You are on page 1of 78

Canuck In Denver's

Emergency Preparedness and Survival Basics Guide


Basic information to get you started on the road to Emergency Preparedness and Survival - A beginner's guide.

By Canuck n !enver
2006 Canuck n !enver and SurvivalistsSite.com canuck"survivalistssite.com ###.survivalistssite.com$%canuck$
&his ebook may be freely posted on the internet' printed and handed out. (ou may not alter or edit any part of this ebook. (ou may not sell or profit from this ebook. All images are public domain.

)atural !isasters - &errorist Attacks - *ood Shortages - Pandemic - Economic Collapse Social +nrest - Chemical Spills - Bioha,ards - nfrastructure *ailure and many other situations threaten us.
n recent years there have been e-amples of many of these threats to ourselves and our #ay of life. *rom .$//' to anthra- and bombs in the mail' to the 0reat Blackout of 1223' to the 1224 5urricane Season and the destruction in the 0ulf States' #e have seen that these events are very real. 6e are #arned daily of the potential for more terrorist attacks' of increasingly unpredictable and e-treme #eather' the possibility of a 0lobal Pandemic and other emergencies #ith devastating effects. 6e have become more a#are that the #orld #e live in is not a paradise #here #e may remain ignorant of the people around us and their intentions' the dangers inherent in our society and economy' or the havoc that nature can #reak upon us. 6e have seen that the government can not predict' plan' prepare or deal #ith emergencies7 that #e can not depend on government to make the correct or timely decisions and actions. 6e are alone and can only depend on ourselves. &hat means that #e must make plans' gather supplies and learn ne# skills so that #e can cope #ith #hatever emergency #e may have to confront. Emergency Preparedness - Survival - Homesteading &hese are the bu,,#ords of our time. )o longer are 8Survivalists8 seen as being on the fringe of society' #ith the government advising us to make plans and store supplies' 8Survivalists8 and 8survivalism8 have become main stream. !on't you think it is time that you started making plans and learning ho# to prepare for and survive the emergency situations facing us all9

Emergency Preparedness and Survivalism cover a #ide range of topics. &his guide is not meant to ans#er all of your :uestions related to Emergency Preparedness and Survivalism' it is meant to be a basic guide to ans#er basic :uestions and to get you started. &his guide should give you enough of the basics to get you started and to sho# that no matter ho# large a topic Emergency Preparedness and Survivalism is' that you CA) do it.

Preface
've been interested in survival since #as a kid gro#ing up in the country. Surrounded by farms' trees' streams and all those things that made my boyhood fun... and dangerous. 've gotten caught in snap bli,,ards #ith ,ero visibility as a kid' obviously lived to talk about it. #ent hiking and camping #ith my friends and #ith my 6olf Cub pack #hen #as a kid. 6hen #as older #ent hiking and camping #ith my friends and #ith the 6olf Cub and Scout troop #as a leader of. taught my 6olf Cubs and Scouts about survival and #ent beyond #hat #as covered in the Scouts Canada manuals. 've been on the survival ne#sgroups since /..;' as Canuck n !enver since 1222. 've visited hundreds of survival and emergency preparedness #ebsites over the years. <any have come and gone during those years' but a fe# good ones have remained through it all. Every #ebsite has it's o#n feel and character' think SurvivalistsSite.com is uni:ue in that it offers anyone the chance to have a Blog or Community Page and is more of a community in that respect. guess you could say that 've been a survivalist for as long as can remember. As a kid al#ays had a pocket knife' lighter' e-tra clothes and some food and #ater #ith me #hen #ent any#here. kne# ho# to build a fire' make a fishing pole and hooks and catch some fish to eat if #orst came to #orst' did mention 5A&E fish unless it is 8*ish ') Chips89 Part of the reason al#ays carried some gear #as that #ith the e-ception of school #as as far a#ay from my house as could get' and living in the country that could mean trouble. 6e built shelters and all those things you need to live fairly comfortably in the #ilderness' it #as =ust #hat #e did. >ater in life once had a car al#ays had some food' #ater' e-tra clothes' tools and spare parts for the car in the trunk. became pretty good at #orking on my car. developed more survival related skills #hen spent time in the Society for Creative Anachronism and did medieval recreation for about /2 years... 8primitive8 camping #ith medieval technology taught me a fe# things. &his ebook is my attempt to give a little something back to all the people #ho have influenced my thoughts on survivalism over the years. (ou can find this ebook on my SurvivalistsSite.com Community Pages at ###.survivalistssite.com$%canuck as #ell as individual do#nloads for the ma=or sections' these are located in the 8!o#nloadable *iles8 section. Some of the 5&<> pages under the 8Emergency Preparedness and Survival Basics8 section contain additional informationnot found in the individual file do#nloads or this ebook.

Ta le o! Contents
Pre!ace ......................................................................................................................................................... "y T#oug#ts on Survival .......................................................................................................................... Getting Started - Survival Basics .............................................................................................................. $ood % &ater Storage ............................................................................................................................... 3 4 ? .

'ecommended B(B )Bug (ut Bag* Contents ......................................................................................... /1 Basic Survival Tools ................................................................................................................................... /4 B(+ )Bug (ut +e#icle* Basics .................................................................................................................. /; Sanitation .................................................................................................................................................... 12 Survival S#elter .......................................................................................................................................... 11 Survival &eapon Basics ............................................................................................................................. 31 "ini ,r an Survival -it ............................................................................................................................ 3@ Basic Pack ..................................................................................................................................................... @/ Sleeping Gear ............................................................................................................................................... @A Cooking Gear ............................................................................................................................................... 4/ &inter Clot#ing ........................................................................................................................................... 4? $irst .id and "edical -its ......................................................................................................................... ;? Day Pack ....................................................................................................................................................... ?1 (dds % Ends - "iscellaneous E/uipment and Clot#ing ......................................................................... ?@

"y T#oug#ts on Survival


Some#here #hile #as gro#ing up became a 8survivalist8. &he idea of having food' clothes' gear and other things on hand in case things #ent #rong makes sense to me. <aybe it #as my time as a 6olf Cub or my time as a 6olf Cub and Scout leader' maybe it is because have al#ays been a history buff' maybe it #as the role playing games like !ungeons B !ragons played' maybe it #as a combination of these and my innate personality. 6ho kno#s9 sure don't. All kno# is that it makes sense to have those supplies. &o me' survivalism is not like <el 0ibson in <ad <a- or the Coad 6arrior or any number of 5olly#ood versions of #hat happens after the crap hits the fan. Survivlism can best be illustrated by those fe# people in )e# Drleans in 1224 #ho made it through hurricane Eatrina #ith little difficulty. By having a supply of food' #ater and a means to cook they #ere able to stay in their homes until government agencies could get their act together and start bringing in relief supplies. 6hen you get right do#n to it' survivalism is #hat our parents' grandparents and great grandparents practiced on a daily basis. &hey al#ays had food in the cupboards =ust in case something #ent #rong. f they lived in a rural area they had gardens' canned' had root cellars and lots of fire#ood. &hey kne# that you need to have food in case you can't get to the store. &hey kne# you had to have light and heat in case the po#er #ent out. At the core of survivalism is the desire to be prepared for #hatever man or nature thro#s your #ay. t could be #eather related' lived ;2 miles a#ay from Buffalo' )( during the bli,,ard of ?A and as a kid thought that a #eek of being completely sno#ed in and then another #ithout school during my favorite season of the year #as great. t could be 8man made8 such as a chemical spill. t could be having no po#er for t#o #eeks for #hatever reason. t could be a disruption in the distribution system used in today's 8=ust in time8 delivery method for store stocking - #hen #as the last time you #ent to the grocery store late Sunday and found that many items #ere out of stock - #hat if no trucks could get through for a #eek or more9 &here are any number of events that can thro# a monkey #rench into your day-to-day routine that could affect your very survival. Part of survival includes kno#ing #hat emergencies or disasters you are may e-perience. !o you live near a busy high#ay that ha,ardous material trucks use9 Cail road tracks9 s there a chemical plant near by9 6hat about a nuclear reactor Fpo#er company or universityG9 6hat about forest fires9 *loods9 &ornadoes9 5urricanes9 6inter bli,,ard9 f you live in a city you may have to deal #ith civil unrest and rioting. Some people have moved from the city to the suburbs' some have moved to a more rural location. Dthers prefer to have a cabin or some other sort of retreat to go to in case the crap hits the fan. Some plan on going to a friend or relative's. Every person's situation is different and re:uires different plans and gear. (ou must assess your situation' your means and make some plans. Cegardless of your particular situation there are a fe# constants in every emergency' disaster or survival situation. 'iding out t#e emergency or 0Bugging In0 &here are any number of simple things the average person can do to make their chances of surviving such an event as easy and assured as possible. Simple things like having at least t#o to four #eeks of food on hand. &he more food you have the better. &his food should be easy to prepare and re:uire no refrigeration. Canned' dried' 8heat and eat8 foods F<CEs' boil in the bag' etcG are great for this and do not re:uire a lot of room. 6ater' at 3 gallons a day per person =ust for food #ill take up more room' but bet#een #ater on hand and some #ay to purify the #ater you should be able to survive on t#o to three days of stored #ater. 'd also increase the amount you store per day to 4 gallons per person per day' #ater =ugs usually come in 4 gallon si,es. f you are going to pack free,e dried food that needs to be rehydrated you #ill need to stock more #ater' #hich is another reason to round up to 4 gallons per person per day. 6ater can be stored as store bought bottled #ater or in bottles or drums that you fill yourself and treat #ith a fe# drops of regular chlorine bleach' or a combination of the t#o. 6ater purification should also be considered as in most cases #hen municipal #ater is once again available it comes #ith a boil and$or treat advisory. A gravity filer such as a Berkey or Eatadyn makes this process much easier. 6ater purifiers also allo# you to use #ater from =ust about any source you may find... stream' pond' lake' etc. Smaller gravity filters can be taken #ith you in the event you have to evacuate your home. &here are a number of other things you can do to make life at home easier in an emergency situation. f you have a fireplace make sure you have #ood to provide heat' you may also #ant to consider a stove insert that #ill allo# you to cook food on the top in pots and pans. (ou #ay #ant to consider a basic #ood burning stove such as a pot bellied stove for the kitchen for heat and cooking. Candles' candle lanterns' oil lamps' battery lanterns' camping lanterns and solar rechargeable deck lanterns
www.survivalistssite.com Page 5 www.survivalistssite.com/~canuck

can all be used around the house to provide light. Camping stoves can be used to cook on as can gas or charcoal grills. Charcoal fire pits can be used inside to provide heat Fand to cook onG' similar items #ere used in the past and are called bra,iers. Propane or kerosene heaters can also be used to heat your house. like charcoal. have three charcoal grills' your standard 6eber kettle grill' a small 5ibatchi' and a large Brinkman F#ill also burn #oodG that has t#o cooking areas and can fit ?1 beer brats on both sides. &he Brinkman #ill stay hot for about @ hours #ith ten pounds of charcoal. Charcoal is fairly cheap' pay about H// for t#o @2 pound bags of Eingsford at Sam's Club' and #ith a charcoal fire pit or improvised bra,ier can use it to heat the inside of the house if #orst comes to #orst. Eeep in mind that anything that burns indoors presents a fire and carbon mono-ide ha,ard' get a couple of battery operated carbon mono-ide monitors and keep them #ith your emergency supplies. <ake sure you open a couple of #indo#s an inch or t#o to allo# ventilation. &hese should be in addition to any carbon mono-ide detectors already in your home' make sure you have e-tra batteries. f you have a lot of fro,en and refrigerated food or have medical e:uipment that re:uires electricity you #ill #ant to think about a gasoline' propane$natural gas or diesel po#ered generator. 0asoline po#ered generators are by far the most common' but gasoline should not be stored for too long. Propane po#ered generators are usually found as #hole house backup generators due to the clean burning propane$natural gas and the long term storage capabilities of propane$natural gas' but can be found in portable models as #ell. !iesel generators are less common but they are more durable than their gasoline counterparts' diesel also has storage issues but can be stored longer than gasoline Fnot to mention bio-dieselG. n some cases you can find dual or triple fuel generators that run on a combination of li:uid and >P Flo# pressure - propane$naturalG gas. 6ith generators in every si,e from small / kilo#att 5ondas and up' there is a generator to meet every need and budget. 6ithout #ater service or electricity Fto pump the #aterG you #ill not have the ability to flush your toilet. A portable toilet of some sort #ill come in very handy. &his can be a basic five gallon pail #ith toilet seat attached and garbage bags to a sa#dust toilet or ready made portable toilets. &hat about covers the various things an average person can do to make staying at home during and after an emergency that disrupts normal services. t goes #ithout saying that you should have the basic tools most home o#ners do' a shovel' a-e' sa#' hammers' etc to make any basic repairs that are needed' such as boarding up #indo#s after a hurricane or clearing do#ned trees. Evacuating your #ome or 0Bugging (ut0 (ou should also have a BDB or Bug Dut Bag for every member of your family in case you have no option but to leave your home. (our BDB should contain food' #ater and clothing for three days to a #eek. (ou should have some means to purify any #ater you find. (ou should have basic cooking gear' sleeping gear' personal hygiene and first aid supplies' basic camping tools' shelter and some means to listen to the ne#s. !on't forget basic identification and proof of #here you live and copies of any other important papers. (our BDB should be packed and ready to go at all times. 6hen the need or order to evacuate comes the first thing you should do is get in contact #ith all of your family members. )e-t put your bug out bags in your vehicle7 if there is time' load up #ith all the e-tra food' #ater' clothing and other gear you can safely fit into your vehicle. 0etting your bug out bags loaded into your vehicle should take no more than five minutes if everyone does it at once. Eeeping a fe# plastic storage totes and a luggage cart can aid in moving other items like cans from your cupboards and pantry and any stored #ater you have. A fe# five gallon #ater =ugs can be :uickly filled then loaded. *rom the time you are notified or decide to evacuate should take no more than 32 minutes in an ideal situation. f you have the money and the room' you may #ant to consider getting a small trailer to to# behind your vehicle. 0enerally your vehicle can to# more than it can carry. f you have a small trailer you can keep most of your gear stored in the trailer #ith the e-ception of any temperature sensitive items like canned or perishable food' free,e dried food is generally fine in a trailer. 6ith a trailer all you have to do is hook it up' load your bug out bags and any e-tra food or gear and leave. (ou should have a plan in place in the event leaving your home is re:uired. &his should include meeting places' a number of destinations depending on ho# long you e-pect to be a#ay and several routes out of the area you live in and to your destination. f at all possible do not take interstate or large high#ays' these #ill :uickly become packed #ith cars as people leave. +se back roads and round about routes if you have to' have alternate routes marked to get around any bottlenecks along your route. &he sooner you leave the less traffic you #ill encounter and the less time it #ill take you.
www.survivalistssite.com Page 6 www.survivalistssite.com/~canuck

Getting Started - Survival Basics


f you are ne# to survival or emergency preparedness you are probably a bit over#helmed at all of the information out there. (ou're probably also #ondering if there is a 8!ummies 0uide8 or a single resource for #hat you #ill need to kno#. Although there isn't a !ummies 0uide there are a fe# good books for people #ho are =ust starting out. &here are also lots and lots of sites on the #eb #ith loads and loads of information and ideas. Dn the book front the t#o main books are the +S Army Survival <anual *< 1/-?; available from Barnes B )oble for about H..22' H/2 in hard cover. &here is a ne#$current version of the +S Army Survival <anual *< 3-24.?2 that have only seen in online versions' a P!* version is available in the !o#nloads Section of the SurvivalistsSite.com <essage *orums F<embers onlyG. &he second book is the SAS Survival Survival 0uide' #ith the Collins 0em pocket si,e being the most preferred due to its small si,e. &he Collins 0em version of the SAS Survival 0uide #ill have a ne# edition available at the end of *ebruary 122;' SB) 22;2A@.A1' and is about HA.22. <ost people in the survival community list these as the t#o best survival books out there' along #ith older versions of the Scouting books. )e-t on my list is !are to Prepare by 5olly !eyo. !are to Prepare is a huge 422I page A.4-// inch format book that is #ritten for the average person. t is available directly from Stan and 5olly !eyo for about H@2.22. call !are to Prepare the book of lists' it has lists for everything and lots of basic information on emergency preparedness and survival. f you go to ###.standeyo.com you can see the table of contents and =ust ho# e-tensive it is. have copies of the +S Army Survival <anual' the SAS Survival 0uide FCollins 0em editionG and !are to Prepare. f have to bug out my copies of the +S Army Survival <anual and the SAS Survival 0uide #ill be going #ith me' they are packed in my BDB FBug Dut BagG' !are to Prepare #ill go #ith me if remember to grab it off the shelf ne-t to my gear. really can't recommend the SAS Survival 0uide enough' have o#ned a copy for years and =ust pre-ordered t#o copies of the ne# Collins 0em edition... and 'm thinking of adding a third to the pre-order. #on't recommend something unless o#n it and find it useful... or it receives lots of really good revie#s... or it is on my need to get list. 6ell there you have it' the basic books that are most often recommended and the one think is probably the best place for ne# people to start out #ith. )o# for some practicle background information to get you started. 6hat comes ne-t is my thoughts on survival basics' the things that are common to =ust about every possible emergency' and from #hich comes everything else. 6hen learning any ne# skill there are a fe# key areas that form the core of the skill' the basics. Belo# are #hat consider the basics' enough to serve you #ell in any situation and enough to get you started. Dnce you understand the basics and the thought processes involved you #ill be comfortable #ith other concepts or areas of survivalism. &here are four main sections to survival or emergency preparedness - *ood' 6ater' Shelter and Planning. &here are other sections to survival' but these four are the basics. #ill touch on the other more advanced areas near the end. $ood 6ithout food you #ill die' it is as simple as that. (ou need to eat. (ou need to have food on hand in case an emergency happens. People in the survival community usually talk about 8rotation8 or 8rotating8 #hen they talk about food you have stored. &his means eating the food you have stored before it goes bad and replacing #hat you have eaten #ith ne# items. 6hat food you choose to store' and for ho# long is a personal choice. 5aving at least enough for one or t#o #eeks is the minimum suggested amount. Some people store enough food for a year or several years. *or more information on food storage see *ood B 6ater Storage. &ater Again' #ithout #ater you #ill die. (ou need #ater to cook #ith' to clean #ith and to #ash #ith. <ost people in the survival community suggest 3 gallons per person per day' suggest 4 gallons per person per day to allo# for e-tras and for the ease of calculating ho# much you need. &here are lots of #ays to store #ater' or purify #ater' etc. See *ood B 6ater Storage. S#elter 6ithout shelter you #ill die. &his 8#ithout - you #ill die8 is really starting to get old' isn't it9 &he simple fact of the matter is
www.survivalistssite.com Page 7 www.survivalistssite.com/~canuck

that it really is true. (ou need shelter from the elements' =ust as you need food and #ater. 6hat your shelter happens to be in a survival situation is going to depend on a lot of factors. f you al#ays have your o#n shelter #ith you then you #ill never have to #orry about keeping the rain off your head or having a dry place to sleep. Shelter can be anything from your house' a travel trailer' a tent' to a cabin or cave. A small tent or a couple of tarps and some rope #ill give you shelter #hen you need it and do not #eigh much. Planning Planning is the big part. (ou have to kno# #hat kinds of emergencies may happen to you. Every to#n and geographic area has its very o#n potential emergencies. *rom #eather and natural disasters to chemical spills and other man made ha,ards there are at least three facing any one of us. 6e usually don't think about them' but under the right circumstances #hat #e don't think about can and #ill kill us. &he first thing #e have to do is perform a 8threat analysis8 and see #hat potential emergencies there are for us in our area. &hen #e have to plan #hat food and e:uipment #e #ill need to survive those emergencies. n some cases #e #ill be able to remain in our homes to ride out the emergencies. n others #e #ill have to evacuate our homes' this is #here having portable gear is a must - you need to be able to get on the road and get out as fast as possible' there is no time for getting everything from the grocery and department stores. A portable kit is usually called a BDB FBug Dut BagG' for more information on BDBs see BDB Basics. f you don't have #hat you need then it is too late. Stopping at a grocery or department store to get e-tra supplies is one thing' #aiting until the last minute to get basic supplies can get you killed. f you need to evacuate you #ill need to kno# #hat routes out of your city or to#n there are. (ou #ill #ant to have multiple routes to take depending on #here you are going and in #hat direction. (ou may have to take a round about #ay to avoid traffic =ams' etc. (ou #ill #ant to kno# interstates' state high#ays' back roads' etc so that you have every option open to you. <ark these on maps you keep #ith your gear7 you #ant local' state and national maps7 and you #ant to at least drive the routes out of your city or to#n for a fe# miles so that you don't have to look at your maps in the event you have to evacuate or bug out. .dvanced &he more advanced aspects of survivalism include having a dedicated BDJ FBug Dut JehicleG and$or trailer that is kept loaded and ready to go7 for more information on BDJs see BDJ Basics. Some people have survival retreats that they intend to go to in the event that they need to evacuate or bug out. Some people store seeds and gardening$farming tools so that they can gro# their o#n food in the event of a long term emergency or survival situation. n most cases people store #hat are called 8heirloom8 seeds' these are older non-hybrid varieties of seeds that produce fertile seeds that can be used year after year versus many hybrid seeds in #hich the crop does not produce fertile seeds. <any people start gardens #here they live no#' plant fruit trees' etc. Some plant fruit trees at their retreats and$or gardens in addition to the ones at their homes. +sually retreats are a country cabin' in some cases it may be land as far a#ay from civili,ation as possible and includes a hidden shelter Fcave' buried house' etcG and buried or 8cached8 supplies. Some people also bury caches of gear along the route or routes they are likely to take to get to their retreat or bug out destination. Some people practice #hat is called homesteading' #hich are small farms that are as self sufficient as possible. <any people live 8off grid8 #hich means they live #ithout electricity in some cases but usually means they have some means to produce their o#n electricity or use alternatives to electrical appliances. 6ood burning stoves and #ater heaters are often installed in houses to provide cooking' heating and hot #ater. 0as' diesel and propane po#ered generators are often installed to provide electricity #hen the po#er goes out. Some people store lots of guns and ammunition. Some people learn to make their o#n bo#s and arro#s along #ith other older skills that are not common in today's #orld. <ost e-perienced survivalists use a number of the skills and ideas #ithout going to e-tremes. <ost survivalists have more in common #ith our parents' grandparents and great grandparents in their daily lives than they do #ith modern families. &hey raise at least some of their o#n food and then can it' they have pantries full of food' have fire#ood split and ready to burn' and are ready in the event that anything does happen. &hey can get along =ust fine #ithout having to run to the grocery store everyday or going to a fast food =oint' and find po#er outages inconvenient at most. &hey are prepared to stay at home in the event of an emergency #hile also being ready and able to leave their homes if that is #hat is re:uired.
www.survivalistssite.com Page 8 www.survivalistssite.com/~canuck

$ood % &ater Storage


$ood <uch has been #ritten on food and #ater storage' especially food. 6ater is fairly straight for#ard and #ill be dealt #ith second. Dn the topic of food there are a variety of ideas' from 42 pound bags of #heat and dried beans' to <CE F<eals Ceady to EatG rations that the +S military eats #hen in the field' to commercially packaged retort pouches' to free,e dried or dehydrated' and finally to #hat you eat on a regular basis. Each idea has its merits and its dra#backs. 6heat and dried beans Fincludes bulk rice' flour' etcG are great due to their ine-pensive cost' but if you don't like #heat or dried beans or #on't eat them then there is no sense in spending the money. 6heat and dried beans can be used as a supplement' or for trading' in addition to your primary food source. Eeep in mind that any radical change in diet or foods eaten can have negative side effects on your body... you had better have a lot of toilet paper and Pepto. <CEs are relatively light#eight' come in many choices and can be eaten hot or cold. &hey are high in sodium' heavier than free,e dried$dehydrated and can be e-pensive and hard to find. &hey are great to have in your pack' BDJ or pantry #hen you need something :uick. *ree,e dried$dehydrated foods are very light#eight' have a fairly long shelf life' come in many choices and are great #hen #eight and space are at a premium. Some meals are better than others' so try one before you buy a case. &hey also re:uire #ater' #hich means you #ill have to have more #ater than the basics of 3-4 gallons per person per day. &hey are also more e-pensive than regular canned goods. &his brings us to 8#hat you eat on a regular basis8. &his is my preferred primary storage food. Being in the middle of an emergency or crisis situation is no time to be e-perimenting #ith foods you are not use to. t is also the cheapest #ay to buy food. kno# ho# much of a given item #e use on average in a #eek. f that happens to be 3 cans of kernel corn then kno# that need /1 cans for four #eeks or /4; cans for a year. )ice and basic. &he first thing to do is keep a small notebook #ith you #hen you go shopping. *or a month you #ill #rite do#n every item you buy or use and ho# much. f you are buying or using fresh produce estimate ho# many cans it #ould e:ual. f you are buying or using meat estimate ho# many pounds it #ould e:ual. 6hen you have your list for the month go through your cupboards and pantry and #rite do#n the spices' baking items and condiments you use. Sit do#n #ith your family and go over the list to see if anything #as missed. &his is the time #hen those items you rarely use are added to the list' figure out ho# much of that item you #ill need for the period of time you are planning on storing food for. Dnce you have a list of everything it is time to figure out the amounts for each item on your list. (ou #ant numbers for a #eek' a month F@ #eeksG and a year F41 #eeksG. &his allo#s you to be fle-ible in your purchasing' you can buy items in one #eek increments or if in multi-packs you easily kno# ho# many #eeks it supplies. Comfort foods and snacks should also be included in your food storage. n times of high stress a &#inkie or cookie can often help calm you do#n' make things seem more normal' and lets face it... it is nice to have a little treat every no# and then. &ater t is a little easier to figure out ho# much #ater you need. 0overnment generally suggests / gallon of #ater per person per day. &his is a < ) <+< amount. <ore realistic numbers are 3 gallons per person per day for food' bathing' cleaning' etc. &hree is a bit of an odd number though. <ost #ater containers come in increments of five' 4 gallon #ater cooler =ugs' 4 gallon #ater =ugs' /2 gallon #ater cooler =ugs' etc. Because of the five gallon increment in most #ater containers suggest 4 gallons per person per day' or 34 gallons per person per #eek' for ease of calculating amounts and it allo#s an e-tra margin for the unseen things that al#ays come up. 6hat you store your #ater in offers a #ide variety of choices. 6ater cooler =ugs stack #ell' and you can buy hand pumps to get the #ater out. Cases of bottled #ater also stack #ell' but mean smaller containers. Dne gallon #ater =ugs can be placed on shelves' stay a#ay from some of the cheaper brands that have poor sealing F6al-<art brand is one e-ampleG or thin =ugs.
www.survivalistssite.com Page 9 www.survivalistssite.com/~canuck

<ost commercial #ater bottlers say that once sealed their #ater has an indefinite shelf life' despite the 8best before date8 mandated by la#. <any people choose to store their o#n #ater' some in 44 gallon #ater barrels' some in 1 litre pop$soda bottles. &o do this you need to add some plain chlorinated bleach to each container before sealing. Because chlorinated bleach looses it's effectiveness over time some people use granulated chlorine available from pool supply stores #hich has a longer shelf or effective life. (ou should check the :uality of the #ater every ; to /1 months if you choose to store your o#n and use bleach. f you do not have a lot of room to store all the #ater you #ant F/2.1 to /A12 gallons per person per year - 3 to 4 gallons per dayG in your house or garage then you need to have other options. Some people build #ater cisterns on their property and then filter drinking and cooking #ater from that. Dthers may choose to use a large #ater storage tank such as the /422 gallon one available from )orthern &ool and other supply companies such as ###.#atertanks.com. &he other option is to have a good gravity based #ater purified. &he Berkey series and the Base Camp by Eatadyn are t#o of the many options out there to purify your #ater before use. 5aving a gravity based #ater purifier allo#s you to store less drinking and cooking #ater and allo#s you to use #hatever #ater is available from your surroundings. E-tra filters for the #ater purifier should be stored per manufacturer's guidelines and can be sealed #ith a vacuum sealer. 1ogistics o! $ood Storage Storing food can take up a lot of room depending on #hat type of food you choose to store. Bulk items like grains can be placed in metal or heavy plastic 44 gallon barrels or drums to keep pests out. &hey can also be stored in 4 or ; gallon pails. n either case make sure that the container is food grade or you run the risk of pesticide or other to-ic substance residue left over from previous use. &here are also stackable plastic containers available made from food grade plastic from 0amma Plastics' don't let the pet food label scare you... food grade is food grade. have a couple of the large ;2 gallon stackable ones Fholds /22-/14 pounds of sugarG. Eeep in mind #hen storing food that not all foods are temperature insensitive' e-tremes of heat and cold can reduce the shelf life of foods. <oderate cold temperatures' @2 to 42 degrees * or 4 to /2 degrees C can actually e-tend the shelf life of foods. 6hen storing food you should mark the month and year of purchase on the container #ith a permanent marker or grease pencil. &his allo#s you to kno# #hen the food is at its best' many foods are still good past 8best before8 dates but may lose nutrients or have a bland taste. f you are storing cans you can stack them on shelves' but this makes rotating your food more difficult. (ou can build can dispensers' like those sold for keeping soda$pop cans in refrigerators' that #ill allo# you to easily add and remove cans. &he oldest cans are al#ays closest to the bottom and the ne#est close to the top. (ou can si,e the dispenser for different diameters of cans easily once a fe# measurements are taken. f you are storing lots of similar diameter cans you can make #ide dispensers #ith ad=ustable dividers. &o the left are a couple of rough pictures of a can dispenser. (t#er T#oug#ts <ake sure that you have a fe# manual can openers #ith your canned foods. (ou may also #ant to store multi-vitamins to make up for any lose of nutrients from older food and to make sure that you and your family are getting the right vitamins and minerals. f you are going to store po#ered milk you #ill find that most of available brands use no-fat' lo#-fat or 1K' in
www.survivalistssite.com Page 10 www.survivalistssite.com/~canuck

the <e-ican food aisle you can find po#ered milk that is #hole or appro-imately @K. (ou may also #ant to consider Coast 0uard approved survival rations such as the !atre- or <ainstay available from )itro Pak and other suppliers. &here are a number of traditional and #eb based retailers and direct suppliers of <CEs and free,e dried$dehydrated products. &#o of the largest #eb based companies are )itro Pak and Ceady Ceserve *oods. Brands such as <ountain 5ouse and AlpineAire being the most common online and in traditional stores. Summary o! $ood Storage (ptions <CE's - Shelf life of up to /2 years' relatively light #eight' complete meals. 0reat for short term F1-@ #eeksG' for backpacks or BDBs and #henever you #ant a :uick meal. Can be e-pensive. *ree,e dried$dehydrated - >ight #eight' long shelf life. 0reat for backpacks or BDBs. Can be e-pensive' re:uires e-tra #ater. Store #hat you eat - Easiest on your system' ine-pensive' easy to get. 5eavy' shorter shelf life. 6heat and beans - 0reat basics' cheap. Can have a long shelf life. Ce:uires you to get containers' may cause problems due to diet change' more #ork. n the end a combination of the four main categories is probably best. <CEs and free,e dried$dehydrated are great for #hen on the go or you #ant something :uick. Canned foods that you already use the most common' easiest to get and cheapest make the best overall choice$primary source. Bulk #heat and beans #ill last for a long time' Egyptian tombs have sho#n shelf life of thousands of years' are very cheap' and can be used to trade #ith other people. 1inks to "anu!acturers and Suppliers <ountain 5ouse ###.mountainhouse.com AlpineAire ###.alpineaire.com Ceady Ceserve *oods ###.readyreservefoods.com *ree,e-!ry *oods ###.free,e-dry.com 5eater<eals ###.heatermeals.com >ong >ife *ood !epot ###.longlifefood.com )itro Pak ###.nitro-pak.com Sopakco ###.sopakco.com 6alton *eed ###.#altonfeed.com 6ornick ###.#ornick.com Ameri:ual ###.ameri:ual.com )orthern &ool ###.northerntool.com 6ater&anks.Com ###.#atertanks.com Berkey ###.berkey#ater.com Eatadyn ###.katadyn.com

www.survivalistssite.com

Page 11

www.survivalistssite.com/~canuck

'ecommended B(B )Bug (ut Bag* Contents


$((D % &.TE' - 3 to /2 days of light#eight food - At least 1 days of #ater - <eans to purify #ater - Some #ay to cook your food Fstove' rack for fireG - / :uart pot' 3 :uart pot' stainless steel fry pan' coffee percolator$tea pot - stainless steel mess kit' t#o insulated or plastic mugs$cups - knife' fork and spoon set' steak knife - 4 gallon collapsible #ater =ug - measuring cups' spatula' slotted spoon - basic spices - 1 :uart canteens' #ater bottles or hydration bag - dish scrubby and dish soap - small bottle of bleach - manual can opener SHE1TE' % S1EEPI2G - tent #ith e-tra pegs$stakes and$or t#o tarps FA feet L ; feetG - sleeping bag or blankets - sleeping pad - /2 to 12 small nails - 42 feet of rope - /22 feet parachute cord - plastic sheet$tarp or heavy duty garbage bags C1(THES - under#ear' @ to ? pairs - socks' @ to ? pairs F#ool - some cotton is DEG - & shirts' @ to A Fat least 1 all syntheticG - long sleeve shirt - fleece or #ool s#eater or 1 - #ind B #ater resistant =acket #ith hood - athletic$s#eat pants' 1 pairs - =eans' / pair - shorts' / pair - thermal under#ear' / pair - #atchmens cap F#ool or fleeceG - baseball cap - sneakers - hiking boots - #ater shoes' moccasins' flip flops' etc - army poncho - seasonal clothing - 6oolite - retractable clothesline and clothes pins F; to /2G - bandannas F3G B.SIC T((1S - <ulti-tool F>eatherman' 0erberG - folding knife' 3 to @ inch - fi-ed blade knife' @ to ; inch - hatchet - machete - leather #ork gloves
www.survivalistssite.com Page 12 www.survivalistssite.com/~canuck

- compass - >E! flashlight - s:uee,e$shake$#indup >E! flashlight - light sticks' three ; hour - solar$crank$battery po#ered multi-band radio - #histle - matches' 42 to /22 - disposable lighters' 1 - magnesium fire block - binoculars' small sportsman's - small shovel or entrenching tool - basic survival kit $I'ST .ID % "EDIC.1 - basic first aid kit - blister cream and moleskin - )P.4 disposable masks - late- e-am gloves - medicated foot po#der - e-tra Ace bandages - spare eye glasses or contacts - 32 day supply of any prescription medications - lip balm$chapstick - sunscreen - 1 decks of cards FSanityG - favorite book FSanityG - travel$auto versions of popular games FSanityG PE'S(2.1 H3GIE2E - comb$brush - tooth brush' tooth paste' floss - deodorant$antiperspirant Fscentless if going into #oodsG - nail clippers B file - soap in soap dish and$or li:uid soap - face cloth or body scrubber - hand to#el - bath to#el - baby #ipes - baby po#der - sample$hotel si,e shampoo and conditioner - antibacterial #ash - sample si,e shaving cream and disposable ra,or - toilet paper - small unbreakable mirror - feminine products - garbage bags "(2E34 ETC - roll of :uarters - pre-paid long distance phone card - Cash' as much as possible in /s' 4s' /2s B 12s Fminimum H122G - Eeep in mind bribes and other 8tolls8 or 8ta-es8 that may suddenly appear - !' copies of important papers &he minimum amount you #ill need is the number of gallons of gas it takes to get to your destination times H4 Fto account for price gougingG' plus meals and snacks along the #ay and hotels based on one room for every /1 hours of travel time plus one more =ust in case.
www.survivalistssite.com Page 13 www.survivalistssite.com/~canuck

THE B,G (,T B.G ITSE1$ (our BDB should be made of sturdy material. t can be a backpack' duffel bag or a plastic tote. #ould suggest a backpack so that it is easy to carry if you are forced to #alk for any distance. Dlder A> CE backpacks allo# you to add pouches' canteen covers' etc and are fairly ine-pensive.

www.survivalistssite.com

Page 14

www.survivalistssite.com/~canuck

Basic Survival Tools


n any survival situation there are a number of tools that #ill help you recover from a disaster' #hether that is rebuilding' cleaning up or getting your BDJ unstuck. deally you should have a set of these at your retreat if you have one and a set on your BDJ. f you can only afford one set keep it #ith your BDJ or in your trailer. f space is a premium in your BDJ consider a large roof basket and build a bo- to put in the basket and keep these tools in. &hese tools could mean the difference bet#een your BDJ remaining stuck' or ho# easy your cleanup or rebuilding is. 6ith the e-ception of the chainsa# you should be able to get these tools for bet#een H/22 and H122' a small price to pay for being #ell prepared for #hatever comes your #ay. &hese tools are on top of the basic tools #e all have - hammers' scre#drivers' sockets' #renches' gardening and #ood#orking tools' etc. Belo# are some of the common tools you can get at any hard#are store. *or less common' or old fashioned' tools that #ould be good to have if you are forced to rebuild from scratch #ith no po#er sources see >ehman's. 6hen trying to decide bet#een #ood or fiberglass handles usually choose #ood. *iberglass handles :uickly raise the price' but are kno#n for being near to unbreakable' lighter and longer lasting. f you decide to go #ith fiberglass handles make sure that the handle can be replaced and that the tool in :uestion is not muolded #ith the fiberglass handle. (ou may also #ant to consider picking up a #ood replacement handle as #ell. - Shovel' round' long handle FSince these are so useful you might #ant to get 1.G - Shovel' round' short handle - Shovel' spade - Shovel' s:uare - !irt Breaker - Pick - A-e - 5atchet - Bo#sa# - <achete - Splitting #edge - Sledge' @ pound - Sledge' /2 pound - Prybar' 3; inch - *ork - 5oe - Cake' bo# $ gravel - Cake' leaf - Bolt Cutters' 1@ or 3; inch F&o cut fence or chain #hile bugging out.G - Chainsa# F&o :uickly cut any fallen trees blocking your path #hile bugging out.G

www.survivalistssite.com

Page 15

www.survivalistssite.com/~canuck

B(+ )Bug (ut +e#icle* Basics


&here are three schools of thought or approaches to BDJsM &he first school is the traditional BDJ' a pre-/.A2 @-@ pickup or S+J' this school of thought advocates these earlier vehicles primarily for their supposed resistance to the effects of E<P FElectromagnetic PulseG from a nuclear #eapon or other source. &he theory is that older vehicles that have less electronics on them #ill survive E<P better than ne#er vehicles. Another side consideration is the lack of tracking systems such as Dnstar and immunity from ne# devices that #ould allo# the police For someone elseG to turn the vehicle off by using some sort of directed energy #eapon Fthese are real although in the early stages and may not be in use any#hereG. &he ne#er vehicle school of thought says that the likely hood of a detonation of a nuclear bomb that #ill produce E<P happening is slim to none' and there is no hard evidence that older vehicles #ill not be affected or that ne#er vehicles #ill be affected by E<P' so you might as #ell use a modern @-@. &his school also points out that modern vehicles have better fuel economy than older vehicles' and they're a lot nicer to be in on long trips. &he third school of thought is the use #hatever you have school. &his school of thought reali,es that not everyone can afford a dedicated BDJ or that they can not afford to buy another vehicle. *or options in this area see my blog article on Bug Dut $ Evacuation Cargo Carrying Dptions and Blackstar's blog article on Survival &ransportation - Small B <idsi,e cars. am going to deal #ith #hat a BDJ should be in an ideal situation. &his #ill apply to the first t#o schools of thought and #ill not advocate one or the other. &here is information belo#' tools and spare parts' that #ill apply to all BDJs. A BDJ should be or have the follo#ing featuresM - @-@ - large enough to fit your family' pets and your core gear - have a trailer hitch - receiver style Fa front mounted hitch receiver is also a good ideaG - have at least one #inch' t#o #ould be better Ffront and backG - be in good repair and running condition - have upgraded shocks or springs Fbetter to#ing and cargo capabilitiesG - have a brush guard - have at least one full si,e spare - a cargo basket or roof racks on the top Fincreased gear storageG - have driving and fog lights - largest tires possible - skid plates Ffront minimum - transfer case and drive line advisableG - gas tank protection Fskid plateG - have a good CB and antenna Ffull si,e steel #hip antenna #ith spring at baseG *or some people the BDJ of choice #ill be a full si,e pickup' a full si,e S+J' a small$midsi,e pickup or a small$midsi,e S+J. &his #ill depend on a lot of factors including the si,e of their family' their budget and their needs. &here are lots of options out there to meet the 8minimum8 re:uirements listed above. &he upgraded shocks or springs are a simple and fairly ine-pensive upgrade that can be done by the o#ner or a mechanic. Brush guards are also fairly ine-pensive and can be installed by the o#ner or a mechanic and allo# the mounting of a #inch and the driving and fog lights. A rear mounted hitch could re:uire the addition of a custom bumper' although there are commercial bumpers available for some vehicles' plus there is the option of mounting the #inch to a custom 1 inch receiver tongue. Some people in the @-@ community carry tubes for their tires in case a hole is too large to patch or plug on the trail' some pre-mount the tube inside the tire so all they have to do is pump it up. (ou #ant to make sure that your fan shroud is in good condition as it is one of the most important items under the hood. &his piece of plastic serves t#o ma=or functions' the first is the guiding of air through the radiator to provide sufficient cooling Fvery important #hen hauling a full loadG by limiting turbulence around the fan. &he second is that it keeps the spray of #ater over the engine and electrical systems reducing the chances of stalling the engine out due to e-cess #ater spraying the ignition system.
www.survivalistssite.com Page 16 www.survivalistssite.com/~canuck

*or those looking to buy an older fullsi,e pickup or S+J they can often be found in good mechanical and body condition for H1222 or less. f you are not mechanically inclined you #ill #ant to take it to your mechanic to have it looked at and get any marginal parts replaced. t is better to be sure than to break do#n half#ay to your destination. (ou don't need a monster truck' you need a basic @-@ truck that #ill get you to #here you are going. Even if you are not mechanically inclined there are a number of basic repairs that any person can do as long as you have the repair manuals and some basic tools. )ot only #ill you get to kno# your vehicle better but you #ill save yourself some money by doing the routine things. 6hen buying repair manuals al#ays get both the Chilton's and the 5aynes manuals. (our BDJ should al#ays have the follo#ing items in itM - repair manuals - basic mechanics tool set - standard and metric socket set - standard and metric #rench set - ball peen hammer - tor:ue #rench - channel lock pliers - locking pliers - linesmans pliers - needlenose pliers - ad=ustable #renches F;' /2 B /4 inchG - scre#drivers F3 flat head B 3 phillpsG - tor- set - allen #rench set - spark plug socket and setting tool - distributor #rench - #ire stripper$crimper - electrical connectors and #ire - basic voltmeter or circuit tester - electrical tape' shrink tubing' cloth friction tape - 6!-@2 or other spray lubricant - duct tape - flashlight - breaker bar - C&J sealant and$or gasket maker - tarp - super glue and paper clips - NB 6eld - starter fluid - degreaser - can of contact cement - Enipe- pliers Ffor gripping rounded nut or boltG - nylon ,ip ties - =ack stands - assorted nuts' bolts and #ashers for your vehicle - other specialty tools re:uired for your vehicle Fusually on *ordsG - spare set of fuses - spare set of all bulbs - spare hoses - spare spark plugs - spare spark plug #ires - spare #iper blades - fluids Foil' transmission fluid' po#er steering fluid' coolant$antifree,e' etcG - tire repair kit including fi--a-flat or 8slime8 - lug #rench$tire iron - flares or reflective triangle - =ack F5i->ift or bottleG
www.survivalistssite.com Page 17 www.survivalistssite.com/~canuck

- 8come-a-long8' 1 ton Fmanual hand #inch type toolG - snatch block - =umper cables F:uality all copper @ or ; gaugeG - air compressor - rags - #aterless hand cleaner - sno# brush - s:ueegee - to# chain - sno# chains Fgood for mud tooG - traction aids Fcarpet' sand' board' etcG - distilled #ater Ffor batteryG - stop leak for radiator' oil' etc - 5EA&$!ry 0as - octane boost$gas treatment - at least one 4 gallon gas can - drinking #ater - leather #ork gloves - change of clothes - spare boots$shoes - first aid kit - baby #ipes - toilet paper - some free,e dried$dehydrated food - blanket - coat - poncho - rope - multi-tool F>eatherman $ 0erberG - maps of city' state and country - candles or fake fireplace log - matches or disposable lighter - trash bags - cooler Fto keep food and #ater inG - #ater purifier FEatadyn or BerkeyG or purification tablets - seasonal items Fclothing' etcG - oil filter n addition to the spare parts listed above you may #ant to carry some of the more common and easy to replace parts belo#M - ignition coil - alternator - thermostat - complete distributor or at least cap' rotor and points Ffor older vehiclesG - starter - +-=oints - voltage regulator Folder vehiclesG - fuel pump - starter solenoid$relay - fuel filter &hese parts are the ones that need replacing the most and can generally be replaced by anyone on the side of the road #ith the basic mechanics tools listed above. Some people' especially in the @-@ community' #ill choose to carry drive shafts and a-les as #ell but these take longer to replace and re:uire more skill. &he optional spare parts listed here can generally be replaced in under an hour. (ou #ould be #ell advised to have a long length of steel pipe' rebar or a very strong scre#driver for leveraging and tightening your alternator.
www.survivalistssite.com Page 18 www.survivalistssite.com/~canuck

See Basic Survival &ools for additional items that should also be kept in or on your BDJ. deally your BDJ should have most of the same items as your BDB FBug Dut BagG in it at all times' so you are never #ithout those items. f your BDJ is dedicated to being a BDJ and is not your daily driver you can keep your BDB and other gear that is not affected by temperature loaded in your BDJ and ready to go #ith a moments notice.

www.survivalistssite.com

Page 19

www.survivalistssite.com/~canuck

Sanitation
Sanitation in an emergency or survival situation is very important. 6ithout #ater #e #ill not be able to #ash our hands or food' etc. 6ithout running #ater flushing our toilets #ill become impossible. &his means #e need to think ahead to ho# #e #ill cope #ith these aspects of emergency or survival situations. f #e don't practice good sanitation #e run the risk of sickness and disease. Storing enough #ater for a #eek or more of these everyday tasks re:uires a lot of #ater. 6e need to have solutions to the problem of sanitation in an emergency preparedness or survival situation that re:uires the least amount of #ater possible. Porta le Bat#room *ortunately there are a some ine-pensive solutions to this problem. 6e'll start #ith a portable bathroom. <ost camping$hunting stores carry a bucket toilet' such as the one belo#' for about H/4. f you get one of these bucket toilets and a spare 4 gallon bucket for the seat to go on then you #ill al#ays have one in use' even #hen emptying the bucket. (ou also #ant to get a roll of heavy duty garbage bags to line the bucket. (ou #ill need a fe# other things as #ell. (ou'll need to get a total of three more buckets' one should be s:uare instead of round. (ou #ill also need sa#dust' baking soda' something to scoop the sa#dust and baking soda' a #ater tap Foutside type - see picture belo#G' a couple of #ashers or some pipe sealant' and a basin tub.

*ill the first bucket #ith sa#dust and fill the second #ith baking soda. (ou should have at least one scoop of some sort to use #ith the sa#dust and baking soda. Sealed buckets #ould be best for these t#o' this #ill keep the sa#dust and baking soda dry. &ake the third bucket' the s:uare one' and cut a small hole' centered and about t#o inches above the bottom of the bucket' =ust large enough to fit the #ater tap into. Put #ashers or pipe sealant on the inside and outside of the bucket to seal the pipe in place. 6hen you are done you should have something that looks like the picture belo#M &his is your #ater source for use #hen #ashing your hands. (ou can place this on the counter above your sink if you are at home' or on some sort of platform or table #ith a basin underneath if you are at a campsite. f the bucket has a handle you can al#ays hang it from tree to get it at the right level. f you keep the #ater filled it #ill be at room or air temperature. 6ater for #ashing should be as pure as possible. (ou should use #ater that you have stored yourself or use #ater that you have purified and kno# is safe. &o use your portable bathroom you first put a garbage bag liner in the bucket toilet. &he ne-t step is to put a layer of sa#dust on the bottom of the bucket toilet' then sprinkle some baking soda into the bucket toilet. After you have used the bucket toilet you sprinkle another layer of sa#dust and baking soda. &he sa#dust helps absorb any #et #aste and eliminate any smell' the baking soda is to help eliminate any remaining smell. Dnce you have finished #ith the toilet you can then move to your #ash basin and #ater bucket to #ash your hands. (our #ater bucket and #ash basin can be used to take sponge or field baths. f hung from a high enough point you can attach some sort of hose for taking sho#ers or #ashing your hair. 6hen not in use the #ater bucket can be used to store toilet paper' soap' etc so that your entire portable bathroom is ready to grab and go #ith a minutes notice.
www.survivalistssite.com Page 20 www.survivalistssite.com/~canuck

&otal cost' including the toilet bucket at about H/4' should be about H34. Porta le kitc#en sink &his should follo# the standard Scouting practice of three basins. Dne basin is filled #ith #ash #ater' one #ith rinse #ater and one #ith a #ater$bleach solution to make sure that the dishes are clean and there is no chance of bacteria on the dishes. (ou can use your #ater bucket' or another' for use #ith the rinse stage of the cleaning process. use three Cubbermade totes #ith lids for this. stack them inside of each other' the top one has a lid and inside it are my dish #ashing items such as soap' scrubbies' sponges' bottle of regular chlorine bleach' etc. also use them for hand #ashing clothes #ith 6oolite and laundry bar soap' and keep a bottle of 6oolite' laundry bar soap' clothes pegs and rope for a clothes line. (ou may #ant to include a dish rack for drying your dishes. 1ist o! items needed - toilet bucket' complete #ith seat - spare toilet bucket' #ithout seat - t#o covered buckets Fsa#dust B baking sodaG - scoop for sa#dust and baking soda - s:uare bucket F#ater bucketG - #ater tap' #ashers$pipe sealant - 3 or @ basins - li:uid soap' gallon - li:uid soap' pump bottle - 6oolite - bar laundry soap - regular chlorine bleach - dish soap - #aterless hand cleaner' antibacterial - dish scrubbies' etc - to#els' paper and$or cloth - clothes line and clothes pegs - toilet paper - sa#dust - baking po#der - garbage bags - tarp for enclosing 8bathroom8 for privacy #hen in the #oods FoptionalG - dish rack FoptionalG

www.survivalistssite.com

Page 21

www.survivalistssite.com/~canuck

Survival S#elter
Shelter #hen you are stranded in the #oods' on your #ay to your destination' or =ust as a temporary shelter for a fe# days' is one of the most important aspects to survival. 6ithout shelter you are e-posed to the elements and your chances of survival are lo#ered. <ost people carry a tent #ith them as part of their camping or bug out gear. Some people choose to use a military poncho or a tarp' or both as their shelter to cut do#n on the #eight they have to carry. <ilitary ponchos are great for making shelters #ith' they are tough' have grommets to stake or tie the corners' can be snapped together' etc. Add a tarp along #ith the poncho and you can have a slightly larger shelter or add a floor to the shelter you make #ith the poncho. f you have t#o tarps you can make a larger shelter and have a floor. &#o ; foot by ; foot or A foot by ; foot tarps and some rope or parachute cord #ill allo# you to make some nice shelters. Some people also carry a small' light #eight tent pole or t#o so that they don't have to use sticks to support their shelter. suggest having t#o tarps for shelter and a poncho for rain gear. &he poncho can be used as a door in a shelter built #ith t#o tarps' or to cover you like a blanket to help keep rain off should your shelter leak and to keep you #arm. prefer parachute cord' also called 442 or seven strand' because it is light #eight yet strong. nside the outer nylon shell are seven strands' hence the seven strand designation. Parachute cord makes an e-cellent survival rope since it is light #eight yet strong and has many uses. &he outer shell can be used as laces' to tie things #hile the seven strands can be used as thread for se#ing or fishing line' etc. &he combined breaking point of parachute cord is 442 pounds' hence the 442 designation. &here are cheaper imitations out there' but al#ays go #ith the real thing if you are planning on using it instead of a /$@ or /$1 inch rope. Along #ith the t#o tarps and rope or parachute cord you may #ant to consider some lighter #eight t#ine' t#o to four tent pegs and a fe# F@ to ;G 1 or 3 inch nails. &he tent pegs can be used to stake do#n the corners of your tarps #hile the nails can be used if you are building a shelter that you plan to stay in for more than a #eek. Even #ith t#o light #eight tent poles the #eight #ill be less than all but the lightest tents available. Belo# are pictures of a number of e-pedient survival shelters. Tarp or Ponc#o &rap Short of hunching do#n #ithin your poncho this is probably the easiest shelter to construct. (ou #rap yourself in your tarp or poncho' like a sleeping bag' and use a stick to keep the top up. f using a poncho you #ant to make sure that the hood is tied so that it minimi,es #ater getting in. (ou #ant to make sure that the bottom and foot are #rapped up so that #ater rolls off and you do not get #et. (ou can also pull pine boughs over yourself to help keep #arm.

www.survivalistssite.com

Page 22

www.survivalistssite.com/~canuck

Tarp or Ponc#o S#elter A tarp shelter can be built #ith a tree' a stick or a piece of rope' t#ine and a tarp. n the top picture you see that a tree and a stick is used to hold up the tarp. (ou could use a piece of rope instead of the stick. &he bottom picture uses three sticks7 you could use the t#o sticks forming the opening and t#o pieces of rope' one to hold up the tarp and another to act as a guy rope for the t#o sticks forming the opening. (ou can use sticks or tent pegs to stake do#n the corners of the shelter. A second tarp' or a poncho' can be used as a floor or a 8door8 over the open end. f there are pine trees around you can lay them along the sides to improve heat retention and as insulation from the cold' #ind or rain.

Tarp or Ponc#o Tents Belo# are t#o basic tarp tents. &he top picture uses a rope from the top of the tent to a tree branch to keep tension on the roof. &he bottom picture uses t#o sticks to achieve the same purpose. Again' a second tarp or poncho can be used for a floor or doors. And you can al#ays use pine boughs to increase insulation on the sides.

www.survivalistssite.com

Page 23

www.survivalistssite.com/~canuck

Tarp or Ponc#o 1eanto &his is a simple leanto built #ith rope tied to t#o trees #ith the tarp attached to the rope. 6hen building a leanto you #ant to make sure that the tarp is on the side the #ind is blo#ing from.

1eantos Belo# are four pictures of leantos. (ou #ill notice in the top picture that man is packing a 8bough bed8 full of pine boughs. &here is a tarp or blanket on top of the pine boughs. &#o of the pictures sho# a leanto built #ith t#o trees #hile the other t#o use a tree and sticks. &#o of the pictures also sho# the use of a 8fire reflector8 to reflect heat into the leanto from a fire built in front of the opening of the leanto. A fire reflector #ill keep a leanto very #arm. (ou can use a tarp under the pine boughs on the 8roof8 to keep #ater out of the leanto. >eantos can be made #ith or #ithout sides and #ith or #ithout a floor. *urther do#n the page you #ill find information on 8bough beds8 and 8fire reflectors8.

www.survivalistssite.com

Page 24

www.survivalistssite.com/~canuck

www.survivalistssite.com

Page 25

www.survivalistssite.com/~canuck

$allen Tree S#elter A fallen tree can be used to form the basis of a shelter. By 8hollo#ing8 out the underside of the fallen tree you create an area to cra#l into. (ou can improve the shelter by putting a tarp over the fallen tree and using the branches from 8hollo#ing8 out the shelter on top of the tarp. f the tree is a member of the evergreen family you can use the branches from 8hollo#ing8 out the shelter as a 8bough bed8. !epending on the fallen tree you may #ant to shore up the fallen portion #ith rope or branches. A variation of the fallen tree shelter can be built under the bottom branches of large evergreen trees' you simply cra#l under the lo#er branches and use a tarp above you to help keep you dry. &his variation re:uires a large evergreen tree and is good for #hen you #ant a shelter that is difficult to find.

De ris Hut A debris hut is like a fallen tree shelter e-cept that you are using #hatever can be found to make the shelter. (ou can see the t#o stages of the debris hut belo#. (ou can of course use a tarp for a roof before you thro# on the branches and #hatever else you can find on the roof as insulation.

www.survivalistssite.com

Page 26

www.survivalistssite.com/~canuck

Boug# Bed A bough bed is built using the smaller branches of evergreen trees. (ou lay the boughs as the floor of your shelter' place a tarp or blanket on top and it makes a nice soft bed to lie on. &arps are preferred to blankets to cover the boughs as it also aids in keeping your dry. n the picture belo# you can see that four branches or logs are used to form the outside of the bed' these are not re:uired but #ill keep the boughs in place better than if not used. A properly constructed bough bed #ill provide softness' insulation and #ill keep you above the level of any rain that is running along the ground. &he sides of the bed can be tied into a leanto as seen in the top three leanto pictures above. Plat!orm or S5amp Bed A platform or s#amp bed can be used #hen in a s#amp. By changing the height of the legs it can be used to keep you off the ground in a forest' sunk into the sno# to create a platform for you to sleep on' etc. (ou can place boughs' or large leaves if in a tropical$s#amp setting' on the top to form a mattress. n a #oods setting a platform bed can be used to make sure that you stay dry in heavy rains' such as the Pacific )orth#est' #ith a tarp or other shelter above you to keep falling rain off of you. &he legs of a platform bed can be t#o logs placed parallel to each other #ith the cross branches laid across them. $ire 'e!lector A fire reflector is used to reflect the heat of a fire into a leanto or other shelter. Along #ith the back #all you can use angled side #alls to get direct the heat into the open side of a shelter. &he reflector should be far enough a#ay from the shelter to ensure that you do not set your shelter on fire. &he fire should also be far enough a#ay from the back and sides of #ooden #alls to make sure that they are not set on fire. A fire reflector can be made from stacked logs' a large log' a rock or piled dirt.

www.survivalistssite.com

Page 27

www.survivalistssite.com/~canuck

Sno5 Trenc# &o make a sno# trench you need good packed sno# of at least ; to /1 inches. (ou #ill need the trench to be a foot t#o longer than your height and about 3 to 3.4 feet #ide. Cut the blocks from the trench area' blocks should be a foot to t#o feet #ide and the #idth of the trench long and at least ; inches thick. Basically' you #ill need to cut blocks from a trench t#ice as long as you need &ake care #hen cutting the blocks' laying each aside as you cut them. Dnce all the blocks are cut carefully lean t#o blocks together to form a peak in the center. Dnce you have made your roof you can pile sno# at one end to close it off. (ou can also use some sno# to fill in any gaps bet#een blocks. <ake sure you have a tarp' poncho or some boughs on the floor of your trench to keep you dry.

Sno5 Pit Sno# pits can be built in areas #here the sno# is deep enough. n picture belo# the pit is dug around a tree #ith the tree acting as part of the roof. &he sno# has to be #ell packed. (ou could also pile sno# up' packing it as you go' then dig out the center. f you pile the sno# yourself make sure to let the sno# sit for at least 1 to 3 hours before digging. &he picture sho#s evergreen bo#s used as a roof' you can also use a tarp or poncho.

www.survivalistssite.com

Page 28

www.survivalistssite.com/~canuck

Sno5 Cave A sno# cave can be built by digging into a sno# drift on the side of a hill' or that has formed around some trees. (ou can also pile sno# up then dig into the side. f you pile the sno# yourself make sure to let the sno# sit for at least 1 to 3 hours before digging. (ou #ant to have a tarp' poncho or boughs bet#een you and the sno# you are sleeping on. A candle #ill keep a sno# cave very #arm.

Sno5 House )Igloo* A sno# house or igloo is a very good shelter if built properly. &hey take practice to build properly. (ou have to make sure that each block is placed properly and is #ell 8cemented8 to those around it before laying the ne-t block. (ou may #ant to consider a sno# #all shelter like the one belo# instead.

www.survivalistssite.com

Page 29

www.survivalistssite.com/~canuck

Sno5 &alls Sno# #alls can be built by using blocks as in an ingloo' e-cept that the #alls are straight up and do#n. &hey are much easier to build than an igloo' but they are not as #arm. A tarp or poncho can be used for the roof. (ou can also build the #alls by piling and packing sno# instead of using blocks. (ou can build sno# #alls large enough to provide a #ind break' #ith room to have a fire #ithin the #alls' and then use pine boughs and sno# over your sleeping area for insulation.

Beac# S#ade A beach shade can be built by piling sand up into #alls around a shallo# trench' laying a tarp or poncho across the #alls and then putting some sand on top. (ou can also use any debris or branches to make the #alls and roof for more strength.

Desert - Belo5 Ground A belo# ground desert shelter is basically the same as the beach shade above' e-cept it is deeper. &he picture belo# does a good =ob of illustrating the building techni:ue. Eeep in mind that there are 32 cm in an inch. &his re:uires t#o tarps for ma-imum insulation from the sun.

www.survivalistssite.com

Page 30

www.survivalistssite.com/~canuck

Desert - . ove Ground &he same basic idea as the belo# ground shelter' e-cept the above ground can be made faster. &he above ground shelter is better for the day to keep the sun off of you. At night the desert can get very cold' so you #ould have to have some #alls and insulation to keep you #arm.

Conclusion As you can see from the shelters above' there are many types of shelters that can be constructed #ith or #ithout a tarp and rope. (ou can combine elements of different shelters to build one that is dry' #arm and comfortable no matter the #eather or the temperature. 6ith a little thought and some minimal items' even =ust a garbage bag' there is no reason #hy you should go #ithout shelter in a survival situation.

www.survivalistssite.com

Page 31

www.survivalistssite.com/~canuck

Survival &eapon Basics


Survival #eapons covers defensive and hunting #eapons. &hese can be firearms or other #eapons such as bo#s or crossbo#s. #ill deal #ith firearms first. *irearms can be an area of heated debate in the survival community. &he :uestion 8 f you could only take one survival gun' #hat #ould it be98 al#ays comes up and results in many different ans#ers' often #ith heated debate. 'm not going to advise you on #hat single #eapon you should have. &his must be a personal decision. #ill recommend a small number of firearm types that #ill aid you in a survival situation. #ill also mention a couple of other #eapon types that could help you. *irst' lets get the firearms out of the #ay. &here are many :uality makers out there' check #ith your friends and family' the local gun store or range to get opinions on #hat specific models and makers to get. 6771' &he .11>C is generally considered a good survival calibre Fsi,e of the bulletG. 6ith the .11>C you can hunt small game' rabbits and s:uirrels' to larger game if you are lucky and a good shot. t can also be used for defense against some predators. A .11>C rifle is usually fairly ine-pensive' light#eight and common. (ou can carry a lot of .11>C ammunition' #hich is also fairly ine-pensive. Along #ith a .11>C rifle you can also buy .11>C pistols' so if you have another rifle #hile hunting and come across a rabbit you can use the .11>C to shoot the rabbit. Another plus to the .11>C is that any larger child and any small adult #ill have no problem firing it. n my opinion' every family that is considering hunting as a means to add food to the table in a survival situation should have a .11>C rifle. T#e 89 cali res 6ithin the 32 calibre range there are a number of common rounds. &he .32A 6inchester' the 32-32 and the .323 British are very common rounds. Any of these #ill make a good hunting round for larger game such as deer or bear. &hey are overkill for small game like rabbits. &he .32 calibre rounds are also very good for self defense' all are or have been military rounds. Because the three specific calibres mentioned are common the price for ammunition is relatively ine-pensive. &he .32A 6inchester and the 32-32 are more common in the +S than the .323 British. 6orld#ide the .323 British is a fairly common round and is still seen in use in the military of some former British Empire and Common#ealth countries. S#otguns &here are t#o main shotgun rounds' the /1 gauge and the @/2. &he /1 gauge can be used on medium and large game #ith little to no overkill. &he @/2 is better for smaller game such as ducks and rabbits. &he /1 gauge is generally considered to be the best all around self defense firearm for homes. &here is something about the sound of a /1 gauge shotgun being racked$round loaded into the chamber that strikes fear into the average person... it is an ominous sound. &he @/2 #ould be better for smaller adults and larger children. Both the /1 gauge and the @/2 are common' and prices for pump action versions are priced from H/22 and up. 68:; &he .34? makes a good self-defense and medium si,ed game round' it is also common and easy to find. 6ith revolvers and carbine rifles you have the option of defensive revolvers or hunting carbines. Being able to use one si,e of round in t#o #eapons for t#o purposes means less ammunition types you have to stock.

De!ensive pistols &here are any number of defensive pistols out there. &he t#o most common rounds are the .mm and the .@4. Again there is a lot of debate as to #hich is better. &o keep this simple' pick the one you feel most comfortable #ith and leave it at that. &alk #ith friends and family or go to the local gun shop or range. &est fire both rounds and see #hich one you are most comfortable #ith. &hat covers the very basics of survival firearms. (ou should have enough information to start thinking about #hat' if any' firearms you #ant in your survival gear.
www.survivalistssite.com Page 32 www.survivalistssite.com/~canuck

(t#er &eapons #ill only briefly mention the other types of #eapons here. <ost people #ould consider these as supplemental to survival firearms and not as a primary means of hunting or defense. &here are a number of #eapons that are not firearms that can be used in a survival situation for hunting and defense. &he t#o that #ould come to mind for most people are bo#s and crossbo#s. Both can be used for hunting or defense. 5umans have used bo#s and crossbo#s for hunting and #arfare for hundreds of years. *or those that can not o#n firearms for one reason or another' bo#s and crossbo#s are often the only option available. Spears can be used for hunting and defense' although they re:uire some skill to use properly. Slings and sling shots can be used for small game and #ith ammunition being as common as smooth stones you #ill never run out of ammunition. An air po#ered pellet or bb gun can be used for small game as #ell.

www.survivalistssite.com

Page 33

www.survivalistssite.com/~canuck

"ini ,r an Survival -it


<any of us have regular day =obs and go into the city every day to get to #ork. *or those #ho #ork in an office setting there is no #ay to bring a BDB. f you drive to #ork you can leave your BDB in the car. *or those #ho take public transit to #ork a BDB is =ust not possible. As .$// sho#ed there are a fe# items that every office #orker should have. An emergency can happen at any time' and #e should be close enough to gear to get out of the office and on your #ay to escaping the general area. &his sort of situation re:uires a small kit that #e can keep #ith us all or most of the time. f #e base our mini urban kit on the average office #orker #e can also apply that to any other #ork setting. &he average office #orker has a minimum amount of room to carry things #ith them' plus those items must fit into the general attire of the office #orker. Cegardless of the specific threat' #e are likely to face fire or dust' lighting being out' and debris. Since #e're in a city #e need a minimum of e:uipment' even a fe# blocks is enough to put most dangers far enough a#ay that #e can rela- for a bit and #orry about getting home from there. 6orking #ithin the attire of the office #orker #e need a small kit #ith enough items to get us out of the immediate area. f #e limit the si,e of our mini urban kit so that it fits into part of a briefcase' laptop bag or other small bag #e don't have much room. &he kit itself needs to fit in these small bags yet remain easily grabbed. A small #aist or fanny pack of no more than @ inches thick by ; inches high by /2 inches #ide Fabout the si,e of a / gallon ,iplock bagG is enough room to fit everything #e need. n this kit #e can keep the follo#ingM - B C lighter - )itrile and$or gardening gloves Fleather palmG - small A<$*< radio #ith bud earphones Fshort#ave$#eather if there is roomG - compass$#histle$match container #ith matches - small tube of anti-bacterial' #aterless hand cleaner - small pack of baby #ipes - flat pack of duct tape F3 to /2 feetG - first aid kit Fe-tra anti-bacterial #ipes and assorted band aidsG - Emergency 8space8 blanket F1 if there's roomG - <oney. Coll of :uarters' H/2 in ones B H12 in fives Fvending machines$pay phoneG - 12 o, bottle of #ater Fempty / liter platypus type bladder if there is roomG - tea$cocoa$coffee packets' suger and creamer - hard candy$granola or po#er bars - Sunglasses' reading$spare glasses as re:uired - #indbreaker Ffolds up into it's o#n pouchG - bandana - Enife or multi-tool - keychain >E! light' 1AA maglite or >E! light. E-tra batteries if there is room. - military type manual can opener - safety goggles - 3 day supply of prescription medicationsv - 1 dust masks Small !irst aid kit <ost of the items above are to aid you in getting out of the building you are in' protecting your hands and eyes' making sure you do not breath in dust' and in cleaning yourself up once a#ay from the immediate threat. n fact the first siitems #ill fit into the first kit suggest' #hile the first aid kit F#ith e-trasG' the emergency blanket and the duct tape #ill fit into a / :uart ,iplock bag. f you #ere to purchase a #indbreaker #ith ,ippered pockets you could fit the all of the items' minus the #ater bottle into the pockets of the #indbreaker. (ou #ould have to grab the #indbreaker and the bottled #ater and be on your #ay.
www.survivalistssite.com Page 34 www.survivalistssite.com/~canuck

tems in a :uart ,iplock bag

tems in a gallon ,iplock bag

&he entire contents <* leather #ork gloves #ith money and roll of :uarters inside fingers 7* bandanna 8* #histle$match case$compass =* 12 o, bottled #ater :* >E! flashlight on keychain >* 0erber pouch #ith knife B military style can opener B folding scissors ;* plastic spoon ?* /2 feet camo duct tape @* travel pack of #et #ipes <9* emergency 8space8 blanket <<* radio and headphones <7* Bic lighter <8* first aid kit #ith #aterless hand cleaner$saniti,er B pair of nitrile gloves
www.survivalistssite.com Page 35 www.survivalistssite.com/~canuck

<=* 1 chocolate bars (ou #ill notice that there is no dust mask' safety goggles or #indbreaker. &he #indbreaker #ouldn't fit on the desk tray and normally keep the goggles and dust mask #ith it. &he goggles and dust mask #ill fit into the gallon ,iplock bag but the #indbreaker doesn't #ith the #ater bottle. )ormally keep the 0erber multi-tool' #hich has a small 3 inch 0erber Paraframe knife' Shortcut folding scissors and military style can opener' on my belt. also keep a lighter or t#o in my pocket along #ith my keys #hich have the >E! flashlight FH4 !orcy AAA from 6al-<artG. &he kit moves from #aist pouch to =acket to vest' etc as need dictates. put it in the ,iplock bags to demonstrate the si,e of the kit. &he t#o biggest items in the kit are the #ater bottle and the safety goggles' although items can be packed into the goggles. (ou may #ant to consider adding the follo#ing if there is roomM - spoon' le-an$plastic Fdoes not set off metal detectorsG - folding city$state map - a small folding mesh or nylon duffel$backpack Ffor anything that is foundG - small tube of vaseline Fhelp safety goggles seal to your faceG - small tube of sun screen - #ater tabs - sport bottle type #ater filter - parachute cord F/2 feetG - sardine can type$si,e survival kit - disposable poncho or garbage bags &he knife or multi-tool can be kept on your belt or in your pocket' as can the lighter' keychain >E! and sun glasses. A bandana can be kept in your back pocket and the military style can opener on your keychain. &his #ill free up some room in your kit for other things f you spend all day at a desk then you can keep a fe# things in your desk dra#er' or in your locker if in a factory' like a polar fleece pull over or light =acket' running shoes or hiking boots' spare socks' pair of =eans' t-shirt' long sleeve shirt' some e-tra food' bottled #ater and maybe a fleece thro# in a small gym type duffel. 0rab the duffel and survival kit and get moving until you have time to change. <any office #orkers keep a small gym type duffelat their desk #ith shoes and athletic gear for #hen they go to the gym during lunch or after #ork. <any office #orkers can be seen on the public transit systems #ith a briefcase$laptop bag and a gym duffel. &he idea behind a mini urban kit is not to keep you alive in the #oods' but to get you out of buildings and to your car' on your #ay home' or to safety. 6hen you think about it' most of the items on the list are fairly common items that #e see many office people #ith. &hese should not attract any attention' but can make the difference bet#een life and death or reduced in=ury. f you do not have room to keep a spare pair of shoes make sure that #hatever shoes you do #ear have a good rubber sole and are comfortable for #alking. 6ith some looking you can find shoes that meet these re:uirements and remain appropriate for dress #ear. *or those times #hen a #aist pack or small duffel is inconvenient or not allo#ed you could get yourself a photographer's or fisherman's vest #ith multiple pockets. f you're getting a fishing vest and plan on #earing it in the city you may #ant to carefully remove the fly patch. (ou #ouldn't come close to using all of the pockets on the vest and your items #ould be #ith you at all times. (ou can see pictures of my vest #ith the +rban Survival Eit contents above in it.

www.survivalistssite.com

Page 36

www.survivalistssite.com/~canuck

*ront Jie# Contents of the pocketsM / - headphones 1 - Bic lighter B spoon 3 - E<P&( @ - #ater bottle 4 - E<P&( ; - E<P&( ? - E<P&( A - 1 chocolate bars

Cear vie#

n the rear 8Poacher's Pocket8 is the #indbreaker.

www.survivalistssite.com

Page 37

www.survivalistssite.com/~canuck

nside vie# Contents of the pocketsM / - E<P&( 1 - pen 3 - duct tape and survival F8space8G blanket @ - 0erber Pouch 4 - travel pack of 8#et ones8 ; - leather #ork gloves B bandanna ? - first aid kit A - E<P&( . - radio /2 - #aterproof match case$#histle$compass // - E<P&(

*ront vie# #ith #indbreaker over vest F,ipperedG

*ront vie# #ith #indbreaker over vest Fun,ipperedG

www.survivalistssite.com

Page 38

www.survivalistssite.com/~canuck

Belo# are e-amples of other vests - a fisherman's vest and a photographer's vest' both are very similar and they usually have around 12 pockets to keep your stuff in. *ishing Jest Photographer's Jest

Another option for outer#ear is a safari =acket. t has less pockets than a vest' but #ill have enough to keep your mini urban kit in. Belo# are a couple of e-amples of safari =ackets from Cabela's F###.cabela's.comG.

f you #ant dressy #ith more pockets then consider a =acket from &illey Endurables F###.tilley.comG' these are more e-pensive but have a reputation for long life and toughness along #ith up to /2 pockets on the dress styles. &hey also have safari and #omen's styles as #ell. Belo# are the t#o men's dressy =ackets.

www.survivalistssite.com

Page 39

www.survivalistssite.com/~canuck

As you can see' no matter the situation or surroundings you find yourself in there is an option that #ill allo# you to keep your mini urban kit' or at least most of it' #ith you at all times. *or dressy situations you #ill have to e-pend more money' but that is the price you pay for having your kit #ith you in the board room.

www.survivalistssite.com

Page 40

www.survivalistssite.com/~canuck

Basic Pack
Everyone should have a basic pack' sometimes called a ?1 hour kit or a 8BDB - Bug Dut Bag8. &his pack should have clothing' some food' sleeping bag' cooking gear' shelter' some basic tools' etc. &his pack should be kept packed and ready to go at a moments notice. &his is the bag you grab #hen you only have seconds to be on the road' the one that #ill ensure that you #ill be able to get to your destination' the one you can carry on your back for e-tended periods of time - days or #eeks if needed. Since your life #ill depend on the gear you have in your pack you must make sure that each and every piece of gear is #ell made. Because you may have to carry your pack on your back for e-tended periods of time you have to balance #hat gear you take and ho# much it #eighs. A 42 pound pack is a lot of #eight to carry for e-tended periods of time. *ood and #ater #ill :uickly add up' and #inter gear can get heavy. Backpack A good backpack is very important' it must fit you properly' carry all the gear you need' and be #ell made so that it can stand up to long term use. &here are internal and e-ternal frame back packs. E-ternal frames allo# you remove the bag and use the frame for transporting cargo' plus it is much easier to attach gear to the outside of the pack. Dne modification is to attach a couple of straps to the frame that go around the bag' this reduces stress on the attachment points. Some options to look for in a backpack are hydration bladder compatible and removable day pack. Belo# are a number of e-ternal frame backpacks from Eelty' Nansport' Cabela's and !#ight Schuh.

www.survivalistssite.com

Page 41

www.survivalistssite.com/~canuck

Belo# are medium and large A.>. .C.E. packs' they are highly thought of by many e--military guys. &he packs allo# additional pouches to be attached to them #hich makes them very customi,able.

Basic Tools (ou should have some basic tools as part of your gear. A small / to /.4 pound hatchet' a take-do#n sa#' shovel and 1@ inch machete have minimum #eight Fabout 4 pounds for everythingG and #ill allo# you cut #ood' clear brush' dig holes and build a long term shelter if re:uired. <ake sure your purchase products #ith good :uality steel. &he shovel should have a fi-ed #ooden handle' to allo# replacement of the handle' #hile the hatchet should have a #ood handle to allo# replacement or a :uality steel handle such as the East#ing - East#ing is the only steel handle hatchet #e recommend as most others are poor :uality tube steel handles.

www.survivalistssite.com

Page 42

www.survivalistssite.com/~canuck

-nives % "ultitools 6e #ould suggest three items here. A @ inch folding lock blade knife for general use' a ;-A inch fi-ed blade knife and a multi-tool. *or multi-tools >eatherman and 0erber are very good. 6e give the edge to 0erber because the tools are on the inside of the handle #hich means they don't dig into your hands or fingers' plus 0erber makes a model that allo#s you to change the plier heads FEvolution ;42G.

<ake sure that you have a sharpening kit and kno# ho# to ue it. 2avigation A good compass or t#o should be carried. Silva makes great compasses' as does Brunton and Suunto. (our compass should have a sighting mirror and declination ad=ustment. (ou should also have maps and kno# ho# to use them and the compass. 0PS units are great' but the last thing you #ant to do #hen you are trying to survive is to rely on something that needs batteries... there are no stores in the #ilderness and solar rechargers can take hours to recharge a set of batteries.

www.survivalistssite.com

Page 43

www.survivalistssite.com/~canuck

S#elter % &armt# (ou can choose a tent' a tarp or t#o' or a poncho for your shelter. f you choose a tent make sure that you can easily set it up and that it does not #eigh too much. !ome tents are very convenient and ligh#eight but it is difficult to use a rope and t#o trees to support a dome tent' for that reason #e are partial to 8A frame8 or 8pup8 tents - you can al#ays find some sticks to replace poles or use a rope strung bet#een t#o trees to hold it up. Eureka makes consumer and military tents' visit their site for more information and a #ider selection tents. A military style poncho' ripstop nylon or rubberi,ed nylon #ith connector snaps on the side and liner can be used to keep the rain off of you and to provide shelter' add a pair of rain pants for total protection form the rain for you and your gear. Add a tarp or t#o and and you have a light #eight multi-use shelter.

$ood % &ater Because food and #ater #eigh so much you must make sure that the food you have is light#eight - free,e dried$dehydrated - and that you can obtain more food along the #ay through eating #ild plants and catching animals #ith snares' etc. nitially you can carry three days of food' more if you have room and can carry the #eight7 and one gallon #ater Fabout a days supplyG. nstant potatoes' instant oatmeal' instant rice and bullion cubes along #ith basic condiments can greatly improve a meal and are easy to prepare' some light #eight snacks are also good to have along. <ake sure that you have a means to purify the #ater. 6ater purification can be tablets or
www.survivalistssite.com Page 44 www.survivalistssite.com/~canuck

filters$purifiers such as the pump and gravity ones sho#n belo#. &he Eatadyn Base Camp gravity bag filter can be hung on a tree' or on your pack #ith the hose going into a canteen for purifying #hile you are #alking.

Bottle style filters like the Eatadyn on the left are generally not as good at purifying #ater as pump or gravity based purifiers. ndependent tests on the Berkey Sport' on the right' sho# that it is as good or better than many purifiers.

6hat ever purifying method you choose make sure that you have spare filters and maintenance kits if they are available. *or very dirt Fsandy' etcG #ater you may #ant to use a nylon stocking and$or some coffee filters to remove as much of the particulate as possible before the #ater goes into the filter. *or information on these purifiers see the manufacturer's sitesM ###.katadyn.com' ###.msrcorp.com and ###.berkey#ater.com.

www.survivalistssite.com

Page 45

www.survivalistssite.com/~canuck

A standard / :uart military canteen #ith cup Fstainless steelG' stand$stove and an 8ESB &8 stove that uses solid fuel is a good idea. &he canteen pouch #ill hold the canteen' the cup and the stand$stove along #ith a bottle of #ater purifying tablets. &he 8ESB &8 stove fits in the cut out on the bottom of the stand$stove.

A 4 :uart collapsible canteen can be used as a pillo# or flotation device as #ell as carrying #ater.

$ire (ou should carry some strike any#here #ooden matches in a #aterproof match case' a disposable Bic lighter or t#o Fdon't get the other brands of disposable lightersG' a Oippo lighter Fstick #ith the Oippo brandG #ith e-tra flints' a #ick and @ o, of lighter fluid FConsonol makes the best flints and fluidG and a magnesium fire starter. (ou can make a nice striker for the magnesium fire starter by taking a ; inch mini hack sa# blade and cutting it in half' you can punch out the peg' put a small key ring on it and attach it to the magnesium fire starter.

"isc6 (ou may #ant to consider a short#ave radio to allo# you to listen to #hat is going on. Eaito makes some very nice multiband short#ave radios that can be po#ered by solar' battery' AC or crank. Copies of the +S Army Survival <anual *< 1/-?; For current version +S Army Survival <anual *< 3-24.?2G and the Collins 0em version of the SAS Survival 0uide SB) 22;2A@.A1 vacuum sealed for protection should be in your pack. (ou may not think you need them but #ith the pressure of leaving home and heading into the unkno#n they come in handy as
www.survivalistssite.com Page 46 www.survivalistssite.com/~canuck

reminders' plus it does give you something to read and allo#s you to brush up on basic skills. (ou should have a basic first aid kit and prescription medication and a personal hygene kit in your pack. (ou could also get a military style #eb belt and a couple of small pouches to put the canteen and pouch on and to keep key items #ith you at all times. &his is not a complete list of the items you could have in your pack' it is a basic list of some key items.

www.survivalistssite.com

Page 47

www.survivalistssite.com/~canuck

Sleeping Gear
A good nights sleep is very important' and one of the fe# lu-uries #hen you're on the road or busy making a base camp. Nust because you're living out of a backpack' your car' or you've =ust arrived at your destination does not mean you have to sacrifice having a good night's rest. (our sleep system should include a sleeping bag For sleeping bag system of an inner and outer bagG that #ill keep you #arm to -@2 degrees *$C' a fleece sleeping bag' silk or other synthetic liner and a pad of some sort. *leece sleeping bags can be used on their o#n during #armer temperatures or used inside your sleeping bag for an increase of /2 to 12 degrees *ahrenheit F4 to // degrees CG. Silk or synthetic liners are to aid in keeping your sleeping bag clean' it is much easier to #ash a silk$synthetic or fleece liner bag than it is to #ash a full si,e sleeping bag. &he sleeping pad serves t#o purposes' one to provide insulation from the cold ground and heat loss' and t#o to provide padding for a better night's rest. A small packable pillo# is nice to have as #ell. A 8sportsmans space blanket8 is very similar to the thin emergency$space blankets that sell for under H4 #ith one big e-ception - they are much more durable. &hey can be used as a ground sheet' as blanket on top of your sleeping bag to hekp keep heat in' and several other uses. &he last item on the list is a cot. A cot is great if you have the room in your vehicle and for once you reach your destination' or any base camp along the #ay. Although you #ouldn't #ant to carry a cot if you #ere traveling on foot it is one of the lu-uries you may #ant to consider if you have the room and the budget. As you can see #e concentrated on mobile$camping gear. Cegular household sleeping sets should also be packed. n a #osrt case scenario you may not have much time to pack your vehicle or may be forced to travel on foot only taking #hat you can carry. &he main items belo# can be carried in a back pack. (ou can never have too much in the #ay of sheets' blankets and comforters' so bring as many as you have or can fit in your vehicle. Belo# you #ill find recommendations for sleeping gear that #ill keep you #arm in temperatures do#n to -@2 degrees *$C. Sleeping Bags &he Cabela's Alaskan 0uide model comes in mummy and rectangular designs' each #ith a hood. 6ith various temperature ratings from 2*$/?C do#n to a single bag at -@2 degrees *$C. &he most e-pensive model is H1?2.22' a far cry from the H;22-H?22 for name brand sleeping bags #ith a -@2 degree *$C rating.

&he 6iggy's t#o bag system is good to -@2 degrees *$C #hen the inner and outer bag are combined and is constructed of a proprietary laminate. &hese sleeping bags are used by the +S )avy SEA>s. &he total cost for these is over H@42.22. 6iggy's also makes a sleeping bag that is good to -;2*$-4/C available in single and t#o bag systems #ith a price range of H342.22 to H4.4.22. &hey #ill also compression pack your sleeping bag for an additional H/?4.22 to the si,e of a cushion. *or more information on the -;2 sleeping bag see ###.#iggys.com.

www.survivalistssite.com

Page 48

www.survivalistssite.com/~canuck

*leece sleeping bags can be used in #armer #eather or as a liner in another sleeping bag to increase the temperature rating. &hey #ill also help to keep your sleeping bag clean. &here are several manufactures of sleeping bags and several retailers so shop around' make sure the fleece bag you buyis of good :uality and the right si,e to fit your sleeping bag - many of the cheaper fleece bags are some#hat small.

Sleeping Pads A sleeping pad can be anything from a H4 blue closed cell foam pad to a H122 delu-e' self-inflating pad #ith some foam. &here are three options pictured in varying price ranges of the latter type. &he self-inflating pad

#ith some foam provides insulation and a some#hat customi,able padding level to aid in comfort. A pad of some type is
www.survivalistssite.com Page 49 www.survivalistssite.com/~canuck

highly recommended if =ust for the insulation value.

Sportsmans SpaceAT#ermal Blanket &hese range in price from H/2 to H/3 depending on the store you buy them at. &hese are ligh#eight and have many uses. &hey are #ell #orth the price and #eight. As mentioned earlier' they can be used as a ground sheet to reflect heat back up and prevent loss of heat to the ground or as a blanket on top of your sleeping bag' or both. Some of the other uses include as insulation inside your tent' or #ith a hole cut in them as a poncho liner - in #hich case they can greatly increase the #armth of a poncho and poncho liner.

Cots and accessories A cot is great to have if you are at a base camp' but too heavy to pack on your back #hen traveling on foot. 6ith accessories including pads and other items they can make any base camp a lot more comfortable. Cots are one of those lu-ury items that come into play #hen you have the room to pack them in your vehicle and the money to spend on them. Belo# is one of the better ones available from Cabela's.

www.survivalistssite.com

Page 50

www.survivalistssite.com/~canuck

Cooking Gear
Cooking gear comes in t#o areas' hiking and base camp. 5iking sets are ligh#eight and are carried in your backpack #hile base camp sets are heavier and entail much more in the #ay of :uantity and varied items. 6e have broken cooking gear into these t#o areas. At the very least you should have a set of hiking cooking gear. &here are t#o things #e recommend against - aluminum and non-stick cook#are. Aluminum is not as durable as stainless steel and doesn't cost much less #hile non-stick coated cooking gear can be scratched #hich effectively ruins it. Both have also been linked to various medical conditions' so #hy chance possible medical problems in the future and less durability in the present9 6e recommend stainless steel #ith copper bottoms for hiking sets and either stainless steel #ith copper bottoms or cast iron for base camps. <any modern stainless steel sets come #ith aluminum on the bottom surrounded by stainless steel - these are fine if you can't find solid stainless steel or copper bottoms. Copper pots and pans intended for cooking food are fine' keep in mind that there are many copper pots and pans that are for decorative purposes and are not for cooking food. Hiking (our hiking set should be stainless steel' preferably #ith a copper bottom for even heat distribution. At the least your kit should have a 3 :uart pot and a / :uart pot along #ith the lid$fry pan for each. 5ere is a set from Coleman but it does not have a copper bottom. 6al-<art has a decent 8family8 set for about half the price of the Coleman set pictured and it does have a copper bottom.

A percolator coffee pot is great for making coffee and heating #ater. Belo# are some e-amples of coffee pots of this type available from Cabela's' #e suggest the /@ cup at minimum due to the handle that #ill allo# it to be hung over a fire. Again stainless steel is preferred to aluminum. Sportsman's 6arehouse and 0ander <ountain also sell these types of coffee pots although their #ebsites do not list much aside from store location and current fliers.

(ou should have a stove for those times #hen you can't have an open flame for #hatever reason. &he stove should be small' light' and burn multiple fuel types. &he Coleman FleftG #ill run on Coleman fuel F#hitegasG$unleaded gasoline$kerosene #hile the Brunton FcenterG and <SC FrightG #ill run on even more fuel types. f a repair or maintenance kit is available you should pickup at least one or t#o and store them #ith the stove. (ou should shop around for fuel bottles to keep spare fuel in and to allo# :uick change over if needed.
www.survivalistssite.com Page 51 www.survivalistssite.com/~canuck

Along #ith the items above you should have one or t#o mugs per person to allo# for hot and cold drinks. nsulated stainless steel mugs are perfect for this. (ou may #ant to consider a thermos or t#o to keep drinks or food hot For coldG for #hen you are on the move. A slim pint F422 mlG thermos is great for coffee or li:uids #hile a #idemouth :uart$litre thermos is also good for food. (ou can find good :uality thermoses for H/2 to H12 each' stay a#ay from 8pour through lid8 type thermoses as these tend to leak.

!on't forget to bring along cutlery Fincluding a steak knifeG and basic utensils' dish soap' etc.

Base Camp Base camp gear includes all the same things that you #ould normally have at home - pots' pans' cutlery' utensils' measuring cups' etc. 6e suggest that you stick #ith stainless steel measuring cups and utensils for durability. t also includes the means to do the actual cooking such as grills' fire rings' barbe:ues' stoves' etc. 6e suggest cast iron' stainless steel #ith copper bottom or all copper for pots' pans and other cook#are. Pre-seasoned castiron is available from many retailers. Cast iron #ill last for generations and #hen properly seasoned #ill become non-stick after some use. Cast iron can be found at second hand and thrift stores as #ell as from retailers and manufacturers. Studies have also sho#n that #omen #ho use cast iron are less prone to being anemic or suffering from lo# iron. Please note that none of these are re:uirements. Aside from pots' pans' etc the items sho#n belo# are to give you an idea of the many different options available. >odge - ###.lodge.com - <anufacturer of :uality cast iron cook#are. Sportsman's 6arehouse - ###.sportsmans#arehouse.com and 0ander <ountain - ###.gandermountain.com both sell cast iron Fand other base camp gearG although their #ebsites do not have much other than store locations and current fliers.

www.survivalistssite.com

Page 52

www.survivalistssite.com/~canuck

&he cooking system om the right has everything you need for cooking over open flame. A bus rim and a grate of some sort can make a great fire pit as #ell.

Belo# are three different types of grills for smaller fires.

A tripod comes in very handy #hen you have a dutch oven that can be hung from it's handle. t #ill allo# for ad=usting the heat by using the chain to ad=ust the height of the dutch oven. &his !utch Dven table is a uni:ue item. !esigned for cooking #ith cast iron dutch ovens it uses charcoal like a barbe:ue but does not have a grill.

www.survivalistssite.com

Page 53

www.survivalistssite.com/~canuck

&he Coleman 3 burner dual fuel stove uses Coleman fuel F#hitegasG and unleaded gasoline' both of #hich are readily available. Add one of these propane converters to the stove and you can use / pound propane bottles #ith your li:uid fuel stove. &hese are available from 6al-<art for about H/4 and are as easy to install as the fuel tank on the stove to the right.

Add a distribution tree and adapter hose and you can use up to three propane stoves or other items that #ork on / pound propane bottles.

Camp kitchens like these provide cooking space and convenience.

www.survivalistssite.com

Page 54

www.survivalistssite.com/~canuck

6ater purifiers like the Berkey series FtopG' the Eatadyn E-pedition Fbottom leftG or Eatadyn Base Camp Fbottom rightG ensure that the #ater you use to cook #ith and drink are safe.

A turkey cooker pot can be used for many things including boiling vegetables' etc.

www.survivalistssite.com

Page 55

www.survivalistssite.com/~canuck

5eavy duty propane stoves$burners for serious cooking.

A charcoal smoker to smoke your o#n meat.

5ere is a neat stove$oven combo that runs on propane from a standard bulk tank or / pound bottles if you buy the adapter. *or H122 you can be baking cakes in the great outdoors as #ell as cooking on the burners.

www.survivalistssite.com

Page 56

www.survivalistssite.com/~canuck

&inter Clot#ing
Because the area around you may get cold during the #inter you must have good #inter clothing and gear. 5aving clothing and gear that #ill not stand up to the #eather conditions could cause you to die. t may sound cliche' but layering is the best approach to #inter outer#ear. >ayering should consist of at least three layersM a base layer - thermal under#ear of silk or synthetic cloth' a mid layer such as a long sleeve shirt or s#eater and an outer layer. <any people #ith e-treme cold e-perience #ill #ear a base layer' a long sleeve shirt' a s#eater' a lighter #eight =acket and then their parka. Some #ear a do#n vest for core #armth #hich also provides additional #armth in e-treme cold #hen they #ill not be active. A do#n vest and mid-#eight =acket can provide #armth in most cases #hen combined #ith other layers. By using layers of clothing you can more effectively control your temperature' being too hot can be as dangerous as being too cold as you #ill be tempted to remove a heavy layer of clothing. (ou can un,ip or remove one or more layers if you get hot' you can also ,ip or put on another layer if you are cold. Air trapped bet#een layers adds to the insulation value of your clothing. Belo# is an e-planation of the layer system. - Base layer Funder#ear$thermal under#ear$&-shirtsG - >ayer / FShirt$PantsG - >ayer 1 FS#eatersG - >ayer 3 F>ight$mid#eight =acketsG - >ayer 3.4 F!o#n vestsG - >ayer @ FCegular #inter =acketsG - >ayer 4 FParkas$sno# pants$sno# suitsG &here are several levels of coldM cool' cold' very cold and e-treme cold. (ou should have a layer for each level of cold' the first four Fand baseG layers #hen combined should provide you #ith clothing for e-treme cold. 6e have said that your base layer should consist of silk or synthetic because cotton becomes dangerous to you #hen #et. !o#n' #ool' silk' polar fleece and other synthetics are the preferred cloth for cold #eather gear' cotton blends are better than /22K cotton but still a long #ay from the others. Belo# you #ill find items for each layer' starting #ith >ayer 4. Please remember that #inter is unforgiving' you must balance cost #ith performance. 6hen it comes to #inter gear lo# cost usually means poor :uality and$or short life. Cabela's has a /22K satisfaction guarantee' fe# companies offer this level of guarantee' this means that they stand behind the products they sell as #ell as their name brand. Parka )1ayer :* A good do#n parka is hard to beat. &here are many parkas out there' by many manufacturers' as #ell as surplus military gear. 6e prefer do#n for the simple reason that centuries of use has proven it to be a good insulator and lost do#n feathers can be replaced. A good parka should have slash hand #armer pockets on the chest' at least t#o bello#s outer pockets for gloves and other gear' and one pocket inside for other items. *ur on the hood is optional' but highly suggested as it keeps sno# from sliding into the hood opening. &he hood should be of the tunnel type' ad=ustable to properly si,e it' #ith a #ire in the edge of the hood to allo# for making the opening smaller. &he parka should be long enough to cover to the top of your knees' have a #aist dra#string' and have a t#o-#ay ,ipper that allo#s you to un,ip from the bottom as #ell as the top' and a button or snap storm flap. Buying a si,e bigger than you normally #ear is fine and #ill allo# for layering in e-treme cold. Dne of the best' and very reasonably priced' comes from Cabela's. &here are better parkas out there' but #ith prices that go to above H422' the Cabela's parka is a good blend of price and performance. Belo# is a picture of the Cabela's parka #e recommend. Available in regular length si,es from small to 4L> and tall length in si,es medium to 3L> there is a si,e to fit almost everyone' prices range from H/A2 to H112 +S!. &he range of si,es' reasonable price' and :uality is #hy #e recommend this parka over others.

www.survivalistssite.com

Page 57

www.survivalistssite.com/~canuck

Dther brands$retailersM Canada 0oose - ###.canada-goose.com - Some of the best do#n parkas available' priced to match. 6oods Canada - ###.soodscanada.com - )o online store. 6iggy's - ###.#iggys.com - >aminate based' e-pensive but very good. S. .C <ailorder FCanadaG - ###.sirmailorder.ca - Sells 6oods and Canada 0oose products.

Sno5 suits )1ayer :*

www.survivalistssite.com

Page 58

www.survivalistssite.com/~canuck

Sno5 Pants )1ayers = to :*

Head5ear )1ayers 8 to :* 6ith a large portion of heat lost through your head it is very important to have proper head#ear. Belo# are several styles of head#ear that #ill keep you #arm in any situation. &he classic #atchmen's cap or to:ue' available in #ool' #ool blends and synthetics such as polar fleece.

Belo# is a polar fleece hat that can be #orn four #ays to provide the protection from the cold you need.

www.survivalistssite.com

Page 59

www.survivalistssite.com/~canuck

Belo# is a classic style northern fur hat #ith ear flaps.

*or e-treme cold or high activity levels the t#o face masks and the head covers belo# are great. +sing the heat of your breath to #arm the air coming in it prevents your lungs from free,ing. Available in t#o styles' face mask and head cover$balaclava' and t#o technologies' these #ill help keep you #arm in the coldest of #eather and highest activity levels. &he face mask can be #orn in combination #ith a to:ue$#atchmen's cap' balaclava or other head covering to provide total head protection from e-treme cold. &o round out your head#ear you should have a good pair of non-fogging' polari,ed sno# or ski goggles. Sno# blindness is a very real threat and polari,ed goggles #ill help prevent the glare reflected from sno# and ice from causing sno# blindness. Also' goggles #ill protect your eyes from blo#ing sno# and prevent your eyes from drying out due to #ind.

Hands )1ayers 8 to :* Cold hands in the #inter are no fun and can lead to frostbite and the loss of fingers or entire hands. Although there are good gloves out there' a good pair of mittens is far better due to all of the fingers being surrounded #ith one piece of fabric and insulation. (ou should have a good pair of #ool or fleece gloves or half gloves for #hen it is not too cold and #hen you need the added de-terity of gloves' a good pair of #ool or fleece mittens for intermediate cold - you can pick a si,e so that you can #ear your gloves or half gloves as a liner. A compromise on half gloves and mittens is the 8glomitt8 #hich is a half glove #ith a fold a#ay mitten pouch. *or e-tremely cold #eather mittens such as these are the best solution' #ith a gauntlet
www.survivalistssite.com Page 60 www.survivalistssite.com/~canuck

style they #ill cover the sleeves of your parka' the fur on the back of the hand can be used to #ipe sno# from your face #hile the velcro and dra#strings can be used to seal them #ell to prevent sno# from getting in. (ou may #ant to get a durable pair of leather gloves or mittens for times #hen you #ill be doing hard #ork such as chopping fire#ood. (ou may #ant to consider a lanyard to attach to the mittens so that you do not have to #orry about losing them. $eet )1ayers 8 to :*

(our feet are very important and are often the coldest part of your body in e-treme cold. >ike your hands' improper foot#ear can lead to frostbite and the loss of toes or entire feet. t is of e-treme importance to have proper foot#ear. (ou should #ear liner socks of silk or synthetic that #ill #ick a#ay moisture and then a #ool sock for #armth. A>6A(S keep at least one pair of dry socks #ith you if you are traveling any#here - clean' dry socks can make a big difference in morale and in the health of your feet. 6e suggest t#o pairs of #inter boots' one for temperatures do#n to around -@2 and one for e-treme cold. 6hen it comes to boots !D )D& consider cheaply made boots - A>6A(S buy the best boots you can get. Belo# are good #inter boots by Sorel that are good to -@2 and then 8pacboots8 that have ratings from -/32 to -/42. Cemember' #hen your feet are cold the rest of you #ill feel cold as #ell.

*or general duty boots' including cool to cold temperatures !anner boots are very good. Soldiers around the #orld s#ear by their 8*t. >e#is8 boots and consider anything #ith the !anner name on it to be the best in the #orld. !anner boots are available in insulated and uninsulated versions. n general #e suggest that people stay a#ay from steel toe boots - the steel cap #ill attract the cold and can cut off your toes in certain situations.

*or a larger selection of !anner field boots ###.danner.com.

www.survivalistssite.com

Page 61

www.survivalistssite.com/~canuck

Backet )1ayer =* Sometimes called 3 Season or @ Season =ackets these should be good for most #inter #eather' and good to at least -@2 #ith other layers F3' 1 B /G #orn underneath. +sually these consist of an outer shell that is #ind and #ater proof' #hich can be #orn alone for the #ind and #ater proof properties' and then a liner that can be #orn on it's o#n as #ell. &he =ackets can have do#n or &hinsulate for insulation. n the case of #ool =ackets the #ool provides the #ater proofing and insulation in a single layer. n either case this is your basic 8#inter =acket8.

Do5n +ests )1ayer 86:* !o#n vests can be #orn in con=unction #ith other layers to increase #armth. 6orn over a long sleeve shirt or s#eater they can greatly improve your comfort. Jests are at their best #hen you are temperatures bet#een the point of a >ight or <id#eight =acket and a 8#inter =acket8. Season #ise' this #ould apply to mid-spring and mid-fall.

www.survivalistssite.com

Page 62

www.survivalistssite.com/~canuck

"id5eig#t $leece % &ool Backet )1ayer 8* >ight or <id#eight =ackets should keep you #arm to tempertures around 2C$31*. A do#n vest can be #orn for those times #hen it is too cool for a >ight or <id#eight =acket and too #arm for a 8#inter =acket8. Season #ise this #ould apply to early-spring and latefall.

S5eater )1ayer 7* S#eaters can be fleece' #ool or some other insulating synthetic. n temperatures belo# /2C$42* or so you should have a s#eater #ith you.

&ool % $leece S#irts )1ayer <* A long sleeve #ool or fleece shirt should be #orn from fall until spring. (ou can roll up the sleeves and #ear a &-shirt underneath #ith the shirt open' but the e-tra #armth is #ell #orth the light #eight of a long sleeve #ool or fleece shirt.

www.survivalistssite.com

Page 63

www.survivalistssite.com/~canuck

&ool % $leece Pants .nd Bi s )1ayer <* Because #ool and fleece #ill keep you #arm #hen #et they are much preferred to cotton based pants. Cegular sythetic pants like polyester and other light#eight synthetics do not have the dra#backs of cotton but they also do not have the insulating benefits of fleece and #ool. A good heavy #ool or fleece material #ill keep you #arm and dry and #ill outlast light#eight synthetics.

www.survivalistssite.com

Page 64

www.survivalistssite.com/~canuck

T#ermal ,nder5ear )Base 1ayer* &hermal under#ear' )D CD&&D)' comes in several #eights Fand insulation valuesG silk$tech silk #eight' medium' heavy' polar$e-pedition and then goose do#n. Each level is designed for a different level of cold. Silk$tech silk is the lightest #eight and is for cool days #hen there is a possibility of s#eating' it #ill #ick a#ay the s#eat #hile also providing some insulation' thereby keeping you #armer than #ithout any thermal under#ear. 5eavier #eights #ill keep you #armer at colder temperatures and #ill also #ick a#ay any s#eat. 0oose do#n thermal under#ear should be #arn #ith a silk$tech silk #eight set to #ick a#ay any s#eat. f you are going to #ear breifs or bo-ers beneath your thermal under#ear these should be of a 8technical8 or synthetic fabric that is designed to #ick s#eat a#ay from your skin' the same applies
www.survivalistssite.com Page 65 www.survivalistssite.com/~canuck

for &-shirts #orn over thermal under#ear.

www.survivalistssite.com

Page 66

www.survivalistssite.com/~canuck

$irst .id and "edical -its


&here are lots of first aid kits out there' ranging from pocket first aid kits to E<& kits. <any kits are poorly thought out or contain poor :uality contents. (ou should have a small pocket first aid kit that is easy to get to for minor cuts' scrapes and pain in every pack. (ou should also have a more complete first aid kit. Some people have several pocket first aid kits and then a larger' more complete kit. Along #ith your larger kit you should have a good first aid book. n researching this page #e came across a very good article #ritten by an EC doctor on #hat he keeps in his first aid kit and #hy. Belo# are some :uotes from his article' available at ###.aeromedi-.com' along #ith the contents of his first aid kit. !r. Blue not only #rote this article' he also sells kits very similar to the one he carries. At first glance the price of his first aid kit' H333.22 F#hich includes about H/22.22 for the bag itselfG' seems high but #hen you compare it to other E<& kits on the market it really isn't. *irst some information about !r. Blue from the article on ###.aeromedi-.comM Over the years, Dr. Blue has assembled his own traveling medical kit for dealing with on-the-road emergencies, based on his long experience as an emergency room doc, frequent traveler, pilot, outdoorsman, and dad. e offers details of exactly what!s in his kit, why each item is there, and how to assemble a really good kit of your own. Brent Blue ".D. is a #enior $viation "edical %xaminer and was the physician for the &.#. $crobatic 'eam at the (orld )ompetition in *++,. &his is from the main page of the medical kit availableM Developed by $eromedix.com founder and emergency room physician Dr. Brent Blue, this is the finest and most versatile first aid kit you can buy. Do you carry a first aid kit in your airplane or car- One of the things that has always driven me cra.y about the commercial first aid kits that you find in drugstores and pilot supply catalogs is that they!re filled with crap that is totally useless ... and sometimes even harmful. Over the years, / have assembled my own traveling medical kit for dealing with away-from-home emergencies, based on my long experience as an emergency room doc, frequent traveler, pilot, outdoorsman, and dad. 0ow you can buy a kit of your own substantially identical to the one / carry when / travel. "ost first aid kits contain too much special-purpose stuff and not enough multi-purpose stuff. (hen weight and space are at a premium, it!s essential to choose medications and other items which can be used to deal with multiple problems. 1or instance, antibiotic eye drops can be used in the ear, but eardrops cannot be used in the eye. Belo# is the contents of !r. Blue's first aid kitM tem /8-38 6oven FS#ift BrandG 38 Cotton &ip Applicators Sterile 1's 38-@8 )on-Ad Pad @-@ 0au,e ?$A8 Plastic Spot FS#ift BrandG Ari,ona Sun SP* 32 /o, Aypanal E-tra Strength FAcetaminophenG 1's Benadryl Caps 14mg Betadine Pads Betadine Solution /$1o, BlisteBuffered Aspirin 1'S Cedaprin F buprofenG 122mg 1's Character Strips 3$@8-38 Co-*le- 38
www.survivalistssite.com

Pty 32 32 4 @2 32 / 31 1@ 12 1 / 31 31 32 /
Page 67 www.survivalistssite.com/~canuck

Cold Pack Cough !rops <enthol Eucalyptus !ermicel &ape /8 !ermicel &ape 18 !ramamine Ear Plugs <a- F)CC 33G Pr's Elastic Bandage 18 Elastic Bandage @8 Elastic Bandage ;8 Electrolyte &ablets Eye 6ash @o, *ingertip 8A8 6oven FS#ift BrandG *irst Aid Book *le-icon 18 *le-icon @8 *le-icon ;8 *olding Paper Cups 0loves )itrile FBlueG >arge PC's 0olf &o#els ultra Compressed 5ydrocortisone /K *oil Pack modium A! EleeneEnuckle 6oven FS#ift BrandG Eote- <a-i Pads F ndividually 6rappedG >i:uid Children's &ylenol 1o, <astisol <oleskin @8-/18 <os:uito 5emostat @8 )atrapel Fdeet free repellentG 1o, )u-&ears /$1o, Pepto Bismol &ablets Porous Cloth &ape /8 Porous Cloth &ape 18 Safety Pins Assorted Sam Splint Scalpel Blade Q/2 Small E<& Shears Steri-strips /$@-/-/$1 FEnvelope of ;G Steri-strips /$@-3 FEnvelope of 3G Steri-strips /$A-3 FEnvelope of 4G Sterile )eedles /Aguage &ampons &ee &ree Dil FBurn A#ayG &ongue Blade Fnon-sterileG 3$@8 - ;8 &rash Bags 12:t &riangle Bandage +rine$puke bag FQ/ &ravel NohnG Jacuum Packed 6ash Cloths Jione- )o Cinse Nell @o, 6ash +p &o#elettes Oip >ock Bags /18 - /48

1 1@ 1 / / @ / / / 31 / 32 / 1 1 1 1 4 / 1 32 1 / @ / / / / @A 1 / / / 3 / / / / 3 1 / /4 @ 3 / / 32 1

Belo# is a picture of the contents of !r. Blue's kitM

www.survivalistssite.com

Page 68

www.survivalistssite.com/~canuck

&here are other items you #ill #ant to pack. Jarious supports' such as #rist and knee #ith metal staves in them. Jarious band aids' sanitary napkins$pads are good for absorbing blood. Plastic food #rap can be used to keep a #ound clean and aid in keeping it dry. >ots of .1K isopropal alcohol and hydrogen pero-ide to keep #ounds clean. Pepto Bisumal or other stomach remedies to help #ith cramps and other intestinal issues - dehydration can kill :uickly. Small packets of distilled #ater can be used to clean out #ounds. Electrolyte po#der and salt tablets help in high activity periods and #hen dehydrated. !ental kits can also be very handy to have. <ore speciali,ed items like blood pressure cuffs and minor surgery kits may be good items to have for the long term. &hese items may be of use to other members of your group #ho have the training to use them' and could save your life. )itro-Pak is a #ell kno#n source of survival and emergency preparedness supplies and carries surgery and in=ection kits such as those belo#M

www.survivalistssite.com

Page 69

www.survivalistssite.com/~canuck

<ake sure that you do have prescription drugs you re:uire' at the very least you need a one month supply' more is better of course. A bottle of multi-vitamins should also be included in your medical kit. Additional :uantities and specialty items can be kept in a larger bo- or bag' this allo#s you to :uickly grab the primary first aid kit and makes sure that you al#ays have a good kit #ith you. Another good site for medical kits is ###.adventuremedicalkits.com. (ou can also buy Adventure <edical Eits from ###.cabelas.com. !on't forget to take care of your pets. Cabelas's has a number of first aid kits and supplies for dogs. (ou can also get first aid kits and supplies from !octors *oster B Smith - ###.drsfostersmith.com. Dne thing rarely seen in any of these kits is a 8casualty blanket8 #hich is used by the +S military. n essence these are D! green versions of the 8Sportsman's &hermal Blanket8 listed on other gear pages. Some of these kits do have the light #eight' and some#hat flimsy' emergency or 8space8 blankets. 5itting the search engines for 8casualty blanket8 #ill turn up a number of retailers if you #ant the official military version. <entioned above is distilled #ater. &hese can come in the form of Coastguard approved survival #ater pouches. A block of Coastguard approved survival rations can also be included in medical kits for those times #hen someone is not able to eat solid food. &hese survival rations are good for 4 years and can be dissolved in #ater to provide nutrition to the in=ured. Bo-es of )itrile gloves' more puncture proof than late- #ithout the allergic reactions that some people have to late-' can be found at any drug store and at 6al-<art. )P-.4 masks are #idely available and #ill help prevent you from contracting any airborne germs. &he books 86here there is no doctor8' 86here there is no dentist8 and 8Comprehensive 0uide to 6ilderness B &ravel <edicine 1nd edition8 among others are handy to have' as is a good book on herbal remedies #ith pictures or illustrations. 6hen all else fails you may have to fall back on trying herbal cures' #hen it is a matter of try a herbal remedy that may #ork or don't try the herbal remedy and die for sure the choice is fairly clear - remember that many medicines are derived from plants and that the pharmaceutical industry invests millions into researching herbal remedies and then making synthetic versions they can make money off of. !on't forget you may be able to talk #ith your family doctor' or veterinarian for your pets' about broad based anti-biotics and other prescription For doctorG only items. (ou #ill have to feel out your doctor - broach the sub=ect of preparing and cite the government's instructions to have emergency supplies on hand' ask for the doctor's advice on #hat items you should have' then bring up prescription For doctorG only items and your desire to have some on hand =ust in case. Some doctors #ill provide you #ith prescriptions for a course of common prescription anti-biotics #hile others #on't. &his is #hy it is important to speak #ith them and feel them out first' some doctors may even suggest that you may #ant to have a course or t#o of certain prescriptions. Some doctors #ill provide you #ith samples instead of #riting you a prescription' either #ay you have the medication.
www.survivalistssite.com Page 70 www.survivalistssite.com/~canuck

!o some research into E<& and paramedic kits' compare the contents #ith those listed in !r. Blue's kit and the ones from Adventure <edical Eits and you can build your o#n kit. Compare prices to #hat you #ill pay at retail' the costs of these readily available kits' and make your decision on #hich path you #ill choose - build your o#n or buy a complete kit. >ook at travel sites - many have surgical' suture and in=ection kits for travelers going to places that may not have sterile instruments' these can be a great resource for kits that are pre-packaged or that may be difficult to obtain... plus the pre-packaged kits can be easily vacuum sealed for long term storage.

www.survivalistssite.com

Page 71

www.survivalistssite.com/~canuck

Day Pack
Everyone should have a day pack that they keep near at hand at all times. &his is the kit you grab #hen you go into the #oods' on a hike' etc. &he si,e should be about /222 cubic inches of space' plenty of room for the essentials. &he pack can be a backpack preferably a hydration pack or a #aist pack. t should be #ell made to allo# for years of use and comfortable enough to #ear all day. Belo# are a fe# e-amples of #hat is available. &he Camelbak 5a#g' bottom left' is the most e-pensive but it does have the ability to have additional +S military <D>>E and A> CE pouches attached. f your pack does not have a built in hydration bladder' such as the Camelbaks' then you should have at least t#o :uart bottles or canteens. n your pack you should keep a fe# key itemsM - small first aid kit - small mess kit' or canteen$cup$stove Fsee Basic Pack on the leftG - #ater filter$purifier Fsee Basic Pack on the leftG - poncho and liner for #et #eather and shelter Fsee Basic Pack on the leftG - a compass - one pair of under#ear - t#o pairs of socks - one &-shirt' synthetic - one pound hatchet or machete Fsee Basic Pack on the leftG - some light#eight rope such as parachute cord - 3 <CE or dehydrated$free,e dried meals - a basic survival kit Fsignalling' fire starting' etc - see belo#G - #indbreaker or light#eight s#eater or fleece - multi-tool' locking folder knife B ; inch fi-ed blade knife - flashlight - toilet paper - small bar or bottle of soap - face cloth and$or hand to#el - a 8Sportsman's Space$&hermal Blanket8 is optional Fsee Sleeping 0ear on the leftG - light#eight' compressable pants and long sleeve shirt are optional - some snack type foods are optionalG

&he Pocket Survival Eit available at Adventure <edical Eits ###.adventuremedicalkits.com' made by !oug Citter - ###.dougritter.com' is one of the better pocket survival kits out there. Belo# are t#o pictures of the kit. See !oug Citter's site for more information on this kit along #ith a lot of supplemental information.

www.survivalistssite.com

Page 72

www.survivalistssite.com/~canuck

(ou may #ant to keep a fe# other items in your pack if room permits. Each person #ill have certain things they like to have #ith them #hen they are heading into the forest - some #ill take a small shovel and folding sa# #hile others #ill include a tarp. 6hen you are in the #ilderness or =ust traveling around to#n accidents and emergencies can come up' some version of this kit should be #ith you at all times possible. &he goal of this pack and the items contained in it are to be light enough that you keep them #ith you at all times #hile providing the basic essentials to stay alive should some une-pected situation come up and you have to spend a night or t#o in the forest.

www.survivalistssite.com

Page 73

www.survivalistssite.com/~canuck

(dds % Ends - "iscellaneous E/uipment and Clot#ing


)o# #e #ill try to tie up loose ends and make suggestions on e:uipment' clothing and other things not covered on the other pages. Dn our other pages #e have tried to cover as much as possible on some key areas' from the essentials to optional e:uipment. 0iven that the concept of survival is one of long term there are any number of things that may not come to mind immediately' plus #e #ant to make things as easy as possible in your planning. Although there is no #ay #e can cover every possible scenario' gear or option #e #ill try to cover things that #e haven't covered on the other pages. As in any plan' you have to balance #hat you #ant' #hat you need and #hat you can afford or improvise. +se this page and the other pages in the Suggested 0ear and Clothing section to guide you and help you get the gear you need to cover the situations you may need to contend #ith. Clot#ing % !oot5ear 6hen it comes to non-#inter clothing you #ant to pick good :uality items that #ill last a long time. Shirts and pants can be made fairly easily' but socks and under#ear are harder to make. Stock up on socks and under#ear' they don't take up much room and sure beat itchy #ool ne-t to your skin. Buy thread and needles' buttons and snaps Fincluding snap repair kits from leather #orking or hobby storesG. As #e've mentioned before a good pair of boots are a must. A good pair of boots #ill last for years and can be re-soled' stopping in at your local shoe repair place to pick up a pair of replacement soles doesn't cost much and ensures that you can replace the soles on your boots #hen they #ear out. f you have special needs for your foot#ear such as #ide or narro# feet or orthopedic foot#ear try to get e-tras. 6ell made running shoes can be found for lo# cost' CDS&CD's brand of plain #hite leather tennis shoes are #ell made and at H/4 are hard to beat price #ise. *or general use cheaper' less durable foot#ear is ok' but for any distance you #ant good foot#ear... you #ant to kno# that they #ill last #ithout causing any aches or pains. $urniture4 #ygiene % misc6 #ouse#old t#ings *olding camp chairs are light#eight' easy to transport and give you some furniture to sit on. Buy good :uality ones #ith a sturdy frame' the fabric can al#ays be replaced in the future if needed. &here are chair' rocker and lounge versions available. *olding camp tables are another option. 6hen it comes to lighting there are a lot of alternatives. Eerosene lanterns' tiki torches' >E! flashlights and lanterns' propane lanterns and more. <ost of these re:uire some sort of fuel or energy to produce light. (ou can get battery operated lanterns and lights and rechargeable batteries #ith a solar recharger. Another option is to get solar po#ered patio or yard lights' these can be used inside as long as you remember to put them in a #indo# or outside so that they recharge. f getting solar po#ered patio lights the best bet #ould be to get metal ones' these #ill last longer than plastic. Candles are al#ays an option' there are any number of candle lanterns that use 8tea light8 candles. <any people forget simple things like soap' tooth paste' tooth brushes and other hygiene and cleaning items. (ou not only have to clean yourself but you have to clean your clothes and dishes. &he Cal Ben Soap Company ###.calbenpuresoap.com makes getting it all at once fairly easy and relatively cheaply. <ade from /22K natural ingredients it is generally highly thought of. 0rab a back brush from the store' it makes getting your back clean easier and comes in handy if you're in=ured. &hose solar sho#er bags are an option. <ake sure you have one or t#o #ash basins' good :uality plastic totes can be used for this once you get there and unpack #hat #as in them. A #ashboard' clothes pegs and clothes line should round out your #ashing and hygiene kit. !on't forget to pack toilet paper' the more you can get the better Fthey take up less room if vacuum sealed and they stay dryRG. (ou may #ant to get one of those plastic bucket type portable toilets' a spare toilet seat to use in an outhouse isn't a bad idea either. $ood % 5ater Although #e plan on raising our o#n food' depending on the time of the year #e may be looking at close to a year before #e can e-pect a harvest. Plan on things being lean in this respect and get as much food as you can afford and can fit into your vehicle. Canned goods are fine' and the cheapest #ay to build up a food supply but they are bulky and heavy. (ou may #ant to consider free,e dried$dehydrated or military <CEs. Canned food and <CEs are temperature sensitive meaning that
www.survivalistssite.com Page 74 www.survivalistssite.com/~canuck

changes in temperature can affect ho# long the food #ill keep. *ree,e dried$dehydrated food is less temperature sensitive. 0et as much food as you can get and your vehicle can safely transport' ideally a year supply for every person in your immediate family. t is better to have food that you can not transport than to not have enough food. f you start #ith canned goods no# you #ill be ama,ed at ho# :uickly they accumulate. S&DCE 65A& (D+ EA&. <ake sure that before you buy a case of food that you try some and like it. <ost retailers #ill have sample packs or you can order individuals of each item you are thinking about. Belo# are links to a number of manufacturers and retailersM *ree,e !ry 0uy - ###.free,edryguy.com <ountain 5ouse - ###.mountainhouse.com AlpineAire - ###.alpineaire.com Ceady Ceserve *oods - ###.readyreservefoods.com *ree,e-!ry *oods - ###.free,e-dry.com 5eater<eals - ###.heatermeals.com >ong >ife *ood !epot - ###.longlifefood.com )itro Pak - ###.nitro-pak.com Ceady Ceserve *oods - ###.readyreservefoods.com Sopakco - ###.sopakco.com 6alton *eed - ###.#altonfeed.com 6ornick - ###.#ornick.com Ameri:ual - ###.ameri:ual.com e*oods!irect - N. <ichael Stevens 0roup - ###.efoodsdirect.com !on't forget to buy seeds' heirloom or other seeds that #ill allo# you to save seeds and #ill gro# the ne-t year are the best bet. f you can find them' try to get seeds for plants that can be harvested in .2 days or less' this is the least amount of time #e #ill have to gro# and harvest crops' shorter gro#ing times #ill allo# for multiple harvests in the gro#ing season. Crops that take more than .2 days #ill have to be started in some sort of green house or indoor setting and then transplanted into gardens or fields. See the Plant 5ardiness Oones link on the left for more information. A great site to brush up on gardening and farming is !ave's 0arden - httpM$$davesgarden.com' a great book to have is %ncyclopedia of )ountry 2iving by Carla Emery - ###.carlaemery.com$country-living-book.htm. Belo# are some links to sites that sell heirloom seeds' you #ill have to bro#se their sites For contact themG to find crops #ith a .2 day or less plant to harvest cycleM +S sites$retailers Baker Creek 5eirloom Seeds - ###.rareseeds.com ###.heirloomseeds.com &he Jictory Seed Company - ###.victoryseeds.com Seed Savers E-change - ###.seedsavers.org Seeds &rust - ###.seedstrust.com Amishland 5eirloom Seeds - ###.amishlandseeds.com 5eirloom Acres Seeds - ###.heirloomacres.net Although *orestfarm - ###.forestfarm.com does not say #hether they sell heirloom seeds you can search via +S 5ardiness ,one. Canadian sites$retailers Agrestal Drganic 5eritage Seeds - ###.agrestalseeds.com 0ardeners 6eb - Alberta )urseries - ###.gardeners#eb.ca 0reen Space !esign - ###.organic-seeds.ca Dntario Seed Company - ###.oscseeds.com Prairie 0arden Seeds - ###.prseeds.ca &he 0arden Path - ###.earthfuture.com$gardenpath$ Stellarseeds - ###.stellarseeds.com Sunshine *arms - ###.sunshinefarm.net$cart$inde-.php *or a list of heritage' organic and open pollinated seeds see Seeds of !iversity - Canada's 5eritage Seed Program ###.seeds.ca$rl$rl.php. &he top part of the page lists Canadian gro#ers$retailers #hile the bottom part of the page lists +S gro#ers$retailers.
www.survivalistssite.com Page 75 www.survivalistssite.com/~canuck

6hen it comes to #ater there are lots of options available. *rom storing 12 o, bottles of #ater to one gallon bottles of #ater or /2 gallon =ugs. (ou can buy the #ater already bottled or bottle your o#n. &here are also @ o, packets of Coastguard approved #ater. Some people store #ater in food grade plastic drums up to 44 gallons in si,e. Eeep in mind that #ater #eighs about A pounds per gallon' storing large amounts of #ater can make it difficult to transport. Dn the Cooking 0ear and Basic Pack pages Fsee menu on leftG #e have suggested a fe# #ater purifiers. &hese are not the only options out there. &he options sho#n belo# either re:uire batteries or have limited effectiveness$lifespan.

6e've covered storing and gro#ing food but #e have not touched on gathering #ild plants' hunting or fishing. 0athering #ild plants is a skill you can develop over time. Dne #ay to develop this skill is to get some good books on #ild plants in your area. f you get books on other areas these can be kept #ith your gear and #ill provide the information you need #hen$if you have to leave your usual area. Everyone should have a basic fishing kit that includes a rod' reel' hooks' lures' etc. &here are decent telescoping rod and reel sets that come #ith some basic hooks and lures. A slingshot is small and easy to pack and #on't raise any eyebro#s' they are also fairly cheap as is shot Fbasically steel ball bearingsG' both are readily available at 6al-<art in the sporting goods section. Slingshots are good for small game such as rabbits. Bo#s and crossbo#s are another option for various si,ed game. BB and pellet guns can be used for small game' pellets and BBs are very cheap' #ith better airguns running to H422 but #ith much higher velocities than your standard !aisey or Crossman airgun. f you look around at sites such as Cold Steel - ###.coldsteel.com you #ill find that spear heads are fairly easy to find' you can al#ays find a good piece of #ood to make the spear shaft out of. )o# #e come to firearms. Df course guns can be used for hunting. Eeep in mind that local' state$provincial as #ell as +S$Canadian la#s differ greatly #hen it comes to firearms. Because of that #e #ill keep mention of firearms to a minimum. 6hen it comes to hunting guns the most used are shotguns and rifles. &he most common shotgun rounds are /1 guage and .@/2. *or rifles there is the .11 for small game and .323' 32-32' and .32A for larger game. &he .323' 32-32 and .32A #ill take do#n most large game in )orth America. &his minimal mention of firearms is not to treated as the last #ord on firearms' check #ith family' friends' etc for more information. &his is =ust meant to give you a very basic primer. Batteries and small electrical items &here are any number of things that #e #ould like to bring #ith us that re:uire batteries or electricity. *or battery po#ered items this isn't such a huge issue. Cechargeable batteries and a solar recharger #ill allo# you to use these items. <ake sure you have lots of good :uality rechargeable batteries. (ou can also use a regular AC recharger along #ith a car battery' AC-!C inverter and a small solar panel to recharge the car battery.

www.survivalistssite.com

Page 76

www.survivalistssite.com/~canuck

*or a large selection of inverters' backup po#er and related items see Lantre- - ###.-antre-.com.

Communications Communications' both receiving and transmitting can bring in a lot of information. 5aving a standard A<$*< radio is one #ay to get information' but there are a couple of better options. A good radio to keep you informed is the Eaito EA22. ###.kaitousa.com$EA22..htm #hich has A<$*<$Short#ave$6eather$&JF1-/3G$Aviation bands and can be po#ered by regular batteries' AC adapter' crank' solar. &he reception on these radios is very good' and at a price of H44 from the Eaito #ebsite' less if you shop around' very affordable. Eaito has a number of very good radios' in fact the +S military has ordered tens of thousands of Eaito radios for use in ra:. A radio such as this' #hether the Eaito or another brand' is a must in any emergency situation. Another option is to get a scanner #hich #ill cover =ust about all of the public radio bands. Scanners can be more e-pensive but they do have #ider coverage. *or the ability to transmit and to keep in touch #e suggest *CS$0<CS radios' these can be used to keep in touch #ith members of your family over short distances Fno more than /@ milesG. Dptional headsets allo# you to have hands free communication if your family is using more than one vehicle. 6ith other members of your group having *CS$0<CS radios these #ill come in handy once you reach your destination. A good CB' #ith upper$lo#er SSB FSingle Side BandG preferably' is a good thing to have on the road. (ou can listen in to the truckers to find out road conditions ahead of you and to keep up on any breaking ne#s. Dn long hauls it can also help keep you company and keep you a#ake. CBs generally have a range of about 4 miles - terrain' antenna' output po#er affect transmission and reception. Although you may be tempted to get a handheld CB be advised that the reception and transmission on these is poor. <ake sure you have a good :uality antenna' the large metal #hip antennas provide the best reception. A ham radio' 1m F1 meterG can also come in handy. 6ith the ability to transmit and receive from much further than *CS$0<CS or CB' these can literally save your life. n the +S you do not need to have a *CC license to o#n a ham radio or to listen but you do need a license to transmit or talk. &he e-ception to the license rule is in life or death emergencies' in this case the *CC #ill not come after you for transmitting$talking #ithout a license. 1m handheld radios can be found for under H/22 used' often as little as H42 in good #orking condition. Eeep in mind that once again' the handheld models #ill not have the transmitting po#er of 8base8 models' although an amplifier can resolve this problem. <arine radios can use the same antenna as a 1m ham radio' and although they are generally used on the #ater there are certain bands that can be used on land. t is also likely that very fe# people #ill be listening to marine radio fre:uencies on land so it can be an alternative to CBs or *CS$0<CS radios #hen your family is using more than one vehicle. Getting around in t#e 5inter 0etting around in the #inter can be a chore that saps your energy #ith seemingly little distance traveled. 6inter gear can #eigh a lot #hen you get into all of the things you need to stay alive and comfortable. Sno# shoes can be used to keep you from sinking into the sno#' but the going is slo#. Cross country skis #ill allo# you travel longer distances at a :uicker pace but take more practice to master. &o help #ith hauling your gear you may #ant to consider a sled or toboggan that you can pull behind you. <ost militaries that practice #inter maneuvers use a combination of cross country skis and sleds' the sleds are hooked to harnesses #orn by one person in front and one person in the rear... in this #ay the person in the back makes sure that the sled does no overtake the person in the front. Sleds can make carrying your gear much easier and can carry more than you can.

www.survivalistssite.com

Page 77

www.survivalistssite.com/~canuck

'ope and clim ing gear Cope comes in handy in many #ays. Everything from basic t#ine' parachute cord to strong climbing rope has a use. A couple of hundred feet of parachute cord can be bought for a small amount and has as many uses as duct tape. Common rope is very useful for many things from tying things do#n to making shelters. Climbing rope' 42 to /22 feet along #ith a basic climbing kit consisting of belt' hammer' some carbiners and pitons can make sure that any climbing you have to do is much easier and safer. 1eisure and entertainment 6e #ill have times #hen #e have nothing to do or #hen #e can't do anything. f you don't plan for these times you could find yourself getting bored or depressed' #hich can affect your survival or =ust your happiness. 6ith space at a minimum and #eight an issue you may be thinking that there is no #ay you can pack anything to pass the time' you #ould be #rong. Aside from a favorite book there are cards' travel versions of popular games such as chess' checkers and backgammon among others. &hese pocket or travel games can be found in dollar stores' toy stores and in some auto parts stores. A book of card games goes #ell #ith a couple of decks of cards. &here is also the 0+CPS role playing game from Steve Nackson 0ames #hich provides a basic set of universal rules that can be applied to multiple settings such as fantasy' #ild #est' etc... one book and a set of dice can provide years of entertainment Fand teaching if you plan it rightG. <usical instruments of all types' from penny #histles to guitars and drums can be part of any long term kit. &hese don't have to be the best :uality if all you're looking for is to pass the time #ith family and friends. &here are also small instruments that can be packed in your kit and carried #ith you. Gas masks4 etc *or those #ho #ant to prepare for every eventuality there are gas masks' nuclear radiation detectors as #ell as full )BC ha,ard suits. *or gas masks' Scott - ###.scotthealthsafety.com and <SA - ###.msanorthamerica.com are #idely recogni,ed as being the best. )itro-Pak - ###.nitro-pak.com and Survival >ogistics - ###.survivallogistics.com have a number of items beyond gas masks. f you #ant radiation detectors the place to go is )uk Alert - ###.nukalert.com or E @+' nc - ###.radmeters@u.com' same company different #ebsites' both have a lot of information on radiation and related preparedness. Transport (ptions (ou may #ant to consider a small trailer to keep everything stored in and ready to go. &railers only take a fe# minutes to hook up. &here are a number of other options available. $inis#ing ,p n the end one #ay to figure out the things you may forget is to go through your house and list everything that you use on a daily basis. <ake a separate list for each room. Dnce you have a list of everything go over each list and see #hat things you #ould be #illing to live #ithout. &hen go through the remaining items and see #hich ones re:uire po#er of some sort and note a manual alternative. Although you #ould need a large vehicle and$or a trailer to transport everything found on the Suggested Gear and Clot#ing pages #e have provided these items to give you an idea of the types of things you will need and some items that are optional and that you may #ant to bring. By no means are the items listed on these pages a must' each person or family must make decisions as to #hat items they consider essential and #hich items they can actually fit in their vehicles. *inances for each person or family differs #hich also factors into #hat items they can get before hand. &hese pages are here to provide ideas and goals to allo# everyone to survive in as much comfort and #ith as much ease as possible.

SurvivalistsSite6com
###.survivalistssite.com
<essage *orums - Blogs - Community Pages - Chat - CSS B Atom Syndication
www.survivalistssite.com Page 78 www.survivalistssite.com/~canuck