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EDL 676: FOUNDATIONS OF STUDENT AFFAIRS IN HIGHER EDUCATION Section A ! Tuesday ! 10:00 a.m. – 12:40 p.m. ! 317 McGuffey Hall Section B ! Wednesday ! 10:00 a.m. – 12:40 p.m. !

218 McGuffey Hall David Pérez II, Ph.D. Assistant Professor, Student Affairs in Higher Education Department of Educational Leadership McGuffey Hall, Room 300F Oxford, OH 45056 Office: (513) 529-2572 Email: DrPerez@MiamiOH.edu Twitter: @DrDavidPerezII Office Hours: By appointment (Monday – Wednesday) “Student affairs . . . is integral to the learning process because of the opportunities it provides students to learn through action, contemplation, reflection and emotional engagement as well as information acquisition” (Learning Reconsidered, 2004, p. 11). COURSE OVERVIEW & OBJECTIVES This course provides an introduction to the student affairs profession as well as the Student Affairs in Higher Education (SAHE) community. As such, the course is divided into five sections: 1) Socialization to Graduate School, 2) Overview of SAHE, 3) Facilitating Learning in Student Affairs, 4) Developing Professional Competencies in SAHE, and 5) Engaging in the Student Affairs Profession. Students will explore foundational ideas in student affairs, reflect on their values in relation to those espoused in the field, and develop a plan to successfully transition through the SAHE program into the profession. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Identify historical, philosophical, and social factors that shaped the development and evolution of the student affairs profession within higher education in the U.S. 2. Articulate the role student affairs plays in student learning and development. 3. Explain the purpose of student affairs’ functional areas and professional organizations. 4. Develop learning goals and outcomes for the SAHE program. 5. Demonstrate reflective practices to develop personally, academically, and professionally. COURSE EXPECTATIONS Participation: As a graduate student, you are responsible for completing all required readings prior to each seminar. Completing the readings increases your own learning, as well as the learning of your classmates and the instructor. Active participation in class discussions is also expected and essential to learning. Active participation can include, but is not limited to:

EDL 676 Syllabus – Page 2 of 24 1. Demonstrating that you have completed the readings by including content from the readings in our class conversations and in written assignments. 2. Contributing thoughtful comments about and examples of concepts being discussed; this includes comments about course content you are still trying to understand. Please note that class conversation is intended to facilitate learning. You are not expected to have the ‘right’ answer or to make ‘profound’ comments, although I anticipate you all will make significant contributions throughout the semester. 3. Raising thoughtful questions as well as asking for clarification when you do not understand what is being addressed in the course. 4. Listening carefully to your classmates’ contributions and respectfully responding to others' comments. 5. Posting thoughtful remarks on Twitter using #EDL676. Attendance: Students who miss more than one class session, excused or unexcused, should not expect to successfully complete this course. As a graduate student, you are expected to attend all class sessions. While emergencies will arise, you should make a concerted effort to minimize your absences. Excessive absences could result in a reduction of your overall grade or dismissal from the course. Please contact me, in advance, if you have to miss class due to illness or other ailments (e.g., flu, pinkeye, etc.). Timeliness: Out of respect to your classmates and the instructor, please arrive on time for all class sessions. If a prior commitment will affect your ability to arrive in a timely manner, please notify me at least 48-hours in advance. Notes, Side Conversations, and Body Language: Although this is a discussion-based course, I highly encourage you to take notes during class. However, I discourage you from writing and passing notes to your peers during class. As a discussion-based course, I also encourage you to share your ideas and questions with the class; do not whisper them to your neighbors. Passing notes and having side conversations can stifle honest discussion, as your classmates and I may assume your notes and whispering are about something we have shared during class. If you have a reaction to a comment that either a classmate or the instructor offered, please share it with the entire class. Candid, but respectful, class conversations facilitate learning. Cell Phones and Laptops: Please turn off your cell phones during class. Otherwise, the temptation is too great to check and send text messages. Along these lines, please let me know if there is an emergency that requires you to keep your cell phone on during class. If you use your laptop during class for taking notes or reviewing class readings, I trust that you are not surfing the web, checking e-mail, or on Facebook. The use of technology is encouraged; so long as it does not detract from your, classmates, and the instructor’s learning. If you are found engaging in computer activities that are not directly related to the course, you will be asked to leave and will be counted absent for that class session. Enacting Miami University’s Values: "I Am Miami" is the phrase we use to define the culture to which we aspire and who we are as Miamians. In 2002, the Miami Board of Trustees formalized a Values Statement, which inspired our Code of Love and Honor: • • I believe that a liberal education is grounded in qualities of character and intellect. I stand for honesty, integrity, and the importance of moral conduct.

EDL 676 Syllabus – Page 3 of 23 • • • • • • • • I respect the dignity, rights, and property of others and their right to hold and express disparate beliefs. I defend the freedom of inquiry that is the heart of learning. I exercise good judgment and believe in personal responsibility. I welcome a diversity of people, ideas, and experiences. I embrace the spirit, academic rigor, opportunities, and challenges of a Miami Experience, preparing me to make the world a better place. I demonstrate Love and Honor by supporting my fellow Miamians. And because I Am Miami, I act through my words and deeds in ways that reflect these values and beliefs. With a deep sense of accomplishment and gratitude, I will Love, Honor, and make proud those who help me earn the joy and privilege of saying, "To think that in such a place, I led such a life."

Academic Integrity: Academic integrity is central to our community. The university policy regarding academic misconduct is stated in Part 4 of the Handbook for Graduate Students and Faculty. For additional information related to Miami University’s stance on academic integrity, please visit http://www.muohio.edu/integrity. Often times, academic misconduct is a result of not being familiar with or misunderstanding certain policies. Please note that The APA Publication Manual also provides useful information related to issues of academic integrity. I highly encourage you to review these documents and websites. Respect for Diversity: One of SAHE’s core values is inclusion, which is reflected through an appreciation of multiple forms of diversity. We strive for an inclusive atmosphere that respects each individual’s background and perspective in the context of sustaining our learning community and celebrates the differences and similarities among members of our community. Similarly, the Miami University Statement Asserting Respect for Human Diversity emphasizes inclusiveness: Miami University is a community dedicated to intellectual engagement. Our campuses consist of students, faculty, and staff from a variety of backgrounds and cultures. By living, working, studying, and teaching, we bring our unique viewpoints and life experiences together for the benefit of all. This inclusive learning environment, based upon an atmosphere of mutual respect and positive engagement, invites all campus citizens to explore how they think about knowledge, about themselves, and about how they see themselves in relation to others. Our intellectual and social development and daily educational interactions, whether co-curricular or classroom related, are greatly enriched by our acceptance of one another as members of the Miami University community. Through valuing our own diversity and the diversity of others, we seek to learn from one another, foster a sense of shared experience, and commit to making the University the intellectual home of us all. We recognize that we must uphold and abide by University policies and procedures protecting individual rights and guiding democratic engagement. Any actions disregarding these policies and procedures, particularly those resulting in discrimination, harassment, or bigoted acts, will be challenged swiftly and collectively.

EDL 676 Syllabus – Page 4 of 24 All who work, live, study, and teach in the Miami community must be committed to these principles of mutual respect and positive engagement, which are integral parts of Miami's focus, goals, and mission. Accommodations for students with disabilities: Students with documented disabilities that affect their ability to participate fully in the course or who require other accommodations are highly encouraged to speak with me so that appropriate accommodations can be arranged. REQUIRED TEXT Magolda, P. M. & Baxter Magolda, M. B. (Eds.) (2011). Contested issues in student affairs: Diverse perspectives and respectful dialogue. Sterling, VA: Stylus. Schuh, J. H., Jones, S. R., Harper, S. R. (Eds.). (2011). Student services: A handbook for the profession (5th ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass, Inc. Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (6th ed.). (2009). Washington, DC: American Psychological Association. Please note that the aforementioned publications will be on reserve at the library. Additional reading assignments will be posted on Niihka. You may also be able to request these publications via Miami University’s InterLibrary Loan system at http://www.lib.muohio.edu/ill/. LEARNING ASSIGNMENTS Unless otherwise instructed, you should submit all assignments in the Niihka assignment folder prior to class on the dates/times specified below. Please note that I am willing to provide feedback on individual assignments prior to the final due date; however, arrangements must be made at least one week prior to the due date of the assignment. I would appreciate it if you would use the following naming convention for electronic files: Last Name, Initial of First Name, and Assignment Title (e.g., PerezD--This_I_Believe_Essay). Assignment #1: Scholar-Practitioner Journal (due on Tuesdays at 9:00 a.m.) Becoming a scholar-practitioner requires an enlightened awareness of one’s strengths and areas of development relative to the Student Affairs profession. To facilitate this process, you will have an opportunity to reflect on your values, interests, and abilities in relation to the assigned readings each week. These journal entries are intended to provide you with an opportunity to engage in self-reflection, refine of your goals, and articulate learning outcomes you hope to achieve during your tenure in the SAHE program. You are welcome to use the following prompts to guide your reflection, but are not limited to these questions: 1. What new insights do you have about yourself? 2. To what extent do the readings inform the personal, academic, or professional goals you hope to achieve?

EDL 676 Syllabus – Page 5 of 23 3. To what extent do the readings inform how you will approach your role as a scholar-practitioner in student affairs? 4. How have the readings contributed to your personal transformation (i.e., belief system, sense of identity, relationship with others)? 5. What new or unanswered questions would you like to explore during your tenure in the SAHE program? Your Scholar-Practitioner Journal entries do not need to exceed more than one (1) single-spaced page and adhere to APA style (i.e., 12-point, Times New Roman font with one-inch page margins). Your completion of weekly journal entries will determine whether you pass or fail this assignment. Assignment #2: Functional Area Brief and Presentation (due dates/times noted below) Select a functional area addressed in MacKinnon & Associates’ (2004) book, Rentz’s Student Affairs Practice in Higher Education, and provide your colleagues with a double-sided, single-spaced handout of key points related to the functional area. These points should be derived from the chapter and could include, but should not be limited to: key historical events, evolution of the functional area, principles of good practice, the name and web address of professional associations for that area, a description of competencies and roles for practitioners in the functional area, and/or current challenges. Talking with a practitioner in that particular functional area is also encouraged, as it may enhance your understanding of current trends and issues. In addition, you should find and duplicate an article published in the past five years from a recent periodical (e.g., The Chronicle of Higher Education, Diverse Issues in Higher Education, The Hispanic Outlook, Inside Higher Ed, etc.) related to your functional area. Lastly, each team should provide classmates with a job announcement for a professional position within that functional area. Job announcements can be found in The Chronicle of Higher Education, Diverse Issues in Higher Education, www.studentaffairs.com, www.higheredjobs.com, and the websites of professional associations. Students will be allocated 30-minutes to present and engage their colleagues in dialogue on the following dates: September 10th & 11th September 24th & 25th October 1st & 2nd October 15th & 16th October 22nd & 23rd October 29th & 30th November 5th & 6th November 19th & 20th

Please post this assignment (i.e., presentation, handouts) on Niihka prior to the date you are scheduled to present. This assignment will be assessed using the Functional Area Brief & Presentation Rubric on Niihka. Assignment #3: Student Affairs Philosophy Statement It is critical to anchor our work in a personal philosophy of Student Affairs. Such a philosophy provides direction and purpose to our work with students and in the higher education community. Personal philosophies are not usually set in stone but evolve with new learning,

EDL 676 Syllabus – Page 6 of 24 knowledge, self-understanding, and experience. The purpose of this assignment is to: 1) Reflect on your own personal values, 2) Articulate your understanding of student affairs’ principles, and 3) Draft a philosophy statement that integrates your personal values and the principles of the profession. Please note that this is a three-part assignment: Part 1: “This I Believe” Essay (due Tuesday, September 17, 2013 at 9:00 a.m.) After reading essays from the “Most Viewed Essays” list on the This I Believe website (http://thisibelieve.org/top), you should draft your own “This I Believe” essay. Guidelines can be found at http://thisibelieve.org/guidelines. Please note that your essay should not exceed 500 words and adhere to APA style (i.e., 12-point, Times New Roman font with one-inch page margins). Although you should focus on one core value when writing this essay, I hope this exercise inspires you to think about the values you hold. We will read these essays aloud in class. If you are not comfortable with sharing your essay publically, you can opt out of this activity; however, I would highly encourage you to share your “This I Believe” essay. Using Nelson, Range, & Burck Ross’ (2012) Checklist to Guide Graduate Students’ Writing, you will be asked to provide one of your colleagues with feedback on their writing. Your completion of the “This I Believe” Essay and submission of feedback will determine whether you pass or fail this assignment. Part 2: APA Style Paper (due Tuesday, October 15, 2013 at 9:00 a.m.) Identify a topic that is aligned with your values and that you would like to expand on in your Personal Point of View (PPV) Philosophy Statement. Using the Miami University Libraries link on Niihka, identify a book, a chapter from an edited book, a peer-reviewed journal article, and website related to your topic Adhering to APA style, draft a two (2) page double-spaced paper using these sources. You should cite these sources at least once in your paper. Additionally, you should complete the following tasks: • • • • • • • Paraphrase content and include a citation Use a direct quote and include a citation Cite at least two sources in the same sentence Cite a secondary source (i.e., As cited in . . .) Include a reference page with the full citations listed Format the paper using APA formatting (i.e., margins, fonts, paragraph format) Use at least two levels of heading

This assignment is intended to familiarize you with APA style. As such, you should not be concerned about using current sources and/or sources that are closely aligned. Please note that your essay should not exceed two (2) double-spaced pages and adhere to APA style (i.e., 12-point, Times New Roman font with one-inch page margins). This assignment will be assessed using the APA Style Paper Rubric on Niihka. Part 3: Personal Point of View Philosophy Statement (due Tuesday, November 12, 2013 at 9:00 a.m.) After reading philosophical documents undergirding the student affairs profession, you will draft a Personal Point of View Philosophy Statement that encompasses your

EDL 676 Syllabus – Page 7 of 23 foundational values, how they relate to course readings, SAHE Core Values, and/or vision of your role as a student affairs professional. Explain how your Point of View affirms or refutes ideas presented in course readings. Using APA style, please cite a minimum of five readings. This assignment should not exceed five (5) double-spaced pages and will be assessed using the Personal PPV Grading Rubric on Niihka. Assignment #4: Mapping Your Professional Development (MYPD) E-Portfolio (due on Tuesday, December 3, 2013 at 9:00 a.m.) Throughout the semester, you will work on components of your MYPD E-Portfolio in and outside of classroom, and will receive feedback from your classmates periodically. These assignments will not be graded individually, but as a final, comprehensive portfolio. In addition to documenting your learning and development in the SAHE program, your portfolio is intended to be a marketing tool. Although your portfolio is not due until December 3rd, I would highly encourage you to begin working on this early in the semester. You can compose your e-portfolio using Chalk & Wire (C & W) or another online platform (i.e., Tumblr, Weebly). For additional information about C & W, please visit the Chalk & Wire ePortfolio tool at Miami University website. With exception to the Job Search materials, your e-portfolio should include the following: Mapping your way to Miami: You will create a map detailing events or experiences that led you to Miami University and influenced your decision to pursue a career in student affairs. Job Search: Bring in two or three job descriptions that you find appealing and would strongly consider applying for post graduation. Identify themes, experiences or personal qualities that seem to stand out as a requirement for the position. Learning Goals & Outcomes: Identify goals you would like to achieve during your tenure in the SAHE program. Set 3-5 learning goals and identify outcomes for each goal. Identify where, at this point in time, you are in regards to working toward this goal (i.e., Exposure, Exploration, Ownership, Synthesis). Second Semester Map: Develop a map that highlights the ways in which you plan to move toward your goals during the second semester. In this map, identify the goals you intend to work toward as well as the experiences you will pursue to move forward in the Exposure, Exploration, Ownership, or Synthesis phase of your journey toward your learning goals. SAHE Program Map: Develop a broader map for your time in the SAHE program that encompasses your second semester map, but builds on it in the same fashion. Identify how, through your involvement in educationally purposeful academic and/or professional experiences, you intend to move toward the Synthesis phase in each of your goals. Synthesis: In this paper, you should reflect on how your personal values and philosophy statement contributed to the maps you created for your journey through the SAHE program. How have your goals evolved this semester? What did you end up including in

EDL 676 Syllabus – Page 8 of 24 your maps? Why? In addition to synthesizing information captured in your portfolio, this reflection paper should articulate how you will assume responsibility for your ongoing learning and development. This portion of the MYPD E-Portfolio should not exceed five (5) pages in length and adhere to APA style (i.e., 12-point, Times New Roman font with one-inch page margins). Please note that you can include additional information in your e-portfolio (i.e., philosophy statement, resume, relevant curricular and/or co-curricular artifacts). This assignment will be assessed using the MYPD E-Portfolio & Synthesis Rubric on Niihka. EVALUATION OF LEARNING ASSIGNMENTS Grades should not be the primary motivation in graduate school. As such, not all activities will be graded. Occasional in-class assignments (i.e., discussions, written work, etc.) will not be graded. These, and other possible ungraded assignments, should be treated as equally important to any graded assignment. Failure to treat these assignments seriously may result in a lower grade for the course. Assignments will be graded on content as well as on technical quality of the writing and presentation. All written assignments should be carefully proofread for spelling, grammar, and syntax. Assignments containing multiple errors may be returned ungraded for revision and resubmission or receive a lower grade. This includes multiple APA style errors. There is an APA on-line tutorial available at http://apastyle.apa.org/learn. Below, you will find general guidelines I use when assigning grades. As the semester progresses, I will provide additional guidelines related to grading criteria for specific assignments. A = Work of excellent quality that demonstrates an excellent understanding of course material; the writing includes thoughtful and meaningful reflection; excellent writing style, grammar and mechanics. B = Work of good quality that demonstrates a good understanding of the course material; evidence of a fair amount of reflection, where appropriate, but still room for more depth; writing (as defined above) that is generally good but includes some mistakes and/or some places where the writing needs improvement. C = Minimally adequate completion of the assignment demonstrating a limited understanding of the course material; evidence of minimally adequate reflection; minimally adequate writing (as defined above). D = Less than minimally adequate completion of the assignment demonstrating little understanding of the course material; evidence of less than minimally adequate reflection, where appropriate; less than minimally adequate writing (as defined above). F = Failure to complete an assignment or completion of assignment that does not meet any of the levels of performance described above.

EDL 676 Syllabus – Page 9 of 23 Grading Scale on Niihka A = 95 – 99.99 A- = 90 – 94.99 B+ = 87 – 89.99 B = 83 – 86.99 B- = 80 – 82.99 C+ = 77 – 79.99 Distribution of Final Grade 10% – Attendance & Participation 10% – Assignment #1: Scholar-Practitioner Journal 20% – Assignment #2: Functional Area Brief and Presentation 30% – Assignment #3: Student Affairs Philosophy Statement ! Part 1: This I Believe Essay (5%) ! Part 2: APA Style Paper (10%) ! Part 2: Personal Point of View Philosophy Statement (15%) 30% – Assignment #4: MYPD E-Portfolio Incompletes will be granted only under dire circumstances and after consulting with me in advance. Incompletes will not be granted simply because more time is desired to complete assignments associated with this course. COURSE SCHEDULE You would be well served if you carefully review the assignments, scan the readings, and plan your time accordingly. In some instances, the assigned readings are relatively brief or readily comprehensible. In other instances, full comprehension will require additional time for re-reading in advance of the class session or afterwards. The formation of reading groups or study groups is highly encouraged. Week 1: August 27th & 28th Course Overview and Introductions Brown, R. D. (1987). Professional pathways and professional education. New Directions for Student Services, 5–18. doi: 10.1002/ss.37119873703 Taub, D. J., & McEwen, Marlu, K. (2006). Decision to enter the profession of student affairs. Journal of College Student Development, 47(2), 206-216. Palmer (2000). Now I become myself. Retrieved from http://www.explorefaith.org/palmer/chp2_9.html and http://www.explorefaith.org/palmer/chp2_9a.html. Suggested Readings C = 73 – 76.99 C- = 70 – 72.99 D+ = 67 – 69.99 D = 63 – 66.99 D- = 60 – 62. 99 F = 0 – 59.99

EDL 676 Syllabus – Page 10 of 24 Hunter, D. E. (1992). How student affairs professionals choose their careers. NASPA Journal, 29(3), 181-188. Millard (2004). Discover your life calling. Retrieved from http://www.ptev.org/images/uploads/gleanings/Conceptual%20Ar ticle.pdf. Sagaria, M. A., Johnsrud, L. K. (1991). Recruiting, advancing, and retaining minorities in student affairs: Moving from rhetoric to results. NASPA Journal, 28(2), 105-120. Assignments ! ! Review course syllabus In-Class: Come prepared to share and discuss expectations you have of yourself, your colleagues in class, and the course instructor.

Week 2: September 3rd & 4th

Thriving in SAHE

Socialization to Graduate School Schreiner, L. A. (2010). The “Thriving Quotient”: A new vision for student success. About Campus, 15(2), 2–10. doi:10.1002/abc.20016 Schreiner, L. A. (2010). Thriving in the classroom. About Campus, 15(3), 2–10. doi:10.1002/abc.20022 Schreiner, L. A. (2010). Thriving in community. About Campus, 15(4), 2–11. doi:10.1002/abc.20029 Suggested Readings Dua, P. (2007). Feminist mentoring and female graduate student success: Challenging gender inequality in higher education. Sociology Compass, 1(2), 594-612. Farmer, V. L. (2003). The Black student's guide to graduate and professional school success. Westport, CT: Greenwood Publishing Group, Inc. Kuh, G. D. (2007). Piecing together the student success puzzle: research, propositions, and recommendations. San Francisco, CA: Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Assignments ! MYPD: Identify 3-5 preliminary goals you hope to accomplish during your tenure in SAHE.

EDL 676 Syllabus – Page 11 of 23 Week 3: Collaborating September with Faculty in 10th & 11th Student Affairs & Higher Education Baker, V. L., & Griffin, K. A. (2010). Beyond mentoring and advising: Toward understanding the role of faculty “developers” in student success. About Campus, 14(6), 2–8. doi:10.1002/abc.20002 Reddick, R. J., Rochlen, A. B., Grasso, J. R., Reilly, E. D., & Spikes, D. D. (2011). Academic fathers pursuing tenure: A qualitative study of work-family conflict, coping strategies, and departmental culture. Psychology of Men & Masculinity, 13(1), 1-15. doi: 10.1037/a0023206 Arcelus, V. J. (2011). If student affairs – academic affairs collaboration is such a good idea, why are there so few examples of these partnerships in American higher education? In P. M. Magolda, & M. B. Baxter Magolda (Eds.) Contested issues in student affairs: Diverse perspectives and respectful dialogue. (pp. 61-74). Sterling, VA: Stylus. Suggested Readings Griffin, K. A., Pérez II, D., Holmes, A. E., & Mayo, C. P. (2010). Investing in the future: The importance of faculty mentoring in the development of students of color in STEM. New Directions For Institutional Research, (148), 95-103. doi:10.1002/ir.365 Allen, T. D., Eby, L. T. (Eds.) (2010). The blackwell handbook of mentoring: A multiple perspectives approach. Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell. Whitt, E. J. (2011). Academic and student affairs partnerships. In J. H. Schuh, S. R., Jones, & S. R. Harper (Eds.), Student services: A handbook for the profession (5th ed.). (pp. 482-496). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass, Inc. Assignments ! ! Week 4: September 17th & 18th Writing in Graduate School & Student Affairs FABP: Team #1 presents on Functional Area. Be sure to post materials on Niihka prior to class. In-Class: Mapping Your Mentor Network

American Psychological Association. (2009). Writing clearly and concisely. In Association, Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (6th ed.). (pp. 61-86). Washington, DC: American Psychological Association. Nelson, J. S., Range, L. M., & Burck Ross, M. (2012). A checklist to guide graduate students’ writing. International Journal of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education, 24(3),

EDL 676 Syllabus – Page 12 of 24 376–382. Beeler, K. D. (1993). The college student affairs professional as author: Barriers and benefits. College Student Affairs Journal, 12(2), 28-34. Pasco, A. H. (2009). Should graduate students publish? Journal of Scholarly Publishing, 40(3), 231–240. doi:10.3138/jsp.40.3.231 Suggested Readings American Psychological Association. (2009). Crediting sources. In Association, Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (6th ed.). (pp. 169-192). Washington, DC: American Psychological Association. American Psychological Association. (2009). Reference examples. In Association, Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (6th ed.). (pp. 193-223). Washington, DC: American Psychological Association. Swales, J. M., Feak, C. B. (2012). Academic writing for graduate students: Essential tasks and skills. Ann Arbor, MI: University of Michigan Press. Williams, J. S. (2007). Lesson 3: Action. In J. S. William, Style: Lessons in clarity and grace (9th ed., pp. 33-52). New York, NY: Pearson Education, Inc. Williams, J. S. (2007). Lesson 5: Cohesion and coherence. In J. S. William, Style: Lessons in clarity and grace (9th ed., pp. 74-90). New York, NY: Pearson Education, Inc. Assignments ! ! ! View online tutorial on The Basics of APA Style. In-Class: Share “This I Believe” Essay. Niihka: Post your “This I Believe” Essay no later than Tuesday, September 17, 2013 @ 9:00 a.m.

Week 5: September 24th & 25th

Overview of Student Affairs in Higher Education History and Thelin, J. R., & Gasman, M. (2011). Historical overview of Contemporary American higher education. In J. H. Schuh, S. R. Jones, & S. R. Context of Harper (Eds.), Student services: A handbook for the profession Student Affairs (5th ed.). (pp. 3-23). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass, Inc. Dungy, G., & Gordon, S. A. (2011). The development of student affairs. In J. H. Schuh, S. R. Jones, & S. R. Harper (Eds.), Student

EDL 676 Syllabus – Page 13 of 23 services: A handbook for the profession (5th ed.). (pp. 61-79). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass, Inc. Griffin, K. A., & Hurtado, S. (2011). Institutional variety in American higher education. In J. H. Schuh, S. R. Jones, & S. R. Harper (Eds.), Student services: A handbook for the profession (5th ed.). (pp. 24-42). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass, Inc. Suggested Readings Gasman, M., Tudico, C. L. (2008). Historically black colleges and universities: Triumphs, troubles, and taboos. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan. Geiger, R. L. (2005) The ten generations of American higher education. In R. O. Berdahl, P. G. Altbach, & P. J. Gumport (Eds.), Higher Education in the Twenty-First Century (2nd ed.). (pp. 38-78). Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press. Thelin, J. R. (2004). A history of American higher education. Baltimore, MD: John Hopkins University Press. Zerquera, D., & Torres, V. (2012). Hispanic-serving institutions: Patterns, predictions, and implications for informing policy discussions. Journal of Hispanic Higher Education, 11(3), 259-278. Assignments ! ! ! ! Week 6: October 1st & 2nd Philosophical Foundations, Principles, and Ethics in Student Affairs FABP: Team #2 presents on Functional Area. Be sure to post materials on Niihka prior to class. In-Class: Come prepared to share the history of your undergraduate alma mater. MYPD: Mapping your way to Miami Niihka: Post feedback on “This I Believe” Essay prior to class. Be sure to email feedback directly to your partner.

Reason, R. D., & Broido, E. M. (2011). Philosophies and values. In J. H. Schuh, S. R. Jones, & S. R. Harper (Eds.), Student services: A handbook for the profession (5th ed.). (pp. 80-95). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass, Inc. Fried, J. (2011). Ethical standards and principles. In J. H. Schuh, S. R., Jones, & S. R. Harper (Eds.), Student services: A handbook for the profession (5th ed.). (pp. 96-119). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass, Inc. Evans, N. J., & Reason, R. D. (2001). Guiding principles: A

EDL 676 Syllabus – Page 14 of 24 review and analysis of student affairs philosophical statements. Journal of College Student Development, 42(4), 359-377. Suggested Readings American College Personnel Association. (2012). Reflections on the 75th anniversary of the student personnel point of view. Retrieved from http://www2.myacpa.org/images/publications/docs/reflections_th e_student_personnel_point_of_view_2012.pdf. American College Personnel Association. (1996). Student learning imperative. Retrieved from http://www.myacpa.org/sli_delete/sli.htm. American Council on Education (1949). Student personnel point of view. Retrieved from http://www.myacpa.org/pub/documents/1949.pdf. American Council on Education. (1937). Student personnel point of view. Retrieved from http://www.myacpa.org/pub/documents/1937.pdf. American Association of University Professors. (1992). Joint statement on rights and freedoms of students. Retrieved from http://www.aaup.org/aaup/pubsres/policydocs/contents/stud-right s.htm. American Association of University Professors. (1992). Joint statement on rights and freedoms of graduate students. Retrieved from http://www.aaup.org/AAUP/pubsres/policydocs/contents/stateme ntongraduatestudents.htm. Council for the Advancement of Standards in Higher Education. (2009). CAS professional standards for higher education (7th ed.). Washington, DC: Author. Keeling, R. P. (Ed.). (2004). Learning reconsidered: A campus-wide focus on the student experience. Washington, DC: National Association of Student Personnel Administrators, American College Personnel Association. Retrieved from http://www.myacpa.org/pub/pub_books_services.cfm. Assignments ! FABP: Team #3 presents on Functional Area. Be sure to post materials on Niihka prior to class.

EDL 676 Syllabus – Page 15 of 23 ! ! Week 7: October 8th & 9th Fall Break (Oct. 11th – 13th) Theoretical Bases of Student Affairs – Part I In-Class: Prior to class, review SAHE’s Core Values at http://www.units.muohio.edu/csp/sahe/page1708.html and http://www.units.muohio.edu/csp/sahe/page1693.html. MYPD: Job Search

Jones, S. R., & Abes, E. (2011). The nature and uses of theory. In J. H. Schuh, S. R., Jones, & S. R. Harper (Eds.), Student services: A handbook for the profession (5th ed.). (pp. 149-167). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass, Inc. Evans, N. J. (2011). Psychosocial and cognitive-structural perspectives on student development. In J. H. Schuh, S. R., Jones, & S. R. Harper (Eds.), Student services: A handbook for the profession (5th ed.). (pp. 168-186). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass, Inc. Torres, V. (2011). Perspectives on identity development. In J. H. Schuh, S. R., Jones, & S. R. Harper (Eds.), Student services: A handbook for the profession (5th ed.). (pp. 187-206). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass, Inc. Blimling, G. S. (2011). How are dichotomies such as scholar/practitioner and theory/practice helpful and harmful to the profession? In P. M. Magolda, & M. B. Baxter Magolda (Eds.) Contested issues in student affairs: Diverse perspectives and respectful dialogue. (pp. 42-53). Sterling, VA: Stylus. Broido, E. M. (2011). Moving beyond dichotomies: Integrating theory, scholarship, experience, and practice. In P. M. Magolda, & M. B. Baxter Magolda (Eds.) Contested issues in student affairs: Diverse perspectives and respectful dialogue. (pp. 54-60). Sterling, VA: Stylus. Suggested Readings Abes, E. S., Jones, S. R., & McEwen, M. K. 2007). Reconceptualizing the model of multiple dimensions of identity: The role of meaning-making capacity in the construction of multiple identities. Journal of College Student Development 48(1), 1-22. Evans, N. J., Forney, D.S., Guido, F., Patton, L. D., & Renn, K. A. (2010). Student development in college. Theory, research, and practice (2nd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass, Inc. Torres, V., Jones, S. R., & Renn, K. A. (2010). Identity development theories in student affairs: Origins, current status, and new approaches. Journal of College Student Development,

EDL 676 Syllabus – Page 16 of 24 50(6), 577-596. Winkle-Wagner, R. (2012). Self, college experiences, and society: Rethinking the theoretical foundations of student development theory. The College Student Affairs Journal, 30(2), 45-60. Assignments ! Week 8: Theoretical October Bases of 15th & 16th Student Affairs – Part II In-Class: Bring your favorite movie snack(s) to class. We will be watching Higher Learning.

Kezar, A. (2011). Organizational theory. In J. H. Schuh, S. R., Jones, & S. R. Harper (Eds.), Student services: A handbook for the profession (5th ed.). (pp. 226-241). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass, Inc. Renn, K. A., & Patton, L. D. (2011). Campus ecology and environments. In J. H. Schuh, S. R., Jones, & S. R. Harper (Eds.), Student services: A handbook for the profession (5th ed.). (pp. 242-256). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass, Inc. Chang, M. J., Milem, J. F., antonio, a. l. (2011). Campus climate and diversity. In J. H. Schuh, S. R., Jones, & S. R. Harper (Eds.), Student services: A handbook for the profession (5th ed.). (pp. 43-58). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass, Inc. Renn, K. A. (2011). Do identity centers (e.g., Women’s Centers, Ethnic Centers, LGBT Centers) divide rather than unite higher education faculty, students, and administrators? If so, why are they so prevalent on college campuses? In P. M. Magolda, & M. B. Baxter Magolda (Eds.). Contested issues in student affairs: Diverse perspectives and respectful dialogue. (pp. 244-254). Sterling, VA: Stylus. Patton, L. D. (2011). Promoting critical conversations about identity centers. In P. M. Magolda, & M. B. Baxter Magolda (Eds.). Contested issues in student affairs: Diverse perspectives and respectful dialogue. (pp. 255-260). Sterling, VA: Stylus. Suggested Readings Kuh, G. D. Student success. In J. H. Schuh, S. R., Jones, & S. R. Harper (Eds.), Student services: A handbook for the profession (5th ed.). (pp. 257-269). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass, Inc. Manning, K., Kinzie, J., & Schuh, J. (2006). One size does not fit all: Traditional and innovative models of student affairs practice. New York, NY: Routledge.

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Strange, C. C., & Banning, J. (2001). Educating by design: Creating campus learning environments that work. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass, Inc. Assignments ! ! FABP: Team #4 presents on Functional Area. Be sure to post materials on Niihka prior to class. Niihka: Post your APA Style Paper no later than Tuesday, October 15, 2013 @ 9:00 a.m.

Week 9: October 22nd & 23rd

Facilitating Learning in Student Affairs Student Dungy, G. J. (2006). Learning reconsidered: Where have we Learning come? Where are we going? In R. P. Keeling, Learning – Part I reconsidered 2: A practical guide to implementing a campus-wide focus on the student experience. (pp. 1-2). Washington, DC: National Association of Student Personnel Administrators, American College Personnel Association. Fried, J. (2006). Rethinking learning. In R. P. Keeling, Learning reconsidered 2: A practical guide to implementing a campus-wide focus on the student experience. (pp. 3-10). Washington, DC: National Association of Student Personnel Administrators, American College Personnel Association. hooks, b. (1994). Introduction. In b. hooks, Teaching to transgress: Education as the practice of freedom. (pp. 1-12). New York, NY: Routledge. hooks, b. (1994). Engaged pedagogy. In b. hooks, Teaching to transgress: Education as the practice of freedom. (pp. 13-22). New York, NY: Routledge. King, P. M., & Baxter Magolda, M. B. (2011). Student learning. In J. H. Schuh, S. R., Jones, & S. R. Harper (Eds.), Student services: A handbook for the profession (5th ed.). (pp. 207-225). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass, Inc. Suggested Readings Baxter Magolda, M. B., & King, P. M. (Eds.). (2004). Learning partnerships: Theory and models of practice to educate for self-authorship. Sterling, VA: Stylus Press. Blake, L. (2011). Student affairs and integrated learning. In P. M. Magolda, & M. B. Baxter Magolda (Eds.) Contested issues in student affairs: Diverse perspectives and respectful dialogue. (pp.

EDL 676 Syllabus – Page 18 of 24 35-40). Sterling, VA: Stylus. Palmer, P. (1998). A culture of fear: Education and the disconnected life. In P. Palmer, The courage to teach. (pp. 35-60). San Francisco, CA: Jossey Bass, Inc. Assignments ! ! Week 10: October 29th & 30th Student Learning – Part II FABP: Team #5 presents on Functional Area. Be sure to post materials on Niihka prior to class. In-Class: Come prepared to discuss strengths and areas of development for EDL 676: Foundations of SAHE.

Haynes, C. (2006). The integrated student: Fostering holistic development to enhance learning. About Campus, 10(6), 17-23. Benjamin, M., & Hamrick, F. A. (2011). How does the perception that learning takes place exclusively in the classroom persist? Expanding the learning environment. In P. M. Magolda, & M. B. Baxter Magolda (Eds.) Contested issues in student affairs: Diverse perspectives and respectful dialogue. (pp. 23-34). Sterling, VA: Stylus. Borrego, S. E. (2006). Mapping learning the environment. In R. P. Keeling, Learning reconsidered 2: A practical guide to implementing a campus-wide focus on the student experience. (pp. 11-16). Washington, DC: National Association of Student Personnel Administrators, American College Personnel Association. Komives, S. R., & Schoper, S. (2006). Developing learning outcomes. In R. P. Keeling, Learning reconsidered 2: A practical guide to implementing a campus-wide focus on the student experience. (pp. 17-41). Washington, DC: National Association of Student Personnel Administrators, American College Personnel Association. Taylor, K. B., & Haynes, C. (2008). A framework for intentionally fostering student learning. About Campus, 13(5), 2-11. Suggested Readings American Association of Higher Education, American College Personnel Association, & National Association of Student Personnel Administrators. (1998). Powerful partnerships: A shared responsibility for learning. Washington, DC: authors.

EDL 676 Syllabus – Page 19 of 23 Connolly, M. R. (2011). Does social networking enhance or impede student learning? Social networking and student learning: Friends without benefits. In P. M. Magolda, & M. B. Baxter Magolda (Eds.) Contested issues in student affairs: Diverse perspectives and respectful dialogue. (pp. 122-134). Sterling, VA: Stylus. Kuh, G. D. (1996). Guiding principles for creating seamless learning environments for undergraduates. Journal of College Student Development, 37, 135–148. Assignments ! ! Week 11: November 5th & 6th FABP: Team #6 presents on Functional Area. Be sure to post materials on Niihka prior to class. MYPD: Learning Goals & Outcomes

Developing Professional Competencies in SAHE Essential ACPA – College Student Educators International & NASPA – Competencies Student Affairs Administrators in Higher Education. (2010). in Student Professional competency areas for student affairs practitioners. Affairs – Part I ACPA College Student Educators International. Baxter Magolda, M. B., & Magolda, P. (2011). What counts as “essential” knowledge for student affairs educators? Intellectual curiosity and lifelong learning. In P. M. Magolda, & M. B. Baxter Magolda (Eds.) Contested issues in student affairs: Diverse perspectives and respectful dialogue. (pp. 3-14). Sterling, VA: Stylus. Carnaghi, J. E., & Boschini Jr., V. J. (2011). What do student affairs educators need to know? A conversation involving two senior university officials. In P. M. Magolda, & M. B. Baxter Magolda (Eds.) Contested issues in student affairs: Diverse perspectives and respectful dialogue. (pp. 15-22). Sterling, VA: Stylus. Be sure to read your assigned book chapter: Komives, S. R. (2011). Leadership. In J. H. Schuh, S. R., Jones, & S. R. Harper (Eds.), Student services: A handbook for the profession (5th ed.). (pp. 353-371). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass, Inc. Hirt, J. B., & Strayhorn, T. L. (2011). Staffing and supervision. In J. H. Schuh, S. R., Jones, & S. R. Harper (Eds.), Student services: A handbook for the profession (5th ed.). (pp. 372-384). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass, Inc.

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Magolda, P. M., & Quaye, S. J. (2011). Teaching in the co-curriculum. In J. H. Schuh, S. R., Jones, & S. R. Harper (Eds.), Student services: A handbook for the profession (5th ed.). (pp. 385-398). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass, Inc. Reynolds, A. L. (2011). Counseling and helping skills. In J. H. Schuh, S. R., Jones, & S. R. Harper (Eds.), Student services: A handbook for the profession (5th ed.). (pp. 399-412). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass, Inc. Love, P., & Maxam, S. (2011). Advising and consultation. In J. H. Schuh, S. R., Jones, & S. R. Harper (Eds.), Student services: A handbook for the profession (5th ed.). (pp. 413-432). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass, Inc. Roper, L., & Matheis, C. (2011). Conflict resolution. In J. H. Schuh, S. R., Jones, & S. R. Harper (Eds.), Student services: A handbook for the profession (5th ed.). (pp. 433-447). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass, Inc. Roberts, D. C. (2011). Community development. In J. H. Schuh, S. R., Jones, & S. R. Harper (Eds.), Student services: A handbook for the profession (5th ed.). (pp. 448-467). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass, Inc. Suggested Readings Cuyjet, M. J., Longwell-Grice, R., & Molina, E. (2009). Perceptions of new student affairs professionals and their supervisors regarding the application of competencies learned in preparation programs. Journal of College Student Development, 50(1), 104-119. Dickerson, A. M., Hoffman, J. L., Anan, B. P., Brown, K. F., Vong, L. K., Bresciani, M. J., & Oyler, J. (2011). A comparison of senior student affairs officer and student affairs preparatory program faculty expectations of entry-level professionals’ competencies. Journal of Student Affairs Research and Practice, 48(4), 463–479. doi:10.2202/1949-6605.6270 Kuk, L. Cobb, B., & Forrest, C. (2007). Perceptions of competencies of entry-level practitioners in student affairs. NASPA Journal, 44(4), 664-691. McClellan, G. S., Stringer, J., & Associates (2009). The handbook of student affairs administration (3rd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass, Inc.

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Assignments ! ! ! Week 12: November 12th & 13th ASHE (Nov. 13th – 16th) Essential Competencies in Student Affairs – Part II FABP: Team #7 presents on Functional Area. Be sure to post materials on Niihka prior to class. In-Class: Come prepared to share a summary of your assigned book chapter. MYPD: Second Semester Map

Suskie, L. A. (2009). What is assessment? In L. A. Suskie, Assessing student learning (2nd ed.). (pp. 3-18). San Francisco, CA : Jossey-Bass, Inc. Bresciani, M. J. (2011). Assessment and evaluation. In J. H. Schuh, S. R. Jones, & S. R. Harper (Eds.), Student services: A handbook for the profession (5th ed.). (pp. 321-334). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass, Inc. Sax, L. J., & Harper, C. E. (2010). Using research to inform practice: Considering the conditional effects of college. In J. H. Schuh, S. R. Jones, & S. R. Harper (Eds.), Student services: A handbook for the profession (5th ed.). (pp. 499-514). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass, Inc. Upcraft, M. L., & Schuh, J. H. (2002). Assessment vs. research: Why we should care about the difference. About Campus, 7(1), 16-20. Suggested Readings Bresciani, M. J., Zelna, C. L., & Anderson, J. A. (2004). Assessing student learning and development: A handbook for practitioners. Washington, DC: National Association of Student Personnel Administrators. Kinzie, J. (2011). Student affairs in the age of accountability and assessment. In P. M. Magolda, & M. B. Baxter Magolda (Eds.) Contested issues in student affairs: Diverse perspectives and respectful dialogue. (pp. 201-214). Sterling, VA: Stylus. Schuh, J. H., Upcraft, M. L., & Associates (2001). Assessment practice in student affairs: An application manual. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass, Inc. Waple, J. N. (2006). An assessment of skills and competencies necessary for entry-level student affairs work. NASPA Journal, 43(1), 1-18.

EDL 676 Syllabus – Page 22 of 24 Assignments ! ! ! Week 13: November 19th & 20th Essential Competencies in Student Affairs – Part III Revisit online tutorial on The Basics of APA Style. In-Class: StrengthFinders 2.0 (TBD) Niihka: Post your PPV Philosophy Statement no later than Tuesday, November 12, 2013 @ 9:00 a.m.

Pope, R. L., & Mueller, J. A. (2011). Multicultural competence. In J. H. Schuh, S. R., Jones, & S. R. Harper (Eds.), Student services: A handbook for the profession (5th ed.). (pp. 337-352). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass, Inc. Turner Kelly, B., & Gaston Gayles, J. (2010). Resistance to racial/ethnic dialog in graduate preparation programs. College Student Affair Journal, 29(1), 75-85. Edwards, K. E. (2006). Aspiring social justice ally identity development: A conceptual model. NASPA Journal, 43(4), 39!60. Park, J. J. (2011). Why is it so challenging for collegians and student affairs educators to talk about race? The elephant in the room – race. In P. M. Magolda, & M. B. Baxter Magolda (Eds.) Contested issues in student affairs: Diverse perspectives and respectful dialogue. (pp. 225-235). Sterling, VA: Stylus Reason, R. D. and Broido, E. M. (2001), Issues and strategies for social justice allies (and the student affairs professionals who hope to encourage them). New Directions for Student Services, 81–89. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass, Inc. Suggested Readings Goodman, D. J. (2000). Motivating people from privileged groups to support social justice. Teachers College Record, 102(6), 1061-1085. King, P. M., & Baxter Magolda, M. B. (2005). A developmental model of intercultural maturity. Journal of College Student Development, 46(6), 571-592. King, P. M., & Howard-Hamilton, M. (2003). An assessment of multicultural competence. NASPA Journal, 40(2), 119-133. Magolda, P. M., & Baxter Magolda, M. B. (2011). Engaging in dialogues about difference in the workplace. In P. M. Magolda, & M. B. Baxter Magolda (Eds.) Contested issues in student affairs: Diverse perspectives and respectful dialogue. (pp. 453-465). Sterling, VA: Stylus.

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Patton, L. D., Shahjahan, R. A., & Osei-Kofi, N. (2010). Introduction to the emergent approaches to diversity and social justice in higher education. Equity & Excellence in Education, 43(3), 265-278. Assignments ! ! FABP: Team #8 presents on Functional Area. Be sure to post materials on Niihka prior to class. In-Class: Review Professional competency areas for student affairs practitioners (ACPA & NASPA, 2010) and identify 2-3 competencies that are areas of strength and areas of development. MYPD: SAHE Program Map

! Week 14: November 26th & 27th Week 15: December 3rd & 4th Thanksgiving Break

Engaging in the Student Affairs Profession Professionalis Arminio, J. (2011). Professionalism. In J. H. Schuh, S. R., Jones, m in Student & S. R. Harper (Eds.), Student services: A handbook for the Affairs profession (5th ed.). (pp. 468-481). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass, Inc. Nuss, E. M. (2000). The role of professional associations. In M. J. Barr & M. K. Desler (Eds.), The handbook of student affairs administration (2nd ed.). (pp. 492!507). San Francisco, CA: Jossey!Bass, Inc. Schwartz, R. A., & Bryan, W. A. (1998). What is professional development? New Directions for Student Services, 3-15. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass, Inc. Linder, K. R. (2011). Why do student affairs educators struggle to set professional boundaries? Establishing and maintaining healthy professional and personal boundaries. In P. M. Magolda, & M. B. Baxter Magolda (Eds.) Contested issues in student affairs: Diverse perspectives and respectful dialogue. (pp. 434-445). Sterling, VA: Stylus. Clement, K. M. (2011). Establishing boundaries beyond time management. In P. M. Magolda, & M. B. Baxter Magolda (Eds.) Contested issues in student affairs: Diverse perspectives and respectful dialogue. (pp. 446-451). Sterling, VA: Stylus. Suggested Readings

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Amey, M. J., & Ressor, L. M. (2009). Beginning your journey. Washington, DC: National Association of Student Personnel Administrators. Magolda, P. M., & Carnaghi, J. E. (2004). Job one: Experiences of new professionals in student affairs. Lanham, MD: University Press of America. Reisser, L. (2002), Self-renewal and personal development in professional life. New Directions for Student Services, 49-59. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass, Inc. Renn, K. A., & Jessup-Anger, E. R. (2008). Preparing new professionals: Lessons for graduate preparation programs from the National Study of New Professionals in Student Affairs. Journal of College Student Development, 49(4), 319-335. Assignments ! Niihka: Post link to MYPD E-Portfolio & Synthesis no later than Tuesday, December 3, 2013 at 9:00 a.m.