.m. followed by dinner at 7 p.m. The cost is $45 per person. Seating is limited. Please make reservations no later than Dec. 1 by calling Donna Collins at the Allen County Museum, 419-222-9426. The location of the dinners is 632 West Market St., Lima. Newspapers provide a daily source of information from around the globe. Expand your horizons.

we love ‘Stand your ground’ proposal clears Ohio House SMILES
COLUMBUS (AP) — The Ohio House has approved a measure making broad changes to the state’s gun laws, including the addition of a “stand your ground” selfdefense rule that has sparked debates on gun control across the country. The measure passed 62-27 Wednesday amid protests from anti-gun groups, black legislators and others. The bill eliminates the duty to retreat in any place in which the person is lawfully allowed to be and makes concealed-carry licenses in Ohio and certain other states valid across state lines. Republican Rep. Terry Johnson said the bill brings reasonable safety protections to Ohioans. Democrats predicted it would foster violence. State Rep. Alicia Reece says opponents have jammed Republican Gov. John Kasich’s phone lines with calls to take their side. At least 22 states have similar self-defense laws.

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4 — The Herald

Thursday, November 21, 2013


Bunge invests Orion ‘The BIG O’ Samuelson in local student talks agriculture at NPAC
Information submitted Information submitted KANSAS CITY, Mo. — Local student Brice Schulte, Venedocia, joined over 550 of the top collegiate agriculture students Nov. 7-10 in Kansas City, Mo. to engage in career preparation training at the Agriculture Future of America Leaders Conference. For four days, Schulte, who studies mechanical engineering at The Ohio State University, participated in soft skill training provided by agriculture, education and facilitation professionals. In the Conference environment, Schulte was surrounded by like-minded students, who are passionate about agriculture, and by agriculture professionals who have invested financially as well as relationally in these students’ lives. Bunge is one of the organizations that partners with AFA to make this training possible. Bunge specifically invested relationally in Schulte. While at Conference, Schulte was invited to a special breakfast hosted by Bunge. During this breakfast, Bunge and Schulte were able to connect and discuss Bunge’s opportunities and Schulte’s interests. Schulte was paired with Bunge based on mutual interest. “Bunge is a proud partner of Agriculture Future of America,” said Geri Hayes, Bunge vice president of human resources. “We continue to work with AFA supporting the mission to create partnerships that identify, encourage and support outstanding college students who are preparing for careers in the agriculture and food industry.” Like all student delegates, Schulte was competitively selected by AFA and its partners for Conference participation and this opportunity to connect with Bunge. AFA Leaders Conference is just one collegiate and young professional leader development program offered by AFA, which exists as a catalyst in the preparation of the next generation of agriculture leaders. VAN WERT — Williamson Insurance Agency presents long-time voice of agriculture, Orion “The Big O” Samuelson, to the Niswonger Performing Arts Center at 3 p.m. Feb. 23, 2014. Samuelson is heard on WGN Radio, where he has served as Agribusiness Director since 1960. His life-long commitment to agriculture has been recognized by organizations in all segments of agri-business. In May of 2001, Orion was named a Laureate of the Lincoln Academy of Illinois and received the Lincoln Medal, the highest award bestowed by the state of Illinois. A week later, the University of Illinois presented Orion with the Honorary Degree of Doctor of Letters. In January of 1998, the American Farm Bureau Federation honored Orion and Bob Dole with the AFBF Distinguished Service Award. At the 1997 Illinois State Fair,


P Task Force II releases final report
James J. Hoorman Ag Educator OSU-Extension Putnam County

Governor Jim Edgar changed the name of the Junior Livestock Building to the Orion Samuelson Junior Livestock Building as a tribute to Orion’s nearly four decades of service to the agricultural youth of Illinois. In October of 1994, Orion was honored as “Man of the Year” by Heifer Project International on

its 50th anniversary. He has received the National 4-H Alumni Award and the Honorary FFA American Farmer Degree and is an honorary member of Alpha Gamma Rho, the agriculture fraternity. Orion is the most recognized agricultural journalist in the industry, Samuelson has more than 60 years experience in broadcasting,

more than 50 of those at Chicago’s WGN. Tickets for the presentation are on sale now: $20 for adults / $10 for students. The Niswonger Box Office, located at 10700 SR 118 S, Van Wert, is open noon-4 p.m. Monday through Friday. Tickets can also be purchased online 24 hours at www. NPACVW.org.

Ag Credit announces continued strong earnings
Information submitted FOSTORIA — Ag Credit, ACA, a memberowned cooperative with more than $1.43 billion in assets, today announced financial results for the first nine months of calendar year 2013. Net income for the first nine months of 2013 was $23.8 million, compared with $19.3 million for the same period in 2012. The increase in net income is primarily due to increased net interest income on increased loan volume and an increase in earnings on the association’s own funds in loans. Loan volume increased by $91.9 million for the first nine months of 2013, representing a 7.18 percent increase in loans. Members’ equity increased to $216.35 million from $200.10 million at the end of 2012. Ag Credit’s credit quality improved during the first nine months in 2013 and remains strong.

“We’re very pleased with the first nine months’ financial results for our cooperative,” said Neil Jordan, President and CEO. “In light of all the uncertainties with federal deficits, reductions in grain commodity prices and unresolved issues related to the Farm Bill, it’s good to know our lending institution is on firm ground. Our members can be confident our board is looking toward year-end with another very strong projection for profit sharing for 2013.” About Ag Credit: Ag Credit takes pride in financing the growth of rural America, including the special needs of young, beginning and minority producers. With more than 6,800 customers and $1.43 billion of assets, Ag Credit is one of the region’s leading providers of credit and insurance services to farmers, agribusiness and rural residents in Northern Ohio. Learn more at www. agcredit.net.

The Ohio Lake Erie Phosphorus (P) Task Force II released its final report in October and there are a lot of interesting facts on phosP delivered from edge of fields is phorus runoff and possible changes 2.05 #/A and from outlets is 1.43 that may be coming in farming prac- #/A. Existing conservation practices tices. This article summarizes and are reducing edge of field P losses highlights major findings from the by 32 percent.” (pg 5) Ideally, a P P Task Force. loss of 1 pound or less per acre is The P Task Force is composed of desirable. representatives from Ohio EPA, Ohio The Task force also reported that Department of Natural Resources, “the relative contribution of disOhio Lake Erie Commission, and solved reactive P from turf to Lake agribusiness, crop consultants and Erie is low; however, recently the farmers. The purpose of the P Task Scotts Company eliminated P from force is to track and reduce soluble their lawn maintenance products reactive phosphorus in Lake Erie resulting in an annual reduction 158 and to develop policy and manage- tons of P.” (pg 10) ment recommendations based on To reduce harmful algae blooms new data and research. (pg 1) (HAB) in Lake Erie, the task force P Task Force key findings: set some targets for P reduction in “Nutrient impairment is impacting the water entering Lake Erie. the $11.5 tourism industry and caus“For total P, reductions of 37 pering increased costs to public water cent (from 1,275 metric ton down supplies.” (pg 1) Approximately 10 to 800 metric ton) during the spring million people get their drinking months (March 1-June30). For diswater from Lake Erie. solved reactive P, a 41 percent “The Task Force concluded that reduction (256 metric tons down to there are multiple contributors to P 150 metric tons) in the spring will in Lake Erie but agriculture is the significantly reduce or eliminated leading source … in the Maumee HAB’s.” (pg 34) River (~80 percent).” (pg 1) Several best management pracA NRCS Great Lakes Conservation tices are being promoted by the P Effects Assessment report includes Task Force: “Soil tests every three the following highlights in the P years representing no more than 25 Task Force report: acres. Recommend using intense “Eighty–four percent of P applied precision technologies with GPS in agriculture came from fertiliz- on as many acres as possible. No er and 16 percent from manure. www.edwardjones.com surface applications of P fertilizer Lake Erie receives 44 percent of on snow covered or frozen ground. all P delivered in the Great Lakes. Nutrients should be incorporated or You Put Them In a Safe Cultivated Cropland contributes 61 Place. banded and injected or applied to a percent of the total P delivered to living crop. Weather predictions and Lake Erie. Average annual loads of soil conditions should be considered

Now, Where Was That?
You Put Them In Place. You Put Them In a aSafe Safe Place.

to minimize runoff.” (pg 51) “Including cover crops is critical to improving soil health, increasing water infiltration, and reducing critical peak runoff that is transporting sediment and dissolved nutrients. Improved crop rotations decrease surface runoff through better water infiltration and water holding capacity and decrease runoff and soil erosion.” (pg 52) Residue and tillage management are critical components. “Mulch till and no-till are critical conservation practices to control erosion in the Western Lake Erie Basin. Recent information indicates that a combination of no-till, strip fertilization, and cover crops dramatically reduces runoff and nutrient movement especially on heavy clay soils that compact easily and seal off, even under no-till or rotational no-till (no-till one year, chiseling or vertical tillage the next) situations. These practices are important for climate change and sequestering carbon in the soil profile.” (pg 52) Other practices that are being promoted: Grass water ways, drainage water management, filter strips/ filter areas, constructed wetlands, blind inlets, phosphorus and denitrifying bioreactors, water sediment control basins, riparian forest buffers. (pg 52-54) The entire 96-page P Task Force report can be found at epa.state.oh.us/portals/35/lakeerie/ ptaskforce2/Task_Force_Report_ October_2013.pdf. There is no “one” practice that can be recommended as best in all cases. Weather and management are key elements in the success of best management practices that reduce runoff, soil erosion and nutrient losses from fields!


Quotes of local interest supplied by EDWARD JONES INVESTMENTS Close of business November 20, 2013
-66.21 -6.50 -10.28 -0.50 -2.54 -0.45 +0.04 -0.40 -0.21 +0.20 -1.09 -0.40 +0.049999 +0.07 -0.08 -0.19 -0.32 +0.15 -0.05 -0.96 -0.63 +0.22 +0.29 -0.05 +0.87 -3.109997 -0.44 +0.34 -0.16 +0.35 +0.03 -0.14 -0.56 +0.20 +0.08 -0.38 -0.35


www.edwardjones.com Are your stock, bond or other certificates in a www.edwardjones.com safety deposit box, desk drawer or closet ... or are you not sure at the moment?

Dow­Jones­Industrial­Average­ 15,900.82­ S&P­500­ 1,781.37­ NASDAQ­Composite­ 3,921.27­ American­Electric­Power­Co.,­Inc.­ 47.51­ AutoZone,­Inc.­ 461.30­ Bunge­Limited­ 79.82­ BP­plc­ 46.99­ Citigroup,­Inc.­ 50.77­ CenturyLink,­Inc.­ 31.80­ CVS­Caremark­Corporation­ 65.42­ Dominion­Resources,­Inc.­ 66.63­ Eaton­Corporation­plc­ 70.89­ Ford­Motor­Co.­ 16.92­ First­Defiance­Financial­Corp.­ 26.08­ First­Financial­Bancorp.­ 15.75­ General­Dynamics­Corp.­ 89.62­ General­Motors­Company­ 37.69­ The­Goodyear­Tire­&­Rubber­Company­ 21.38­ Huntington­Bancshares­Incorporated­ 8.82­ Health­Care­REIT,­Inc.­ 58.48­ The­Home­Depot,­Inc.­ 79.75­ Honda­Motor­Co.,­Ltd.­ 41.19­ Johnson­&­Johnson­ 95.15­ JPMorgan­Chase­&­Co.­ 56.10­ Kohl’s­Corp.­ 54.71­ Lowe’s­Companies­Inc.­ 47.330002­ McDonald’s­Corp.­ 97.54­ Microsoft­Corporation­ 37.08­ Pepsico,­Inc.­ 85.13­ The­Procter­&­Gamble­Company­ 84.69­ Rite­Aid­Corporation­ 5.10­ Sprint­Corporation­ 7.35­ Time­Warner­Inc.­ 65.72­ United­Bancshares­Inc.­ 13.99­ U.S.­Bancorp­ 38.74­ Verizon­Communications­Inc.­ 50.40­ Wal-Mart­Stores­Inc.­ 78.90­




know why some of its turkeys wouldn’t plump up in time for Thanksgiving this year. CEO Rod Brenneman says in an interview with the AP that it’s the first time it happened and that the company is investigating You still retain ownership make all themake all the You still retainand ownership and payments, mergers, splits, bond calls or maturiwhat went wrong. Butterball had decisions while we handle all the paperwork. We’ll automatically process dividend and interest decisions – while we handle all the paperwork. Call or visit your– local Edward Jones ties, and more. Even better, you’ll receive a announced last week that it will payments, mergers, splits, bond dividend calls orand maturiWe’ll automatically process interestand interest financial advisor today. We’ll automatically process dividend consolidated account statement and a single form have a limited supply of large, ties, and more. Even better, you’ll receive a payments, mergers, splits, bond calls or maturipayments, mergers, splits, bond calls or maturifresh turkeys that are 16 pounds tax time. Andyat North Corey Norton ties, and more. Even better, you’ll receive a ties, and more. Even better, you’ll receive a consolidated account statement and a single form or heavier for the holidays. Financial Advisor Financial Advisor account statement and a singleand form consolidated account statement a single form at tax time.consolidated “It’s a really good question. or visit local Edward Jones 1122 Call Elida Avenue 1122 Elida Avenue at tax your time. at tax time. We don’t have an answer yet,” Delphos, OH 45833 Delphos, OH 45833 financial advisor today. 419-695-0660 419-695-0660 Brenneman said when asked Call or visit local Edward Jones Callyour or visit your local Edward Jones Call orCorey visit Norton your local Edward Jones Andy North about the cause. But he noted financial advisor today. financial advisor today. financial advisor today. Financial Advisor Financial Advisor that turkeys are “biological creaNorth Andy North Corey NortonCorey Norton Andy North Corey Norton 1122 Elida Andy Avenue 1122 Elida Avenue tures” subject to a variety of Financial Advisor Financial Advisor Financial Delphos, Advisor Delphos, OH 45833 OH Advisor 45833 Financial Advisor Financial Advisor Financial factors. 419-695-0660 419-695-0660 1122 Elida Avenue 1122 Elida Avenue 1122 Elida Avenue 1122 Elida Avenue 1122 Elida Avenue 1122 Delphos, Elida Avenue “For whatever reason, they Delphos, OH 45833 OH 45833 Delphos, OH 45833 Delphos, OH 45833 Delphos, OH 45833 Delphos, OH 45833 419-695-0660 419-695-0660 419-695-0660 419-695-0660 just didn’t gain quite as well this 419-695-0660 419-695-0660 year,” he said. Like many other turkey producers, Butterball feeds its birds antibiotics to prevent and treat Member SIPC illnesses, which can occur from living in cramped quarters. The use of antibiotics, which also Member SIPC promote growth in livestock, has Member SIPC Member SIPC been the subject of concern that it could lead to antibiotic-resisMember SIPC tant germs.
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your stock, bond or can other certificates a A lost or Are destroyed certificate mean Are your stock, bond or other in certificates in a
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A lost or destroyed certificate can mean www.edwardjones.com www.edwardjones.com inconvenience and lost money for you and your NEW YORK (AP) — Are yourYou stock, bond or otherIn certificates in a Put Them a Safe Place. heirs. Let Edward Jones hold them for In you. You Put Them a Safe Place. Butterball apparently has Aresafety your deposit stock, bond or other certificates in a box, desk drawer or closet ... or You still retain ownership and make all the big fat mystery on its hands: safety deposit box, drawer or closet ... or are you not sure at desk the moment? decisions – while we handle all the paperwork. The company says it doesn’t are you not sure at the moment?

Now,Where Where Was That? Now, Was That?

Butterball mystery: Turkeys wouldn’t fatten up

Now, Where Was That? Now, Where Was That?







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Butterball, a privately-held company based in Garner, N.C., declined to say whether it made any changes to its feed formula this year. But the problem seems to have come up rather recently. For much of the year, Butterball produces turkeys that are frozen and stored until they’re ready to be sold for the holidays. But then in October and November, it shifts into production for fresh turkeys. And that’s when the company ran into problems with the turkeys not gaining enough weight, Brenneman said. It hasn’t been an issue for some other poultry producers. “The weather was great, so the turkeys were a little bigger,” said Theo Weening, the global meat buyer for Whole Foods Market, which is based in Austin, Texas. The grocer works with smaller suppliers from around the country to sell turkeys that haven’t been treated with antibiotics. Over at meat producer Cargill, spokesman Michael Martin says in an email that the company has never had a problem where its birds didn’t put on enough weight to produce an adequate supply of large turkeys.


Thursday, November 21, 2013

The Herald — 5


Kitchen Press
Thanksgiving is almost here. Enjoy it with family and friends.
Roast Turkey Breast with Orange Glaze 2 tablespoons oil 1/4 teaspoon onion powder 1/4 teaspoon garlic powder 1 (4 - 5-pound) fresh or frozen whole turkey breast, thawed 1 teaspoon dried thyme leaves, optional Salt and pepper Orange Glaze 1 tablespoon margarine or butter 1/2 cup orange marmalade 1/3 cup frozen orange juice concentrate, thawed 1/2 teaspoon ginger Heat oven to 350 degrees. In small bowl, combine oil, onion powder and garlic powder; brush turkey breast on all sides with oil mixture. Rub thyme (if using) over all sides of turkey; sprinkle with salt and pepper. Place turkey, skin side up, on rack in roasting pan. Bake at 350 degrees for 2 1/2 to 3 hours, or until internal temperature reaches 170 degrees and turkey is tender throughout. Meanwhile, in small saucepan combine all glaze ingredients. Cook over medium heat until smooth and bubbly, stirring constantly. Remove turkey from oven; brush with glaze. Let turkey stand 15 minutes before slicing. Pass remaining glaze to spoon over sliced turkey. 8 to 10 servings. Caramelized Onion Mashed Potatoes 4 large potatoes, peeled and quartered 6 tablespoons butter, divided 1/3 cup chopped onion 1/3 cup packed brown sugar 1/3 cup sour cream 1/4 cup milk 2 ounces cream cheese, softened 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/8 teaspoon pepper Dash cayenne pepper Place potatoes in a large saucepan and cover with water. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat; cover and cook for 15-20 minutes or until tender. Meanwhile, in a small skillet, melt 4 tablespoons butter. Add onion; cook until slightly softened. Sprinkle with brown sugar; cook until brown sugar is bubbly and onion is tender. Drain potatoes; transfer to a large bowl. Add the sour cream, milk, cream cheese, salt, pepper, cayenne and remaining butter; mash until smooth. Stir in the onion mixture. Yield: 8 servings. If you enjoyed these recipes, made changes or have one to share, email kitchenpress@yahoo.com.

Ottoville Immaculate Conception Church

Calendar of Events
TODAY 9-11 a.m. — The Delphos Canal Commission Museum, 241 N. Main St., is open. 11:30 a.m. — Mealsite at Delphos Senior Citizen Center, 301 Suthoff St. 1-3 p.m. — The Delphos Museum of Postal History, 339 N. Main St., is open. 5:30 p.m. — The Delphos Canal Commission meets at the museum, 241 N. Main St. 5-7 p.m. — The Interfaith Thrift Store is open for shopping. 7 p.m. — Spencerville Local Schools Board of Education meets. St. John’s Athletic Boosters meet in the Little Theatre. 7:30 p.m. — Delphos Chapter 26 Order of the Eastern Star meets at the Masonic Temple on North Main Street. Delphos VFW Auxiliary meets at the VFW Hall, 213 W. Fourth St. FRIDAY 7:30 a.m. — Delphos Optimist Club, A&W DriveIn, 924 E. Fifth St. 11:30 a.m. — Mealsite at Delphos Senior Citizen Center, 301 Suthoff St. 1-4 p.m. — Interfaith Thrift Store is open for shopping. SATURDAY 9 a.m.-noon — Interfaith Thrift Store is open for shopping. St. Vincent dePaul Society, located at the east edge of the St. John’s High School parking lot, is open. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. — Delphos Postal Museum is open. 12:15 p.m. — Testing of warning sirens by Delphos Fire and Rescue. 1-3 p.m. — The Delphos Canal Commission Museum, 241 N. Main St., is open. 7 p.m. — Bingo at St. John’s Little Theatre. SUNDAY 1-3 p.m. — The Delphos Canal Commission Museum, 241 N. Main St., is open. 1-4 p.m. — Putnam County Museum is open, 202 E. Main St. Kalida. 1:30 p.m. — Amvets Post 698 Auxiliary meets at the Amvets post in Middle Point. 4 p.m. — Amvets Post 698 regular meeting at the Amvets post in Middle Point. 7:30 p.m. — Sons of Amvets Post 698 meet at Amvets Post in Middle Point. MONDAY 9 a.m.-7 p.m. — Ottoville Branch Library is open.

Kitchen Press Kitchen Press

Johnson Lima Beane ‘Barbershopper of the Year’
The Lima Beane Barbershop Chorus recently held its 2013-14 Officer Induction and Awards Banquet at the Red Pig Inn in Ottawa. Dave Johnson, left, received the 2013 “Barbershopper of the Year” Award and 2013 President John E. Wellman was again inducted as the incoming 2014 president. The 2014 annual Lima Beane Show will be April 5 at the Lima Civic Center. (Submitted photo)

Dickman passes basic training
Army Pfc. John T. Dickman III has graduated from basic combat training at Fort Jackson, Columbia, S.C. During the nine weeks of training, the soldier studied the Army mission, history, tradition and core values, physical fitness and received instruction and practice in basic combat skills, military weapons, chemical warfare and bayonet training, drill and ceremony, marching, rifle marksmanship, armed and unarmed combat, map reading, field tactics, military courtesy, military justice system, basic first aid, foot marches and field training exercises. Dickman is the son of John Dickman Jr., of Delphos and Tammy Baker of Columbia City, Ind. He is a 2007 graduate of Jefferson Senior High School and earned an associate degree in 2011 from the ITT Technical Institute- Fort Wayne Campus.

NOV. 25-29 MONDAY: Salisbury steak, mashed potatoes, broccoli, bread, margarine, applesauce, coffee and 2 percent milk. TUESDAY: Meatloaf, ranch mashed potatoes, cream corn, roll, margarine, gelatin/fruit, coffee and 2 percent milk. WEDNESDAY: Chicken Alfredo, tossed salad, garlic bread, apricots, coffee and 2 percent milk. THURSDAY: Senior Luncheon Cafe is closed for Thanksgiving! FRIDAY: Baked fish with tartar sauce, potato wedges, coleslaw, bread, margarine, Mandarin oranges, coffee and 2 percent milk.

Just because you’re going away for the summer doesn’t mean you have to miss out on a single issue of your favorite hometown paper. All you need do is contact our customer service department at least 10 days prior to your departure and have your subscription forwarded to your vacation address. It’s simple, and it won’t cost you an extra cent — that’s what we call really good news!


Happy Birthday
Nov. 22 Kelsey Buettner Charles Fletcher



Announce you or your family member’s birthday in our Happy Birthday column. Complete the coupon below and return it to The Delphos Herald newsroom, 405 North Main St., Delphos, OH 45833. Please use the coupon also to make changes, additions or to delete a name from the column.


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Specialty Angel Food Cakes
Regular & Flavored To order angel food cakes call the church at 419-695-2616
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FRIDAY, NOV. 22 9am to 5pm

in the Main Lobby of the First Federal Bank, Delphos

Homemade Noodles, and Luscious Baked Goods
This message published as a public service by these civic minded firms.

•Delpha Chev/Buick Co.

•Lehmann’s Furniture •Westrich Home Furnishings •Omer’s Alignment Shop •Delphos Ace Hardware & Rental


•Pitsenbarger Auto

•First Federal Bank


6 – The Herald

Thursday, November 21, 2013

Associated Press AMERICAN CONFERENCE East N. England N.Y. Jets Miami Buffalo South W 7 5 5 4 L T Pct 3 0 .700 5 0 .500 5 0 .500 7 0 .364 L T Pct 3 0 .700 6 0 .400 8 0 .200 9 0 .100 L T Pct 4 0 .636 6 0 .400 6 0 .400 6 0 .400 L T Pct 1 0 .900 1 0 .900 6 0 .400 6 0 .400

NFL Glance
South PF 254 183 213 236 PF 252 227 193 129 PF 275 216 208 192 PF 398 232 194 228 PA 199 268 225 273 PA 220 226 276 318 PA 206 245 212 238 PA 255 138 246 222 W N. Orleans 8 Carolina 7 Tampa Bay 2 Atlanta 2 North W Detroit 6 Chicago 6 Green Bay 5 Minnesota 2 West L T Pct 2 0 .800 3 0 .700 8 0 .200 8 0 .200 L T Pct 4 0 .600 4 0 .600 5 0 .500 8 0 .200 PF 288 238 187 214 PF 265 282 258 240 PA 183 135 237 292 PA 253 267 239 320

By JIM METCALFE Sports Editor jmetcalfe@delphosherald.com I would not relish being on that committee that will cut down the list of potential modern-era National Football League Hall-ofFame nominees from 126 to 25. These will go with the two “senior” nominees — Ray Guy (Really? He’s not already in? Perhaps the best punter of all time?) and former Atlanta/Philadelphia DE Claude Humphreys. There are some worthy candidates that will not be on that list, let alone get in. If you want to see the whole list — players, coaches, owners/contributors — go to the official site of the Pro Football Hall of Fame. If the argument boils down to was this person among the best players in the game at the time he was playing, needless to say, each one could make a convincing case for inclusion in the game’s immortals — I like that phrase! — and each one could have a convincing case made against them. I took a brief scan of the nominees and I can’t see one that really wasn’t at least among the upper echelon of players when he was playing but I


All NFL eyes on Canton
Metcalfe’s Musings
don’t know if they can claim to be among the best. Remember, the one who started playing the earliest in this group was Ed “Too Tall” Jones, whose career began in 1974, so you’re talking about almost 35 years worth of players. That is tough for any sport in any era. I almost prefer the argument of would this player have been good in any and every era in order to make it into the best of the best, the elite of the elite. For example, would Phil Simms have been the caliber of quarterback he was when the NFL was more of a running league — say, in the Vince Lombardi era — than in the modern era, which has increasingly become more of a passing game. Would a receiver like Andre Reed does as well when cornerbacks — like a Mel Blount — were allowed

W Indianapolis 7 Tennessee 4 Houston 2 Jacksonville 1 North Cincinnati Pittsburgh Baltimore Cleveland West W 7 4 4 4

W Denver 9 Kansas City 9 Oakland 4 San Diego 4

NATIONAL CONFERENCE W Philadelphia 6 Dallas 5 N.Y. Giants 4 Washington 3 East L T Pct 5 0 .545 5 0 .500 6 0 .400 7 0 .300 PF 276 274 192 246 PA 260 258 256 311

W L T Pct PF PA Seattle 10 1 0 .909 306 179 San Fran 6 4 0 .600 247 178 Arizona 6 4 0 .600 214 212 St. Louis 4 6 0 .400 224 234 ___ Today’s Game New Orleans at Atlanta, 8:25 p.m. Sunday’s Games Minnesota at Green Bay, 1 p.m. Jacksonville at Houston, 1 p.m. San Diego at Kansas City, 1 p.m. Chicago at St. Louis, 1 p.m. Pittsburgh at Cleveland, 1 p.m. Tampa Bay at Detroit, 1 p.m. N.Y. Jets at Baltimore, 1 p.m. Carolina at Miami, 1 p.m. Tennessee at Oakland, 4:05 p.m. Indianapolis at Arizona, 4:05 p.m. Dallas at N.Y. Giants, 4:25 p.m. Denver at New England, 8:30 p.m. Open: Buffalo, Cincinnati, Philadelphia, Seattle Monday’s Game San Francisco at Washington, 8:40 p.m.

to beat the snot out of receivers all the way down the field until the ball was released? Officiating in those days probably had its own share of problems — how could a cornerback know when the ball was released, for example, unless he was looking? Or for coaches: did they show the ability — like a Don Shula, who had success with the Miami Dolphins when they featured the bruising Paul Csonka, as well as when they had the gun-slinging Dan Marino — to win with different styles and different eras? I know that’s not a perfect question, either, because even that is open to interpretation. Let the arguing continue. It will anyway. ——— I really hope this is not a trend that continues. I ran cross this item the other day about how three former college football players: Joey Balthazor, Paul Morgan and Cliff Deese; have sued the NCAA, alleging the powers-thatbe did not inform the players of the inherent dangers of football. See MUSINGS, page 7

NFC Week 11 Quarterbacks Foles, PHL A. Rodgers, GBY Brees, NOR R. Wilson, SEA Romo, DAL M. Stafford, DET C. Newton, CAR S. Bradford, STL M. Ryan, ATL Cutler, CHI Rushers L. McCoy, PHL M. Lynch, SEA A. Morris, WAS A. Peterson, MIN Forte, CHI Gore, SNF Lacy, GBY Re. Bush, DET De. Williams, CAR D. Murray, DAL Receivers Garcon, WAS B. Marshall, CHI J. Graham, NOR Cal. Johnson, DET De. Jackson, PHL Cruz, NYG J. Nelson, GBY V. Jackson, TAM Jeffery, CHI Gonzalez, ATL Punters A. Lee, SNF S. Martin, DET Bosher, ATL Morstead, NOR Weatherford, NYG Nortman, CAR Hekker, STL Donn. Jones, PHL Locke, MIN Chr. Jones, DAL Punt Returners Dw. Harris, DAL Hyde, GBY G. Tate, SEA Page, TAM Ginn Jr., CAR T. Austin, STL R. Randle, NYG Sproles, NOR P. Peterson, ARI Spurlock, DET Kickoff Returners C. Patterson, MIN Dw. Harris, DAL Hester, CHI Dam. Johnson, PHL Ginn Jr., CAR Scoring Touchdowns Cal. Johnson, DET

Associated Press

NFL Individual Leaders
Att 162 251 406 275 370 419 299 262 404 265 Com Yds TD Int 103 1554 16 0 168 2218 15 4 277 3369 26 8 176 2362 19 6 239 2681 21 6 248 3198 21 8 189 2179 16 8 159 1687 14 4 267 2868 18 12 167 1908 13 8 M. Lynch, SEA J. Graham, NOR A. Peterson, MIN Forte, CHI B. Marshall, CHI D. Bryant, DAL Ve. Davis, SNF R. Cooper, PHL Gore, SNF Kicking Hauschka, SEA Crosby, GBY Hartley, NOR Gould, CHI Henery, PHL D. Bailey, DAL Feely, ARI Akers, DET Walsh, MIN P. Dawson, SNF ——AFC Quarterbacks P. Manning, DEN P. Rivers, SND Roethlisberger, PIT Luck, IND Locker, TEN Dalton, CIN Brady, NWE Manuel, BUF Tannehill, MIA Ale. Smith, KAN Rushers J. Charles, KAN Ry. Mathews, SND Chr. Johnson, TEN Moreno, DEN F. Jackson, BUF Ridley, NWE Be. Tate, HOU A. Foster, HOU Green-Ellis, CIN Spiller, BUF Receivers Ant. Brown, PIT And. Johnson, HOU A.. Green, CIN Welker, DEN De. Thomas, DEN Ke. Wright, TEN A. Gates, SND Cameron, CLE Woodhead, SND Decker, DEN Punters Fields, MIA Lechler, HOU M. King, OAK Anger, JAX Ry. Allen, NWE S. Powell, BUF McAfee, IND B. Colquitt, DEN D. Colquitt, KAN Quigley, NYJ 11 10 10 8 8 8 8 7 7 9 0 9 7 0 0 0 0 7 2 10 1 1 8 8 8 7 0

Injury gives Tony Stewart new perspective
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 LG 53 57 55 58 48 53 52 53 54 55 66 60 60 50 50 48 48 42 42 Pts 104 96 90 84 82 80 74 73 72 71

By JENNA FRYER Associated Press

Att Yds Avg LG TD 213 1009 4.74 41t 5 208 925 4.45 43 9 181 918 5.07 45t 5 194 851 4.39 78t 9 175 774 4.42 55 7 175 748 4.27 34t 7 172 696 4.05 56 5 145 654 4.51 39 2 141 579 4.11 27t 2 111 548 4.94 41 4 No Yds Avg LG TD 67 871 13.0 44 3 64 828 12.9 44 8 60 846 14.1 56t 10 59 1083 18.4 87 11 58 985 17.0 61t 7 58 824 14.2 70t 4 57 889 15.6 76t 7 56 827 14.8 59t 5 54 818 15.1 58 3 54 568 10.5 25 4 No 54 44 38 34 55 39 53 57 41 54 No 16 16 31 18 15 30 21 21 24 22 No 28 20 30 17 16 Yds 242 234 401 202 165 268 172 147 161 145 Yds 962 645 847 441 367 Yds 2631 2124 1792 1582 2559 1792 2419 2588 1860 2435 Avg 15.1 14.6 12.9 11.2 11.0 8.9 8.2 7.0 6.7 6.6 Avg 34.4 32.3 28.2 25.9 22.9 LG 62 72 63 61 68 65 63 70 65 62 Avg 48.7 48.3 47.2 46.5 46.5 45.9 45.6 45.4 45.4 45.1

PAT 32-32 27-27 33-33 27-28 31-31 29-29 20-20 31-31 27-28 29-29

FG 24-25 23-27 19-25 19-20 17-22 17-19 18-19 14-18 15-17 14-17

Att 409 358 383 347 183 410 380 217 366 360

Com 286 254 247 206 111 252 223 127 224 209

Yds 3572 2989 2901 2430 1256 2954 2552 1385 2474 2149 Avg 4.32 4.44 3.78 4.00 4.19 4.29 4.45 4.48 3.35 4.12 Avg 12.9 13.4 15.2 10.6 15.2 11.2 11.9 11.2 7.7 14.7 LG 66 65 66 61 65 66 60 60 65 56

TD 34 19 17 14 8 21 14 8 14 11

Int 6 8 10 6 4 15 7 4 11 4

Att Yds 186 803 150 666 167 632 150 600 141 591 131 562 122 543 121 542 156 522 123 507 No Yds 74 952 72 966 67 1020 61 648 60 914 59 660 56 664 56 629 55 424 54 792 No 52 52 64 62 50 35 44 39 62 44 Yds 2565 2538 3114 2884 2307 1613 2020 1773 2817 1986

LG TD 35 6 51 2 30t 4 25t 8 59 6 23 7 60 1 23 1 25 3 61 1 LG 47t 62t 82t 33 78t 45 56t 53 26t 61 Avg 49.3 48.8 48.7 46.5 46.1 46.1 45.9 45.5 45.4 45.1 TD 5 5 6 9 9 1 3 6 4 3

Scott, Kuchar favored at World Cup
Associated Press MELBOURNE, Australia— On current form and on a very familiar golf course, the two top-ranked players in the World Cup — Adam Scott and Matt Kuchar — are heavy favorites for individual honors when play begins today at Royal Melbourne. The second-ranked Scott has won two tournaments in a row — the Australian PGA and the Australian Masters, which was held last week at Royal Melbourne. Seventh-ranked Kuchar led by two strokes late in the final round of the Masters before a double-bogey on 18 enabled Scott to successfully defend his title. Kuchar finished second. “He has been in such good form,” Kuchar said of Scott on Wednesday. “To at least give him a run it was awfully good. I stood five back going into Sunday. Unfortunately, I got a bad break on 18 and that’s part of golf.” The Australians, with Scott’s teammate Jason Day at No. 18, are the highest-ranked team this week and will have the benefit of local crowds. “It’s an interesting week,” Scott said. “We playing together as a team but we still want to beat each other.”

KANNAPOLIS, N.C. — Tony Stewart has come to loathe stairs. Out of a wheelchair, off his crutches and only in the last week or so walking without the use of a cane, Stewart still hasn’t totally settled back into his usual routine since breaking his right leg in an Aug. 5 sprint car crash. He’s living on his own again but his most recent digs were on the second floor; leaving the house each day required a thorough mental checklist. “I have a huge appreciation for just daily things that I can’t do now,” he said. “It’s like I have to plan, I have to think about stuff. When I go to leave, I don’t want to have to go back up those steps. Before I get to the end of the hallway, I make sure I have everything I need before I get down that flight of steps.” Being out of a race car for

more than four a distraction,” he months now has said. “When you given the 3-time have all that taken NASCAR chamaway from you, pion a new outlook your daily activon just about everyity becomes a lot thing. more subtle and On pace to run you appreciate it more than 100 races all a lot more. Not this year before only Cup racing the injury, Stewart but everything instead spent almost that I do each a week in a hospiday, I think about Stewart tal following the acciit different than I did dent in Iowa. He spent before.” another week in bed with his A third surgery in October leg immobilized and was essen- to address an infection was a tially confined to the home of setback Stewart wasn’t expecthis business manager for about ing and also a wake-up call. a month. Stewart needed an He’d been pushing himself from ambulance to transport him to the moment he’d been cleared doctor appointments, daily tasks to leave the house in early such as bathing were a chore and September and tried to enjoy his the busiest man in racing sud- time at the race track as a spectadenly had nothing but free time tor and driver coach to Stewarton his hands. Haas Racing’s Danica Patrick. “I think it’s very easy to get caught up in everything that’s See NASCAR, page 7 going on, just daily stuff being

LG TD 86t 1 93t 1 71 0 52 0 25 0 98t 1 32 0 28 0 22 0 57 0 LG TD 109t 2 90 0 80 0 33 0 38 0 Ret Pts 0 66

Added Day: “I don’t know whether to love him or not if he beats me.” Kuchar and his teammate, Kevin Streelman, will attempt to successfully defend for the Americans the title that Kuchar and Gary Woodland won in 2011. The differences between the tournament, format-wise, that Kuchar and Woodland won in 2011 is about as far as the distance between Royal Melbourne and Haiku, China, where the Americans won. Then, it was a team event in keeping with the near 60-year history of the tournament. Two days of 4-ball competition, two days of foursomes. This time, to prepare for golf’s return to the Olympics and the format that will be used in Rio, it’s basically an individual stroke-play event. The financial emphasis is on the individual portion of the tournament — $7 million in prize money to be divided among the 60-man field, including $1.2 million to the winner. And just $1 million allocated for the team event, with money only going to the top three teams. See GOLF, page 7

TD Rush Rec 11 0 11

See LEADERS, page 7

World Cup of Golf Teams
Associated Press At Royal Melbourne Golf Club (Composite Course) Melbourne, Australia Today-Sunday Argentina — Emiliano Grillo, Fabian Gomez. Australia — Adam Scott, Jason Day. Brazil — Adilson da Silva, Alexandre Rocha. Canada — Brad Fritsch, David Hearn. Chile — Felipe Aguilar, Mark Tullo. China — Liang Wenchong, Wu Ashun. Denmark — Thomas Bjorn, Thorbjorn Oleson. England — Danny Willett, Chris Wood. Finland — Mikko Korhonen, Roope Kakko. France — Gregory Bourdy, Victor Dubuisson. Germany — Marcel Siem, Maximilian Kieffer. India — Anirban Lahiri, Gaganjeet Bhullar. Ireland — Shane Lowry, Graeme McDowell. Italy — Francesco Molinari, Matteo Manassero. Japan — Ryo Ishikawa, Hideto Tanihara. Netherlands — Robert-Jan Derksen, Tim Sluiter. New Zealand — Michael Hendry, Tim Wilkinson. Philippines — Angelo Que, Tony Lascuna. Portugal — Jose-Filipe Lima, Ricardo Santos. Scotland — Martin Laird, Stephen Gallacher. South Africa — Branden Grace, George Coetzee. South Korea — K.J. Choi, Bae Sang-moon. Spain — Miguel Angel Jimenez, Rafael Cabrera Bello. Sweden — Jonas Blixt, Peter Hanson. Thailand — Kiradech Aphibarnrat, Prayad Marksaeng. United States — Matt Kuchar, Kevin Streelman.

Saints will make Falcons hit rock bottom
By BARRY WILNER Associated Press What a juicy matchup the NFL scheduled for to night, a showdown for the lead in the NFC South and maybe for the best record in the conference. Then the Atlanta Falcons didn’t do their part. Instead, the prime-time meeting between long-time rivals has lost much of its luster. Atlanta (2-8) is the biggest disappointment in the entire NFL, going from nearly making the Super Bowl to contending for the top overall draft choice. It’s been a rough year for the Falcons, who have been ravaged by injuries and plagued by sloppiness (minus-11 turnover margin). “It’s certainly not fun when you’re not in the mix,” Matt Ryan said. “That’s part of this league. There are times when it can be humbling. You’ve got to keep your head down and keep going. I think you learn from everything, the good and the bad, and sometimes you learn more from the bad than the good. I think everybody is trying to learn from it, apply it to themselves and find ways to get better, find ways to use it as motivation.” The Saints (8-2) don’t need much more motivation than this: If they can win out, they will get the home field throughout the NFC playoffs because they will have beaten the Seahawks (10-1), the only team ahead of them in the conference. They meet Dec. 2. That’s huge: No one wants to go to Seattle or to New Orleans in the playoffs. “You always want to be at home,” Drew Brees said, “especially in those games.” New Orleans (No. 4 in the AP Pro32) is a 9-point favorite at Atlanta (No. 31, AP Pro32). The Falcons have almost hit rock bottom. When the archrival Saints rout them in prime time, that will be as low as they can get. SAINTS, 33-17 No. 15 Dallas (plus 2½) at No. 16 New York Giants Giants win fifth straight, increase the angst in Cowboys fans. BEST BET: GIANTS, 30-23 No. 7 Indianapolis (plus 2) at No. 13 Arizona Bruce Arians was 2012 Coach of the Year as Colts interim. He’s doing just as good a job in the desert. Still … UPSET SPECIAL, COLTS 21-20 No. 2 Denver (minus 2½) at No. 6 New England Tom Terrific tends to get the better of Peyton in Foxborough matchups. Not this time with that banged-up defense. BRONCOS, 33-28 No. 8 San Francisco (minus 5) at No. 27 Washington, Monday night If Niners have any designs on getting back to big game, they need to start now. 49ERS, 20-16 No. 18 New York Jets (plus 3½) at No. 19 Baltimore If Ravens have any designs on … well, you know. RAVENS, 17-15 No. 5 Carolina (minus 4) at No. 17 Miami Panthers must show some staying power after big win over Patriots. See NFL, page 7


Thursday, November 21, 2013

The Herald — 7

trying to avoid Roby entering NFL Draft Browns hangover against Steelers
Associated Press COLUMBUS — Ohio State AllAmerican cornerback Bradley Roby will forgo his senior season to enter the NFL Draft, coach Urban Meyer announced Wednesday. Meyer said Roby will be honored with the Buckeyes’ 18 seniors before Saturday’s home finale against Indiana. Roby, a fourth-year junior who entertained leaving for the NFL after last season, is widely projected as a first- or second-round pick. Roby, a 5-11, 192-pounder from Suwanee, Ga., has 155 tackles in 33 games for the Buckeyes, with seven tackles for a loss, eight interceptions, one blocked kick, a fumble recovery and a fumble caused. In confirming Roby would give up his final year of eligibility, Meyer said it was too much to ask players these days to give five years to their college career. Ohio State (10-0, 6-0 Big Ten), No. 3 in the BCS rankings, is seeking a schoolrecord 23rd consecutive win against the Hoosiers (4-6, 2-4). Meyer declined to say if other players were leaving a year early for the draft. “We talked and he’s going to go and move on,” Meyer added. “That’s all you ask. You don’t ask for five years nowadays. … It’s no secret. There’s nothing wrong with that. It’s great for him, great for Ohio State.” BUCKEYES BUZZ: This is Meyer’s 12th year as a head coach and before that, been a good offense and played better he was on staff for 15 years at Ohio State, defense. We haven’t had our physical presIllinois State, Colorado State and Notre ence and haven’t played the run well. We Dame. struggled. So the way they do it, they’ve So it stands to reason that along the had a run threat. They are going out way, both on the field and in space, with fast guys, and at coaches’ meetings and they delivered the mail pretty conventions, he has met a good. So it’s a very good lot of people. offense.” Once again this week, Wilson is particularly Meyer will encounter enamored with Ohio State someone he knows quite QB Braxton Miller. well when No. 4 Ohio State He hears negative things hosts Indiana (3:30 p.m.). about him but doesn’t give Hoosiers third-year them much credence. head coach Kevin Wilson “Braxton is a tremendous is about the same age as runner for a quarterback,” Meyer and their careers Wilson added. “Now a lot of have run for about the guys say the guy can’t throw. Roby same span. Like Meyer, I mean, his passing percentage Wilson is considered an offen(this year) is 68 percent.” sive-oriented coach who loves the spread. The Buckeyes are also wary of the Wilson has an assistant at North Carolina, Hoosiers, who rang up 49 points on Ohio Winston-Salem State, North Carolina State a year ago but still lost 52-49. A&T, Miami (Ohio), Northwestern and “They’re talented at the skill posiOklahoma — usually coordinating the tions. Coach Wilson does an unbelievoffense — since 1984. able job with the offense,” Ohio State So the coaches know each other and co-defensive coordinator Everett Withers have taken note of what each other has said. “It’s the same offense he ran when done in past jobs. Now, this week, they’re he was at Oklahoma, when I was at paying particular attention to each other’s Texas. It’s high-tempo so he tries to limit teams. what you can play defensively. It’s a big “There is a physical presence and I challenge for us but it’s not much differthink that’s a sign of really good teams,” ent than what our offense does. So we Wilson said of the Buckeyes’ attack. do have some familiarity with the speed “When we’ve had that on our team, we’ve part of it.” By TOM WITHERS Associated Press BEREA — Browns quarterback Jason Campbell has learned that once Sunday’s over, Sunday’s over. Win or lose, good or bad, strong performance or forgettable one, there’s only one way to survive in the NFL. “You’ve got to move on,” he said. Cleveland can’t afford to dwell on its curious loss in Cincinnati. At least the Browns had better not. It’s Steelers Week,and that’s no time to lose focus. Three days after their stranger-thanfiction loss to the Bengals, the Browns (4-6) began practicing for their bitter rival. They’re still searching for answers to what happened during the second quarter at Paul Brown Stadium. After taking a quick 13-0 lead, the Browns botched two punts, had a fumble returned for a touchdown and gave up 31 straight points in 15 minutes on the way to a disheartening 41-20 loss. “You have games where everything just seems not to be going right for us and that’s just one of those games that happened on Sunday,” Campbell said. “The whole day was weird. Even the flight was weird. It was just one of those days that happened. You move on.” Campbell threw three interceptions, an outing that partially erased the positive vibes he created with strong games in consecutive weeks against Kansas City and Baltimore. But the 9-year veteran never got into a rhythm against the Bengals and must now bounce back against the Steelers (4-6), who have recovered nicely from a 0-4 start. Campbell knows the Browns have to block out any recent memories, painful as they may be. “You can look at it two ways,” he added. “What happened Sunday is over. You can bounce back this Sunday and

He had a large hand in the Bengals’ first touchdown as well, slightly tipping Campbell’s pass late in the first quarter with the Browns up 13-0. The deflected throw went to linebacker James CINCINNATI — Greg Little broke free of the coverage as Harrison for an interception that set up Cincinnati’s first score he ran along the front of the end zone. All Cleveland quarter- in a 31-point second quarter. back Jason Campbell had to do was lob the ball his way. “It changed the whole momentum of the game,” cornerback Whap! It never got past the line of scrimmage. Another Adam “Pacman” Jones said. “Signs of a good team: working quarterback had failed to escape the long arms of the Bengals’ together to be great.” Michael Johnson. The Bengals thought Johnson would develop into a disrupThe 6-7 defensive end has batted down five passes this sea- tive pass rusher when they drafted him in the third round out son, according to STATS, but none of his swats has been more of Georgia Tech in 2009. He had his best season in 2012, getprominent than the ones last Sunday during a 41-20 victory over ting 11½ sacks, second on the team to Geno Atkins’ 12½. The Cleveland. The Bengals (7-4) came away in conBengals designated him their franchise player in the trol of the AFC North heading into their bye week. offseason. Getting the ball past Johnson and 6-6 Carlos With Atkins out for the season with a torn knee Dunlap on the other end of Cincinnati’s line is a ligament, Johnson came through with his best game tall order. Sunday. He batted or tipped three passes, forced “Sometimes you get it and a lot of times you a fumble, sacked Campbell once and picked off a don’t,” Johnson said. “The percentage is a lot deflected pass. lower of getting it than not getting it. Sometimes Johnson was a basketball star at Dallas County you can feel it grazing (a hand) and know you High School in Alabama, averaging 16 points and could have gotten a lot more on it.” 10 rebounds as a junior forward. He’s gotten enough of them to make a difference. He’s developed a knack for getting his hands on the football. Johnson’s total of five passes batted down at the line ranks “You rush and try to beat your guy,” Johnson added. “You second in the NFL to Connor Barwin’s six for Philadelphia, see him getting ready to throw and get your hands up. Most according to STATS. The Bengals have batted down 10 overall, have to look when they finally decide where they’re going to tied for sixth in the league. throw the ball. And if they look in my direction, the ball is probThat doesn’t include the number of passes redirected at the ably coming that way. line. Johnson had both on Sunday. “When you do that, good things happen.” The Browns had a chance to go up 7-0 when Little got open Notes: The Eagles lead the NFL with 15 passes batted down on a third-and-goal play. Johnson got his left hand up at the last at the line, according to STATS. The Cardinals are second at (Continued from page 6) instant to bat down the pass and force a field goal. His back was 14. The Broncos, Vikings and Chiefs have batted down 12. to the receiver, so he didn’t realize he’d prevented a touchdown The Bengals, Rams and Bears have 10 each. … The Bengals Kuchar said the change doesn’t bother him. until he got to the sideline. signed DT Christo Bilukidi on Wednesday. He was Oakland’s “I know the format is different but the golf is the same,” Kuchar “I came to the sideline and everybody was excited,” Johnson sixth-round pick in 2012 and played in 13 games. The Raiders said. “I just thought it was a tipped pass. I didn’t know some- waived him on Oct. 23. … They released DT Kheeston Randall, added. “It’s much more of an individual event … but there is a team body was wide open. Just turned out like that. We got each a second-year player from Texas who had signed on Nov. 5 and component and I think we have got as good a shot as anybody.” U.S. PGA Tour Commissioner Tim Finchem defended the other’s back like that.” didn’t play in either of the last two games. move away from the team-only concept at a media conference Wednesday at Royal Melbourne. “I think it is way too soon to conclude that the team portion of the Cup is lost,” Finchem explained. “We haven’t played yet so (Continued from page 6) While most of his peers will be vaca- the same results now. I think it’s a con- let’s see how that plays out and then we will see. We feel like the tioning and enjoying time off, he’s com- stant moving target. The relationship is tournament is more marketable. We think that it has a better chance But when he landed back in the hos- mitted to grueling rehabilitation three one aspect of it but still the moving target of fulfilling its mission which is to create more interest in the game in unique ways.” pital, he was reminded of advice he days a week. is the technology side of it. received from Brian Vickers, who missed But he also feels a responsibility to be “The more pieces you add to the 25 races in 2010 because of blood clots. available to Greg Zipadelli, who spent puzzle, the harder it is to put the puzzle “Brian Vickers gave me the best a decade with him as crew chief at Joe together. When we had two crew chiefs piece of advice that I couldn’t use. He Gibbs Racing and is now charged with and two drivers, it was at a certain level. (Continued from page 6) PACKERS, 20-13 says to enjoy your time off. You’re not running all four teams at SHR. Zipadelli And then the third team and now the No. 20 Pittsburgh (plus 2) going to get to do what you want to do is overseeing the expansion to four cars, fourth team. Now you have to make PANTHERS, 23-20 at No. 22 Cleveland in racing so just enjoy your time off,” assembling a crew for Kurt Busch’s new sure, instead of just getting two crew No. 22 San Diego (plus 5) Not buying into either of Stewart recalled. “The problem was I team and orchestrating a reorganization chiefs to communicate, now you have these teams right now. wasn’t able to get out of bed for the first that will give Stewart his third crew chief four. The equation gets more compli- at No. 3 Kansas City Now that the pesky perfecBROWNS, 22-17 two weeks. I kept that in mind the whole in three years. cated.” No. 32 Jacksonville (plus time.” Stewart, who jettisoned Darian So Johnston makes sense in that he’s tion questions have ended … CHIEFS, 17-13 10) at No. 29 Houston So Stewart skipped the NASCAR Grubb immediately after winning the coming directly from Michael Waltrip No. 11 Chicago (plus 1) at Never have bought into weekend in Phoenix earlier this month 2011 Sprint Cup title with him, has Racing, along with Rodney Childers, either of these teams. and attended the World of Outlaws World signed Chad Johnston to replace Steve who will crew chief new SHR driver No. 21 St. Louis Like Bears’ backup more TEXANS, 23-14 Finals at Charlotte for the first time as a Addington after two seasons. Stewart Kevin Harvick. It will give the team No. 26 Tennessee (plus team owner. acknowledged not being able to be in two crew chiefs who have been working than Rams’ backup at QB. BEARS, 24-17 1½) at No. 25 Oakland “In all the years I’ve had my dirt track the car before Daytona to work with side-by-side for several years at a time No. 28 Tampa Bay (plus 9) A couple of inconsistent teams, I’ve never been to the last race of Johnston “is not ideal” but said speak- the organization will desperately need at No. 10 Detroit teams, but Matt McGloin is a the year with any of them. Never been ing to his new crew chief daily will help steady leadership. Lions better be seri- nice story able to walk through and thank the guys build a rapport. “I think we have a lot more potential RAIDERS, 20-17 for their hard work,” he explained. “I got Still, after working with Zipadelli for than we’ve ever had,” Stewart added. ous about Bucs, even with ___ to do that. I won’t get to do that again. I 10 years, he’ll be on his third crew chief “Kevin and I have a great relationship. Thanksgiving date with 2013 RECORD: Against got to take Brian’s advice and actually in six seasons. Is he struggling to recap- I’ve not really worked with Kurt before. Packers ahead. LIONS, 30-20 spread: 3-10-2 (66-84-6). apply it to something.” ture something he had with Zippy? The first time talking to Kurt, it’s been No. 30 Minnesota (plus Straight up: 8-7 (96-66). Still planning to be back in the car “It’s literally results. I don’t think we great so far. Enjoy our conversations. To 4½) at No. 14 Green Bay Best Bet: 4-7 against for the season-opening Daytona 500 in were ever on pace to be where we needed me, there is potential to take this orgaPackers will be serious spread, 10-1 straight up. February, Stewart is skipping any normal to be,” he replied. “It’s a moving target nization to a level that it just hasn’t had Upset special: 3-8 against semblance of a driver offseason to focus and I don’t think you could bring Ray the opportunity to be yet because we’ve about Vikes before the holiday matchup in Motor City. spread, 1-10 straight up. on the expansion at Stewart-Haas Racing. Evernham back to Jeff (Gordon) and get been smaller.”

MJ’s long arms helping Bengals stay in first
By JOE KAY Associated Press


come out and play great, or you can continue to hang your hat on that and come out and be flat. I think with us being in the race right now at 4-6 with a lot of other teams, we need to put this one quickly behind us.” Campbell’s right, of course. But there was a sense in Cleveland’s locker room Wednesday that the loss in Cleveland’s most significant game since 2007 is lingering. “It was tough,” said wide receiver Davone Bess. “It’s been a while Cleveland had something to play for this late in the year and we let slip through our hands. Give Cincinnati credit. They’re a good team. They won the game. The better team won on Sunday.” To keep their playoff hopes alive, the Browns need much more from Campbell against the Steelers, who have won 11 of the last 14 games in Cleveland and are 24-5 vs. their AFC North neighbors since 1999. This hasn’t been a real rivalry in years. Making his third start this season, Campbell finished 27-of-56 for 248 yards with one TD and the three picks. Campbell explained bruised ribs suffered two weeks earlier against the Ravens weren’t an issue and offered no excuses. Campbell knows the only way to distance himself from the poor game is to have a better one. Campbell replayed the Bengals game in his head over 10 times and it never got better. He spent two days being hard on himself but is now looking ahead. He has to. “I really was hurt by the outcome because it was a game I felt like we had a chance to win and put ourselves in a really good position,” he ended. “And the fact that it didn’t happen, what can you do about it now but learn from it and move on. It was just one of those weird games but it’s quickly got to be done and behind you.




(Continued from page 6) The three players — who apparently would like other former college players (those who didn’t make it to the pros) to join the suit — also claim the NCAA failed to put together prevention, monitoring and treating brain injuries and seek medical monitoring and testing for former players who are suffering from head injuries related to their playing days. This suit joins others throughout the country. I just think it’s a real problem when trying to prove what someone knew when, as in, when did the NCAA really know the extent of the brain injuries that playing football caused. Think about it: we STILL don’t fully know! Can you say that 30 years ago, the NCAA should have known about all these risks when we didn’t have the technology, etc., we do now? As I have written before, if this keeps up,

No 23 18 22 26 25 42 17 25 24 18 No 16 14 19 26 21 16 22 20 13 15

football as we know will go the way of the do-do a lot sooner rather than later. The price will be too high. Personally, I think there are more than a few that would like to see that happen. Unfortunately, when that happens, will that really be the end of it? ——— That must be a sight to behold. I am referring to Tony Picard, a 400-pound running back — that is no misprint or misspelling — for White Swan High School in Washington. So far, he has gained 576 yards and seven touchdowns. Apparently, this kid has surprising footwork and athleticism for someone so big. A reference to the old Bill Cosby comedy routine about “Fat Albert” comes to mind but would you REALLY want that guy falling on you?

(Continued from page 6) Yds 359 236 257 299 250 420 159 218 199 135 Yds 510 411 537 693 548 398 530 475 308 355 Avg 15.6 13.1 11.7 11.5 10.0 10.0 9.4 8.7 8.3 7.5 Avg 31.9 29.4 28.3 26.7 26.1 24.9 24.1 23.8 23.7 23.7 LG 82t 50 79t 43 81t 89t 34 87t 29 35 TD 1 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 0

Punt Returners Doss, BAL Ant. Brown, PIT Benjamin, CLE Edelman, NWE Holliday, DEN McCluster, KAN Hilton, IND K. Martin, HOU Br. Tate, CIN Reynaud, TEN Kickoff Returners Holliday, DEN Q. Demps, KAN Todman, JAX K. Martin, HOU Br. Tate, CIN Cribbs, NYJ Thigpen, MIA D. Reed, IND Jac. Jones, BAL Reynaud, TEN

Scoring Touchdowns Ju. Thomas, DEN Moreno, DEN De. Thomas, DEN Welker, DEN J. Charles, KAN Bernard, CIN Cotchery, PIT M. Jones, CIN Ridley, NWE Royal, SND Kicking Gostkowski, NWE M. Prater, DEN D. Carpenter, BUF Suisham, PIT Folk, NYJ Novak, SND Succop, KAN Vinatieri, IND J. Tucker, BAL Nugent, CIN

TD Rush Rec 10 0 10 9 8 1 9 0 9 9 0 9 8 6 2 7 4 3 7 0 7 7 0 7 7 7 0 7 0 7 PAT 26-26 50-50 22-22 20-20 16-16 24-24 25-25 22-22 20-20 32-33 FG 24-25 14-15 22-24 22-24 23-24 20-23 19-22 20-23 20-22 15-19

Ret 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Pts 60 54 54 54 48 42 42 42 42 42

LG TD 105t 1 57 0 59 0 49 0 71 0 42 0 44 0 39 0 35 0 40 0

LG Pts 54 98 54 92 55 88 48 86 50 85 50 84 51 82 52 82 52 80 54 77

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8 – The Herald

Thursday, November 21, 2013



To place an ad phone 419-695-0015 ext. 122
FREE ADS: 5 days free if item is free or less than $50. Only 1 item per ad, 1 ad per month. BOX REPLIES: $8.00 if you come and pick them up. $14.00 if we have to send them to you. CARD OF THANKS: $2.00 base charge + $.10 for each word.


Telling The Tri-County’s Story Since 1869


Today’s Crossword Puzzle
ACROSS 1 Brooch 4 Former frosh 8 Grocery buy 11 Wolfed down 12 Copy 13 Ending for depart 14 Crop protector 16 Naughty 17 Frugal 18 Endures 20 Family mem. 21 So far 22 Four duos 25 Chided 29 Sound of suffering 30 Assn. 31 Gulf st. 32 Everyone 33 Fix, as a fight 34 QED part 35 Save from a landfill 38 Hag 39 Dehydrated 40 Curly’s friend 41 Tex-Mex dip 44 Hit 48 Numerical prefix 49 Having many uses 51 Salt Lake athlete 52 Strange 53 That girl 54 Provo sch. 55 Allen and Conway 56 Nurse DOWN 1 History 2 Hankering 3 Approach 4 Splinter groups 5 Grand Ole - 6 Ski instructor 7 -- monkey 8 Wheel parts

Deadlines: 11:30 a.m. for the next day’s issue. Saturday’s paper is 11:00 a.m. Friday Monday’s paper is 1:00 p.m. Friday Herald Extra is 11 a.m. Thursday
We accept

THANKS TO ST. JUDE: Runs 1 day at the price of $3.00. GARAGE SALES: Each day is $.20 per word. $8.00 minimum charge. “I WILL NOT BE RESPONSIBLE FOR DEBTS”: Ad must be placed in person by the person whose name will appear in the ad. Must show ID & pay when placing ad. Regular rates apply

105 Announcements
ADVERTISERS: YOU can place a 25 word classified ad in more than 100 newspapers with over one and a half million total circulation across Ohio for $295. It’s easy...you place one order and pay with one check through Ohio Scan-Ohio Advertising Network. The Delphos Herald advertising dept. can set this up for you. No other classified ad buy is simpler or more cost effective. Call 419-695-0015 ext. 138

545 Firewood/Fuel
SEASONED FIREWOOD: Oak, Ash, Hickory. All split, well seasoned, 18” in length. 419-910-1404

670 Miscellaneous
LAMP REPAIR Table or Floor. Come to our store. Hohenbrink TV. 419-695-1229

080 Help Wanted

Vanamatic Company in Delphos, Ohio is seeking Screw Machine Operators Vanamatic Company in with 2+ years experience. Ideal candidates will have the Entry Level Screw following skills and experience: • • • • •

592 Wanted to Buy

805 Auto
2009 MERCURY Grand Marquis. 13,300 miles, one owner, perfect shape. $15,500. (239)822-9971


Delphos, Ohio is seeking Machine Operators.
Blueprint Reading

Raines Jewelry
Scrap Gold, Gold Jewelry, Silver coins, Silverware, Pocket Watches, Diamonds.

Cash for Gold
2330 Shawnee Rd. Lima (419) 229-2899

930 Legals
WASHINGTON TWP. Trustees of Van Wert County will hold a special meeting Friday, November 22 at 5pm to approve a tax abatement. Meeting will be held at the Township office, 22693 Lincoln Hwy, Delphos. James M. Mox, Clerk 11/21/13

125 Lost and Found
FOUND: SMALL white dog. Was seen on Lehman Rd., Found on Peltier Rd. Call 419-234-7043

• Blueprint Reading Starting wage commensurate with • Basic Gaging and skills and experience. Measurement • Tool Adjustments

Basic Gaging and Measurement Ideal candidates will have Screw Machine Operation the following skills and Tool Adjustments experience: Set‐Up Experience a Plus

Vanamatic has served the precision • Screw Machine Operation machining industry for 58 years.

610 Automotive

Stable employment with flexible shifts, • Set-Up Experience a Plus climate controlled manufacturing facility and competitive wage and Starting wage benefit programs including commensurate with skills gainsharing.

and experience.

2006 BUICK Lacerne CXL, 4 door, candy apple red, hand leather heated seats, V-6, auto2 BEDROOM, 415 E. matic on steering col8th, Delphos. Appli- umn, bench seat, 39,000 080 Help Wanted ances, curtains, lawn miles. Must see, $14,900 GLM TRANSPORT hircare. No pets. $410/mo. obo. 419-647-4492. ing for our regional fleet. 419-236-9301 Safety, performance and 419-692-7441 referral bonus programs. 640 Financial 401(k) and direct deApartment For 305 posit. Home weekends. Rent IS IT A SCAM? The Del- Mileage paid via PC 1 NICE downstairs phos Herald urges our Miler practical miles. Call bedroom apartment readers to contact The (419)238-2155 for dew/range, refrigerator, Better Business Bureau, tails. washer/dryer. $425.00 in (419) 223-7010 or SAFETY DIRECTOR Ottoville. Phone: 1-800-462-0468, before Needed. Dancer Logis419-453-3956 entering into any agree- tics is looking for somement involving financing, one for our DOT safety business opportunities, position. Experience 320 House For Rent or work at home oppor- needed. Please apply at tunities. The BBB will as- 900 Drive, Delphos, 3 BEDROOM, 1 Bath, sist in the investigation Ohio. central A/C. 430 Euclid of these businesses. St., Delphos. No pets. (This notice provided as $495.00/month. a customer service by 419-695-5006 The Delphos Herald.)

303 Duplex For Rent

Please submit resumes to: Vanamatic has Company served the Vanamatic precision machining 701 Ambrose Drive industry Delphos, for almost OH

Stable (p) 419‐692‐6085 employment with flexible shifts, climate (f) 419‐692‐3260 controlled manufacturing Unity, Empowerment, Teamwork facility and competitive “The Right People, Making the Right wage and benefit programs Decision, At The Right Time” including gainsharing.
Please submit resumes to: Vanamatic Company 701 Ambrose Drive Delphos, OH

60 years. Attn: Scott Wiltsie


9 10 12 15 19 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 30

Trapped like -- -Docs prescribe them Tailoring job Up -- -- glance Safecracker Bradley or Sharif Composer Porter Face powder base Soft cheese Poi base Vigorous spirit Evening out Monsieur’s airport

34 36 37 38 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 50

Not hunched Fabric meas. Necktie “-- the Barbarian” Ruminates Pencil remnant Showy Stead Demure Teakettle sound Grades 1-12 Profound Yale athlete

The new gets old faster and faster
“Can you send a fax for me?” asked Charlotte, a close neighbor, on the phone one morning. I was a little perplexed. It was like asking me if she could borrow our butter churn or a bucket of coal. Who sends faxes anymore? Didn’t they go out with mullets and Beanie Babies? Why not just send a scan, or an email attachment or a screenshot of whatever she was being asked to fax? Who was she sending a fax to? Had she invented some kind of time machine? Was she sending a fax to her old self in 1989 telling her not to marry that bozo Tom? I had to check, but it turns out my printer is also a scanner and a fax machine, even though I had never used it for that. “Sure,” I said. “Come on over, or do you need me to come over there and help crank your car?” Charlotte now thinks I am out of my mind. She has no idea that people once started cars by hand-cranking them. The only crank she knows about is me. Old technology never seems to die willingly. I worked with a writer not so long ago who insisted on using a fountain pen. If he could have, I’m sure he would have used a quill. This meant that every single word he wrote had to be typed into the computer by someone

Jim Mullen

Attn: Scott Wiltsie scottw@Vanamatic.com
(p) 419-692-6085 (f) 419-692-3260

Unity, Empowerment, Teamwork “The Right People, Making the Right Decision, At The Right Time”

The Village Idiot

Wagner. Ronald J. Ellerbrock and Linda K. Ellerbrock, 40.0 acres Blanchard Township, 40.0 acres Blanchard Township, 62.05 acres Blanchard Township, 20.88 acres Blanchard Township, 20.88 acres Blanchard Township, 62.05 acres Blanchard Township, 62.05 acres Blanchard Township, 20.88 acres Blanchard Township, 23.60 acres Blanchard Township, 67.38 acres Blanchard Township, and 71.0 acres Blanchard Township to Ronald J. Ellerbrock TR and Linda K. Ellerbrock TR. Kenneth W. Burwell and Jenny Burwell, Lot 648, Ottawa, to HSBC Mortgage Services, Inc. Donald L. Cromly and Pauline F. Cromly, Lot 239, Continental, to Matthew E. Newsome. Shirley J. Reichenbach LE, Lot 463 and Lot 464, Pandora, to Terry L. Reichenbach, Robert D. Reichenbach and James D. Reichenbach.

3-4 BEDROOM home. Detached 2 car garage. Deposit required. No Pets. Available immediately. 419-692-5143. 604 S. Clay St, Delphos. 2BR Washer/Dryer hook-up. No pets. $475/mo+deposit. Available now. Call 419-234-7505. DELPHOS AREA: 2-Story, 4 bedroom home. 2 car detached garage. $750/month + deposit. Call 419-235-0639

Car Care

Putnam County Rollin D. Biery Jr. Home Repair and Joan M. Biery, 29.24 655 acres Riley Township to and Remodel Rollin D. Biery Jr. TR and Joan M. Biery TR. CARPET INSTALLARollin D. Biery Jr. TION & re-stretches. New, half-inch padding and Joan M. Biery, 29.24 40¢/sq.ft. Vinyl installa- acres Riley Township to tion. Licensed, insured. Rollin D. Biery Jr. TR, Joan M. Biery TR and Travis Wright Rollin Dean Biery Jr. 419-953-7473 John W. Teegardin, dec., Lot 943 Annesser Mobile Homes Sub., Ottawa, to LMYR 325 For Rent LLC. Michelle L. Martz, Lot RENT OR Rent to Own. 142 and Lot 143, Pandora, 1,2 or 3 bedroom mobile to Jeffrey L. Martz. home. 419-692-3951 Marguerite E. Breece nka Marguerte E. Lause and Robert J. Lause, Lot 45 Hidden Timbers Sub., Ottawa, to Marguerite E. Lause and Robert J. Lause. Timothy A. Kaufman and Linda K. Kaufman, .82acre Monterey Township and .444 acre Monterey Township, to Timothy A. Kaufman and Linda K. Kaufman. Lanny Wagner, Lot 480 and Lot 481, Continental, to Scotty C.



Answer to

else. His typist went on to become quite successful in the publishing business; the scribe, not so much. It turns out that what you write is more important than what you write with. Go to almost any lawn sale and you’ll find cassette tapes and vinyl records and dictaphones and VHS players and giant, coffinsized speakers that aren’t as good as the tiny ones in your car’s door, yet some people still buy them. People who say old vinyl records sound better than digital either have a hearing problem or a memory problem. No, I take that back. Maybe they just have a drinking problem. But even if it were true, once you’ve run a needle over a vinyl record a few times, you can throw high fidelity out the window and watch it smash like dish at a Greek wedding. But if you like vinyl, there’s a program that will add authentic-sounding clicks and pops to the songs on your MP3 player. About 10 years ago, well into the age of cellphones, I read about a local woman Puzzle who was finally getting rid of her party

line. (If you’re a teenager who doesn’t know what a party line is, let me just say, it’s probably not what you’re thinking.) There hadn’t been another party on her line for years; she had been the last one using it. She wanted to keep it because it was amazingly inexpensive but her phone carrier wouldn’t hear of it. They dragged her kicking and screaming into, oh, the 1950s. And charged her more for it. Me, I like the new stuff. The printer I talked about earlier is wireless. That doesn’t mean it has no wires, it just means it has one less wire -- the one to the computer. It still has a power cord and it has to be plugged into a phone jack to use the fax. Maybe wireless is a little optimistic. The term should really be “wirefewer” as in “her party line was wireless compared to my wirefewer printer.” I like that my smartphone can take pictures and let me read my email. Yet I know that when I reread this story in two or three years, I’ll say, “Wireless? Really? That went out ages ago. A smartphone? When is the dude going to catch up and get a phone chip implanted in his forehead like everyone else? He probably has one of those, what do you call them? Fax machines.” (Contact Jim Mullen at JimMullenBooks.com.) DISTRIBUTED BY UNIVERSAL UCLICK FOR UFS



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Sales Representative Position
Times Bulletin Media is searching for a full-time sales representative. If you appreciate working as part of a team, enjoy working with businesses large and small, thrive in a busy and creative environment, and love using the web and social media sites, this position may be a perfect match for you. Candidates who succeed in sales possess above average written and oral communications skills, work with multiple deadlines and projects, and demonstrate effective organizational, time management, and planning skills. The successful applicant will learn and work with Times Bulletin Media’s many products. Applicants must demonstrate a working knowledge of the internet and active participation in social networking and media. The successful candidate will play a key role in developing the company’s online campaigns and social media strategies. We pay our sales representatives using a draw and commission plan. The parent company offers a full schedule of benefits including Health Insurance, 401K and Vacation. We are an equal opportunity employer. For consideration, please forward a professional resume and cover letter detailing how you will apply your skills and experience to the marketplace. Incomplete applications will not be considered. Mail to: Kirk Dougal, Publisher P.O. Box 271, Van Wert, Ohio 45891 E-mail to kdougal@timesbulletin.com Or deliver to The Times Bulletin Media office: 700 Fox Road, Van Wert, Ohio

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Customer Relationship Specialist
Job #11075
Farm Credit Mid America is seeking a Customer Relationship Specialist to serve Delphos, Ohio. The Customer Relationship Specialist provides exceptional, first-level, internal and external customer service. Responsibilities include helping to market, cross-sell and deliver credit and other financial services to our customers and prospective customers. This position also provides administrative support for others in the field business development division, and maintains information and reporting as directed. CUSTOMER RELATIONSHIPS: Establishes, develops and maintains strong internal and external customer relationships by consistently providing quality service that is timely, thorough and responsive and exceeds customer expectations. Receives walk-in customers and incoming customer calls, and provides administrative support to field business development division team members, including sales office staff, crop insurance and Agribusiness team members. MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS: This level of Customer Relationship Specialist is fully functional in the role, except in the delivery and servicing of credit. High school diploma and at least three years of successful experience in two or more of the following areas: administrative support, financially related customer service or computer operations. To be considered an applicant, you must: • Meet minimum qualifications for the position • Submit your resume by 11/29/2013 to: www.e-farmcredit.com Careers, Job Opportunities, indicating the specific position for which you are applying Check out our Benefits! • Once on our Web site, click on Careers, Employee Benefits, then click on Employee Benefits Presentation




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Thursday, November 21, 2013

The Herald - 9

Sister’s memory lapses may be serious

Tomorrow’s Horoscope
By Bernice Bede Osol


Dear Annie: Over the past recognize birthdays, holidays 10 years, I have noticed that and special events. Our plan my sister’s memory has be- was to make small investcome very confused. She ments into this account for her often has false memories, be- in the years to come. lieving something Soon after the that happened to a parents received friend or celebrity the information on actually happened the account, they to her. She also says cashed it out and hurtful things and reinvested it in a doesn’t remember different type of acsaying them. My count. They recenthusband and I dely offered to share cided it was best the details with us just to let it go, as so we could invest she gets upset quite for their daughter. easily. Annie, what Recently, she Annie’s Mailbox would have been said something that a fun way for us to really hurt my feelings, and I honor her is no longer of indecided to talk to her about terest to us. We will of course it and clear the air. However, still send gifts to the child, when I mentioned it, she be- but we feel the parents’ action came terribly agitated and was extremely tacky. What do insisted she would never say you think? — Boston Aunt any such thing. She actually Dear Boston: We undergot her family involved, and stand why you have lost your they agreed that I was imagin- enthusiasm, and we agree that ing things. the parents should have been I love my sister and don’t grateful and left things alone. want to upset her, but this re- But it might assuage your anally bothers me. She has men- noyance to look at it another tioned that her friends joke way: If you had purchased the about her memory, and she child an outfit and the parents doesn’t like it. But I’m sur- had exchanged it for someprised that her children and thing they preferred, would husband are not aware of the you be as upset? Probably problem. Should I just let it not. The account was a gift, go? — Massachusetts meaning she could do with it Dear Massachusetts: We what she wished. It was still suspect her husband and chil- a thoughtful present from you dren are well aware of the and undoubtedly appreciated. problem, but have chosen not If the goal is to provide the to deal with it. Please encour- niece with a college fund, it age your sister to talk to her really doesn’t matter which doctor. Say that you are wor- account receives the funds. ried about her. Memory prob- Your contribution is the same. lems are common, but if she Dear Annie: Thank you is substituting others’ experi- for printing the letter from ences for her own, it could be “Finally at Peace,” who has more serious. endured three of her five chilAsk if she is scheduled for dren cutting off contact with a regular checkup and see her. It gives my husband and whether you can accompany me hope and comfort. We are her, alerting the doctor if she experiencing rejection from neglects to do so. Also men- our oldest daughter, who has tion your concerns to her hus- cut off contact except to send band and children. Your sister birth announcements of her may be too embarrassed to children. address this, so they need to We will be grandparents be more proactive. again because of our youngest Dear Annie: A year ago, daughter, who makes up for, my husband, who is very fi- over and above, what we are nancially savvy, set up an living without. But I am cominvestment account for his forted from your writer’s sage 2-year-old niece. Because she advice on coming to peace didn’t need any more toys and with the situation and knowthe family lives quite a dis- ing that other factors helped tance from us, we thought this shape our older girl. — Gratewould be a nice way for us to ful for What We Have

Distributed by Universal UClick for UFS

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 2013 Take action. Being proactive will bring the results you want. A chance to make monetary gains is within reach through investments, settlements or money that comes to you from an unexpected source. Focus on the more obscure aspects of life and love, and you’ll find happiness. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -A positive change to what you have and what’s within reach is heading your way. A contract or proposal will improve your prospects as well as your position. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- Evasiveness will lead to trouble. Face the music and move on. Pent-up resentment will result in an argument if you don’t make a move based on the way you feel. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- You don’t have to make abrupt alterations in order to make your point. Stick to what has worked in the past, and your consistency will lead you to victory and peace of mind. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -Go to the source and verify whatever information you’ve been given before you make a move. A change is in order, but your reasons must be valid and your enthusiasm genuine. PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) -- Look over personal papers and discuss your options with anyone who will be affected by your decision. Socializing and celebrating your accomplishments will lead to romance. ARIES (March 21-April 19) -An unsavory situation will develop if you overreact or get involved in extravagant or indulgent situations. Pace what you do, what you spend and what you say, if you want to avoid regret. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) -Enjoy family and friends. The events or activities you attend will give you all sorts of ideas that will spark your imagination regarding what you can offer others. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) -Expect someone to meddle in your affairs. Don’t invite trouble by getting involved in gossip. Stick to the truth and stand up for your beliefs. Someone from your past will offer a solution. CANCER (June 21-July 22) -- You’ll impress whomever you talk to with your knowledge and your imagination. Creative ideas will help you pick the perfect way to please the people you care about most. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- Keep your eyes open and focus on your goals. Don’t allow anyone to ruin your plans or guilt you into unreasonable demands. Step out and socialize with people who share your interests. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- Short trips and participating in activities that are geared toward helping others will lead to new friendships. A close relationship will get stronger if you are attentive or romantic. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -Strategy coupled with diplomacy will help you ward off controversy. Keep your distance from anyone who is unpredictable or unreasonable. Protect your money, home and possessions.






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10 – The Herald

Thursday, November 21, 2013


Gov’t to require seat belts on large buses
WASHINGTON (AP) — New tour buses and buses that provide service between cities must be equipped with seat belts starting in late 2016 under a federal rule issued Wednesday, a safety measure sought by accident investigators for nearly a half century. Beginning in November 2016, all new motorcoaches and some other large buses must be equipped by manufacturers with three-point lap-shoulder belts, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration said. The rule doesn’t apply to school buses or city transit buses. An average of 21 people in large buses are killed each year in crashes, and nearly 8,000 others are injured annually, the safety administration said. Seat belts could reduce fatalities and moderate-to-severe injuries by nearly half. About half of all motorcoach fatalities are the result of rollovers, and about 70 percent of those killed in rollover accidents were ejected from the bus. “Adding seat belts to motorcoaches increases safety for all passengers and drivers, especially in the event of a rollover crash,” said David Strickland, head of the safety administration. The nation’s fleet of 29,000 motorcoaches transports about 700 million passengers a year in the United States, roughly equivalent to the domestic airline industry, according to the United Motorcoach Association. Since buses are typically on the road for about 20 to 25 years, it will likely be many years before most motorcoaches have seat belts. The new rule is “an important step,” the American Bus Association said in a statement, adding that industry officials worked with government regulators “to ensure that sufficient research and testing went into crafting the new seat belt standard released today.” Many new buses are already equipped with seat belts, the association said. The National Transportation Safety Board first recommended motorcoaches be equipped with seat belts in 1968 after investigating a highway crash that killed 19 passengers nearly the Mojave Desert town of Baker, Calif. Investigators said the passengers had survived the crash, but were unable to escape a fire that consumed the wreckage, probably because they were too badly injured and confused. The passengers would have had a better chance of survival if they had been held in their seats by safety belts or some other restraint, the board said. Hundreds of motorcoach passengers have died and even more have been injured, many severely, since the board

Solid Oct. retail Limited patient choice next health overhaul issue sales lift hopes WASHINGTON (AP) — After they get the Some of those people already have coverage for US economy website fixed, then what? Keeping your doctors through individual plans.
WASHINGTON (AP) — An increase in shopping last month during the partial government shutdown suggests that the U.S. economy may be more resilient than some have feared. Retail sales rose 0.4 percent in October, the Commerce Department said Wednesday, after being flat the previous month. The increase showed that many consumers remain willing to spend as the allimportant holiday shopping season nears. At the same time, other data released Wednesday point to an economy that’s still struggling to reach full health: — Sales of existing homes fell 3.2 percent last month from September, the National Association of Realtors said. Higher mortgage rates and a shortage of homes on the market contributed to the dropoff. So did delays by potential homebuyers during the government shutdown. — Businesses boosted their stockpiles 0.6 percent in September, the Commerce Department said. Some economists worry that businesses may slow their stockpiling if consumer demand falters at the end of the year. If that happened, JPMorgan Chase economist Daniel Silver said it could exert a “significant drag on growth.” But the upturn in retail sales last month was a positive surprise. Analysts had speculated that retail sales would be unchanged in October, slowed by the 16-day partial government shutdown and by cheaper gasoline that would mean less money spent at the pump. Whatever money many consumers saved on gas in October they spent elsewhere. Excluding sales at service stations, retail spending rose 0.5 percent. Sales of furniture, electronics, appliances and clothing all showed solid gains. Congress likely blunted some of the impact of the shutdown by guaranteeing back pay for 800,000 furloughed federal workers. and hospitals may be the next vexing challenge for Americans in the new health plans created by President Barack Obama’s law. Obama promised people could keep their doctors. But in many states the new plans appear to offer a narrow choice of hospitals and doctors. Overall, it’s shaping up as less choice than what people get through Medicare or employer-based coverage. Also, it can get complicated tracking down which medical providers are in what plans. “The next shoe is going to drop sometime after Jan. 1, when people actually start using their plans,” said health economist Gail Wilensky, who ran Medicare for President George H.W. Bush. “Whether or not they can keep their doctor is going to depend on whether their doctor was chosen — or wanted to be — part of a plan on the (insurance) exchange.” Concerns are already being raised from New Hampshire to Kentucky, and Chicago to New York. Narrow networks are part of the economic trade-off for keeping premiums under control in Obama’s health insurance markets, the new gateway to coverage for people who don’t have job-based plans. Technical problems with the website HealthCare.gov have dampened initial signups, but 7 million people are expected to participate in the insurance exchanges next year.

made its initial recommendations. Victims have included college baseball players in Atlanta, Vietnamese churchgoers in Texas, skiers in Utah, gamblers returning to New York’s Chinatown, and members of a high school girls’ soccer team en route to a playoff match. “This is a great victory for the safety of intercity bus travelers,” said Jacqueline Gillan, president of Advocates for Highway and Auto Safety. ” At last, consumers will be afforded the basic safety protections everyone enjoys when they get into their car Sen. Sherrod Brown, D-Ohio, who sponsored a bill requiring seat belts on the buses, said seat belts are “a common-sense safety measure that is long overdue.” He urged the safety administration to move forward on two other safety measures that have been sought nearly as long seat belts — windows that prevent passengers from being ejected from buses in rollover crashes, and stronger roofs that aren’t crushed in such crashes. New regulations on windows and roofs are expected to be proposed next year, said a safety administration official, who spoke on condition of anonymity because she was not authorized to release the information in her own name.

Ballooning animal controversies mar Macy’s parade
NEW YORK (AP) — Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade is awash in animalrelated protests over its floats, with controversies involving the unlikely pairing of rocker Joan Jett and Shamu the killer whale. Activists plan to line the route of next week’s parade to protest a SeaWorld float over accusations in a new documentary that the theme parks treat whales badly. And ranchers succeeded in getting Jett pulled off the South Dakota tourism float after they questioned why the vegetarian and animal-rights ally was representing their beefloving state. The float flaps threaten to shake Macy’s traditional position of staying out of politics and soaring silently above the fray, like the massive balloons of Snoopy, Kermit the Frog and SpongeBob SquarePants. “The parade has never taken on, promoted or otherwise engaged in social commentary, political debate or other forms of advocacy,” Cincinnati-based Macy’s Inc. said in a statement this week. It was in that spirit that parade executive producer Amy Kule said Tuesday that the SeaWorld float is staying. “There is no controversy,” she said. “Our goal is to entertain, and that is their goal, as well.” The SeaWorld float, which depicts rolling waves, tropical fish, penguins and Shamu, comes months after the release of the documentary “Blackfish,” which contends that SeaWorld’s poor treatment of its killer whales contributed to the aggression of a whale involved in a trainer’s death. SeaWorld says the accusations have “absolutely no basis” and that “the men and women who care for these animals at SeaWorld are dedicated in every respect to their health and well-being.” Activists, including

Exchange plans are required to take all applicants, cover broad benefits and provide robust financial protection against catastrophic illness. In return for that, something else has to give. The result: limited choices and significant out-of-pocket costs through deductibles and copayments. “To get that low premium, the way to get there is by having a more limited or narrow provider network,” said Matthew Eyles, a vice president of Avalere Health, a market analysis firm that is closely following developments. The Obama administration says none of that takes away from what will still be a historic improvement for uninsured people. Exchanges “will vastly increase uninsured Americans’ access to providers, giving them an alternative to the emergency room or community health centers,” said Health and Human Services Department spokeswoman Joanne Peters. The health care law sets standards for insurers to provide adequate networks, she added. But the American Medical Association has questions. “Although it may be too early to reach any definitive conclusions, we are monitoring the adequacy of the exchange networks and will be analyzing the impact of these restrictive strategies on patient access to care,” said Dr. Ardis Dee Hoven, the organization’s president.

members of the People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals, say they plan to stage a protest somewhere along the route during next week’s parade. And the group says it has sent Macy’s more than 80,000 emails from animal lovers demanding that the store drop the float. Among those joining were actor Alec Baldwin and his wife, Hilaria, who wrote last week that SeaWorld was a “cruel prison for whales” and that the parks “should not be celebrated with a giant Shamu float parading down 34th Street.” Kenneth Sherrill, professor emeritus of political science at Manhattan’s Hunter College and a longtime parade watcher, says the SeaWorld controversy puts Macy’s in a tough spot. “It’s damned if they do, damned if they don’t,” Sherrill said. “Macy’s is making a statement. If there’s a political conflict, saying ‘I’m not getting involved’ means you’re supporting the status quo.” PETA also is connected to the float controversy involving Jett, an animal-rights vegetarian who works with the organization. She was scheduled to sing atop South Dakota’s tourism float until an outcry from the South Dakota Cattlemen’s Association, which said it made no sense to feature an artist who is critical of the state’s top economic sector. Macy’s found a solution: The “I Love Rock ‘n’ Roll” singer and her Blackhearts band are being moved to a different float as yet to be announced. A parade spokesman said it made the move so attention isn’t diverted from the “entertainment mission” of the event, which also features Carrie Underwood, Jimmy Fallon, the Radio City Rockettes and the cast members of the reality show “Duck Dynasty.”

Kerry: US, Karzai agree on language for pact
WASHINGTON (AP) — Secretary of State John Kerry said Wednesday that the U.S. and Afghanistan have agreed on the language of a bilateral security pact that could clear the way for thousands of U.S. troops to train and assist Afghan forces after the NATO combat mission ends in 2014. The agreement is far from complete. The document now goes to the Loya Jirga, a 3,000-member council of elders that has the right to revise or reject any clause of the draft agreement. Whatever they agree upon then goes to the Afghan parliament, which could make still more changes before the agreement is approved. On the U.S. side, only the Obama administration needs to approve the agreement, but it could reject changes made by Afghan officials. If it does, that leaves open the option for the U.S. to pull all troops out of Afghanistan. Such was the case in Iraq, when the U.S. and Iraq couldn’t agree on terms of a security arrangement. Sectarian violence has plagued Iraq since, and some fear Afghanistan could head down that path without a continued U.S. presence if Afghan forces cannot defend the country themselves. Kerry said the language, agreed to after about a year of tense on-again, off-again negotiations, will be reflected in the draft proposal presented today to the Loya Jirga, in Kabul. “There were some people who may have questioned or doubted whether that was going to happen. Well, it’s happening tomorrow, and it’s happening tomorrow with agreedupon language between us,” Kerry said during a news conference at the State Department with Australian officials and Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel. “We have agreed on the language that would be submitted to the Loya Jirga, but they have to pass it,” Kerry said. The agreement would give the U.S. a legal basis for having forces in Afghanistan after 2014, and also allow it to use bases across the country. U.S. officials have not yet disclosed the number of U.S. troops they want to keep in Afghanistan after 2014. U.S. officials have said the U.S. and NATO could keep between 8,000 and 12,000 troops there. Of those, the U.S. is expected to provide no more than 8,000. Kerry said that whatever the number, the role of the U.S. military would be “limited.” “It is entirely train, equip and assist. There is no combat role for United States forces, and the bilateral security agreement is a way to try to clarify for Afghans and for United States military forces exactly what the rules are with respect to that ongoing relationship,” he said. Karzai’s office posted a copy of the draft proposal on its website on Wednesday.

Study ties nuts to lower cancer, heart death risk
DALLAS (AP) — Help yourself to some nuts this holiday season: Regular nut eaters were less likely to die of cancer or heart disease — in fact, were less likely to die of any cause — during a 30-year Harvard study. Nuts have long been called heart-healthy, and the study is the largest ever done on whether eating them affects mortality. Researchers tracked 119,000 men and women and found that those who ate nuts roughly every day were 20 percent less likely to die during the study period than those who never ate nuts. Eating nuts less often also appeared to lower the death risk, in direct proportion to consumption. The risk of dying of heart disease dropped 29 percent and the risk of dying of cancer fell 11 percent among those who had nuts seven or more times a week compared with people who never ate them. The benefits were seen from peanuts as well as from pistachios, almonds, walnuts and other tree nuts. The researchers did not look at how the nuts were prepared — oiled or salted, raw or roasted. A bonus: Nut eaters stayed slimmer. “There’s a general perception that if you eat more nuts you’re going to get fat. Our results show the opposite,” said Dr. Ying Bao of Harvardaffiliated Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston. She led the study, published in today’s New England Journal of Medicine. The National Institutes of Health and the International Tree Nut Council Nutrition Research & Education Foundation sponsored the study, but the nut group had no role in designing it or reporting the results. Researchers don’t know why nuts may boost health. It could be that their unsaturated fatty acids, minerals and other nutrients lower cholesterol and inflammation and reduce other problems, as earlier studies seemed to show. Observational studies like this one can’t prove cause and effect, only suggest a connection. Research on diets is especially tough, because it can be difficult to single out the effects of any one food. People who eat more nuts may eat them on salads, for example, and some of the benefit may come from the leafy greens, said Dr. Robert Eckel, a University of Colorado cardiologist and former president of the American Heart Association. Dr. Ralph Sacco, a University of Miami neurologist who also is a former heart association president, agreed. “Sometimes when you eat nuts you eat less of something else like potato chips,” so the benefit may come from avoiding an unhealthy food, Sacco said. The Harvard group has long been known for solid science on diets. Its findings build on a major study earlier this year — a rigorous experiment that found a Mediterranean-style diet supplemented with nuts cuts the chance of heart-related problems, especially strokes, in older people at high risk of them.


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In boys soccer, Colin Bendele was First-Team PCL; Lucas Maag, Austin Honigford and Joel Beining was Second Team; and Alex Horstman, Joe VanOss and Jared Fanning were Honorable Mention. Horstman was also a Scholar Athlete. In district soccer, Bendele was Second Team. In volleyball, Annie Lindeman was FirstTeam PCL; Taylor Mangas was Second-Team; and Nikki Burgei and Kara Schimmoeller were Honorable Mention. In district honors, Lindeman was Honorable Mention. Scholar Athletes were Schimmoeller, Burgei, Mangas, Kelsi Miller and Tonya Kauffman. In golf, Wesley Markward was Second Team PCL and District Honorable Mention. Luke Schimmoeller was

District Honorable Mention and Scholar Athlete. In other business, the board: • Approved Vaughn Horstman and Susan Jones as volunteer indoor track coaches. Currently, there are no students signed up for indoor track; • Accepted the resignation of Kirt Martz as varsity girls volleyball coach; • Accept the resignation of Terry Byrne as junior varsity boys basketball coach; • Approve non-certified supplemental contracts to Darrell Von Sossan as assistant varsity basketball coach and Adam Koester as junior varsity boys basketball coach; • Appointed Kevin Landin as president pro-tem for the January Organizational Meeting; and • Set the Organizational Meeting for 7:30 p.m. Jan. 8.


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15 years — The risk of coronary heart disease is that of a non-smoker. More information about quitting Quitting is hard but you can increase your chances of success with help. The

American Cancer Society can tell you about the steps you can take to quit smoking and provide quit-smoking programs, resources and support that can increase your chances of quitting successfully. To learn about the available tools, call 1-800227-2345.

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Court Delphos and Court Defiance Catholic Daughters of America, joined for an initiation held in the C. D. of A. rooms in Defiance Sunday afternoon. Attending from Delphos were Mrs L. H. Huber, Mrs. N. J. Schmit, Mrs. Carl Lindemann, Mrs. Edward A. King, Mrs. J. W. Clark, Mrs. L. C. Laudick, Martha Ulm, Marie Hageman, Martha Minzing and Emma Metzner. The members of two local bridge clubs are planning dinner meetings for this week. Both dinners will be served at Maude’s Restaurant Tuesday evening. Following the Alpha Theta Bridge Club dinner, the members will meet at the home of Ila Scott for bridge. Catherine Stallkamp will receive the members of the Club Without a Name into her home for bridge following that club’s dinner.

Answers to Wednesday’s questions: The first zoo in the United States was the Philadelphia Zoological Gardens, which opened in 1874. In 1938, it became the sight of the first children’s zoo. The zoo currently houses more than 1,400 specimens of more than 400 species. Elizabeth P. Hoisington, who was appointed to the post of director of the Women’s Army Corps in June 1970, was the first female general in the U.S. armed forces. Today’s questions: What U.S. state is known as the Land of Steady Habits? Besides being Groundhog Day, what other significance does Feb. 2 have?


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