Giles, Halpenny, McDonald, Williams

Instructional Services Related Services Specify Student Name: Hunter Barber INDIVIDUAL EDUCATION PLAN
th

Draft Accepted by ARD

School: Starpoint

Grade: 4 Level

Duration of services:

4/22/2013 (M/D/YR)

to

4/22/2014 (M/D/YR) ESL?

Implementers: General Education Teacher (4 Level, Starpoint) Location of Implementation: General Classroom (Starpoint) Yes No

th

Language of delivery: English

Present Levels of Academic Achievement and Functional Performance: I. Sources of Information: In developing Hunter’s Present Level of Academic Achievement and Functional Performance (PLAAFP), the following data sources were reviewed: STAR Reading Test, DIBELS, Individual Evaluation of Strengths/Weaknesses/Areas of Focus, teacher information, progress monitoring (multiplication facts 0-12), and Hunter’s 2012-2013 IEP. II. Impact of Disability: Hunter’s weaknesses in the area(s) of: Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), Primarily Inattentive ADHD (previously referred to as ADD) will affect his involvement and progress in the general education curriculum in the following way:  Hunter has difficulty attending to tasks, assignments, and activities for sustained, extensive periods of time. Due to his Primarily Inattentive Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, Hunter becomes easily distracted by external stimuli (i.e. peers, background noise, etc.) and struggles to keep sustained attention to lessons and assignments in settings prone to background noise and activity. Hunter also becomes easily distracted by external stimuli, often attending to sights and sounds easily ignored by his peers. Furthermore, Hunter’s Primarily Inattentive Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder results in difficulty finishing and completing in class assignments and projects which require sustained concentration. Hunter frequently shifts his attention between uncompleted activities rather than attending to and completing one activity before starting another. In addition, Hunter’s work habits prove disorganized and often result in him forgetting to complete important tasks and assignments on time. Furthermore, Hunter’s tendenc y to frequently shift his attention from one activity to another may impair his social interactions with his peers and adults; specifically, Hunter’s inattentiveness may result in Hunter not listening to instructions, not engaging in two-way conversations, and not attending to details and rules important in specific social activities and situations. Also, Hunter’s avoidance patterns (i.e. procrastination in the form of storytelling and conversation) also interfere with his ability to complete tasks and assignments in the general education classroom and often result in reprimand for distracting other students. III. Student Strengths, Preferences, Interests: Based on collected and reviewed data, Hunter’s strengths, preferences, and interests include:  Hunter is highly linguistic and demonstrates a well-developed ability to express his ideas and thoughts verbally. (English Language Arts and Reading 110.15.28)  When writing and speaking, Hunter demonstrates an ability to insert sophisticated and advanced vocabulary terms into appropriate contexts. (English Language Arts and Reading, 110.15.2B)  Hunter proves an influential classroom leader in the general education classroom setting. The other students often model Hunter’s behavior and respect his opinions and ideas.  Hunter demonstrates a well-developed ability to use technology efficiently and productively in the general education classroom setting (i.e. Netbooks, iPads, etc.). (Technology Applications, 126.7.1A)  Hunter is highly inquisitive and is able to articulate astute, relevant questions during lessons and assignments. Hunter’s ability to formulate analytical questions in response to new content or material improves the conceptual understanding of the entire classroom as he models high level, inquisitive thinking skills for his classmates. (English Language Arts and Reading, 110.15.27A)  Hunter’s creativity allows him to produce unique, innovative, and original responses in the general classroom setting. Hunte r never struggles to produce imaginative work that reflects his individuality. Hunter’s resourcefulness lends itself especially well to open-ended tasks, creative writing assignments, and project-work. (English Language Arts and Reading, 110.15.17)  Hunter shows a special interest in geography and social studies content. During geography and social studies lessons, Hunter rarely struggles to remain engaged and mentally involved in the assignments and activities. Hunter continuously demonstrates an advanced understanding of maps, direction, and location, allowing him to engage in above-grade-level tasks and assignments. (Social Studies, 113.15.6A)  Hunter reads numbers with accuracy and precision; Hunter’s number sense is well developed and he can ord er numerical quantities with confidence and accuracy. (Mathematics, 111.16.4.1A)

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Giles, Halpenny, McDonald, Williams

IV. Weaknesses: Based on collected and reviewed data, Hunter’s areas of weakness/need include:  Hunter struggles with organizational skills. His inattentiveness often causes him to misplace assignments, papers, and materials (i.e. books, pencils, etc.) and his inability to sustain attention to details makes establishing and implementing organizational routines and procedures a challenge.  Hunter struggles to attend to small details and frequently shifts his attention from one incomplete task to another, often causing him to forget about important directions, guidelines, and deadlines.  Hunter has difficulty sustaining attention during the reading of long passages of text, often resulting in poor or incomplete comprehension of the text. Hunter also struggles with discerning important details within a text, resulting often in an incomplete understanding of the plot of the text and difficulty in extracting the “big idea” or over all message of the text. (English Language Arts and Reading, 110.15.6A, 110.15.9, 110.15.11A)  While Hunter comprehends spoken and conversational language, he becomes easily distracted when listening to extensive texts, causing him to struggle in recalling and comprehending stories read aloud to him. (English Language Arts and Reading, 110.15.3A , 110.15.27B)  Hunter also struggles with discerning the literal from the abstract. This difficulty proves especially challenging in his reading and comprehension of text, especially since his high reading level exposes him to complex texts with abstract themes and ideas. (English Language Arts and Reading 110.15.2D)  Though Hunter demonstrates mastery over the memorization of his multiplication facts, the conceptual understanding of mathematical operations such as multiplication and division (i.e. in word problems) remains an area of weakness. (Mathematics, 111.16.4.4, 111.16.4.14B, 111.16.4.14C)  Hunter’s avoidance patterns prove a hindrance in the completion of written assignments. While Hunter can readily articulate his thoughts and ideas in great detail verbally, he often uses storytelling as an avoidance strategy to stall transferring his spoken words onto paper. Extensive writing tasks prove daunting for Hunter since they require prolonged concentration and attention to detail; as a result, he often uses avoidance techniques to procrastinate working on written assignments. (English Language Arts and Reading, 110.15.15, 110.15.16)  Hunter also struggles with correctly solving word problems. The format of word problems forces Hunter to discern relevant details from the text and transfer these details into mathematical operations and procedures. Hunter’s weakness in attending to details interferes with his ability to correctly solve word problems; although Hunter may understand the mathematical operations, his difficulty in identifying and attending to significant details often results in a misunderstanding of the word problem. (Mathematics, 111.16.4.14B, 111.16.4.14C) V. Accommodations, Modifications, and Supports: Taking into consideration the impact of Hunter’s Inattentive Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (Inattentive ADHD) and Hunter’s areas of need, the following related services, supplemental aids, accommodations, and/or supports may be needed to attain the annual goal(s) and make progress in the general education curriculum:  Graphic organizers to help Hunter attend to details while reading texts.  Allow Hunter to break up extensive reading assignments into smaller sections with breaks in between.  Provide Hunter with verbal reminders to concentrate and ignore external stimuli in the classroom setting.  Allow Hunter to use word-processing technology (i.e. Netbooks, iPads, etc.) to type extensive written responses instead of handwriting extensive written responses.  Provide Hunter with a planner or other organizational tool to keep track of important deadlines and assignments.  Establish an individual organizational plan for Hunter to keep track of and turn in important papers (i.e. homework, in-class assignments, projects, etc.).  Provide Hunter with an advanced organizer for the day’s lessons and planned activities in order to keep him organized and on task.  Provide Hunter with individual instruction exploring abstract ideas and conceptual understandings to support his inquisitive nature.  Allow Hunter opportunities to prepare oral presentations or complete other alternative forms of assessment instead of written papers to support his creative strengths and reduce the amount of extensive writing required for outside projects.  When needed, provide Hunter with an alternative seat within the general education classroom that is distanced from external stimuli (i.e. a “quiet spot” away from the door, win dow, peers, etc.) during individual tasks and assignments.

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ARD Goals & Obj

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Giles, Halpenny, McDonald, Williams

Measurable Annual Goal #1: In order to improve Hunter’s reading comprehension, Hunter will use a graphic organizer to correctly discern (by completing the graphic th organizer) the important details and “big ideas” of both fiction and non-fiction texts 100% of the time, as required by the 4 Grade English-Language Arts TEKS (110.15.6A, 110.15.9, and 110.15.11A).
SHORT-TERM OBJECTIVES The student will be able to: Criteria Level of Mastery Method of Evaluation Schedule for Evaluation EVALUATION CODES DATE DATE DATE CODE CODE CODE EVALUATION CODES DATE DATE DATE CODE CODE CODE

In the general education classroom independent reading time, Hunter will maintain a reading log, including one big idea and at least two supporting details from the text he selects to read in a daily reading log entry. In the general education classroom, Hunter will complete a graphic organizer (i.e. Venn diagram, concept map, flow charts, etc.) to identify important details and big ideas when reading fiction and/or non-fiction texts at least three times per week.

Completion of one reading log entry containing at least one big idea and at least two supporting details daily.

Daily Evaluation of Reading Log Entries (Work Samples #6)

Formal Evaluation Every 6 Weeks Informal Evaluation Daily

6/3/13 ______ W

7/15/13 _______

8/26/13 ______

9/23/13 ______

10/28/13

11/25/13

______

_____

Completion of a graphic organizer identifying important details and big ideas from fiction and/or non-fiction texts at least three times per week.

Weekly Evaluation of graphic organizers (Work Samples #6)

Formal Evaluation Every 6 Weeks Informal Evaluation Weekly

6/3/13 ______ W

7/15/13 _______

8/26/13 ______

9/23/13 ______

10/28/13

11/25/13

______

_____

Evaluation Procedure Codes 1. Teacher made Tests 2. Observations 3. Weekly Tests 4. Unit Tests 5. Conference

6. 7. 8. 9.

Work Samples Portfolio Other CLASS

Evaluation Codes C- Continue M - Mastered * Not Yet Addressed W – Work in Progress N – Not Mastered D - Discontinue

The student is making sufficient progress toward mastery of the annual goal: Yes No (If No, explain) Date Comments:

1

st

reporting period

6/3/13

Hunter has been using flow charts and concept maps to map the texts he reads. However, he still struggles to discern details from the big ideas and often misplaces details and big ideas on his graphic organizers.

2

nd

reporting period

7/15/13 8/26/13 9/23/13 10/28/13 11/25/13

3 reporting period 4 reporting period 5 reporting period 6 reporting period
th th th

rd

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Giles, Halpenny, McDonald, Williams

Measurable Annual Goal #2: In order to improve Hunter’s ability to solve mathematical word problems, Hunter will implement a consistent problem -solving procedure for word problems when he encounters a mathematical word problem, solving the problem with at least 90% accuracy, as required by th the 4 Grade Mathematics TEKS (111.16.4.14B, 111.16.4.14C).
SHORT-TERM OBJECTIVES The student will be able to: Criteria Level of Mastery Method of Evaluation Schedule for Evaluation EVALUATION CODES DATE DATE DATE CODE CODE CODE 6/3/13 ______ 7/15/13 _______ 8/26/13 ______ EVALUATION CODES DATE DATE DATE CODE CODE CODE 9/23/13 ______
10/28/13
11/25/13

In the general education classroom, when solving multiplication word problems, Hunter will solve multiplication and division word problems with at least 80% accuracy using the “understand,” “plan,” “solve,” and “check” strategy. During the general education classroom mathematics centers time, Hunter will record his attendance at a center practicing the process of solving multiplication and division word problems at least three times every week. In the general education classroom, Hunter will complete a mathematics test requiring him to solve multiplication and division word problems with at least 90% accuracy.

At least 80% accuracy in solving multiplication word problems.

Weekly Tests (#3) 5-8 Word Problems

Formal Evaluation every 6 weeks

______

_____

W

Submission of a weekly center log reflecting his attendance of a word problem solving center at least three times every week.

Center Attendance Log (#8)

Formal Evaluation Every 6 Weeks Informal Evaluation Weekly

6/3/13 ______

7/15/13 _______

8/26/13 ______

9/23/13 ______

10/28/13

11/25/13

______

_____

W

Completion of a mathematics division and multiplication word problem test with at least 90% accuracy.

Teacher Made Tests (#1) 8-10 Word Problems

Formal Evaluation every 6 weeks

6/3/13 ______

7/15/13 _______

8/26/13 ______

9/23/13 ______

10/28/13

11/25/13

______

_____

W

Evaluation Procedure Codes 1. Teacher made Tests 2. Observations 3. Weekly Tests 4. Unit Tests 5. Conference

6. 7. 8. 9.

Work Samples Portfolio Other CLASS

Evaluation Codes C- Continue M - Mastered * Not Yet Addressed W – Work in Progress N – Not Mastered D - Discontinued

The student is making sufficient progress toward mastery of the annual goal: Yes No (If No, explain) Date Comments:

1

st

reporting period

6/3/13

Hunter has been introduced to and been practicing the “understand,” “plan,” “solve,” and “check” problem solving strategy for multiplication word problems.

2

nd rd th th th

reporting period

7/15/13 8/26/13 9/23/13 10/28/13 11/25/13

3 reporting period 4 reporting period 5 reporting period 6 reporting period

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Giles, Halpenny, McDonald, Williams

Measurable Annual Goal #3: In order to improve Hunter’s ability to transfer his verbal ideas and stories into written form, Hunter will consistently use pre-writing strategies and planning tools (i.e. concept maps, cluster webs, outlines, brainstorming) to organize his thoughts and ideas every time th he begins an extended writing response, as required by the 4 Grade English-Language Arts TEKS (110.15.15A, 110.15.15B, 110.15.15C).
SHORT-TERM OBJECTIVES The student will be able to: Criteria Level of Mastery Method of Evaluation Schedule for Evaluation EVALUATION CODES DATE DATE DATE CODE CODE CODE EVALUATION CODES DATE DATE DATE CODE CODE CODE

In the general education classroom, before beginning the first draft of an extended writing response, Hunter will select a pre-writing strategy and/or planning tool (i.e. concept map, cluster web, outline, etc.) to organize his ideas every time he begins an extended writing response. In the general education classroom, Hunter will compile a portfolio of at least five extended writing assignments with the attached pre-writing strategies and/or planning tools used for all five extended writing assignments.

Written evidence of use of a pre-writing strategy and/or planning tool attached to every extended writing response.

Work Samples (#6)

Formal Evaluation every 6 weeks

6/3/13

7/15/13

8/26/13

9/23/13

10/28/13

11/25/13

______

_______

______

______

______

_____

W

Submission of a studentcompiled portfolio containing the pre-writing strategies and/or planning tools used for at least five extended writing assignments.

Portfolio (#7)

Formal Evaluation Every 6 Weeks

6/3/13

7/15/13

8/26/13

9/23/13

10/28/13

11/25/13

______

_______

______

______

______

_____

W

Evaluation Procedure Codes 1. Teacher made Tests 2. Observations 3. Weekly Tests 4. Unit Tests 5. Conference

6. 7. 8. 9.

Work Samples Portfolio Other CLASS

Evaluation Codes C- Continue M - Mastered * Not Yet Addressed W – Work in Progress N – Not Mastered D - Discontinued

The student is making sufficient progress toward mastery of the annual goal: Yes No (If No, explain) Date Comments:

1

st

reporting period

6/3/13

When instructed by the teacher, Hunter uses a pre-writing strategy and/or planning tool to organize his thoughts before writing his first draft; however, Hunter’s planning is often superficial in detail and doesn’t relate to the content of his draft. .

2

nd

reporting period

7/15/13 8/26/13 9/23/13 10/28/13 . 11/25/13

3 reporting period 4 reporting period 5 reporting period 6 reporting period
th th th

rd

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Giles, Halpenny, McDonald, Williams

Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) Referred to in the IEP I. Strengths 110.15.28 (English Language Arts and Reading, Listening and Speaking/Speaking) Students speak clearly and to the point, using the conventions of language. Students continue to apply earlier standards with greater complexity. Students are expected to express an opinion supported by accurate information, employing eye contact, speaking rate, volume, and enunciation, and the conventions of language to communicate ideas effectively. 110.15.2B (English Language Arts and Reading, Reading/Vocabulary Development) Students understand new vocabulary and use it when reading and writing. Students are expected to use the context of the sentence (e.g., in-sentence example or definition) to determine the meaning of unfamiliar words or multiple meaning words. 126.7.1A (Technology Applications, Creativity and innovation) The student uses creative thinking and innovative processes to construct knowledge and develop digital products. The student is expected to create original products using a variety of resources. 110.15.27A (English Language Arts and Reading, Listening and Speaking/Listening) Students use comprehension skills to listen attentively to others in formal and informal settings. Students continue to apply earlier standards with greater complexity. Students are expected to listen attentively to speakers, ask relevant questions, and make pertinent comments. 110.15.17 (English Language Arts and Reading, Writing) Students write about their own experiences. Students are expected to write about important personal experiences. 113.15.6A (Social Studies, Geography) The student uses geographic tools to collect, analyze, and interpret data. The student is expected to apply geographic tools, including grid systems, legends, symbols, scales, and compass roses, to construct and interpret maps. 111.16.4.1A (Mathematics, Number/Operation/ Quantitative Reasoning) The student uses place value to represent whole numbers and decimals. The student is expected to use place value to read, write, compare, and order whole numbers through 999,999,999. _____________________________________________________________________________________________ II. Weaknesses 110.15.6A (English Language Arts and Reading, Reading/Comprehension of Literary Texts/Fiction) Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the structure and elements of fiction and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to sequence and summarize the plot's main events and explain their influence on future events. 110.15.9 (English Language Arts and Reading, Reading/Comprehension of Text/Independent Reading) Students read independently for sustained periods of time and produce evidence of their reading. Students are expected to read independently for a sustained period of time and paraphrase what the reading was about, maintaining meaning and logical order (e.g., generate a reading log or journal; participate in book talks). 110.15.11A (English Language Arts and Reading, Reading/Comprehension of Informational/Expository Text) Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about expository text and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to summarize the main idea and supporting details in text in ways that maintain meaning. 110.15.3A (English Language Arts and Reading, Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Theme and Genre) Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about theme and genre in different cultural, historical, and contemporary contexts and provide evidence from the text to support their understanding. Students are expected to summarize and explain the lesson or message of a work of fiction as its theme. 110.15.27B (English Language Arts and Reading, Listening and Speaking/Listening) Students use comprehension skills to listen attentively to others in formal and informal settings. Students continue to apply earlier standards with greater complexity. Students are expected to follow, restate, and give oral instructions that involve a series of related sequences of action. 110.15.2D (English Language Arts and Reading, Reading/Vocabulary Development) Students understand new vocabulary and use it when reading and writing. Students are expected to identify the meaning of common idioms. 111.16.4.4 (Mathematics, Number/Operation/Quantitative Reasoning) The student multiplies and divides to solve meaningful problems involving whole numbers. The student is expected to: (A) model factors and products using arrays and area models; (B) represent multiplication and division situations in picture, word, and number

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Giles, Halpenny, McDonald, Williams

form; (C) recall and apply multiplication facts through 12 x 12; (D) use multiplication to solve problems (no more than two digits times two digits without technology); and (E) use division to solve problems (no more than one-digit divisors and three-digit dividends without technology). 111.16.4.14B (Mathematics, Underlying Processes and Mathematical Tools) The student applies Grade 4 mathematics to solve problems connected to everyday experiences and activities in and outside of school. The student is expected to solve problems that incorporate understanding the problem, making a plan, carrying out the plan, and evaluating the solution for reasonableness. 111.16.4.14C (Mathematics, Underlying Processes and Mathematical Tools) The student applies Grade 4 mathematics to solve problems connected to everyday experiences and activities in and outside of school. The student is expected to select or develop an appropriate problem-solving plan or strategy, including drawing a picture, looking for a pattern, systematic guessing and checking, acting it out, making a table, working a simpler problem, or working backwards to solve a problem 110.15.15A (English Language Arts and Reading, Writing/Writing Process) Students use elements of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing) to compose text. Students are expected to (A) plan a first draft by selecting a genre appropriate for conveying the intended meaning to an audience and generating ideas through a range of strategies (e.g., brainstorming, graphic organizers, logs, journals). 110.15.15B (English Language Arts and Reading, Writing/Writing Process) Students use elements of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing) to compose text. Students are expected to develop drafts by categorizing ideas and organizing them into paragraphs.

110.15.15C (English Language Arts and Reading, Writing/Writing Process) Students use elements of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing) to compose text. Students are expected to revise drafts for coherence, organization, use of simple and compound sentences. 110.15.16 (English Language Arts and Reading, Writing/Literary Texts)

Students write literary texts to express their ideas and feelings about real or imagined people, events, and ideas. Students are expected to (A) write imaginative stories that build the plot to a climax and contain details about the characters and setting; and (B) write poems that convey sensory details using the conventions of poetry (e.g., rhyme, meter, patterns of verse). __________________________________________________________________________________________________
III. Measureable Goal #1 110.15.6A (English Language Arts and Reading, Reading/Comprehension of Literary Texts/Fiction) Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the structure and elements of fiction and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to sequence and summarize the plot's main events and explain their influence on future events. 110.15.9 (English Language Arts and Reading, Reading/Comprehension of Text/Independent Reading) Students read independently for sustained periods of time and produce evidence of their reading. Students are expected to read independently for a sustained period of time and paraphrase what the reading was about, maintaining meaning and logical order (e.g., generate a reading log or journal; participate in book talks). 110.15.11A (English Language Arts and Reading, Reading/Comprehension of Informational/Expository Text) Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about expository text and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to summarize the main idea and supporting details in text in ways that maintain meaning. ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________ IV. Measureable Goal #2 111.16.4.14B (Mathematics, Underlying Processes and Mathematical Tools) The student applies Grade 4 mathematics to solve problems connected to everyday experiences and activities in and outside of school. The student is expected to solve problems that incorporate understanding the problem, making a plan, carrying out the plan, and evaluating the solution for reasonableness. 111.16.4.14C (Mathematics, Underlying Processes and Mathematical Tools) The student applies Grade 4 mathematics to solve problems connected to everyday experiences and activities in and outside of school. The student is expected to select or develop an appropriate problem-solving plan or strategy, including drawing a picture, looking for a pattern, systematic guessing and checking, acting it out, making a table, working a simpler problem, or working backwards to solve a problem ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________

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V. Measureable Goal #3 110.15.15A (English Language Arts and Reading, Writing/Writing Process) Students use elements of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing) to compose text. Students are expected to (A) plan a first draft by selecting a genre appropriate for conveying the intended meaning to an audience and generating ideas through a range of strategies (e.g., brainstorming, graphic organizers, logs, journals). 110.15.15B (English Language Arts and Reading, Writing/Writing Process) Students use elements of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing) to compose text. Students are expected to develop drafts by categorizing ideas and organizing them into paragraphs. 110.15.15C (English Language Arts and Reading, Writing/Writing Process) Students use elements of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing) to compose text. Students are expected to revise drafts for coherence, organization, use of simple and compound sentences.

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