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02/27/2014

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Proposed Course Syllabus for Summer Course Proposed Course Title: EDFS 380 – Race, Culture, Instruction and

Achievement Credits: 3 Credits = 45 contact hours Instructor: Vincent M Mugisha, ABD Proposed Meeting dates and times: 9 Days in May 2014: 9am-2.30pm (5 hours each day) Monday -Friday (May 19-23); Monday-Friday May 26-30) Note: I am flexible with summer scheduling Proposed Location: Waterman Building 403 Desired Class Size: Max. 12 students Course Background and Description: Although the United States of America has historically been and continues to be a multiracial and multicultural society, ethnocentric mono-cultural ideologies have always shaped, and to a considerable degree, continue to shape our educational policy and classroom instructional practices (Castagno & Brayboy, 2008; Gay, 2010; T. Howard, C, 2010; Ladson-Billings, 1995; Rios & Stanton, 2011; Sheets, 2005; C. E. Sleeter & C. Cornbleth, 2011; Sleeter & Grant, 2009). In line with this thinking, we observe how positive schooling outcomes, and educational excellence for many minority-culture students (African Americans, Latinos, Native Americans, and Asians,) continue to be an illusive goal. Historically, in order to understand this challenge, many educators have adopted simplistic explanations that place the blame on families and minority-culture students for their persistent scholastic failure. On a promising note, however, a cadre of transformative educators (G. Howard, 2006; Ladson-Billings, 1995; Lezotte, 1997; Nieto, 1994; C. E. Sleeter & C. Cornbleth, 2011) has diligently sought for alternative culturally relevant explanations for why overwhelming failure rates persist among minority-culture students, and how to correct them. These transformative educators and instructional practitioners believe that pathological explanations and cultural deficit models are not viable solutions to the challenge of promoting equitable schooling outcomes of minority-cultural students. These transformative educators believe that we are racial and cultural beings, even though most of the time our race and culture may not be visible to us especially if we are white. Teaching and learning processes are cultured in nature, or even racialized especially in America (LadsonBillings, 1995; Sheets, 2005). As teachers and learners, we bring our own cultural ways of making sense of the world into the classroom. Teachers from dominant cultural groups unwittingly use their instructional power to impose their norms and values on minority-culture students thereby unintentionally alienating them and causing them to disengage from instructional processes that are critical for their scholastic success. As educators and instructional practitioners, we should not expect a disengaged student for whatever reason to achieve on the same level as a student from a dominant culture who is racially and culturally affirmed in all facets of curriculum and instruction. Rather we ought to be intentional in our endeavors to engage all learners using race-conscious and culturally relevant instructional strategies. On the other hand, there are legitimate educational and social reasons for enabling students of all races and cultures to see the world through different cultural prisms. However, when we do this, we should be intentional so as to approach our instruction in ways that will not threaten and disregard students’ own cultural norms and values, rather in a manner that cultivates among learners culturally pluralist attitudes about schooling and social life. Therefore this course seeks to address topics of race-conscious and culturally relevant instructional practices as strategies to enhance the academic engagement and scholastic achievement of minority-culture students in American public schools.

Proposed Summer Graduate Course- Instructor: Vincent M. Mugisha, ABD

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Goals: There are 5 goals for students that will take this course: 1. Develop an understanding of how socially constructed racial and cultural differences in the U.S. shape student engagement and academic achievement 2. Identify racially and culturally biased instructional practices that challenge the wellbeing of minority-culture students and lead to their disengagement, and scholastic failure. 3. Develop an understanding of how classroom practitioners and instructional leaders can utilize cultural differences as assets for the enhancement of quality of learning for all students 4. Develop awareness and ability to plan instructional strategies that promote academic achievement and educational equity for students in a 21st century American classrooms 5. Develop competences to use appropriate methods and materials that promote racial and cultural diversity in the classroom. Learning Outcomes: In this course, the enduring takeaway understandings for my students will include the following statements: 1. Socio-cultural context mediates teaching and learning and therefore our instructional practices should critically and practically take students’ racial and cultural identities into account. 2. Social constructions of racial and cultural differences have historically, and continue to create schooling relations that privilege the achievement of some, and deny the opportunity to others. Unless instructional practitioners act alternatively to interrupt this phenomenon, the status quo will continue. 3. American classrooms are increasingly becoming racially and culturally diverse, as is the U.S. population. Unless instructional practices change to match the changing demographics, the goals and purposes of public schooling will not be achieved at the local, state, and national levels. 4. Culturally alienated school children are disengaged children, and disengaged children will not achieve. General Course Information Course Policies/Expectations: The course is generally intended for graduate students of different education concentrations such as those pursuing the Master of Arts (M.A.T) in teaching degree, the master’s degree in educational leadership, or curriculum and instruction as well as doctoral students who need an elective for their concentration. Undergraduate education majors with a minimum junior, and in good academic standing may also take this course as an elective. In-service instructional practitioners as well as other adult learners from the community seeking graduate credit in education may take the course as well to gain knowledge about teaching and learning in multi-racial/multicultural public school settings. As a culturally responsive instructor, I believe students have diverse learning styles, and also learn through being actively engaged in class. I therefore will use varied teaching strategies including short lectures to specifically unpack theory, reflective writing activities, small group interactions, and group or partner projects. I will expect you as a potential student in this class to complete all assigned readings ahead of the class, take notes, and organize your thoughts about the readings before coming to class. This will help you get the most mileage from your class participation. Attendance Expectations: There are only 9 class days each five hours (a total of 45 contact hours). You are required to attend all of them in order to earn course credit (10% of the grade). I also recognize that sometimes you may be running late. If you know you will be running late to class it is your responsibility to inform the instructor in advance, and also ask for help with missed work.

Proposed Summer Graduate Course- Instructor: Vincent M. Mugisha, ABD

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Religious Observance: The official policy for excused absences for religious holidays: Students have the right to practice the religion of their choice. Each semester students should submit in writing to their instructors by the end of the second full week of classes their documented religious holiday schedule for the semester. Faculty must permit students who miss work for the purpose of religious observance to make up this work. Contributions in Class: As a goal-oriented and motivated student in this class, you are expected to come to class substantially prepared to discuss the readings, share your understanding of the readings, listen to other students’ views and perspectives, and construct meaning from class discussions. Academic Honesty & Professionalism: All students are required to be familiar with and adhere to the “Academic Honesty Policy Procedures” delineated in the following website. http://www.uvm.edu/~uvmppg/ppg/student/acadintegrity.pdf ). Accommodations: Accommodations will be provided to eligible students with disabilities. Please obtain an accommodation letter from the ACCESS office and see one of the instructors early in the course to discuss what accommodations will be necessary. If you are unfamiliar with ACCESS, visit their website at http://www.uvm.edu/access to learn more about the services they provide. ACESS: A-170 Living Learning Center, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT 05405. PH: 802-6567753, TTY: call 711 (relay), Fax: 802-656-0739, Email: access@uvm.edu, Instant Messenger: UVMaccess. General office hours: 8:30am – 4:30pm Monday through Friday. Call to make an appointment. Required and/or recommended readings: Required Book (available in UVM Bookstore): Howard, T., C. (2010). Why race and culture matter in schools: Closing the achievement gap in America's classrooms. New York: Teachers College Press. (ONLY 150 short pages) Required Reading: Journal Articles, and Book Chapters (See class schedule below for when readings will be due. I will make them available on Blackboard): • Guess, T. J. (2006). The social construction of whiteness: Racism by intent, racism by consequence. Critical sociology, 32(4), 649-671. • Gutiérrez, K. D., & Rogoff, B. (2003). Cultural ways of learning: Individual traits or repertoires of practice. Educational Researcher, 32(5), 19-25. • Hilliard, A. G. (1992). Behavioral style, culture, and teaching and learning. Journal of Negro Education, 61(3), 370-377. • Mugisha, M., V. (2013). Culturally responsive instructional leadership: A conceptual exploration with principals of three New Zealand mainstream schools. International Journal of Multicultural Education, 15(2), 1-20. • Parrish, M. S., Klem, J. L., & Brown, D. R. (2012). Diversity in learning: A comparison of traditional learning theories with learning styles and cultural values of Native American students. Ideas and Research You Can Use, 1(VISTAS 2012), 1-9. • Richman, K. (2011). Teaching thematically in a standards context. In C. E. Sleeter & C. Cornbleth (Eds.), (pp. 61-72). New York, NY: Teachers College Press. • Stiller, S. (2011). Hooking students so they don't give up. In C. E. Sleeter & C. Cornbleth (Eds.), (pp. 82-96). New York, NY: Teachers College Press. • Wheeler, R. S., & Swords, R. (2004). Codeswitching: Tools of language and culture transform the dialectically diverse classroom. Language Arts, 81(6), 470-480. Recommended Books (available in UVM Bookstore): 1. Gay, G. (2010). Culturally responsive teaching: Theory, research, and practice. New York, NY: Teachers College Press.
Proposed Summer Graduate Course- Instructor: Vincent M. Mugisha, ABD Page 3 of 10

2. Howard, G. (2006). We can't teach what we don't know: White teachers, multiracial schools. New York, NY: Teachers College Press 3. Sleeter, C. E., & Cornbleth, C. (2011). Teaching with vision: Culturally responsive teaching in standards-based classrooms. New York, NY: Teachers College Press. 4. Sheets, H. R. (2005). Diversity pedagogy: Examining the role of culture in the teaching-learning process. New York, Ny: Pearson. Student Evaluation/Assessment Grading: Grades will be determined on the basis of attendance (10% of grade), class participation (10% of grade), and 3 kinds of assignments described below (80% of the grade).
Note: In order to earn credit for class participation (10% of the grade), your active participation in this class will be critical. I will need to see evidence that you did the readings, and that you are able to articulate and apply your conceptual understanding in class discussions. I will also ask each one of you to lead a discussion group on readings and other class activities where you will be required to apply your conceptual understanding.

Grading Scale:

A+ 97-100; A 93-96; A- 90-92; B+ 87-89; B 83-86; B- 80-82; C+ 77-79; C 73-76; C- 70-72; D+ 67-69; D 63-66;D- 60-62; F <60
Description of Class Assignments (80 % of the grade): Assignment#1 (20%): Reflective personal development Paper - Who am I as a racial/cultural being? 6-8 double-spaced pages You will write a personal narrative essay about your own life describing who you are as a racial/cultural being, the experiences that have shaped your views of race, culture, and other diversity issues. In this essay you ought to reflect on your experiences in terms of your racial and cultural identity, your family background and upbringing, and how and why you interact with others unlike yourself the way do. You will reflect on how you think your racial/cultural identity has shaped the way you learn, and function the way you do as a classroom practitioner or instructional leader. Be sure to include examples of SPECIFIC events and situations in your life to support your narrative. To the extent possible, relate your experiences to the theoretical underpinnings of the course. Grading rubric will be ready by the beginning of the class Assignment#2 (20%): Either: Individual demonstration of a culturally responsive instructional strategy in class. You will have 30 minutes in class to creatively put into practice an aspect of culturally responsive pedagogy of your choice by engaging the class participants as your learners. You will have the option of engaging the course participants either as diverse adult learners, OR preparing them to role-play as young adult learners. OR: Group project (3 persons per group) and presentation of one-hour long peer training on an identified aspect of culturally responsive pedagogy in a given content area, or area of instructional leadership You will have a one-hour to deliver a training to benefit your course mates on an important aspect of culturally responsive pedagogy (CRP) in a given content area, or area of instructional leadership. Group members will need to split responsibilities and effort equally (33.3%-33.3%-33.3%). Grading rubric will be ready by the beginning of the class
Proposed Summer Graduate Course- Instructor: Vincent M. Mugisha, ABD Page 4 of 10

Assignment#3: Culturally responsive instructional vision paper (40%) Length 8-10 double-spaced pages By the end of the course you will be knowledgeable about the theory and practice, and the promise of race-conscious and culturally responsive instruction in the enhancement of minority-culture student’s engagement and achievement. Inspired by this knowledge you will be empowered to craft your vision as a classroom practitioner, instructional leader, or educator at any level. You will need to state your role in this paper (i.e. are you a classroom practitioner, an instructional leader, professional developer, etc.?). As you define your personal beliefs on classroom process, or instructional leadership in relation to diversity and social justice, I expect you to draw on the literature discussed in class. You will need to decide on an appropriate structure of your vision paper, so it reads like an academic paper that blends reflection on practice with conceptual analysis. Grading rubric will be ready by the beginning of the class Scoring Rubrics: Will be ready before class begins Class Schedule and Instructional Sequence: Date Day 1: Monday May 19, 2014 Topic Overview of the course: -Definitions of key terms of race, culture, instructional practice, and achievement -Important theoretical underpinnings of the course: Structuration, and social construction of racial and cultural differences in America Readings due prior coming to class; Assignments due and in-class activities Readings due before Class: Assignment due: NONE None In-class activities: -Presentation of the course -Short lecture on theoretical underpinnings of the course -Brief reflective writing and small group discussion: Who am I as a racialcultural being? -Video on social construction of racial and cultural differences -Handout-guided group discussion of video -Instructor’ synthesis, and clarification of next day’s homework Assigned Readings due before class: -Journal article: Social construction of whiteness (Guess, 2006), pages 649673 (23 pages) -Book section: series forewordIntroduction: In “Why race & culture matters in schools” (T. Howard, C, 2010), pages ix-8 (24 pages)
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Day 2: Tuesday May 20, 2014

-Social construction of intelligence in American public schools, and its relationship with underachievement of minority-culture students -Implications of socially constructed racial and cultural differences in public schooling and educational outcomes

Assignment due: Readings and prep for active class participation

Proposed Summer Graduate Course- Instructor: Vincent M. Mugisha, ABD

In-class activities: -Brief recap of yesterday’s class content -Discussion of the readings -Video on social construction of intelligence in American public school -Handout-guided group discussion of video Day 3: -Competing (traditional and alternative) Assigned Readings due before Wednesday explanations of academic class: May 21 underachievement of minority-culture - Book chapter 1: Achievement Gap2014 students in the U.S. contextualizing the problem: In “Why race & culture matters in schools” (T. -The changing face of America Howard, C, 2010), pages 9-34 (24 pages) 26 pages -Book chapter 2: Changing demographics: In “Why race & culture matters in schools” (T. Howard, C, 2010), pages 35-50 (16 pages) In-class activities: -Brief recap of yesterday’s class content -Group exercise on readings -Instructor presentation and synthesis of readings Day 4: Thursday May 22, 2014 -The role of RACE and CULTURE in learning -Cultural ways of learning and knowing Assigned Readings due before class: --Book chapter 3: Culture: In “Why race & culture matters in schools” (T. Howard, C, 2010), pages 51-66 (16 pages) --Book chapter 5: The role of race in learning: In “Why race & culture matters in schools” (T. Howard, C, 2010), pages 91-100 (20 pages) -Book Chapter 1-Student learning and culture: In “Diversity pedagogy: Examining the role of culture in the teaching-learning processes (Sheets, 2005), pages 3-13 (11 pages) Recommended Reading: -Book Chapter 7-White teachers and school reform: Toward a
Proposed Summer Graduate Course- Instructor: Vincent M. Mugisha, ABD

Assignment due: Readings and prep for active class participation

Assignment due: 6-8 double-spaced reflective personal development paper: Who am I as a racial/cultural being?

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Day 5: Friday May 23, 2014

transformationist pedagogy: In “We can’t teach what we don’t know: White teachers, multiracial schools (G. Howard, 2006), pages 117-136(20 pages) In-class activities: -Brief recap of yesterday’s class content -Individual free writing exercise to finalize “reflective personal development paper: Who am I as a racial/cultural being” -Discussion of the readings -Instructor’s presentation and sythensis of the readings Assigned Readings due before -Role of culturally responsive class: instruction/ pedagogy, and critical race --Book chapter 4: Culturally responsive pedagogy in closing achievement gaps pedagogy: In “Why race & culture matters in schools” (T. Howard, C, 2010), pages 67-90 (16 pages) Short journal article: Behavioral style, culture, & teaching and learning (Hilliard, 1992) (6 pages) -Short journal article: Diversity in learning….(Parrish, Klem, & Brown, 2012) (9 pages) -Short journal article: Cultural ways of learning: Individual traits or Repertoires of practice (Gutiérrez & Rogoff, 2003) (5 pages) In-class activities: -Brief recap of yesterday’s class content -Video on cultural responsive pedagogy -Discussion: connections between readings and video content -Instructor’s synthesis of readings and class material

Assignment due: Readings and prep for active class participation Preparation for assignment #2presentation

Day 6: Monday May 26, 2014

-The concept and role of culturally responsive instructional leadership in enhancing academic engagement and scholastic achievement of minority-culture students -Emergency of culturally responsive

Assigned Readings due before class: -Journal article: The concept of culturally responsive instructional leadership (Mugisha, 2013) (20 pages)

Assignment due: Readings and prep for active class participation Preparation for assignment #2-

Proposed Summer Graduate Course- Instructor: Vincent M. Mugisha, ABD

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instructional leadership in Burlington School District of Vermont Guest Speaker: Principal Amy Mellencamp of Burlington High School

--Book chapter 6: Developing cultural competence & racial awareness in classroom teachers: In “Why race & culture matters in schools” (T. Howard, C, 2010), pages 111-128 (18 pages) --Book chapter 7: Examples of school success for culturally diverse students: In “Why race & culture matters in schools” (T. Howard, C, 2010), pages 129-150 (22 pages) In-class activities: -Brief recap of yesterday’s class content -Instructor’s presentation of the concept of “culturally responsive instructional leadership” -Discussion of the readings -Guest speaker’s presentation, and Q & A session. Assigned Readings due before class: --Book chapter 5: Teaching thematically in a standards context (Richman, 2011): In “Culturally responsive teaching in standardsbased classrooms (C. E. Sleeter & C. Cornbleth, 2011) (18 pages) --Book chapter 7: Hooking students so they don’t give up (Stiller, 2011): In “Culturally responsive teaching in standards-based classrooms (C. E. Sleeter & C. Cornbleth, 2011) (15 pages) -Book Chapter 11-Cultural strengths of African American children: In “Diversity pedagogy: Examining the role of culture in the teaching-learning processes (Sheets, 2005), pages 18313 (15 pages) --Short journal article: Codeswitching: Tools of language and culture transform the dialectically diverse classroom. (Wheeler & Swords, 2004) (10 pages)

presentation

Day 7: Tuesday May 27, 2014

Practical Applications: Culturally responsive instruction in Standardsbased classrooms Guest Speaker: A local (Burlington/Winooski) classroom practitioner of culturally relevant pedagogy

Assignment due: Readings and prep for active class participation Preparation for assignment #2presentation

Proposed Summer Graduate Course- Instructor: Vincent M. Mugisha, ABD

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Day 8: Exploring multicultural instructional Wednesday materials and Resources May 28 2014

In-class activities: -Brief recap of yesterday’s class content -Discussion of the readings -Guest speaker’s presentation, and Q & A session -Instructor’s synthesis of class content Assigned Readings due before class: -Book Chapter 11-Linguistic strengths of Mexican American children: In “Diversity pedagogy: Examining the role of culture in the teaching-learning processes (Sheets, 2005), pages 198212 (15 pages) -Spend time working on project presentations -Plan to bring your computers to class so we use them in the exploration of multicultural instructional resources In-class activities: -Brief recap of yesterday’s content -A session to share multicultural instructional resources/materials -Individual/group presentations Assigned Readings due before class: --None, but work on project presentations In-class activities: -Brief recap of yesterday’s content -Individual/group presentations Instructor’s course wrap up, and evaluations

Assignment due: Readings and prep for active class participation Preparation for assignment #2presentation

Day 9: Thursday May 29, 2014

Project presentations, and wrap up

Assignment due: Preparation for assignment #3-CRI vision paper to be submitted to instructor electronically by 5pm Wednesday June 4, 2013

Supplemental Readings (Should you need to deepen your knowledge about the class topics): • Castagno, A. E., & Brayboy, B. M. J. (2008). Culturally responsive schooling for indigenous youth: A review of the literature. Review of Educational Research, 78(4), 941-993. • Gimps, B. J., & Ford, N. F. (2010). White power and privilege: Barriers to culturally responsive teaching. International Journal of Educational of Educational Policies, 4(1), 39-52. • Hayes, C., & Juares, B. (2012). There is no culturally responsive teaching spoken here: A critical race perspective. Democracy & Education, 20(1), 1-14. • Ladson-Billings, G. (1995). Toward a theory of culturally relevant pedagogy. American Educational Research Journal, 35(1), 79-85. • Lezotte, L. W. (1997). Learning for all. Okemos, MI: Effective School Products.
Proposed Summer Graduate Course- Instructor: Vincent M. Mugisha, ABD Page 9 of 10

• • • • •

Nieto, S. (1994). Lessons from students on creating a chance to dream; in. Harvard Educational Review, 64(4), 392 - 426. Philips, R., & Vaughn, L. M. (2009). Diverse ways of knowing and learning: The impact of culture. The Open Medical Education Journal, 2, 49-56. Rios, F., & Stanton, F. C. (2011). Understanding multicultural education: Equity for all students. New York, NY: Rowman & Littlefield Education. Sleeter, C. E., & Grant, C. A. (2009). Making choices for multicultural education. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons. Villegas, A. M., & Lucas, T. (2002). Preparing culturally responsive teachers: Rethinking the curriculum. Journal of Teacher Education, 53(1), 20-32.

Proposed Summer Graduate Course- Instructor: Vincent M. Mugisha, ABD

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