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BACKSTAGE ARCHITECTURE

LUIGI PRESTINENZA PUGLISI CHIEF CURATOR 2012 Backstage Architecture. All rights reserved. e-book version, last updated 10th of September, 2012 CHIEF CURATOR Luigi Prestinenza Puglisi SeNior Curator Bernardina Borra JuNior Curators Nicol Lewanski, Rosella Longavita, Federica Russo English translations and editing: Paul David Blackmore Thanks to: Massimo Russo and Alessandro Ferullo, creators of web site www.backstage-architecture.org Francesco Trovato, Lettera22, Editorial Support Mauro Rallo, IT consultant BERNARDINA BORRA SENIOR CURATOR NICOLO LEWANSKI ROSELLA LONGAVITA FEDERICA RUSSO JUNIOR CURATORS

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INDEX

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New Zealand Australia Russia Indonesia Japan South Korea China Hong Kong Taiwan Vietnam India Bangladesh Iran Jordan Kuwait Turkey Israel Lebanon Romania

GlaMuzina Paterson ArcHitects KOKKUGIA ROLAND SNOOKS PlanAR AKanoMa Studio HirosHi NakaMura & NAP ArcHitects Ko Kiwoong + Lee Jooeun HHD_FUN, Wang ZHenFei + LuMing Wang Alvin Yip CHAOTI CHEN + WORKSHOP LEVITAS VO TRON GNGHIA ARCHITECTS SHROFFLEON SHAHNAWAZ BAPPY HaMed KHosravi, MaHtaB AkHavan MATTHEW BARTON, EMAD SLEIBY AGI ArcHitects PAB ArcHitects HQ ArcHitects BERNARD KHOURY / DW5 UNULAUNU NOA 2610 SoutH ArcHitects PAAN ARCHITECTS GEORGI ZAYKOV Autori AOA VROA / CH+ Architekci BORD ARCHITECTURAL STUDIO MMMM MAJA MILAT, MARIO MATIC TASTE

www.gp-a.co.nz www.kokkugia.com mukosey@gmail.com, info@plan-ar.ru yusinglim@yahoo.com, sing@bdg.centrin.net.id press@nakam.info www.ofce-kokiwoong.com www.hhdfun.com sday@polyu.edu.hk shuchi@gmail.com www.votrongnghia.com k.shroff@shroffleon.com, m.leon@shroffleon.com bapsg1@yahoo.com www.hamedkhosravi.com barton.mb@gmail.com, emadsleiby@gmail.com www.agi-architects.com www.pab.com.tr www.hqa.co.il www.bernardkhoury.com www.unulaunu.ro aggela@notonlyarchitecture.com www.2610south.co.za www.paan.gr www.atikaholding.com www.autori.rs www.aoa. www.vroa.pl, www.chplus.pl www.bordstudio.hu/index.php emariomatic@gmail.com www.taste.si

150 Czech Republic 154 Sweden 160 Norway 164 Austria 168 Italy 172 Germany 178 Denmark 184 Switzerland 188 Nigeria 192 The Netherlands 196 Belgium 202 Algeria 206 France 210 United Kingdom 214 Spain 220 Portugal 226 Ireland 232 Brazil 238 Venezuela 242 Bolivia 246 USA

OV-A FoAM-NORDICA Fantastic NorwaY soma CAFEArchitettura Birk und Heilmeyer Architekten NORD Architects Copenhag en Dreier Frenzel Architecture NL, KUNL ADEYEMI Anne Holtrop PT ARCHITECTEN MAGDA BENDANI Nicolas ReYMond THE ASSEMBLE ARTURO FRANCO eMBaiXada CLANCY MOORE ARCHITECTS SIAA ArQuitectos LAB.PRO .FAB. G/CdR ArcHitects ForM-ula

www.ov-a.cz www.scene-thinking.com www.fantasticnorway.no www.soma-architecture.com www.cafearchitettura.it www.birkundheilmeyer.de www.nordarchitects.dk www.dreierfrenzel.com www.nleworks.com www.anneholtrop.nl peter@ptarchitecten.be bendanimagda@hotmail.com www.nicolasreymond.com www.assemblestudio.co.uk www.arturofranco.es www.embaixada.net www.clancymoore.com www.siaa.arq.br www.labprofab.com www.gallardocostadurelsarquitectos.com
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24 30 36 42 46 50 56 60 64 68 72 78 82 86 90 94 98

104 Cyprus 108 South Africa 114 Greece 118 Bulgaria 122 Serbia 128 Finland 132 Poland 138 Hungary 142 Croatia 146 Slovenia

www.form-ula.com jepp@perezmorales.com.do choy@cubarte.cult.cu luiscallejas@paisajesemergentes.com www.nomena-arquitectos.com Rodrigo@murua-valenzuela.com keltonvillavicencioarquitectos@gmail.com abel@productora-df.com.mx

250 Dominican Republic PEREZ MORALES Y ASOCIADOS 254 Cuba 258 Colombia 264 Peru 268 Chile 274 Nicaragua 278 Mexico
CHoY-Len Estudio de ArQuitectura PaisaJes EMergentes Hctor Loli Rizo Patrn + Ximena Alvarez de la Piedra BENJAMN MURA, RODRIGO VALENZUELA Kelton Villavicencio ArcHitects PRODUCTORA

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LUIGI PRESTINENZA PUGLISI fewer certaiNties aNd iNcreased doubts


like nancial markets by greater uncertainties and volatility. We are afraid to realise overly iconic works and run the risk of the excesses that are inevitable in the presence of overly precise ideas. We return to the past with more nonchalance there is no longer an idea that we must propose innovation at all costs and we return to approaches that, until a few years ago, appeared to have gone out of style. There is also a greater desire for simplicity and an increased awareness of economics and ecology. In particular, it would appear possible to dene three trends. The rst is neo-organic. This has little to do with the super-organicism of Greg Lynn or Nox, that, to be clear, employed computer-generated manipulations to create buildings characterised by complex fractal geometries and which, in the end, caused buildings to resemble a medusa or a head of cauliower. The new organics prefer instead the use of softer, less overtly allusive forms, constructed of natural materials such as wood and stone. Their work recalls the origins of this type of research: for example Alvar Aalto or Frank Lloyd Wright. However, they conserve their own freshness and modernity. The second trend is technological. However, it is extraneous to the excesses of high-tech: the virtuosities of Norman Foster or Santiago Calatrava. On the contrary, it appears to move towards the style of the Apple store, where technological innovation is suggested not by pipes and tie rods, but by lightness, transparency, simplicity and versatility. Where instead of a futuristic steel structure there is a preference for glass, with the aerodynamic desk substituted by a table in blonde wood, the computer cables hidden from view or even eliminated. In the end new devices are all wireless. The third trend is neo-modernist. Far from the heroic season of the Modern Movement, marked by a Calvinist work ethic that saw standardisation and the reduction of ornaments as the path towards a better future. Today modernism is viewed, instead, as one style among many others, perhaps the best for expressing a desire for order and rigour, though not necessarily frankness or economy. On behalf of the Associazione Italiana di Architettura e Critica I am pleased to present this second edition of Backstage Architecture, which brings together the best architects under the age of 35 working around the globe, enriched this year by a number of new entries, and involving a total of 57 nations. I would like to thank all of the architectural critics who selected the under35s, and these latter for providing the requested documentation of their work. The research and this product are the result of the work of a group composed of Bernardina Borra (senior curator), Nicol Lewanski, Federica Russo, Rosella Longavita (junior curators), with the invaluable assistance offered by Massimo Russo for the web design and programming and Paul David Blackmore for the English translations.

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As I write these words, the economic crisis aficting Europe has not yet abated. And there are no signs on the horizon that things are about to improve any time soon, above all in those countries facing the most serious problems: Greece, Spain, Portugal and Italy. This comports a stagnation in the building market and an absence of employment perspectives for young architects, forced to seek work abroad. However, they are no longer searching, as was once the case, in the architecturally saturated countries of France, The Netherlands or Great Britain, but on other continents where economic development, despite that fact that the crisis is global, is impetuous: Brazil, China, India and Australia. In parallel with the redenition of the geographic scenarios in which architecture is being produced, we are also witness to a redenition of theoretical research that, with respect to the past, is marked by fewer certainties and increased doubts. The 1990s were a decade of theorisations on design. These were the years of numerous books on architectural theory, and the best designers from this season sought to construct theorems, that is, projects that served to demonstrate their ideas. We need only consider the work of Rem Koolhaas and the protagonists of the rst wave of the star system, such as Steven Holl, Daniel Libeskind, Bernard Tschumi and Zaha Hadid. However, there are also works that came later: for example the blobby and digital era that sought to demonstrate how the computer could be used to generate the new geometries of buildings and cities. Today we live in an era that is marked somewhat

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BERNARDINA BORRA THE DIFFERENT WAYS OF BEING HYPE


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Given the system this book relies on, the survey it presents banks on the critics choice. As its curators we cannot pretend that it offers a complete picture of what is happening around the world. Its global scope makes it relevant, while to the same degree - due to the scope itself - it must be acknowledged that its underlying system is highly interpretative and possibly even arguable. Perhaps it simply reects the current condition of the world we live in: impossible to grasp in a single attempt. Admitting and having this in mind, nevertheless the critics choices unmistakably fell on those architectural ofces that can be assumed to represent the most successful practices in each country, based on local appraisal. Therefore, a few provisional assumptions can be derived from reading between the lines. For instance, it is possible to observe that the world of architecture is simultaneously as close and as distant as it has perhaps ever been. However, before venturing into the denition of several trends that can be identied, it is rst important to take note of an overall mind switch shared by the upcoming generation around the globe. Throughout the years the Eurocentric monopoly over debate has become multipolar, uctuating as much as the past decades economic developments. Yet there is a discrepancy between the established conventional way of looking at, making, and discussing the contents of architecture. While there remains an overwhelming pride in seeking all that is fashionable in architecture, a reading of the texts submitted by the invited critics clearly reveals

how the aims being pursued by young architects are changing in each country according to local conditions. Being hype today is a subtle game of satisfying the rhetorical call of aesthetics on the one hand, and a struggle to respect a growing professional ethic on the other: the professions new schizophrenia. In general terms it could be said once again that the notion of form for the sake of Form is now exhausted (see Bob Somol and Rem Koolhaas). In specic terms it can be noticed that this is not entirely true, and that it could rather be considered as being in a phase of re-development. Seen from within the current generation, there appears to be a set of new parameters that offset purely formal research, with content assuming increasingly more importance, and becoming more objective and relative to specic contingencies. Architects will never relinquish the performative aspects of design, yet they are recovering its critical aspects in relation to its content. As mentioned in the rst edition of this book, the aggressiveness and self-reference inherent to the suspension of judgment have reached their end. The precariousness and the hangover accompanying the period that spanned from the end of the Second World War until the conclusion of the twentieth century generated a common feeling that is shrouded in most of the projects featured in this book. This is not yet an outspoken condition, but rather one that is sneaking into the profession as a true condition of the everyday for many, and as a warning for others. The professional education and architectural climax that dened the current generations development is beginning to feel like a straight jacket for many; several are tweaking the boundaries (Hong Kong, Sweden) or trying to be sober and efcient (Jordan, Vietnam, Nicaragua), while others are nding ad hoc and even unexpected solutions (Brazil, South Africa, Croatia, Norway, Russia, Great Britain). In those countries suffering from a recession, as well as in those of the so-called BRICS, or in any

other place reached by educational exchange and Internet communication, worldwide awareness is stealthily introducing an attentive care for local socio-cultural and economic situations. A comparison with the rest of the world translates into a concern in relation to architectural production and the subjectiveness of its users.. Young architects are beginning to consider design and process as part of a more pondered relationship between subject/ object, or, individual/collective-architecture, as part of a shared project for the city and its territory. Unfortunately, this is not always immediately retraceable and applicable due to the resilience of both culture and the market, and obviously because of the time required for its physical construction. Perhaps the course of this transformation will be more evident a few years hence. Being fair to and critical of given conditions is in a way a new kind of conscious/unconscious modest hype that reveals itself with a different professional approach in many of the countries examined in this book. Being hype in Western countries now means tackling the city through processes of mending and restructuring (Poland, Serbia, Spain), through analysis, and through an attempt to make up for the failings of the participatory dream of the 1970s (Belgium). In countries with a growing economy, like those of the roaring Asia, being hype means riding the wave with rather open criticism, knowing that not everything is as spotless and bright as assumed (Indonesia, South Korea). There are also examples of an emergence of concepts of reuse and social engagement (Taiwan). Similar observations could be made for South America, where the collective assumes a different dimension from Asia, yet not exactly the same as in the old West, and where cities are in a different state of affairs (Chile, Colombia, Nicaragua). For the few countries we could recruit from Africa while extremely different from one another it could be said that being hype takes the meaning of nurturing existing local culture on its own strength (Nigeria, Algeria, South Africa).

The profession is thus returning more and more to what Hannes Meyer would have called an organiser of the biological aspects of life, meaning Architecture produced and inspired by man for man, as much as it produces man itself; as a co-operation between man and his environment. This is very close to Karl Marxs concept of the production of man and society: just as society produces man as man, so is society produced by him (The Economic and Philosophic Manuscripts of 1844). The architecture designed by most of the young architects presented in this book is fed by observing the multitude of individuals as much as individuals will be affected by it. The focus on the rst phase of this mutual relationship is growing sharper and more contextual, seeking the non-arbitrary effects of architecture on individuals, but directly connected to them. There is still a long way to go before we can conrm whether this is mere intellectual speculation or truly the way young architects of the upcoming generation will leave their mark around the world. It remains to be seen regardless of any fashionable label, and without incommoding any elevated cultural legacy whether the hype of the 2010s will assert itself as more locally rooted and ethically engaged, or as simply a new opportunistic professional survival instinct to adapt to new environments, or maybe both.
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New Zealand

Architects Glamuzina Paterson recognise the opportunity that this affords young practices to explore the relationship between realised domestic projects and New Zealands vast, picturesque landscapes. The Lake Hawea courtyard house exemplies this. Grounded in rural land at the foot of a Central Otago mountain range, the 250sqm home is an enquiry into where a site begins and ends, how to dene the edges of the project, and the way landscape may be inhabited. Firmly dug into the earth and composed as a simple square plan, its low form recollects modest buildings in the region that housed prospectors during the mid nineteenth-century gold rush. The textural faade of brick wraps the house and large central courtyard, providing shelter as well as framing views to lofty mountains and low plains. Living, dining and sleeping spaces occupy the northern and eastern edges of the plan, favouring the predominant direction of the sun, while niches and overhangs in the building envelope protect from the hot, dry summers and harsh winters. As award-winning compatriot Ted McCoy once commented: The good thing about isolation [is that] one had to learn for oneself, by looking at surroundings. Lake Hawea house reects this.

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GlaMuzina Paterson ArcHitects


DATE OF COMPLETION :

Lake Hawea Courtyard house

2012
LOCATION :

Wanaka
CONSTRUCTED AREA:

250M2
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New Zealand, Aotearoa, offers circumstances of freedom for its architects. Remote and scenic, the country has a tradition of building, rather than architecture per se, rst established by pioneering settlers and their need for shelter. In the years since, Aotearoas architectural vernacular has been constructed through various ideas the Elegant Shed that draws on simple farm building precedents; trampers huts hidden in native bush; the unpretentious family bach. Yet in practice, the act of making architecture here is equally a way of creating turangawaewae a place to stand a place to form home, heritage, ownership and in the broadest sense, an environment to live in.

444148.79S 1690753.13E

text by Rebecca Roke

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8.0

VA S T L A N D S C A P E S
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OTAGO MOUNTAIN RANGE

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413.00

UP UP UP

Seen from the mound Even from the walled interior views to the mountains are the highlights

UP

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PLAN
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Turangawaewae a place t o s tand


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THE EXTERIOR PEERS INSIDE


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Explore the relationship between domestic and exterior

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The good thing about isolation [is that] one had to learn for oneself, by looking at surroundings.

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Seeking the way landscape may be inhabited

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Looking into ones self


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Australia

KOKKUGIA ROLAND SNOOKS


DATE OF COMPLETION :

Inverted Memorial

--LOCATION :

Babiy Yar, Kiev, Ukraine


CONSTRUCTED AREA:

0 M2

This project is part of Kokkugias on-going research into Behavioural Design Methodologies. These methodologies operate through MultiAgent algorithms to generate the point of interaction of simple architectural decisions at a local scale that gives rise to the emergence of a self-organised design intent. Within the landscape this methodology is applied with agents navigating a differentiated eld of intensities, negotiating between their own swarm logic and a eld of external inuences. The project is concerned both with the emergence of gure from a eld as well as the dissolution of the gure into abstraction. The space of remembrance within the inverted monument is cast from bronze and generated through the interaction of agent-based components. At a local level the component has no base state, but instead adapts to its conditions. Consequently while local moments of periodicity may occur, its constant shifting of state triggered by local relationships resists a denitive reading of the component. The component logic of this carved space is polyscalar: self-similar agents operate across scales to form a set of intensive affects. The intensity of this space is intended to evoke a visceral response, without being directly metaphorical or referential. In contrast to many of Kokkugias projects, which attempt to dissolve hierarchies and dichotomies in favour of the negotiation of a synthetic whole, this project consciously sets up a series of contradictions. A deliberate tension or conict is sought between the smooth monolithic shell of the exterior and the intricate bronze memorial space, between the intensity of the memorial and the reective calm of the exhibition spaces.
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This speculative project reconsiders the monument as object, instead positing the formation of an immersive space of remembrance, a space that emerges from the landscape and is carved from within a sombre stone monolith an inverted monument. Rather than the reductive, singular, top-down imposition of form, this project explores the emergence of a space, rich with intricate detail, reecting the culmination of individual differences within a multitude. The memorial is designed through the use of complex non-linear systems in which coherent order and space emerge from interactions at a local scale.

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LANDSCAPE BASIS
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TUNING

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EXTRAPOLATING

Varying intensities emerge within the landscape through the local interactions of the multi-agent generative algorithm

Emerge FROM the Landscape


The intense bronze memorial space is carved from the museum mass, containing contemplative exhibition spaces The memorial is designed through the use of complex non-linear systems in which coherent order and space emerge from interactions at a local scale

FROM A SOMBER STONE MONOLITH


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The monument is inverted to generate an intensive memorial space rather than a monument as object

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Russia

PlanAR
DATE OF COMPLETION :

Marfino Public Spaces

2011.10
LOCATION :

11a Botanicheskaya, Moscow


CONSTRUCTED AREA:

14 Ha

In Moscow and a majority of Russian cities, the eld of cheap and social housing is still fullled by the production of concrete factories operating since the 1970s. This results in the spread of outdated standards in building technology, planning and design solutions, and the general quality of the urban environment. Examples include the still-present asphalted platforms for laundry or 12 parking spaces for 10-storey blocks of ats. Despite changes to the economic system, the spread of social groups in the city and signicant changes in lifestyles, many of the basic elements of a contemporary city have yet to be introduced to Russian urban space.

In this light the story of urban twins would be quite illustrative. Marno is a typical housing area near Stalins World Exhibition Centre complex. The apartments are used as social housing and possess all facilities typical of the 1980s and 90s. Marnos twin is located nearby and offers ats for sale. This affected developers desire to make make the microrayon attractive to potential buyers. Planar - a young Moscow-based architectural ofce, was invited to re-evaluate the urban space in this architectural environment. Planars involvement in the project brought essential changes to Marno, beginning with an attractive and inventive navigation system (a set of African animals with specic colours), bicycle and jogging paths with clever intersections with vehicular circulation; from infrastructure for the disabled to original wood gazebos, awarded as the best wooden architecture in Russia. What truly changed the ow and typical lifestyle of microrayon Marno inhabitants is the system of playgrounds. In comparison, the playgrounds in the social housing area are a compact, colourful, though uninventive block that is cloned throughout the area. On the contrary, diversity of the playgrounds of the twin area makes the inhabitants interact, walking around to choose which attraction is more desirable at the moment. In conclusion, it must be said that it is a fact that urban space in Russia isnt improving with the rise of the price for an apartment. The only introductions made for luxury housing are restricted access and underground parking. In this light, Marnos human-centred and visually effective design make the project and its architects forerunners of the long-awaited changes in the post-USSR urban environment.

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text by Anastasia Albokrinova

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PLAN EXOT I C AN I M A L S FI G U R E S

B right c olors and k itschy O B J E C T S

A typical prefab high-rise microrayon of Soviet Union style is boring to live in and hard to navigate

Unexpected objects make the dull background disappear

The most atypical landscape possible


HO U S E NU M B E R S road Markup
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Figures of animals form an effective navigation system

The inhabitant had adopted them as totem animals for their courtyards

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Tweak it!
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Indonesia

the old materials of the former house, leftover construction materials, as well as the clients personal collection of unique objects, beer bottles, wine bottles, cigarette packages, and various ethnic handicrafts. Further design techniques are applied to the house. A sensitively-designed 10-centimeter deep faade which lters indirect sunlight after 10 a.m., split levels that make the house airy and spacious, the uncommon use of roof tiles as wall cladding and a reference to the peranakan, the traditional Chinese-Indonesian house: a courtyard garden with a red dadap tree. The use of old materials bring a homey feeling to the spaces, an effect one usually has to wait for decades to achieve. Yusings idea of the dream of cheap housing is a guerrilla approach to make exciting, modern, experimental architecture affordable to Indonesias middle-to-low income families. Within a year, the ofces productivity has reached 20 designs, of which 10 are built annually.

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AKanoMa Studio
DATE OF COMPLETION :

Puzzle House

2011
LOCATION :

West Jakarta
CONSTRUCTED AREA:

500 M2
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The puzzle house is one of the many houses designed by Akanoma, a rising Indonesian architectural practice. It exemplies the radical reuse of materials, 90% of which is from the site itself. This house is a renovation of an existing home from the 1980s. A one-story house has been renovated into three oors, with the rst oor height being only 2 meters to function as warehouses and storage tanks for potable water, water wells, and rainwater. For a small house set within a 10 x 18 m plot in Jakarta, this water planning is noteworthy. It is designed like a puzzle: a series of elds and masses with a variety of materials, from

6 10 14.52 S 1064638.80W

text by Daliana Suryawinata

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SECTION

The new house is a collection of old materials of the former house, construction leftover materials, as well as the clients personal collection unique objects, beer bottles, wine bottles, cigarette packs, and various ethnic handicrafts

The rooms in the home are set surrounding the courtyard, like a mirrored /c/ letter

Simplicity will bring PEACE of mind


The corridor is bordered by a gabion wall made of coral stones and some leftover wood from the construction
+0.00 -0.10 -0.35

The house becomes relatively cooler and offers changeable atmospheres according to the weather

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PLAN

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+0.80 +1.30

Small house within a 10mx18m plot

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Radical material reuse


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Japan

j
HirosHi NakaMura & NAP ArcHitects
DATE OF COMPLETION :

Despite its ordinary rectangular plan, House C does not look sculpturally squared, or like a volume in tension. House C is relaxed, and it appears to be a gradual and not exact piece of architecture, reminding the viewer of the expression of beauty and imperfection of nature that is celebrated by the Zen Japanese aesthetic. By putting himself in active resonance with the site, Nakamura designed a house in which the luminous and connective central space calmly lets in the mountain and the ocean. House C does not lean towards the landscape, it instead receives it; it does not offer itself to the exterior, it instead waits for it to come in. The thick roof slab is made of anti-corrosive concrete and designed with horizontal forces driven into the ground to create a space with almost no columns. The soil is utilized as a protective layer and nishing to reduce the cost of the exterior coating. Instead of looking for an excessively precise design at any cost, Nakamura prefers to leave the nal shape of the House C to the discretion of nature and its owners, allowing them to change the aspect of the house by planting trees and plants on the roof. In some ways, House C shows the courage of having an architect that let it go.

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2008.10
LOCATION :

Chiba, Tokyo Bay


CONSTRUCTED AREA:

90 M2
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House C

Nakamura designed a weekend house in the Tokyo Bay. It is surrounded by the mounts of Bousou Peninsula and by the Pacic Ocean. The Japanese architect cut a strip of ground, lifted it up into the sky (not just metaphorically), and turned it into a walkable, vegetal roof for House C. Initially, Nakamura thought to sink the house into the earth to hide it within the landscape; however, in the end, he preferred to extract the soil from the site of House C and use it as a construction material. This conceptual gesture denes the projects identity, and makes House C melt into its surroundings, existing in a sort of seamless continuity with the landscape.

353550N 1400643W

text by Salvator-John A. Liotta, Tomoko Kawai

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A F A M I LY H I D E AW AY O V E R L O O K I N G T H E B AY

Touching soil brings certain emotions


Remind through details

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The site is located between ocean and mountains, it looks upon the horizon, the seashore, and the cliffs with beautiful layers of earth and fields full of wildflowers

PLAN

A LARGE ONE-ROOM HOME

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SECTION
In this region soil has been made into mounds, kneaded and fired it into pottery for many centuries

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Local soil was used to cover the roof and, mixed with diatomite, cement and resin, to apply on the walls

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An extension of gardening

South Korea

Ko Kiwoong + Lee Jooeun


DATE OF COMPLETION :

A Window on the District

2010.10
LOCATION :

Pangyo, Seoul
CONSTRUCTED AREA:

242,21 M2

This single family house is situated in the detached housing complex in Pangyo, the new town on the outskirts of Seoul. According to the master plan based on the district unit plan, fence construction is strictly controlled as ones domesticity must be entirely exposed to the exterior. Without even a minimum protection lter, young parents are facing the dilemma of wishing to provide safe surroundings for their children. The neighbouring houses show rather closed constructions with massive walls in dark concrete or stone panels, and the outdoor activity areas, placed in the centre of the house, are rather introversive and surrounded by walls. However, Juns house exposes people coming

in and going out through the main entrance, and theres only a thin separation made of glass and shades between living room and exterior. Variously proportioned windows on the faade are expression of a will for an active observation towards the outside. (The northern faade shows this intention clearly by placing lots of small sized windows facing outward to their neighbours.) Generally, one who is inside the house would like to avoid others attention, but the role and relationship between observer and observed is reversed in Juns house. Spectators looking at Juns house from outside are rather observed by the inhabitant hiding himself behind the window. The windows of the main rooms on the rst oor also support this notion with their slightly protruding shape. The steps and corridors circulate like a vessel, driving children up to the roof where they can enjoy the articial landscape, as a change to the front yard. Dense perforations in the parapet provide the curious children a role as an observer. The seductive white surface offers strong proof of this changing relationship by pushing the formerly known limits of suburban housing to the extreme. Also, this is the rst case in Korea to use the latest solid surface material* on the exterior, which is well coordinated with the spatial ows inside. For the moment, of the 2,000 housing units in this planned district, only 1/3 have been completed. It is evident that the uniqueness of Juns house exists as an important inuence in the neighbourhood. Serving as a milestone within the area, created atop a tabula rasa, it is a pleasant anticipation of the future appearance after the completion of one large housing block. * This mineral material consists of approximately one third acrylic resin and 5% natural pigments. Its main constituent, at 70%, is the natural mineral aluminium hydroxide obtained from bauxite.

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37 39 07.91 S 127 09 63.06W

text by Bae Yoonkyung

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The house to OBSERVE


Densely perforated holes on parapet provide the curious children a role as an observer. Credit pictures: Photo by Kim, Yong-kwan

PLAN

This house is situated in the detached housing complex in Pangyo, the new town on the outskirts of Seoul

The variously proportioned windows are an expression of a will for active observation towards the outside

SECTION

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The interior spaces are separated by white colored surfaces that give more brightness to the rooms

o pening to the o utside

Juns house exposes people coming in and going out through the main entrance

Contrary to the neighbouring houses that show rather closed constructions with massive walls in dark concrete or stone panels, this house is completely extroverted and open to the outside

45

China

Rizhao Landscaping Project

HHD_FUN ZHenFei Wang+LuMing Wang


DATE OF COMPLETION :

2010
LOCATION :

Rizhao
CONSTRUCTED AREA:

2000 M2

Instead of working with many professional consultants, HHD_FUN is trying to simplify the construction challenges using computer aided systems or, to be more specic, parametric commands or other related methods. Since 2009 the practice has extended its ambitions from small scale projects to much more challenging opportunities. HHD_FUN has recently completed a beach side visitor center development on the Shanhaitian beach park in Rizhao, east China. In the special context of the Chinese economy, one of the most successful strategies of the project is that of balancing relevantly unsophisticated

construction skills with the high expectations of a complicated geometrical form. This development consists of 11 buildings spread along the 2 kilometers beach park. It includes an information center, retail shops, cinema, restaurants, beach shower and changing facilities, gym and a clubhouse for the nearby hotel. Each facility is unique and all together they provide a complete touristic experience to its visitors. Alongside the beach, the key feature of this park is its 50 year old black pine forest and the design challenges are to minimize the construction impact to the natural environment. As a result, the buildings were either positioned on the available area or being pushed towards the sea to preserve the forest. The form of the buildings was minimized in order to t into their natural environment while at the same time to gain the best view. The park is spatially divided into 2 parts due to the 2 main access roads, therefore 2 building prototypes were developed in order to enhance the recognizability of each land portion. Parametric design technique has been adopted throughout all design process i.e. form nding, structure optimization, facade penalization and construction documentation. Each building is site specic, being varies in sizes and different orientations to accommodate different function requirements. Together a group of them generate a new conguration that has the emphasis on the varieties of the indoor and outdoor spaces. Based on academic work at the Berlage Institute, enhanced by knowledge gained through design work in China, HHD_FUN practice in parametric architecture has, and will continue to move the margins of imagination for emerging architects, especially for young architects in China and the rest of the world.

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35 41 63.77 S 119 52 68.88 W

text by Fu Ming Cheng

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48

the design challenges are to minimize the construction impact to the natural environment

This project consists of 11 buildings spread along the 2 kilometers beach park

The buildings generate a new configuration that has the emphasis on the varieties of the indoor and outdoor spaces

Reaching the SEAsIDE

Each building is site specific, varies in size and orientation to accommodate different function requirements

The service buildings such as showers and toilets present a more convex facade, creating a sheltered feeling

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P lan

The structure is designed to integrate into the existing landscape, embedding and extending the natural contours present on site

Parametric design technique has been adopted throughout all design process

49

Hong Kong

Alvin Yip

Visual Archive

DATE OF COMPLETION :

May 2011 - ongoing


LOCATION :

Wan Chai
CONSTRUCTED AREA:

re-used existing place

Visual Archive is a non-prot community art space with a lifetime of three years. It is, simultaneously, a research project that investigates alternative development models in Wan Chai, a culturally diverse old neighbourhood in Hong Kong. With his strong interests in the social aspects in architecture and cities, Alvin has invented a newposition for himself - independent curator, and focuses on the process of formulating another possible city planning.He has engaged in writing journals, participated in numerous decisionmaking boards, teaching and researching in order to create a platform where he could formulate and implement his alternative city model via

collaborations with various agencies - one in which its citizens are not forgotten, and are part of the active participants in art creation. Dating back to the acclaimed Detour event in 2009, Alvin successfully transformed the deserted Police Married Quarters into a sand beach lled with creative exhibitions andactivities which the public could enter and enjoy, free of charge, in the middle of the CBD. Visual Archive is less-dened at this moment. Different from many gentrications in our city where the main focus lies on efcient construction time and best economical return, Alvin persuaded and collaborated with a likeminded developer to spare a little space and time for this art space on the rst oor of a service apartment block before redevelopment. On-going workshops, exhibitions and forums are organized with one consistent theme: embrace and engage with the local neighbourhood. The interior space has taken up a simplistic approach, using panels of zinc metal the common material for old letter boxes- to cover all walls for changing exhibitions. Externally, foldable metal shop gates are adopted to echo the surroundings. Downstairs, a western bar adorned in local Chinese fashion, is introduced to create an informal gathering place. Can this stretch of time produce a better awareness of the locals, synergize any changes, and emerge something unexpected? Nonetheless, it is this insertion one should applaud to, as it demonstrates to our society what could be achieved by deviating from the typical, with its innite intangible qualities and possibilities. The project Wan Chai Visual Archive is initiated as a collaborative research between PolyU School of Design and the Goldig group in Hong Kong.

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22 27 77.78 S 114 18 05.56W

text by Annette Chu

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WVA is an intense dialogue of inside-outside, public-private, modern-tradition The visual archive project organizes debates and promotes culture in its community with very different kind of means and events

l ooking for r oof c reature ALTERNATIVE CITY MODEL


Steel creature collaborated with Frank Havermans and local metalsmiths. The installation provokes building boundary and definition of illegal structure

Co-Creative DIALOGUES between old and new


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Temporary photo studio, where families make their own pin-hole camera before shooting

Adaptable room arrangement and Fan Lees magnet wall display system. The space has to function at different times a lounge, a community centre or an art workshop

53

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No profit community art space


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Taiwan

volunteers from every corner of Taiwan. These participants have driven the whole design & realisation process to adapt various situations. A series of community-based events were initiated not just by the team, but also by the participants. Social Amoeba thus evolved and grew organically in time and with the community engaged. It is worth noting that the idea of playing beyond the rules of the game has also fullled an important role in their decision making: initially assigned to design the interior, the team eventually subverted the assignment, and took the outdoor space. The decision to deal with outdoor space enabled the team to connect the public to the locality, and to expose the organic bamboo structure that has hosted many public events. In a time of scarce resources, the team has managed to rebuild the connection between designers, planners and user communities in a marginalised neighbourhood. For unsolicited practises, Social Amoeba can be an interesting reference - how it negotiated with the authorities, how it evoked public participation, and how social values were generated by using minimal means.

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CHAOTI CHEN + WORKSHOP LEVITAS


DATE OF COMPLETION :

2011
LOCATION :

Hualien and Kaohsiung, Taipei


CONSTRUCTED AREA:

0 M2
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Social Amoeba

In the past decades, mainstream architectural practices in Taiwan (or elsewhere) have been focusing mainly on commercial projects; socially engaged practices were out of the public interest and often considered as alternative. Today, an emerging number of young practices are re-dening the role of architects by working together with communities and generating new social values - such as the chosen team and their project Social Amoeba. Social Amoeba is about a collaborative team work, a series of workshops and a participatory process. In order to call for participation, social Media (Facebook) was incorporated during the process, gathering

2 3 0 1 0 8 . 7 1 N 120 66 60.04 E

Text by Chang Fang Luo

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S PA C E C R E A T I N G

Light workshop at Hualien Youth Home


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PLAYGROUND for strangers to connect


The Social Amoeba project in Treasure Hill Artist Village

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LIGHTING UP

Trash Art: an installation made with materials from Kaohsiung recycling plant

PLAN
0

15m

Trash Art, an installation made with materials from Kaohsiung recycling plant

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S ection

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Fish Lamp

Vietnam

VO TRONG NGHIA ARCHITECTS


DATE OF COMPLETION :

Binh Duong School

2011
LOCATION :

Di An town, Binh Duong


CONSTRUCTED AREA:

2029 M2

Vo Trong Nghia Architects, with ofces in HCMC and Hanoi, represent a new generation of architects in Vietnam. Thirty-six year old Vo (a Vietnamese architect trained in Japan) began his career creating elaborate structures of bamboo for cafs and bars in the Mekong Delta and Hanoi. His rst bamboo project was a spectacular Wind and Wind (wNw) Caf in Binh Duong province which included a pavilion with a graceful dome shape, created by 48 bamboo frames 10 meters high, with a 15-meter span with a 1.5-meter diameter oculus. Traditional Vietnamese techniques woove the mud-soaked and smoked bamboo together and high re-resistant water-coconut material covered it. The construction did not use any metal nails. His work also includes the transformation of a warehouse into the

Vietnamese pavilion for the Shanghai Expo 2010, built, not surprisingly out of bamboo. Although the ofce has thus far only used their developments in bamboo construction for the hospitality sector, they are anxious to apply their ingenuity with bamboo construction methods to other building typologies, particularly with housing in post-disaster contextsand the seasonal ood events that hit the Mekong Delta and central Vietnam with increasing devastating consequences. More recently, Vo Trong Nghia Architects has been developing what can be termed green architecture. In 2011, they completed in Binh Duong (a new city in a province of the same name, northeast of Ho Chi Minh City), a 800-student, 5300 square meter (private) junior and high school. The glaringly white sinuous plan building wraps onto itself to create two courtyards and optimally use the site. One courtyard collects the teachers rooms, gym, laboratories and library and the second the classrooms. The continuous volume that starts on ground level, and only uses one slope, is constructed of cast in-place concrete. On-site pre-cast concrete louvers, which serve as sun-shading devices, successfully create natural ventilation and playful light patterns. Airy communication spaces bridge the two sections with large balconies and staircases and overlook the courtyards, the classroom one which has a swimming pool and lush clusters of trees while the entrance court has less vegetation but a striking grid of concrete pavers separated by strips of grass. The entire building site has been elevated from the existing ground plane due to its low elevation and the building footprint itself has been raised on another platform of a few steps of red terracotta (the only color in the building). There is a clear articulation of the simple serpentine structure of the building and an almost whimsical arrangement of openings in the exterior screens facing the courtyard, thus animating the facades. In April 2012, the project was awaiting the budget to nish the green roof. Their newest work is not unlike the neo-modernism of Japan in the mid-1990s of architects such as Toyo Ito and early works Kazuyo Sejima. It also echoes the promise of tropical modernism that briey appeared in Vietnam in the 1960s in a number of remarkable public buildings, most notably by the architect Ngo Viet Thu.

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Text by Kelly Shannon

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D I S C OV E R I N G A N G L E S

The courtyard hosts outdoor facilities and gets animated during schooltime. The facade is covered by concrete louvers whose density is due to direction

BORDERLESS school and surroundings


PLAN

The benches under the trees provide intimate gathering places

Simple yet elegant facade

The winded building is climatic responsive for natural ventilation.

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BAC K TO T R O P I CA L MODERNISM

The serpentine plan forms two courtyards on each side

20m

The sloping green roof is an important new feature in the area, and the building itself became a beacon

63

India

The built becomes a platform shaded from the intense sun, where the living quarters merge at a deck under the tree. The tree is dense during the summer and sparse during the winter, allowing for the best blend of sunlight underneath. Maria and Kayzad of SHROFFLEN bring with their design process respect and nesse. Practicing in a city like Mumbai, these are rare qualities. The unnatural, circumstantial pressures of the city can devour the souls of any young architectural practice. Yet they do so with ease, taking complex and most often complicated briefs to nd something which should always have been but never before conceived. India nds itself at the end of a decade of prolic construction. Cities have grown exponentially over this period of time, towns have become cities and villages have grown into towns. Architecture has been seen at its most brutal. Architecture has become fetish.The Kashid farmhouse and its processes give us a little hope.

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SHROFFLEON
DATE OF COMPLETION :

House in Kashid

--LOCATION :

Kashid, Maharastra
CONSTRUCTED AREA:

139 M2
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A virgin site sloped towards a view. A tree, the contours of the land, the direction of sunlight and the seasons manifest a composition; a composition which balances these elements and nurtures them to their best sensuous memory. The only thing unnatural about the Kashid farmhouse is the oating still water, which reects the sky. Maria and Kayzad have managed in the process of building a farmhouse to re-imagine it as the shaded ground under a tree, where tired travelers stop to rest for a while. It is here that they notice the beauty of the landscape they were traveling through. It is here that they gain the strength to continue their journey.

1 8 4 1 2 0 . 3 0 N 72 91 18.82 E

Text by Gaurav Roychoudhury

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F O L L O W I N G T H E S I TE
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MUMBAI ARABIAN SEA

ALIBAG

KASHID

PHANSAD WILDLIFE SANCTUARY

A virgin site sloped towards a view. A tree, the contours of the land, the direction of sunlight and the seasons manifest a composition

A TREE, land and sun


VOLUMES WITH A CENTRE

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The tree is dense during the summer and sparse during the winter, allowing for the best blend of sunlight underneath

The built becomes a platform shaded from the intense sun, where the living quarters merge at a deck under the tree

PLAN

67

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there came a point when he decided to end his architectural career and move on to a different eld. With the success of the Jury project Bappy regained his lost hope. Gradually his condence returned. He felt that he could continue on his chosen path, to give form to his inner vision. More projects followed, leading to a maturing of his personal architectural language. My selection of Bappy is primarily because of the architectural language he engages in. I appreciate his sensitivity to the built environment and his efforts at coming up with architecture responsive to our geographic region. Secondly, I feel architects holding on to their ideological ground in the face the vagaries of the construction industry need to be encouraged and brought to the forefront of the international arena, to give them an opportunity to share their work with the world at large. This is based upon his interpretation of historic, cultural and climatic dictates of the Bengal Delta.

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Bangladesh

SHAHNAWAZ BAPPY
DATE OF COMPLETION :

Ruthna Residence

2007.8
LOCATION :

Ruthna tea garden, Moulavibazar, Sylhet district


CONSTRUCTED AREA:

280 M2
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I rst met Bappy as a recipient of the Berger Excellence in Architecture Award in 2010. As a student in Architecture school, Bappy was full of promise. His work consistently produced appreciation from teachers and peers alike. Bappy was preparing for a future leading to quality architectural work. Things changed when Bappy graduated from Architecture school. The reality of the construction industry was a shock, and adjusting to it was harder than he anticipated. The everyday realities of building in a dense, urban environment with the typical client- architect relationships eroded his earlier idealism. The inevitable disappointment set in. Ultimately,

24 22 20.18 N 92 08 16.24 E

text by Raq Azam

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THE JURY RIVER


70

PLAN

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The terrace, the pool and the river merge to from continuity with the landscape
Use of local materials and construction techniques

Merge the HOUSE with Nature


The pattern of the roof is reminiscent of local huts

G A R D E N T E R R aC E

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The entire building is at ground level

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T h e h o u s e i s a p r i v a t e B u n g a l o w i n t h e R u t h n a Te a G a r d e n

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Iran

this false layer. This political intention reduced the new form of the city into a modern mask while tradition is fully present underneath this shallow layer. As a result of constructing a nation-state through a political project, Tehran, in a historical transition, has become a modern metropolis, while there are neither signs of a modern state nor a nation in the modern sociological denition traceable in the body of the city. Today this metamorphosed village, by carrying all the disorders of an immature capital city, is rather a transnational Islamic megalopolis; another manifestation based on the eclectic mixture of Islam, tradition and contemporary values. It has elevated the fortress of a walled village as high as the fourth-ranked highest telecommunication tower in the world: a sign of Islamic state phallogocentrism. Tehran has lots of entangled gardens that make it a secure place for its inhabitantswith this project, Hamed Khosravi re-reads one of the rst visible layers of the palimpsest of the city. The Pairi or clay wall is symbolically projected next to an icon of the late modern metropolis: the Milad telecommunication tower, which now is being reincarnated in the postmodern corpus of a global city: a world trade centre, a 5-star luxury hotel and shopping mall. His architecture ironically illustrates this historical transition: Tehran the village has become the capital city and is being reincarnated once again into a corpus of a global village. In the functional complexity of the site, the inherited historical values are preserved in the natural topographic identity of the city; the massive construction symbolises a wall of an archaeological site while it gently touches the ground. The project celebrates a secured place shaped around intertwined gardens in the heart of the city, where environmental and symbolical issues are combined as the main concerns of the project. It appears as a reduced form in which beneath the modernist non-gurative form lays a metaphor of a historical process, the metaphor of an unnished project: a Modernity, made in Iran.

72

HaMed KHosravi MaHtaB AkHavan


DATE OF COMPLETION :

Pairi the clay wall

--LOCATION :

Tehran
CONSTRUCTED AREA:

293.300 M2

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In Simulacra and Simulation Baudrillard writes: To dissimulate is to feign not to have what one has. To simulate is to feign to have what one hasnt. But the matter is more complicated, since to simulate is not simply to feign: Someone who feigns an illness can simply go to bed and pretend he is ill. Someone who simulates an illness produces in himself some of the symptoms.

Tehran today is the same two-hundred-year-old village that was accidentally chosen as the capital of the Qajar dynasty. Not having developed through a consistent historical process, Tehran, as a simulator, often produces the symptoms of a capital city. Consequently, through its intense short history of urbanisation, it has produced an Iranian urban hyper-reality. This hyperreality as the representation of a capital city, is just able to produce the symptoms of an ill metropolis. However Pahlavis modernisation project accredited

354449.75N 512225.38W

text by Homayoun Askari Sirizi

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Commercial Mall

Rebuild paradise
PLAN
Paradise is a secured place surrounded by walls. (Modelling: Ali Zeinalzadeh)

Offices

Two gardens shape the core and the building surrounds them as the walls

Hotel Accomodations

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Pairi, the Persian origin of the word Paradise, means clay wall or the wall constructed out of earth
75

The Pairi is symbolically projected next to an icon of the late modern metropolis

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Entangled gardens as secure place

Jordan

MATTHEW BARTON EMAD SLEIBY


DATE OF COMPLETION :

Sleiby House

2012
LOCATION :

Amman
CONSTRUCTED AREA:

family of one of Ammans leading fashion tailors. Various housing prototypes have sprouted up in the capital based on nuclear-family living arrangements. This house is quite distinct. On one level it acknowledges the formality of expression manifest in the faades of the existing structure beneath it. Instead of making a statement against it, it actually builds on the formal undertones. When speaking about their approach in this design, Sleiby and Barton refer to guring a rational composition that builds on what the building may look like were it built to the maximum allowable height and given the existing architecture of the ground oor. They also refer to practices in Ammans old housing stock in which deploying simple details such as concrete brise soleil can be an effective solution for sun protection. In the overall composition of the house, the architects refer to the formal vocabulary of classical architecture. The Sleiby house and its extension can be seen as layered like a modern-day Greek order containing a base, a column (the capital yet to be added, were the building to grow further). Despite the classical and contextual formality, for one to think that this building can be easily read is somewhat delusional. Unlike the ground oor it rests on, the extension is structurally supported by one wide column supporting a lightweight concrete roof. The windows maintain the width of their ground-oor counterparts, though repeated in a denser rhythm. Due to such repetition, the resulting interior is suited to the modernist openplan main living space. The devil certainly lies in the details of this building.

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78

265 M2
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The Sleiby House is situated in one of Ammans lush neighbourhoods, Abdoun. The majority of the residences surrounding it used to be dominantly one-oor villa prototypes. This is no longer the case as neighbourhood densication has resulted in the expansion of residences to four-storey buildings. In such a medium-density neighbourhood additions to any existing structure have to be surgical in order to weave gracefully into the existing residential fabric. The extension of the Sleiby house, an existing one-storey family residence, certainly speaks to this. Vertically expanding into a second oor, the 265 m2 addition was designed to accommodate the extended

31 94 87.60 N 35 87 70.13 E

text by Sandra Hiari

79

Extension viewed south east

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from

the

PLAN
0 5m South facing loggia
0 5

Contextual FORMALITY

Open plan living room

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Kuwait

AGI ArcHitects
DATE OF COMPLETION :

Star House

2007-2009
LOCATION :

Bnaider
CONSTRUCTED AREA:

in the countrys coastline, from Al-Khiran in the south to Al-Maghasil in the north. The Star House by AGI architects, emerges within this context, predicting the unpredictable: the reclamation of an old land provides the opportunity for a new lifestyle. Therefore the house responds to the ambition of a new relation between the Kuwaiti contemporary Man and the nature of his territory. In Bnaider, they call them chalet, the weekend houses where the post-invasion generation rst played over the sand (Paul Virilio,1975). Along the plot, the construction of different levels of domesticity, inverting conventional programmatic features, is the surface and texture. Meandering down to the sea, the star house goes far beyond the noble vernacular that stands at Sheikh Ahmad Al Jaber rest house in Failaka island.A strange awareness of the moment provides AGI with different ways of translating common and conventional domestic uses into hybrid forms alternative images to what some named as the welfare aesthetic. The needs of the programme, together with an extreme ability to operate in larger spaces outside the primitive domain of the house, provide those with experience and knowledge to enable a wide range of architectural characters and tasks. In Bnaider, the Kuwaiti/Spanish team produced a sort of machinic proposition where each builds on the other: resident-residence, plot-house, seadesert; as a system of horizontal complementary re-territorialisations (Deleuze Guattari, 1980).

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5000 M2
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During the consolidation of Kuwaits post-oil society, the denition of public/common space evolved in two ways: (1) when it was dictated by the need for accumulation, in order to foster an acceleration in development (Kuwait Town Development, from 1951) or to concentrate and mobilise the means for oil extraction (land reserve for oil extraction, from 1975), public property was expanded; (2) Although, after Saddam Husseins invasion (Gulf War,1991), the need for the exercise of territorial domain, beyond the city limits, became an argument to occupy among other forms and types, the shoreline with the chalet, weekend houses, became a common pattern

284521.79N 481940.91E

text by Ricardo Camacho

83

PLAN
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The Main Entrance from the Desert

T H E P R I VA T E S I D E
Night view of pool and guest house

View from the roof of the Office looking into the bedrooms

Be nestled
The main facade overlooking the sea View from the Boat Loading Dock

A T H R E E - W aY S T a I R

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Main family living room

KU WA I T S COA S T L I N E

Turkey

PAB ArcHitects
DATE OF COMPLETION :

Tanyards Revitalization Project

(2011.10)
LOCATION :

Kirishane-Denizli
CONSTRUCTED AREA:

(145000 M2)

The last 10 years in the Turkish architecture scene witnessed major changes in the practice. These changes were closely related to the inltration of neoliberal urban policies in big cities, the increase in foreign direct investment, the export of largescale construction expertise to the neighbouring countries and the emergence of a new generation of architects who are well connected to the information and practice networks abroad specically during their education years. This boom of capital, foreign interest and information was then followed by a period of political change especially in local urban politics, economic crisis around the world and a search to reconstruct

the role of the architect in the domain that is left behind by a large-scale architectural ofces with 100+ employees who are working on all the major commissions in big cities. The young practitioners are now relearning what their positions entail; diversifying skills to move between different scales (from urban to product design, from publication to consulting), looking for opportunities outside of the major cities like Istanbul or Ankara, working in collaborative teams and trying to build their own breathing space away from the competition against the star architects. PAB Architects, which ts into the description of young practitioners above, is operating on various scales to understand the mechanisms that architects can encroach into for more inuence in the decision making processes. Their work ranges from the design and production of a storage unit to an intervention into a small citys fabric to strategize its economic revival. They are architects, urban researchers and also are involved in the publication of an architecture magazine, Betonart. The ofce works closely with material suppliers and manufacturers to understand the production process of unique problems embedded in each project. Their work deals with the issues of reuse, collaboration and limited resources not with grand gestures, big commissions and large budgets and in this way they are a good representation of the new generation of architects outside of the galaxy system. For the project presented in this book, which was an invited workshop where all the groups worked on various sites at different scales in Denizli, PAB worked in a collaborative model with local and foreign ofces. The central question was what economic revitalization meant for a small city and how various constituents came together in an alternative understanding of renewal.

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The existing dense settlement pattern is studied to identify old and worn-out workshops which cannot be restored or new but out of sync buildings

DO U B L E FACA D E

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AR CA D E S EXISTING
Boutique Hotel

NEW URBAN LIFE

L O F T S PA C E S

NEW OPEN AIR F AC I L I T I E S

The client of this project proposal was the Denizli Municipality, and the coordinators Arkitera Architecture Center, Kentsel Strateji Strategical Planning Office. Team: PAB Architects - Pinar Gokbayrak, Ali Eray, Burcin Yildirim + Samim Magriso, Zeynep Ceren Erdinc

L andmarks

work at neighbourhood scale


s ection

S ub S titutions

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RISING HIGH

park

market

shop

fashion street

boutique hotel

arts street

multi-purpose hall

uni axis

open air

Arcades filling the gaps in the pattern create a lively and continuous street life

Intervention models at building scale

89

Israel

hand with the clients and all the professionals and consultants who take part in the process. The architects also present a fresh approach to current design topics such asbuilding preservation and sustainability. Preserving without being conservative is the motto of projects such as an art school built on the abandoned old bus terminal in Tel Aviv, and a dance theatre built in one of Jaffas old harbour hangars. The ofces design process is a remarkable one. Each project is assigned to a design team that includes experienced architects working side by side with young designers and even students. Each member of the team plays an equal role in producing intelligent solutions that always take into consideration budget limits, local building codes and regulation, site limitations, etc. Erez Ella established HQ Architects in Tel Aviv in 2008, after returning to Israel from New York, where he was a principle at REX Architects, and earlier an associate at O.M.A. Mr Ella has also established and is currently leading the sustainable studio at the Bezalel School of Architecture in Jerusalem.

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HQ ArcHitects
DATE OF COMPLETION :

Multifunctional Cultural House

ongoing
LOCATION :

Old Jaffa Harbor, Tel Aviv


CONSTRUCTED AREA:

6000 M2
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HQ Architects is one of Israels young architecture ofces, yet with a diverse design experience with complicated cultural and public buildings, research, urban planning, and housing projects. At the moment the ofce is designing two theatre buildings, a hotel and an arts school, among other projects. The ofce introduces a unique approach to both design and working methods. Rather than imposing solutions by the architect, HQ believes that the design process is a collaboration merely guided and lead by the architect. HQs designs are not objects created by the architect, but rather the result of working hand in

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LANDSCAPE

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The ability to host several EVENTS


A public roof terrace is overlooking the Mediterranean sea The design is a renovation of old warehouse into a multifunctional cultural house and dance theatre

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PLAN

The project is born from a renovation of a old warehouse

DIFFERENT USES

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The main core space is a hall for traditional theatre or conference event

T H E E V E N T A N D T H E S H O W L EVE L

The show level allows for flexible theatre with unique dimensions and state of the art functionality

SECTION

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Lebanon

BERNARD KHOURY / DW5


DATE OF COMPLETION :

Plot 10283

--LOCATION :

Kferdebian
CONSTRUCTED AREA:

1255M2

do to survive -from the industrial revolution to the modern era- and the impact they have physically and metaphysically on the environment, it is inspirational to witness an invisible building; an invisible haven. To envision this project, the architects used the topography and relied on morphology studies. They almost rebuilt what was decayed through the years in a way that one enters the villa through what seems to be an impermeable formation of triangular structure, since the villa from the street level is quite obscure. Once you are inside, there is a long hallway, which leads to a gym and an interior swimming pool. Alongside the corridor wall there is a linear stair which leads to the lower level where the kitchen, a dining space and a living room are located. On that level two guestrooms are also located which are imposed from the private bedrooms above, resulting in a clear split, a street level [private and hidden] and a lower level [public and exposed]. On the other hand, just before the site drops dramatically into a rocky cliff an exterior swimming pool lays there so one can take pleasure in the outstanding panorama of the wild, untamed valley. Invisible architecture is not a new discourse for Bernard Khoury. One of his most renowned projects is actually an underground club, a camouage; call it a tomb, or even a bunker. The BO18 is a public memorial, a negative monument, a cosmos to forget and dance on the memory of the civil war. Twenty-two years have passed and yet the civil war inuences Bernards architecture consciously and subconsciously. Plot10283 is a private villa built on the philosophy of the collective memory.
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The invisibility of Plot #10283 reminds us that the presence of architecture is sometimes in its [dis]appearance. It is a project that is conceived on the mountains of Lebanon [Kferdebian] in an area where private villas are most dominant. Architects who usually build in that area are asked to create monuments more than dwellings, icons more than residences however, dw5 refused to do so. Instead they created a non-creation. They decided to go back to what architecture is in its fundamentality: a shelter, a refuge, a place to protect beings from the environment. Yet the project itself protects the environment from human beings. After realizing what humans can

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text by Jad Semaan

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C OV E R I N G
96

ORGANIZING THE INTERIOR

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Site plan

Plan at street level

Replace EXISTING topography


An invisible building; an invisible haven

P rotect

The project itself protects the environment from human beings

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FOLLOWING

South

elevation

INTEGRATED
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Romania

tensions between the inside and the outside, the need to explore space as a physical and material experience or to submerge into a timeless but bodily presence, the relation between static and dynamic elements that concur for the same space these are all qualities that share a vision based on a palpable and active presence around the architectural construction. Architecture is not only a shape, nor is it only a function. It is an active gesture that opens the materiality of constructions and seeks to mark out differences by appealing to basic space interactions. And yet the most surprising element is the architects constant and tireless intention, not only here but with other projects as well, to dene space by starting from an architectural object that unveils its crisp geometry through its relation to all the inherent tensions, dynamics, and constructions. UNULAUNU creates a balance between geometry, materiality, and interaction. The architects approach is a clear way of inviting people to explore architecture beyond the given form or function, to touch or to sense in order to understand space and its constructions. And ultimately, to understand architecture as a way of dening the inner conditions that inspire us not only to build, but also to create.

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UNULAUNU
DATE OF COMPLETION :

House of Architecture

2011-2013
LOCATION :

Novi Sad, Serbia


CONSTRUCTED AREA:

137 M2
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There is an inner consonance in all the projects signed by young architecture ofce UNULAUNU (one-to-one), one that is given by a close relation to the materiality of architecture. In a generation of young Romanian architects who often continue or re-interpret the Modernist architectural faults, UNULAUNU departs from a rather different approach, dening space not in its relation to transparencies, technologies, or the various mediums and needs, but in its relation to the material surroundings. There are several marks of an unusual and even fresh approach to architecture: the constant

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text by Sabin Bors

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100

North elevation

S ection

The interior space never reveals itself totally. The internal slope gives an outside character to the space, adding a 3rd dimension to it.

South elevation

On the outside a monolith marks at once, the presence of something, of space

PLAN

10m

On the interior the same space is defined in the opposite way, it becomes something that never gives away its total presence

TThe round whole emphasizes the non-functionalistic character of the building, distorting in the same time the scale

The tension between outside and inside


S T U DY M O D E L
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The walls of the building are bent in order to stiffen the structure, due to its thickness of 15cm

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A strong nonfunctional character


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Cyprus

NOA
DATE OF COMPLETION :

Exhibition Through a Broken Mirror

2009.11-2010.01
LOCATION :

Nicosia
CONSTRUCTED AREA:

310 M2

Not Only Architecture, a young Cypriot architectural ofce located in Nicosia, was recently founded by Spyros Th. Spyrou, Aggela Zisimopoulou, Charis Christodoulou and Martha Krassari. NOA has assembled an exceptionally varied portfolio of architectural media, in all its diverse forms, in a very short period of time. It includes a series of private and social housing projects, public interventions, interiors, exhibitions, competition entries and research related to urban design. Their works blend in with the context and explore the physical and sensory qualities of spaces and materials. Furthermore, their productive evolution adds to the creative and future development of

Cypriot Architecture. In addition, the richness of the Cypriot landscape which is often revealed through the alteration of light and shadow inuences their choices, materials and compositions. This fundamental relationship consistently forms ideal conditions for various means of spatial production. Combined with various objects and locations these elements form the basic components that portray the uniqueness of the Cypriot context. The interventions of NOA, from thought to creation, take up a position towards these natural conditions together with the physical relationship of human beings with space and their surroundings. These characteristics are evident in various examples of their work, altering in scale and situation. For instance, in the exhibition Through a Broken Mirror the Architecture of Zenon Sierepeklis, an atmosphere was shaped using movement, light and materiality as the main agents. The physical perception, recognised through an emotional sensibility, was designed and constructed in such a way that people could experience the attributes not only of the work displayed but of the event as a whole. NOA has begun a productive journey for the imminent architectural development of Cyprus. Besides, it is an apparent and rewarding attempt that could re-shape the transition between local and contemporary Cypriot architecture. In other words, the creation of a unique and beautiful architecture experienced through light, material, air and object. NOA partners Charis Christodoulou and Spyros Th. Spyrou were appointed through a competition procedure by the ofcial responsible committee to curate the National Participation of Cyprus entitled REVISIT in the 13th International Architecture Exhibition La Biennale di Venezia.

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text by Chryso Onisiforou

PUZZLING THE OLD

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Fragments reflect the architects work


The metal structures dialogue with the old Electricity Power House

PLAN
Exploring fragments

MODELS AS A TREASURE

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T R A N S PA R E N T P A R C O U R

The hidden room

107

The visitor gets familiar with the architects work through different views and movements

South Africa

2610 SoutH ArcHitects


DATE OF COMPLETION :

2610 transcends this condition, and goes beyond the discomfort in their quest to portray and ultimately alter the urban landscape, comprehensible to the many. Their rigorous and pragmatic ways (not to say methodology) of reading and mapping the South African context become the basis for an approach where place, presence and people are the primary generators of space and form. Stubbornly, they go beyond the visible and refuse to play safe; they rather follow the desire to make something extraordinary out of the common. Their continued work translates this position, no matter what scale, media or programme. From their extensive and varied portfolio, we would like to span their Informal City project to the Cooking School under the aspect of urban compounding, which we consider a South African spatial characteristic that describes many layers of the extremely different contexts we live and work in. 2610 succeeds to implement lessons learnt during their work in Diepsloot, an in/formal settlement, into the design of their own ofce/ home headquarter. With greatest respect for the work of 2610, we hope that more voices like theirs can make themselves heard in the future and thus make South Africa a better place to be and live.

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Informal City/ Cooking School

2012.06
LOCATION :

Brixton, Johannesburg
CONSTRUCTED AREA:

321 M2
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Nearly two decades after the rst free elections in South Africa, the legacy of apartheid permeates and weaves its way through the everyday of the city, competing with short-sighted postapartheid efforts, global economic challenges and residents DIY. This potent compound is - at times - becoming an insurmountable obstacle which drives many city makers almost to the point of throwing their hands in the air in frustration and resorting to either producing nice and glossy renderings that ultimately sell, or the design of a perfect shelving system for uncounted A4 folders with the documentation of endless process driven projects with little visible outcome.

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text by BLACKLINES

RESEARCH PROJECT
INFORMAL SETTLEMENT RECEPTION AREA, DIEPSLOOT

BOARDROOM PATIO LIBRARY

LOUNGE

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Tenure type relocation stand size 80M2 average unit size (self built) 8-36M2 initial residential density stands/ha 125 initial gross residential density stands/ha 76 Initial gross habitable rooms/ha 76 Potential gross habitable rooms/ha 342

1ha densification informal settlement

A continuous process of physical change

the Brixton Studio-Home affords a distinctly Johannesburg living experience

STAIRS

ROOF TERRACE c ourtyard


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In dialogue with the surroundings


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Greece

team with strong links to both Greece and Sweden, exploring ways to inhabit the environment. The existing stone retaining walls become habitable, the new plastered walls take the colour of the olive trees and the layout of each house adapts to the natural curves of the traditionally terraced landscape. Low-cost materials were preferred to respond to a low budget while carefully composing the interior spaces and nishes. Comfortable white rooms focus on large windows framing intensive views, a perfect setting for a vacationer.

114

y
PAAN ARCHITECTS
DATE OF COMPLETION :

OLIVe Three Vacation Houses

2011
LOCATION :

Kaliroi, Peloponnesus
CONSTRUCTED AREA:

306 M2
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Since the 1950s Greece has been branded as an ideal tourist destination. Glossy posters of breathtaking landscapes drew large numbers of people each year, resulting in a climaxing need for houses that spread from the hotspots of the Aegean Islands across the entire Greek territory. Today the landscape has been shamelessly dotted with villas as a result of the dispersive development promoted by current legislation. The question is how to keep up with the demand for housing while preserving the quality of the landscape. Paan give their own answer by merging the three Olive houses with the site, an olive grove in southern Peloponnese. Concepts of living are reformed by a

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115

text by Katita Chrysanthopoulou

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POSITIONING

The perfect SPOT


Each house adapts to the natural curves of the traditionally terraced landscape

116

D AW N V I E W

Guesthouse interior view

SECTION

PLAN

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The question is how to keep up with the demand for housing while preserving the quality of the landscape

The existing stone retaining walls become habitable, the new plastered walls take the colour of the olive trees

117

Bulgaria

successes during his studies. After completing the course he returned to Bulgaria, precisely to Burgas, the countrys fourth largest city, where he opened an ofce together with the very important Bulgarian architect Petko Yovchev. The ofce was named Atika Desgin, and shared space with the architectural ofce Atika Holding. In recent years, the designer George Zaykov has met with much success in Bulgaria, designing interiors that have been published in such well known magazines as brava casa, casa, dcor, etc. However, his most important works are his public projects such as hospitals in Burgas, an airport in Plovdiv, a theatre, international ofces and his latest project, the rehabilitation of the centre of Burgas, together with Akita Holding. At present the project has passed through 3 of its 5 phases and the city centre appears totally changed and beautiful. His biography appears rich enough for someone of his age. The project here featured is - a big villa in Varnas city parkwith view on the seaside. the house is unfolds on three oorshas a swimmingpool and a dependance for guests with spa and tness. The building is made in natural materials and is lit by a Dali system in RGB.

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GEORGI ZAYKOV
DATE OF COMPLETION :

Tailored House

2008.9
LOCATION :

Varna
CONSTRUCTED AREA:

1027 M2
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George Zaykov is a young, powerful, ambitious and creative designer, with one foot in the world of design and the other in the world of architecture. I could go on forever with positive accolades. I would like to present this gure in as brief a manner as possible. He was born on 4 July 1976 in the small Bulgarian city of Yambol. He graduated from high school specialising in sport. After graduating in 1999 he already knew that his future lay in the eld of design. He enrolled at the IED in Turin, with a specialisation in interior design, arriving at his rst success while a student with the design of stand for FIAT. There were undoubtedly other

431033.31N 275711.90E

119

text by Stela Andonova

120

PLEASE AT EASE

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EDONISTIC life
CLEAR AND BOLD
Luxurious design interior Different materials characterise the space

PLAN

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SECTION

a p r i va t e c i n e m a a t t h e h a r t o f t h e h ou s e

DOUBLE HEIGT

No detail is left to chance


121

But you can also turn around

Serbia

complex of buildings with respect. The basic idea was to offer an interconnected cluster of facilities for culture, art and the exchange of knowledge and experience, accommodating participants and visitors, in particular young professionals from the region. House B is one of ve buildings arranged around a courtyard that make up the ensemble. It is used for workshops and seminars. It occupies the site of a family home dating from 1878 which had to be demolished due to its dilapidated condition. The architects approach is direct and clear: a reinterpretation of heritage through the use of plain forms and contemporary materials. What they have designed is functional and refers to the memory of the place, like the special piece of furniture: a bench made from wooden beams that were a part of the roof construction of the demolished house, salvaged to continue living in a reinterpreted way. It is to be hoped that this contemporary makeover of a traditional ensemble will set a strong example for the revaluation of vernacular architecture and for giving talented young architects an opportunity to enrich the built environment.

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AUTORI
DATE OF COMPLETION :

House B

2011
LOCATION :

Mokrin, Kikinda
CONSTRUCTED AREA:

250 M2
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Mokrin is a small town in northeast Serbia, situated on the vast Pannonian Plain in the province of Vojvodina. It is a typical Vojvodina town characterised by a clear-cut linearity, applied to plot plans and the arrangement of houses on the plots. One of these larger housing estates is home to the new Terra Panonica cultural-tourist complex, designed by the young architects of Studio AUTORI.The architects faced a challenging task because of the manifold demands of the company, which is engaged in marketing authentic local produce and developing new trends in highend tourism. They were required to design ofces and educational facilities and to treat the existing

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Text by Vesna Vucinic

SECTIONS
124

+4.74

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PLANS

Multipurpose hall with the view to the pergola

+2.39

Wardrobe

SPACE for creative work

+0.00

Street faade
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Stairs

Courtyard faade / opened sliders

Student apartment

125

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Greeting Neighbours
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Finland

new university library for Helsinki University City Center Campus. There was an open competition for the library in 2008, and AOA won the rst prize. The site is in the center of Helsinki, just a stones throw from the main railway station by Eliel Saarinen. The library is surrounded tightly by commercial and ofce buildings. As approaching the building you can see it already from quite far in the street corner of Kaisaniemi area. The facades are made of dark red bricks as the old buildings nearby, but the curve glass openings make the brick-elevation look fresh and trendy. The idea of the architecture is to offer visitors different kind of openings: to the cityscape and inside the building. The interior is divided into spaces by curve holes in the oor plan. The main space through the seven-decker building is an oval form lobby. The spectacular high space with white solid railings helps the visitor to orientate in the library. There are plenty of different kinds of cosy reading places for the students besides the huge windows and the curve oor openings. The library will be opened to the public in the autumn 2012. Helsinki will get a bright new pearl when it is ready.

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Helsinki City Campus Library

AOA
DATE OF COMPLETION :

2012
LOCATION :

Helsinki
CONSTRUCTED AREA:

28000 M2
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AOA Architects is one of the most prominent young architecture ofces in Finland. It was founded in 2006 by architects Vesa Oiva (b.1973) and Selina Anttinen (b.1977) after the winning project of an open competition for Poltinaho residential area in Hmeenlinna. The housing project was a completion of an old military area. In AOAs entry the old military buildings were surrounded by circle housing blocks or chains of detached houses. It was a suitable solution for the greeny area. The rst part of the block was built in 2010. The circle red-brick apartment building has got already good reputation. The real breaking through of the ofce is the

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129

text by Pirjo Sanaksenaho

M U L T I P L E H E I G H T S PA C E S
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View from Fabianinkatu street

Blur STANDARD floor division


WATCHING OUTSIDE

View from Kaisaniemenkatu street

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Central void (under construction)

PLAN
131

typical floor plan (5th floor)

5th floor interior view

Poland

VROA / CH+ Architekci


DATE OF COMPLETION :

historical context. This realisation brings new arguments to the discussion of preserving Polish architectural heritage, searching for a new identity after 1989. The entire complex together with the monumental Centennial Hall was built in 1913 as a part of the Fairgrounds in Wroclaw. The restaurant was burned at the end of WWII, and only the structure survived. The building was remodelled for the Exhibition of Retaken Grounds a communist propaganda fair, when it became the ofce and magazine facility. As an early landmark of reinforced concrete architecture, it was listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 2006. The original project by Max Berg was an excellent example of a technical state-of-the-art. VROA/ CH+ decided not to follow the original technical solutions but instead proposed its contemporary equivalent. In this way it is the spirit of the project that is preserved and not its supercial form. Its dark presence next to the historical monument seems unapologetic yet respectful, edgy yet restrained, contemporary yet timeless. Its subjects are memory and the space-time continuum, but the mind/heart dichotomy is the axis around which it revolves. The project by VROA/ CH+ resonates so deeply with what can fairly be described as a triumph of discreet elegance. Its also a clear sign that young Polish architects deserve more attention and public commissions than they receive.

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Centennial Hall Pavillion

2010
LOCATION :

Wrocaw
CONSTRUCTED AREA:

4070 M2
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At a time when economic disparity seems to bisect every cultural and political paradigm, the most difcult ability one could possibly think of is a restraint. This winning project of the UNESCO authorised competition for the refurbishment and extension of an existing pavilion located directly beside the 1913 Centennial Hall by Max Berg proves to be an outstanding example of how young Polish architects are dealing with the current challenges of the profession. While most of the young ofces oeuvre is still dominated by small scale private commissions, the project by VROA Architekci and CH+ Architekci confronts enormous public programme and complex

51 10 78.85 N 17 03 85.38 E

133

Text by Sebastian Janusz

Auditor ium with cur tains drawn. Credit pictures: Kr zysztof Smy k

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134

Multipurpose hall looking to the outside

Triumph of descreet elegance


PLAN
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Unapologetic

yet Respectful
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sufciently detailed while also misty enough to allow the idea to be appropriated. They need to be brilliant but not too much, as this can be offensive. They need to be able to control expenditures while offering rich, dynamic solutions while also being open to others; they must be provocative but not overly, hard and indulgent at the same time. There are not too many young Hungarian architectural practices behaving like BORD Studio.

138

Hungary

BORD ARCHITECTURAL STUDIO


DATE OF COMPLETION :

Korda MoviePark Visitors Centre

2011
LOCATION :

Etyek, Alcsti t
CONSTRUCTED AREA:

102.71M2
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What is really absent in the training of Hungarian architects and urban planners is learning how to work with restrictions. BORD Studio is one of the few examples of those aware that restrictions are invariably one of the aspects of the equation that must be resolved. Instead of taking an ideal approach to design, they rst identify the restrictions that are part of the overall scenario and the rules they must abide by, because it is only within these rules that one nds the true degrees of freedom to develop a project. This is where the challenge lies. Young architects need to be convincing, able to express our elite culture to offer solutions that are attractive yet modest,

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text by Sndor Finta

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PLAN V - S H A P E D C U T AWAY S

A GLIMPSE behind the scenes of FILM industry

The single-storey building has an open floor plan with high ceilings to provide a striking contrast to the backlot sets

MONOLITH

The structure is essentially a vast marquee, framing and offering excellent views of the nearby studios.

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N E U T R A L A N D T R A N S PA R E N T

141

The exhibition hall and the visitors cafe were created to give visitors a full insight into filmmaking

Croatia

Medieval to the Modern. The building at number 7 is a sort of makeshift work of so-called active heritage conservation from the 1970s, when a couple of smaller buildings occupying the site were renovated, extended and connected. The Cinematheque, a rather small projection hall for some 150 spectators, was originally opened in 1971 on its upper oors. After forty years of intensive use it was in desperate need of renovation, not simply because of wear and tear. Obviously, with their very rst public commission, the young architects-couple faced an extremely complex task. A task they faced up to very well by logically continuing the series of adaptations that constitute Splits fascinating urban culture, revealing forgotten layers and adding other new ones. A slight spatial distortion to t the program, the introduction of daylight into darkness, shifting the interior colours to match the view once the windows were reopened. With this sequence of contextual decisions, a small but important cultural institution was successfully brought back to life, carefully reinvented in spatial and material terms, in other words, the terms of architecture.

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MMMM MAJA MILAT, MARIO MATIC


DATE OF COMPLETION :

Art Cinema Renovation

2009
LOCATION :

Split
CONSTRUCTED AREA:

225 M2
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Even though it sounds appropriate for any cinema in any place, in this specic case the Golden Gate is a highly contextual name bound to the actual location. The address of the Golden Gate Cinematheque is also quite signicant: Diocletians Street 7, right along the Cardo connecting the Peristyle with the Porta Aurea, the northern Golden Gate of the Roman Emperor Diocletians Palace. What was originally a prominent, vaulted axis of the Emperors retreat is now just a normal, narrow street in the historic centre of Split, at least at a rst glance. To a slightly more attentive observer the manifold historic layers appear, from the Roman to the

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text by Krunoslav Ivanisin

The renovation reveals forgotten layers and adds other new ones: a slight spatial distortion to fit the program, the introduction of daylight into darkness, shifting the interior colours to match the view once the windows were reopened

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BETWEEN NEW & OLD

Cinema lower floor (parterre)

SECTION

More than another BLACK box


Womens restroom ceramic tiling

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Gallery panorama

145

Slovenia

TASTE
DATE OF COMPLETION :

Return to Nature

2012
LOCATION :

Ptuj
CONSTRUCTED AREA:

250 M2

A classic ambition of every individual is to ensure a quality standard of living, often idealised in the form of a single family dwelling. However, the construction of such a building is no longer merely a realisation of ones dreams, but it is also becoming an increasingly prominent issue of ensuring the ethics and wider social acceptability of interventions in space. In contemporary architecture the ethic relationship with the client an individual is transitioning towards an ethical responsibility towards society and nature. Modern technologies offer an instant answer, but they potentiate the idea of a house machine on the one hand, while on the other hand they

give a false impression that it is possible to build anywhere simply by reducing the impact on the environment. The single family dwelling designed by Taste demonstrates an appropriate form of cohesion between a strong architectural idea and the paradigm of reducing the environmental burden. The house is located on the northern edge of the town of Ptuj, in an area of single-family residential buildings, dened primarily by its quiet rural character and the edge of a lowland forest. The edge as the focal point of the greatest spatial complexity has a signicant effect on the formulation of the building volume, the vertical allocation of spaces, and the selection of materials. The house distances itself from the existing building stock with its clear abstract architectural diction, while it seeks contact with the natural context through its uniformly designed faade skin composed of horizontal wooden slats. The visual design is emphasised by window openings embedded into aluminium proles, while the architectural mass is loosened by indentations and a vertical breakdown of the volume. The parents sleeping quarters are at ground oor together with the living area that gradually extends into the garden. The rst oor is composed of a larger common living and play area surrounded by the childrens bedrooms, each with its own terrace with attractive open views of the nearby forest and the old city centre. The logical, compact and sincere design, together with the technological solutions, shows how sustainability issues can be integrated into a highquality architectural language. The key question of sustainability is: how much architecture do we actually need? Just a little. And it must be done with taste.

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text by Ernest Milcinovic

F a C ade s kin
148

The terrace has attractive open views of the nearby forest and the old city centre

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PLAN
0 5m
Horizontal wooden slats

The parents sleeping quarters and the living area are located on the ground floor

Find the BALANCE


A larger common living and play area is surrounded by the childrens bedrooms

SECTIONS
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The living area gradually extends into the garden through larger openings and terraces

F AC I N G A L O W L A N D F O R E S T
The house is located on the northern edge of the town of Ptuj, in an area of single-family residential buildings

149

Technological solutions are combined with architectural language

Czech Republic

rst common design of a house in the town of Svitavy. The house was actually designed two years before the establishment of their ofce. During the course of ve years, since the studio was founded, the architects have designed an integral complex of houses, buildings and structures. The latest house that has recently been completed is located in Kraluv Dvur. The arrangement of the house is based on a square plan covered with a at roof. The space is lled with three closed cells (or modules) containing the inhabitants private rooms. Between the cells is a free glazed living space in combination with the outer shell made from modular sliding panels. By sliding the panels to the side and back, the inhabitants can change the mood of the house. By day, when the panels are closed, the house is closed in on itself. By night, the house shines unobtrusively through the panels. The house makes quite a different expression if the panels are pushed aside and the inside of the house can be seen. Searching for an original creative way has always been difcult. Today, when practically everything (from emotions to original architectural ideas) can be found on-line on the Internet, it is even more difcult. It is easier not to be original, and more difcult to be original.

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OV-A
DATE OF COMPLETION :

2010

House Kraluv Dvur

LOCATION :

Kraluv Dvur
CONSTRUCTED AREA:

225 M2
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The architects Opocensk and Valouch founded their studio in 2007. As the studio is small (consisting only of these two architects), the size of the designable buildings and structures is limited. On the other hand, they are able to devote a lot of energy to their designs. The architects prefer some austerity in their expression. The appearance of their buildings and houses is simple and straightforward without any phrases. The architects way of thinking and their creative ideas can be best seen in the charts that accompany their designs. Therefore, no extensive explanatory texts are required to interpret their creative intentions. They have won their spurs with their

49 94 64.01 N 14 03 52.29 E

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text by Alexandr Skalicky

Southview
152

Livingroom

B AC K S TAG E A R C H I T E C T U R E 2 0 1 2

PLAN

Unfenced GARDEN

Te r ra c e

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N o r t h-E a s t View

SECTION
153

Sweden

FoAM-Nordica
DATE OF COMPLETION :

Foodprints

2012
LOCATION :

and to demonstrate opportunities for urban food production. In the next phase of the project the team intends to stage a food performance, exploring a number of possible food-system scenarios guring in the toolkit, together with invited guests currently involved in the Norra Djurgrden (Stockholm) development plans. Each scenario combines an example from all eight themes: food logistics, cultural dimensions, ecosystem types, environmental challenges and benets, urban food sources, farming methods and urban elements. The aim is to disseminate knowledge and inspire a change in urban policymaking with a view to integrating food-system resilience into the urban planning process. But ghting climate change and environmental degradation is not just about nding technical solutions. The issue of how to transform our way of life to make it sustainable, locally and globally, needs to be addressed from a large range of viewpoints simultaneously social, political, economic, industrial, urban and environmental if such radical changes in our modes of living are to be achieved. Foodprints is an unusual architecture project in that it is non-object-oriented, multidisciplinary and modelled on natures eco-systems, considering the city as a living organism where there is no waste, only closed loops. It has no lesser ambition than to work towards a paradigm shift.

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Norra Djurgrdsstaden, Stockholm


CONSTRUCTED AREA:

--B AC K S TAG E A R C H I T E C T U R E 2 0 1 2

A Polish/Italian architect now living in Sweden after a childhood in South Africa and studies in both the USA, UK and Sweden, has teamed up with a Swedish industrial designer to work on one of the crucial issues facing the worlds constantly expanding unsustainable cities: food security. They have set out on their Foodprints journey with the aim of exploring how the discipline of biomimicry can promote urban food resilience and biodiversity. The rst step was to design a discussion toolkit, a biologically-centred ruler, to throw light on the complexity of food culture and on the signicant impact this has on our environment

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text by Susanna Malzacher

coal oil nuclear

INP UT

oo S f d

tim

go o

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brain immune system

university, library, school legislation, police, court parks, gardens

lungs

Urban food CULTURES

156

ds be r en er

water fuel

organic waste (landfill/sea dumping) emissions (co2, no2, so2) OUTPUTS solid waste liquid wast LINEAR METABOLISM inorganic waste (landfill)

gy

URBAN_METABOLISM
Two diverse flow patterns of resource inputs through a city: one is a linear system, whilst the other is a closed circular system source: Herbert Girardet

FARM BELT renewables solar economy food energy INPUTS goods water recycled organic & inorganic waste OUTPUTS reduced pollution & waste

digestion system stomach, liver, kidneys

garbage dumps, sewage food markets

timber fuel

CIRCULAR METABOLISM arteries, veins roads, railways, waterways

nervous system

commuication networks

ECOSYSTEMS FUNCTION s uperorganism

Author and educator Herbert Girardet describes the city as a complex living body with a variety of interacting organs, similar to our human bodies. Source Herbert Girardet, Cities, People, Planet

FARMING+
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There is an inherent relationship between the city and how food arrives on our plates

SCENARIOS

Peak

Technology

Values

Communal

Regeneration
157

Farming+ was a project instigated during Foodprints in order to trace the food strategy for future urban developments in Goa, India

5 scenarios which holistically capture the future of possible food outcomes for Norra Djurgrdsstaden

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Urban Food
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close to people and everyday life. The studio aims to rst nd interesting projects and problems to be solved, and then nd the client. Not the other way around. To create enthusiasm and participation in their processes Fantastic Norway uses local and national media. Their philosophy within communication is: If you want to discuss the problem, start with the fantastic. Through the years the ofce has written more than 60 essays in local newspapers, made cartoons and publication and recently hosted a television series on The Norwegian Broadcasting Channel (NRK). Fantastic Norways credo is that all projects are stitched together by the stories and lives of the people involved. Every client is different; every place is in some way peculiar. Fantastic Norway aims to embrace this fact and through dialogue transform it into architecture. Fantastic Norway is by far one of todays most promising Norwegian architect-rms. They have already won several international architectural awards.

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Norway

Fantastic NorwaY
DATE OF COMPLETION :

Dialogue

2014
LOCATION :

between Rosenholm Campus and the Station


CONSTRUCTED AREA:

330m long
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antastic Norway was founded in 2004 by Hkon F Matre Aasard and Erlend Blakstad Haffner. Their primary ambition was to create an open, inclusive and socially aware architectural practice and to re-establish the role of the architect as an active participant and a builder of society. The heart and soul of this practice is a red caravan that functions as a mobile platform for architectural discussions, debates and workshops. Fantastic Norway uses the caravan when they gather ideas, suggestions and local knowledge for the projects they work on and utilise the collected information in the design process. The caravan is a new platform for architecture, down to earth and

59 49 29.55 N 10 47 25.01 E

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text by TYIN Tegnestue Architects

Along the 330 meter long bridge each of the four turrets brings practical and poetic qualities into the forest area below

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The bell tower

The project is an elevated promenade to improve the stretch between Rosenholm Campus and Rosenholm Station

Start with the fantastic

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The walk from the station to the office complex includes walking throught a tight, clean cut in a rocky hill, past an out door fire place, through an icy steel mesh, inside a bell tower and through a high rise bird dwelling

163

Austria

soma
DATE OF COMPLETION :

Pavilion in Yeosu, South Korea. The building is composed by cylindrical structural bodies the client wanted a part of the faade to be a media faade. But the architect wanted the architecture itself to play here, an analog media faade, so to speak. Together with Knipper Helbig, an engineering ofce in Stuttgart, they have developed a kinetic faade that does not work mechanically. According to bionics principle each slats on the facade opens like the gills of a sh and closes again, thus ensuring - according to the time of the day - more or less light in the building. While most of the other pavilions will be dismantled at the end of the Expo 2012, the building by soma will remain and serve as a symbol of the former industrial harbour. The approach of soma is similar in both Austrian and international projects: it is an intuitive approach, marked by the joy that drives them to explore something. The only difference is that in their home country - now at least - only smaller commissions are available. The trust in young ofces in this country is usually too low. The design for the tower in Taiwan by the way - even though it will not be built is also noteworthy. In this competition they won the second prize behind Sou Fujimoto. The design is a zero-carbon construction that combines high-tech and lowtech, and would be composed of individual bers, whi ch diverge and then merge back to node.

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One Ocean Pavilion

2012
LOCATION :

Yeosu, SouthKorea
CONSTRUCTED AREA:

6918 M2
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Whether it be the extension of the Building Academy in Salzburg, a temporary art pavilion, an observation tower in Taiwan or an Expo Pavilion in South Korea - beauty on itself does not exist for the four architects of soma. A building for them must demonstrate that form is conrmed by function. Soma architects are always looking for more value, for something new, they are extremely keen to experiment and also oriented on implementation. The fact that the buildings really function and that they keep the spirit of the design after being realized, is due to the great condence they put in the beginning plan. A good example is the Expo

34 44 53.80S 127 45 0.08W

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text by Anne Isopp

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1 foyer 2 theme exhibition / preshow 3 theme exhibition / main show 4 theme exhibition / post show 5 cafe 6 vip area 7 mechanical 8 swimming platform 9 stairs and escalator to

best practice area

K I N E T I C M E D I A F ACA D E
7 6

Multilayer spatial experience


Conglomeration of solid vertical cones in constant negotiation between water and land

166

Moving lamellae in an open position


5

THE MAIN ENTRANCE ON OCEAN PLAZA

A N E W M E A N D E R I N G C OA S T L I N E

We experience the Ocean as an endless surface and in an immersed perspective as depth

25m

SECTION
+25.00 +21.50 +15.91 7 7 7 8 9 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 theme exhibition / preshow theme exhibition / main show theme exhibition / post show cafe vip area best practice area mechanical main cone viewing platform
0

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PLAN
0 25m
1 foyer 2 theme exhibition / preshow 3 theme exhibition / main show 4 theme exhibition / post show 5 cafe 6 vip area 7 mechanical 8 swimming platform 9 stairs and escalator to

F2 +9.00

F1 +0.00 EL +6.70

9 H.W.L. +3.770 M.S.L. +1.808 L.W.L. 0.000

25m

best practice area

The pavillion embodies the Expos theme and is constructed in a former industrial harbour

The facade covers a total length of about 140 m, and is between 3 m and 13 m high

167

Italy

O
CAFEArcHitettura
DATE OF COMPLETION :

in elevation, cladded with a perforated brown metal sheathing from which a white volume with panoramic view juts out. The building unravles a form that creates a piazza in the front opening the winery to the people, and echoes the surrounding hills. Thanks to this form it can accommodate inside different interconnected spaces for both production and ofces, ending in the overhanging room where the tasting area is. The treatment of the exterior surfaces with perforated metal panels the strongest identity feature- is inspired by the sparkling Prosecco bubbles. At the back, open to the wine production buildings, the Wine Center instead breaks away from the metal sheathing in a more common, everyday look, due to the pure whiteness of the plaster. Cafarchitettura represents an exception, but also a conrmation of how difcult it is for young people to emerge in Italy. Also in this case looking at other works of theirs, one nds designs, installations, interiors and contests won but not realized. Despite an initial convincing test, they struggle to nd an opportunity to challenge their skills again. In Italy the greatest difculty for young people is the lack of real opportunities for putting their talents to the test. And the impossibility to determine whether their potential can be turned into reality leaves the ofces suspended in a never-ending state of unexperienced youth.

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ProseccoWine Centre

2011
LOCATION :

Valdobbiadene
CONSTRUCTED AREA:

3390M2
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The typical CV of Italians under 35 is full of unrealized projects, collaborations with famous ofces and small renovation jobs. Only the last ones turn into real works and represent the real debut in construction, mostly thanks to demands coming from relatives and friends. There are plenty of competitions won, but rarely actually carried out. Only a special occasion can change this situation such as happened to Cafarchitettura, the winners of the competition open to students and new graduates held by the Val DOca winery for its new showroom. They stood out for their non-linear building, with angles and projections both in plan and

455405N 115942.86E

169

text by Diego Barbarelli

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INTERFACE production and consumption


PLAN

170

5m Behind the panels T h e S h ow ro o m

S PA R K L I N G A T N I G H T

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JUTTING OUT

171

Inviting entrance square

The tasting room is a panoramic outlook

Germany

f
Birk und HeilMeYer ArcHitekten
DATE OF COMPLETION :

played an emblematic role, both as functional elements as well as symbols of prestige. Today, this typology has returned in vogue as an ideal model for experimenting with forms, materials and structural feats at the limits of static design. The interpretation offered by the team of Stephan Birk and Liza Heilmeyer represents a bridge between tradition and the future. Using an ancient material wood they have realised a work that is aligned with the most recent trends in German architecture: essential, minimalist, and sensitive to the landscape. Awarded numerous prizes and a special mention in the prestigious 2011 Mies van der Rohe Award, with the Jberg tower Birk and Heilmeyer have conrmed their predilection for a soft architecture that, discretely inserted within the environment, utilises its models and instruments in the search for an optimum equilibrium. As a technological lightweight machine, the tower pays homage to sustainability. Its daring morphology blends with the image of lightness, guaranteeing a minimal impact within the territory. Situated in the periphery of the city, at the edge of a forest, the structure is inserted within its context with the grace of a sapling that draws its expressive force and justication from its symbiosis with nature.

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Jueberg Tower

2010.4
LOCATION :

Hemer
CONSTRUCTED AREA:

Height: 23.5 m Diameter Foot: 6.0 m


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The small German city of Hemer in Westphalia has recently come to international attention thanks to a project realised for the Regional Gardening Expo: the Jbergturm, a twenty-meter tall panoramic tower that scenographically enriches the urban skyline and valorises its qualities, assuming the unusual role of a sponsor. The project is the work of the Stuttgart-based ofce of Birk and Heilmeyer that, in only nine months of work, in collaboration with the work of the ofce of Knippers Helbig Advanced Engineering, has realised an agile vertical construction with a characteristic structure in wood slats. In the history of architecture towers have always

512310.20N 074653.50E

173

text by Monica Zerboni

Marking the transition between city and landscape


The look-out tower stands out at the end of a long stair

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ENTRANCE

PLAN
The principle is based on the hyperboloid used for steel constructions by V. G. Suchov (1853 1939)
Jbergturm | Lageplan | Site | 1:500 | Birk und Heilmeyer Architekten BDA

175

The structure consists of 240 straight timber slats of Siberian larch (glued laminated) with a cross section of 8 x 8 cm

Reacting 360-degrees

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Denmark

The building I have selected is the Natural Science Center in Bjerringbro, Denmark, which was nominated for the Mies Van Der Rohe Award in 2010. The center is an educational laboratory for the natural sciences and the innovative design by NORD creates a setting well suited to inspire both students and teachers alike. Located on a hillside north of Bjerringbro the solitary standing building has been rightfully compared to a lighthouse. The monolithic cylinder, with a couple of thoughtfully placed cuts in its volume, is clad mainly in translucent u-glass proles turning it into a beacon of light at dusk. The simple and iconographic exterior, with its smooth and homogeneously glazed faade, is contrasted by the raw aesthetics and the spatial diversity of the interior. Here you are met with unmasked mechanical installations, oors and walls of exposed concrete and a dynamic layout of vertically interconnected spaces. In the educational spirit of the project a Natural Science Garden, open to the public, is planned to grace the generous grounds of the center.

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NORD ArcHitects CopenHagen


DATE OF COMPLETION :

Natural Science Center

2009
LOCATION :

Bjerringbro
CONSTRUCTED AREA:

2.560 M2
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NORD Architects was established in 2003 by founding partners Johannes Molander Pedersen and Morten Rask Gregersen. Working within the eld of architecture, urban development & innovation processes the practice puts great emphasis on the design process itself. Incorporating user involvement and facilitating various workshops with parties relating to each project is characteristic of their approach. In their body of work one can discern a preference for larger scale urban strategies, meanwhile NORD has proven equally skilled in realizing smaller scale projects.

56 36 57.18 S 09 67 42.26 W

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text by Kristjn Eggertsson

LIGHT TOWER

SOLITARY BUILDING

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180

UNMASKED INSTALLATIONS

PLAN

To make the building an open learning platform the architects have designed it with visible installations Located on a hillside north of Bjerringbro. The facade changes character when weather and light conditions change

The building is a monolithic cylinder generated in a series of geometrical transformations

The monolithic cylinder beacon of light at dusk

DETAIL

Education and knowledge PRODUCTION


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SECTIONS

FLEXIBLE AREAS

The facade openings produce a different reading of the interior space


181

Inside the building there are differentiated spatial experiences

Dynamic layout of vertically interconnected spaces

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Setting well suited to inspire students


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Switzerland

by outreaching foundations that literally anchor the building onto the terrain. Grey wooden shutters close the three boxes as if they were cupboards. The authors of this building, Yves Dreier and Eik Frenzel, established their ofce in Lausanne in 2008 after having worked, among others, in Herzog & de Meuron. The pavilion they have built at Congnon can be considered as representative of the current Swiss young architectural scene: one could say that this building takes on the tradition of the Swiss-box. This theme has been associated to projects and buildings by the famous aforementioned architects, whose early work is often described as minimal architecture. In addition to the afnity of the pavilion in Congnon to the Swiss-box, one should also remark that Dreier Frenzel have adapted their boxes not only to the programme and to the terrain, but also to an economic situation with which young architects are often confronted: a return to the essence, to structure and construction, is imposed by the limited budget at disposal. If this pavilion exudes a minimal language, this is not due to a stylistic or formal search, but rather to an appropriated pragmatism.

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Dreier Frenzel ArcHitecture


DATE OF COMPLETION :

Storage Kitchen and summer Room

2009
LOCATION :

Confignon
CONSTRUCTED AREA:

32M2
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This pavilion, built in Congnon by the young Swiss architecture practice Dreier Frenzel, houses a storage space, a kitchen and a summer room. It is located on the sloping garden of a single-family house with views over the city of Geneva. Following the tripartite programme the architects conceived three modules of differing dimensions that resemble a sequence of boxes attached to each other. The whole construction is built in exposed reinforced concrete, which protects and divides the spaces while providing the structure of the building. Two walls and three pillar-walls emerge out of three slabs that touch the slope only on one of their edges. The generous cantilevers are enabled

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185

text by Cornelia Tapparelli

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PLAN

In sequence kitchen and summer room

SWISS-BOX

S E C T I O N A N D E L E VA T I O N S
Gently accomodated along the slope

A smal pavillion as garden extension of a family house

mid-summer retreat

When open the space totally merges into the garden

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Shutters detail

Nigeria

NL, KUNL ADEYEMI


DATE OF COMPLETION :

Makoko Floating School

2012.12
LOCATION :

Makoko, Lagos
CONSTRUCTED AREA:

210 M2

valid and vital obligation. NL shapes architectural and infrastructural solutions in developing cities by bringing together international expertise through a multi-disciplinary and collaborative practice (quote NL). In conjunction with the personal experience of Kunl Adeyemi, a Nigerian born and educated architect. After practicing in Nigeria, Adeyemi worked at the Ofce of Metropolitan Architecture (OMA) in the Netherlands for 10 years. There he led the design and construction of signicant public buildings and infrastructural projects around the world. Having founded NL, Adeyemi leads a project on Makoko, an informal oating settlement which houses about 100,000 people who make up a large part of the informal workers who support the city and its growth, and is located in the very centre becoming a landmark. Providing over one third of Lagos sh supply and most of its timber, for nearly a century, Makoko has thrived on shing and sawing industries. Having adapted its lifestyle to its environment it has become a city on water. There are no roads, no land and no modern infrastructure yet it is a highly dense and urbanised area. Although overall living conditions are very poor, peoples adaptation to their environment offers valuable insights for addressing the imminent challenges of rapid urbanisation and climate change namely rising water levels - in coastal cities.The area is still susceptible to ooding due to rising water levels, as was the case in October 2011 when the city experienced heavy rainfall (quote NL). NLs proposes to build a oating nursery and school for the community. The project will also provide a exible multi-use space that can be used outside school hours by the entire community for a range of purposes.
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The fact that our world is urbanising at an unprecedented pace is well known. The fastest growing cities are located in developing regions. Lagos, Nigeria, is presently growing by 53 new citizens each hour (births and newly arrived migrants). The population is expected to reach 25 million by 2015, which would make it the third largest city in the world. In our age of Mega-Cities, current planning and architectural approaches are all too often dominated by western city-making approaches that barely t todays realities and demands. This added to the often lack of cultural understanding of on-going processes of urbanisation - how cities are changing and how citizens interact with cities means questioning and rethinking institutionalised planning recipes is a

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text by Rachel Stella Jenkins

OVERVIEW
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Makoko is an informal floating settlement which houses about 100,000 people who make up a large part of the informal workers who support the city and its growth, and is located in the very centre becoming a landmark. Credit picture: Ade Adekola

Design for a floating School for the water community of Makoko located in the city of Lagos, Nigeria

A floating community
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Credit picture and renders: NL

NLs proposes to build a floating nursery and school for the community. The project will also provide a flexible multi-use space that can be used outside school hours by the entire community for a range of purposes

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The Netherlands

Anne Holtrop
DATE OF COMPLETION :

artist completed a research project entitled Articial Arcadia, in which he investigated unplanned territories in The Netherlands, used by the Dutch for recreational purposes. The people captured on lm were driven less by the qualities of space, rather by the conditions imposed by the equipment employed (mountain bikes, motocross motorcycles, kite-surfers). The Trail House is born out of an analogous principle: in the natural and indeterminate space of SITE2F7, people had traced a series of paths over time according to their desires and their needs, which Holtrop ideally rendered threedimensional in his dwelling. The house, like the equipment used by the subjects of Princens images, is the interface through which it is possible to read the site. From the Trail House one has a view out and, beyond the hedges; it is possible to continue to observe the extension of the structure. In some points, sitting with your back to the wall, you can touch the opposite wall with your feet. This generates a number of minor rooms and hoops by the curvilinear form of the pavilion, where Holtrop placed furniture that functionally determine the spaces required by a home. They are ambiguous spaces, in which the canons of dwelling disappear: the perspective created by endless vanishing lines and symmetry are erased.

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Trail House

2009
LOCATION :

Almere, SITE2F7
CONSTRUCTED AREA:

Endless
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The site of the Trail House was once at the bottom of the sea. SITE2F7 is characterised by a uniform nature that conceals the articial origins of the surrounding territory. The architect conceived of its form beginning with the patterns of a number of spontaneous paths present in the area, generated by the crossing of people. Holtrops works have a brief lifecycle. They colonise a space for only a few months and, similar to the work of Thomas Demand or Gordon Matta-Clark, all that remains is photographic documentation. It is thus no accident that the Trail House was photographed by Bas Princen. In 2004 the Dutch

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text by Giampiero Sanguigni

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Bend and split through the LANDSCAPE

A M B I G O U S S PA C E

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The plan, as an objet trouv of a landscape element, has defined characteristics without being formed by its architectural function

The house has a view totally open to the landscape and the distinction between inside and outside is lost

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BRIEF

LIFE

CYCLE

Inside there are ambiguous spaces, in which the canons of dwelling disappear and the functional division of spaces is determined by the location of different furniture

Holtops works colonise a space for a few month and all that remains is photographic documentation. Trail House was born in the natural and indeterminate space of SITE2F7. Credit pictures: Bas Princen

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Belgium

PT ARCHITECTEN
DATE OF COMPLETION :

Cadix Square

2015
LOCATION :

Cadixstraat, Antwerp
CONSTRUCTED AREA:

transforming it in a quite scattered semi-industrial, semi-rural densely inhabited landscape. This stealth invasion that turned especially the Dutch speaking side of the country into a witless urbanized mat, has been longly investigated and also criticized. The tendency now is to try counterbalancing it, recovering cities as the main gravity points of the territory, translated mostly in densication and transformation of the existing fabric. This is one of the main issues that in 1998 urged the Dutch speaking governement to re-established the institution of the Vlaamse Bouwmeester (Flemish Building Master) who cares for the improvement of the living quality in the built environment. One of the most relevant intruments enforced by the Vlaamse Bouwmeester is the Open Oproep (Open call): a list of public open competitions that since then fostered great chances for both young and established architecture practices to engage in several public tasks. The project for Cadix square is the winning proposal of an Open Oproep. The Cadix area in the former harbour of Antwerp, close to the historic centre, is under main redevelopment, it will maintain its maritime character and transform into a fully edged living area hosting nearly 10 times the inhabitants it now has. The main selection reason for the winners has been the importance that PT architects gave in the design process to the wishes expressed by the inhabitants of the area, as well as the evolutive format of it that will adapt in time according also to the newcomers.

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19.400 M2
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Architecture in Belgium since middle ages has mostly relied and thrived on private commission, witnessing qualitative production peaks during guilds time and the colonial economy of Leopold II in late 800 for instance. During such moments architecture production had a great impact on the form of the city as a collective project. Especially in the times of Leopold II urban visions were carried out in a complentatary way though not frictionless- to the distributed private wealth, and shaped many of the most important Belgian cities. After WWII this unity was not recovered and citizens gradually ed the city sprawling in small constructions that consumed the territory

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text by Bernardina Borra

WATERFRONT

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Flamish granite

vegetation

vegetation

vegetation

vegetation

vegetation

concrete

concrete

concrete

concrete

concrete

vegetation

concrete

concrete

wood

LANDSCAPE is the base, people its activators


Cadix is a neighbourhood in progress in the old harbour district Eilandje in the north of Antwerp. Massive housing projects are planned and population will multiply in a few years. The park/square is designed to be evolutionary just like the neighbourhood itself. A tram line will cross the square and the former warehouse will be re-used as a covered public space

Opening the waterfront to the public is one of the main conditions to regenerate the maritime functions and exhalt it as one of the most distinguished features of the neighbourhood

WINTER

Around the square are planned new housing, a school, and services for elderly people. The area will cater a diverse social mix in terms of origin and age of the people using the open space in different modes and times of the day during the whole year

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SUMMER

The landscape gradually turns from park into square in order to collect different potential open space use according to inhabitants wishes and seasonal changes

The project has already been discussed in several meetings with the inhabitants. the definitive design is adapting to the outcome of this open discussion and the square will be implemented before end 2015

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Evolve in time
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Algeria

Masterplan for The Mzab Valley

MAGDA BENDANI
DATE OF COMPLETION :

2007
LOCATION :

Mzab Valley, Ghardaa


CONSTRUCTED AREA:

12.000M2

of the Mzab Valley). She has acknowledged the Mozabites social values and environmental factors and embedded them in the spatial organization. Located within the Algerian Sahara, the Mzab Valley was listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site for its exemplary nature of traditional human settlements, faultlessly adapted to the local environment. The uniqueness of the Mzab Valleys natural landscape, social habits, traditional architecture, and building techniques are signicant tourism assets for the region. However, the Mzab Valley is witnessing a serious housing shortage and is considerably lacking structures and services for visitors. Seeking to address these shortages, the architect created the opportunity to combine function (housing and tourism facilities) with the Mozabites natural environment and socio-cultural needs. The result is a troglodytic architecture that hunts for durability. In her view, only the Mozabitians sustainable way of thinking and acting would ensure returns for local inhabitants and guarantee a suitable use of local resources without compromising future generations. She responds to the housing scarcity by juxtaposing compact habitats based on the Mozabitian lineage and habits. Following the slope of the rocky site, she combines introverted spaces that ensure privacy and female life, with common semiextroverted spaces for mens activities. In addition, she proposes a subterranean hotel dug into the Mzab rock, an efcient spatial organization that ensures protection from the Mzabs arid climate and is seamlessly integrated into its environment. The project exhibits the uniqueness of the Mzab Valley and forces the visitor to actively interact and learn from the traditions of the Mozabites.

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Architecture could carry a more local signicance, if it would consider the natural environment and social relations in which culture plays a central role. In Algeria, more than ever, an ethical and political awareness is needed among all actors to make today and tomorrow more desirable and appropriable. The drawings of the project have been a collaboration between Magda Bendani and GANFOOD Grac design. Contentwise the design for the Mzab Valley in Algeria is the result of an accurate consideration of specic relationships between the social and spatial contexts of the Mozabites (inhabitants

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text by Samia Henni

M Z A B VA L L E Y
Working on the Mzab valley does not imply the imitation of Mozabites forms, but the understanding of its quintessence

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A A

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D E S I G N P R I N C I P L es

BB PLAN

Create TROGLODITIC spaces


PART 1: HOUSING pROJECT LITTLE KSAR

A A BB CC
A collection of fragments

CC

Terrace buildings integrated in the landscape


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PART 2: T H E H O T E L C AV E

Typology

Master Plan

GROUNDFLOOr

1 STF L O O R

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France

Nicolas ReYMond
DATE OF COMPLETION :

Archipelago

2010
LOCATION :

young urbanist by Ministry of Sustainability, and the second one in 2012 as young architect in a selection by the the Ministry of Culture. His ofce is relatively small, it stands out as being perfectly adequate to his way of working. In a constant search for new things, his teaching and writing are deeply part of his practice. While urban is always at the top of his list, he questions the act of building in our contemporary environment. He claims before all else to be an architect. Strong and clear concepts, followed trough with careful attention to detail, characterises his work. Some of his recent work with Parisian apartments makes this obviously clear. Archipelago is a second prize-winning proposal to an open competition, done by Nicolas Reymond in collaboration with Julien Joly Architecture. In Switzerland, many competitions offer young architects a chance to measure themselves against established and renowned ofces. Typically, this is the kind of large-scale project that architects are not frequently offered to work on. Located in a suburban context near Lausanne, the project tempts to compose a new city life with a programme of mixed uses: retail and dense residential/public space: prospecting for a new response of how to create shopping spaces for the coming century. Far from the big shopping malls one can imagine, this project attempts to nd a new sensory experience, involving different layers. Credits portrait picture: Gaston Bergeret.

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Chavannes-prs-Renens, Switzerland
CONSTRUCTED AREA:

150000 M2
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In France, where urban planning is often detached from the question of architecture, Nicolas Reymond Architecture is part of a new generation of architects with a global approach. He masters diverse sized projects, from furniture to small apartments to houses and cities. The variety of scale of his practice is one of the reasons he was selected for this catalogue. Despite his youth, Nicolas Reymond began working for himself just after graduation, completing a number of successful projects and winning the prestigious Europan competition 3 times. Nicolas Reymond has been already awarded two prices by the French government. The rst one in 2010 as

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S W

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text by LA Architectures

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The aim of the project is to articulate a new dense urban quarter with a peri-urban site, facing the Leman Lake, near Lausanne in Switzerland

A transversal promenade is excavated in the blocks, allowing to cross the entire district trough diagonal passages, connecting the different public spaces

The project, designed in different levels, experiments new ways of planning public space

New CITY life


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M ix u se

PLAN
The project is based on a repetitive block, that organizes a vertical stratification of the quarter on 3 layers : underground, parking and commercial stockage ; at ground level, a 7 meters-high public layer with shops, showrooms, passages and access to the apartments ; on the upper level, apartments and offices around surelevated gardens

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United Kingdom

a
THE ASSEMBLE
DATE OF COMPLETION :

Folly for a Flyover

2011
LOCATION :

Hackney Wick under the A12


CONSTRUCTED AREA:

Temporary

Assemble are young, highly motivated and have already completed some great projects, such as the self-initiated Cineroleum and Folly for a Flyover. They are a community interest company composed of a whole bunch of different disciplines. Their pilot project Cineroleum tested out the reuse of a derelict petrol station as a temporary cinema and was completely self initiated; and with the Folly they had the opportunity to explore social as well as architectural issues in the rapidly developing context of Londons Lower Lea Valley, working their way around complex stakeholder management. The Folly is a temporary canal-side cinema under a London motorway yover built by a

team of volunteers over a month, using reclaimed and donated materials from the neighbourhood and the Ashelwell timber supply from Essex. The temporary installation is inspired by the red-brick buildings of Hackney Wick, featuring an imaginary piece of the areas past. Peering from under a motorway yover, it suggests an alternative history - where a stubborn landlord refused to move his house when the motorway was built. By day the folly hosted a caf, workshops and events and boat trips exploring the surrounding waterways. After the project was dismantled the timber blocks became reusable again. Some of them will be rebuilt as play structures in Gainsborough school - the local primary. Following positive feedback, the yover site will be undergoing permanent development, as part of muf architecture arts series of public realm works in Hackney Wick. Assembles approach is to collaborate and work across different disciplines with a range of specialists and local enthusiasts in a range of elds from design, cookery, lm, theatre to plumbing. This approach not only creates a fantastic moment celebrating the everyday, but also pushes pioneering uses into areas undergoing rapid change, often lacking creative spirit and in danger of becoming dominated by soulless housing developments. Design for London is the Mayor of Londons urbanism and architecture team. We get involved in public realm projects across the capital, instigating and supporting exciting work by a wide palette of practitioners. We value highly and aspire to improve the dialogue between Londons stakeholders, such as the boroughs, the sponsors, the designers and essentially its citizens. We need all you creative spirits to get involved to bring even more layers of richness and make Londons hidden spaces blossom even more, learn from Assemble and get involved!

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text by Tobias Goevert

Film/performance
FILM/PERFORMANCE

boats
B O AT S

The temporary building resignifies the lost space under the flyover tunring it into a succesful destination
BAR

212

bar

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A building APPEARS

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Everything was built over a month by a team of volounteers

SECTION

P eering from undern eath h

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Spain

Arturo Franco was entrusted in 2009 with the low-budget recovery (500,000 Euros) of pavilion 8b, destined to house the centres administrative ofces. The rst problems encountered were of a structural nature: the deteriorated roof had to be integrally substituted and the load bearing walls reinforced to support new loads. The construction site thus gave rise to a simple and efcient strategy: the tiles removed from the existing roof were recycled and reutilised to create the new walls that, depending upon their role in the project, perform a functional, decorative or structural role. Overlapping and linked to one another by a layer of exposed mortar, the tiles form a vibrant ceramic skin that creates surprising formal relations with the existing pattern on the buildings walls. The porosity, which varies according to the quantity of mortar used, becomes a tool for ltering light and articulating the spaces based on differing levels of privacy. Arturo Francos work is of interest because it moves away from predetermined formal strategies, in the constant search for specic solutions, linked to the site, social process, building practices and the potentialities of materials.

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ARTURO FRANCO
DATE OF COMPLETION :

2009
LOCATION :

Antiguo Matadero Legazpi, Madrid


CONSTRUCTED AREA:

1000 M2
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Former Slaughterhouse Legazpi

Over the past 5 years the historical municipal abattoir, now the Matadero Madrid Cultural Centre, has become one of the most active centres of artistic and architectural experimentation in the Spanish capital. It is also the point of convergence of two large operations of urban rehabilitation: the extension and transformation of the PradoRecoletos cultural axis, currently underway, and the Madrid Ro project, recently completed. The complex, constructed in 1910 in the neomedejar style, a language born in Spain between the 13th and 14th centuries from the encounter between Arab and Christian culture, is characterised by its ornamental red brick skin.

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text by Graziella Trovato

C onstruction P rocess
216

E N T R A N C E S PA C E

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RE USING

The tiles removed from the existing roof were recycled and reutilised to create the new walls that, depending upon their role in the project, perform a functional, decorative or structural role

Removed to SOLVE
PLAN
The complex, constructed in 1910 in the neo-medejar style, a language born in Spain between the 13th and 14th centuries from Arab and Christian culture, characterised by its ornamental red brick skin

Entrance to the toilets

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SECTION

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The Potentiality of Materials

Portugal

eMBaiXada
DATE OF COMPLETION :

the co-habitation between the exhibitionism of Christian culture, using the visibility of public space as a system of social representation, and the introspection of Islamic culture, that reduces the visibility of public spaces to a navigation system. This context becomes particularly relevant in the work of Embaixada, in the way it serves various design purposes and motivations, from the dialogue between attraction and the explorer, house and vernacular, enclosure and exhibitionism, continuity and rupture; to the argument for the construction of a new landscape dening attraction criteria mediating dependencies between man and nature with the introduction of new spatial mechanisms, contradicting the idea of ecological disruption usually associated with construction and heralding a new continuity. This last condition is key to describe the Casa Dos Cubos environmental monitoring and interpretation centre in Tomar, revealing its uniqueness within the architectural panorama in Portugal, this project assumes a behavioural universe that clearly exceeds the scale of inuence of the recognized Oporto School. From the inside Casa Dos Cubos is an attempt to establish an anatomical structure of preexistence, thus promoting an architectural image fundamental to the process of (re)-approximation between: man and nature, built and environment, memory and reality.

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Casa Dos Cubos

2007
LOCATION :

Tomar, Portugal
CONSTRUCTED AREA:

980 M2
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The housing boom of the last two decades, together with mass tourism and favourable bank credit conditions, has affected ancestral ways of living, ignoring the relevance of relating contemporary lifestyles to the specicities of the city. Most of the units built to date are the result of real estate strategies that do not recognise the potential of a certain region to attract a new type of inhabitant, or take advantage of the rich historical inheritance to create new proposals to occupy the area. The idea of a new subjectivity coming after bankruptcy, when associated with the phenomenon of living standards, promotes a central discussion about the construction of Portuguese space:

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text by Ricardo Camacho

PLAN

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Anatomy of the EXISTING


The new architectural body runs throughout the available space

222

S PA T I A L M E C H A N I S M S

Theres a dialogue between attraction and exploration, enclosure and exhibitionism, continuity and rupture

the finite interior become a new series of places and programmatic situations

The new structure infills a new body using the old one as an outer shell

SECTION
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The museum is a re-approximation between man and nature, built and environment, memory and reality

Pre-existing and new engage each other


223

The design maintains the entire external perimeter construction while its interior is totally scooped out

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Reconversion
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contemporary, are studied and assimilated. This slow architecture is the antithesis of the frenetic, commercially driven work that dominated recent times. The site is a disused quarry at the edge of a forest above the city of Dublin, a designated scenic area. The architects gained permission by convincing the authorities that the new building would restore what was formerly an industrial landscape. The timber-framed, bridge-like forms extend across the quarry, resting on concrete cores, facing a shear wall to the rear and looking out over the city through a canopy of evergreen trees. The facade is clad with blackened timber and its grid of vertical ns brings order to the single storey volumes. Seen from a distance, the elongated forms read as abstract sculptures in the trees, scaled to sit in the landscape. Windows are discreetly slotted between ns, and barely register from a distance. The houses are cranked in plan to front and rear. The north-facing, front walls converge towards a shared porch, which sits on a stepped concrete stoop and the south-facing verandas seem to hug the carved out walls of the quarry. They run alongside the living areas, drawing in sunlight, creating an intermediate zone between inside and out as well as loosely connecting the two families. This architectural element, redolent of the great Georgian houses of the eighteenth century, is well suited to the damp and temperate Irish climate. The houses oat: the landscape is pictured through frame-like window openings, which create columns of light on the oor of the living room, where the openings are outlined with oak. According to Andrew Clancy, the proportions of the rooms have been inspired by Dublins Georgian architecture. Clancy Moores architecture embraces the future and the past in equal measure. The two houses in the quarry sit condently in a dramatic and beautiful setting and, at the same time feel intimate and familiar, like home.
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Ireland

i
CLANCY MOORE ARCHITECTS
DATE OF COMPLETION :

Two Quarry Houses

2012
LOCATION :

Allagour, County Dublin


CONSTRUCTED AREA:

510 M2

Clancy Moore Architects was founded by Andrew Clancy and Colm Moore in 2006, after receiving their rst commission to design two houses in the Dublin Mountains. Since then, they have been frequent competition nalists and have won awards for their completed work. Andrew Clancy is the most recent recipient of the prestigious Kevin Kiernan Award, granted by the Arts Council of Ireland in partnership with the Ofce of Public Works, for his research into place-specic forms of construction. Clancy Moores architecture is serious, careful and calm and shows a predilection for handcrafted construction. Contemporary technologies are embraced without being overtly expressed. Architectural precedents, both historic and

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text by Sarah Cremin

Caught between the two houses the shared entrance stairs ends in a low porch that frames a view back to the trees

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DARK WOOD

An INHABITED bridge
SECTION

A patio acts to link the living spaces of the eastern house

CONVERGING VOLUMES
The verandah overlooks a shared garden in the old quarry to the south, and offers a third order of space, taller again than the living spaces

The western end of the house is embedded in the forest. Credit pictures: Alice Clancy
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PLAN

10m

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Embracing the wood


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to: be adapted to several different topographical contexts; create a new environment and change the relations of the surrounding urban spaces with the building; increase the feeling of belonging, by which the neighbours should be able to incorporate the school in their collective social activities; and nally increase the level of commitments of those children with the school and their educational future. The main focus of the program was to create a positive impact in certain areas of the city with social, economical and infra-structural problems. All schools became - and this was part of the competition terms- the main point of attraction, creating a new gravitational point in neighbourhoods that were lacking points of reference and had very poor or inexistent urban planning. The FDE initiative was a major public competition that was a fair opportunity for many young ofces to build their rst big commission. In a country where all major projects built by the young generation are mostly single-family houses, that opportunity meant a huge step forward in their career. Also important is the fact that since 2003 FDE was experimenting the comprehensive use of pre-fabricated elements in order to reduce costs, speed construction and gain endurance. However, this policy did not narrow the architectural variations, it has pushed hundreds of architects to rethink and adapt new pedagogical and social aspects in new experiences.

232

Brazil

SIAA ArQuitectos
DATE OF COMPLETION :

Umuarama School

2005.10+
LOCATION :

Campo Limpo, So Paulo


CONSTRUCTED AREA:

3470 M2
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The Umuarama School in So Paulo is not an isolated experience. It is one of the milestones in a path shaped by the hope of young architects work. Shundi Iwamizu from SIAA arquitectos is one of the young architects who had the opportunity to build some schools for FDE initiative (Foundation for the Educational Development), an institution belonging to the government of So Paulo State. The Umuarama School is the rst one of these and he developped it togheter with Alexandre Mirandez, Marcelo Pontes, and Ricardo Bellio. The main aim of the competitions was to develop certain prototypes for schools that should be able

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text by Flavio Coddou

URBAN CONTEXT
Designed to a new brief that includes a sports hall in the school complex, this building is open to the local community on weekends. Credit pictures: Nelson Kon

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PLAN
0 20m

Open the school to the neighbourhood


Classrooms are at the lowest levels, whilst the sport facilities and common uses are at the highest levels
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Pre-fabrication of the structure guarantees the quality of construction on site, limits the budget of the building and reduces construction time by almost 50%

The school bridge makes possible new walks and connections between this neighborhood and the city as a whole

S ection

235

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A new social and pedagogical gravity point

Venezuela

V
LAB.PRO.FAB.
DATE OF COMPLETION :

themselves as a rm, they prefer the term workshop, which combines architectural practice and theorization, urban design and industrial design; constantly downloading such dedication both into their professional practice as well as into the academic eld. In the case of LOFT San Marino, the workshop presents in one single project, three fundamental edges of their professional practice: urban analysis of the surroundings to which they must adapt and affect; research and proposal of the residential typology; and innovation in building techniques. On an urban scale, the territory in which the project is settled was beneted, meaning it resulted into a positive catalytic effect of transformation of the preexisting residential way if living, giving a chance to re-activate new offers in this area of the city, now revalued for younger inhabitants. On a constructive level, LAB.PRO.FAB proposes an innovative structural system which allows the inhabitants to enjoy spatial qualities typical of isolated houses; all united within a single volume. By means of a series of structural efforts, the building shows generous heights and cantilevers, which lend the city balconies, patios and terraces; accomplishing on one single lot, nine stacked houses, capable of enjoying open spaces with the requested privacy for each one of the housing cells.

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San Marinos Lofts

2010
LOCATION :

Caracas
CONSTRUCTED AREA:

1100M2
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The historical evolution of any country can be understood through its architectural legacy. Venezuela is a special case. During the midtwentieth century, the country set an example of progress and modernity amongst the cities of Latin America. Today, we can understand through our current practice how young professionals of the architectural guild are gathering innovative tools in order to face up to a contemporary panorama, complex and full of contingencies, which has now left behind modernism and is looking forward to broadening new paths. LAB.PRO.FAB is a clear example of what current architecture is aiming at. Instead of presenting

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text by Fundacion Espacio

E D I T A B L E P O LY G O N S
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PLAN

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NINE HOUSING CELLS


The building is a hybrid between a metallic and a concrete structure, Modelling and digital dissection techniques managed to diminish the number of coupling points. Credit pictures: Ileana Pita, Eduardo Sauce, Javier Gutierrez The dwellings have the same benefits as a traditional single-family house brings, i.e. patios, gardens, balconies and terraces, to the horizontal property

SECTIONS

Connecting interior and exterior

E AC H I T S O W N

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The use of transformable components could expand or contract allowing the building to be a permeable entity.

Each apartment is different

Bolivia

G/CdR ArcHitects
DATE OF COMPLETION :

Universidad Andina Simn Bolvar

2009
LOCATION :

Sucre, Bolivia
CONSTRUCTED AREA:

3.110 M2

On the inside, the spatial connections between the learning rooms are linked through informal meeting points that stimulate visual contact redening the classic idea of space for learning. The learning rooms, library and auditorium are meant for a exible use with extraordinary natural light condition and effortless spatial articulations. The design strength that G/CdR Architects - Luis Ignacio Gallardo De Aliaga and Andrs Costa du Rels - show in this specic project expresses their ability to reinterpret the local identity of a mixed society and combine it with a sensible understanding of the use of the space. They present with this work a local and yet modern new architectural attitude in Bolivia. A fascinating challenge, to create a building destined to serve education with a progressive point of view; means for a developing country like Bolivia the hopeful chance to reshape the way that its inhabitants think about education and increase young peoples interests about their future. In this sense the campus for the University of the Andes is seen as an innovative meeting point for knowledge and social encounter, playing a very important role in the complex multicultural Bolivian society. This project was chosen for the present publication because of its architectural and theoretical qualities, the potential of its spaces serving as a platform for social exchange. This young practice opens to the world a new chapter for the Bolivian modern architectural scene worth to be seen. Hopefully their architecture enabled as a tool for transformation will have the power to contribute to social cohesion and stimulate the new generations.
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Located in the historical capital of Bolivia, where most of the architectural forms follow mainly a conservative colonial and monumental line, the building for the University campus of the Andes became a new icon in the landscape of the city of Sucre, offering a new face to represent such an important public educational institution. The campus manifest itself in the landscape by mimicking and evoking the impetuous presence of the surrounding Frailes mountain chain. The project was conceived as an ensemble of freestanding white volumes, unied and interconnected by green areas and small squares on the exterior.

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text by Stephanie Lama

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PLAN

Library entrance (North facade) is six meter height wooden door Connection between the library tower from second patio and the terrace The spatial connections between the learning rooms are linked through informal meeting points

The library opens its views to the surrounding Frailes mountain chain

The Campus introspective architecture evokes its contextual cultural heritage The project was thought as an ensemble of freestanding white volumes

Effortless spacial articulation


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A NEW ICON IN THE L ANDSCAPE

West Facade

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USA

An independent section: the section introduces the vertical penetrations of light, which open up the top oor. It appears that the path of light determines the layout of the spaces. On the other oors, the layout is a function of the specic programme of each level. Juxtaposing a uid internal logic against a more regular urban one is a recurring theme in the United States since Simmons Hall (Steven Holl, Boston, 2002), which this project seems to reinterpret. An active faade: even the curtain wall system expresses a widespread theme of research. In terms of design, the idea that the material of architecture is the result of the composition of multiple elements is now a distinctive trait of the latest generation of faades (cf. Cooper Union, Morphosis, New York, 2010). On the other hand, the technological complexity of the system refers to the increased performance requirements of buildings, what is more also in relation to issues of sustainability. Finally, I would add that the programme constitutes an optimum viaticum towards multiethnic integration, the social foundation and urban compromise atop which the city of New York is founded.

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ForM-ula
DATE OF COMPLETION :

Brooklyn Mosque: Penrose

2011
LOCATION :

New York
CONSTRUCTED AREA:

(835 M2)
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I selected this project because I believe it well reects some of the specic themes being investigated by contemporary American architecture, both in relation to programme and design. Urban cohesion and an active ground oor: the massing of the building completes the fabric and conserves the sense of repetition of the adjacent row houses, with the sole variation in height, a result of its special function. The building opens towards the park space in front, offering the sole evident co-penetration between interior and exterior precisely at the ground oor level in correspondence with the access to the park.

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text by Stefano Ceccotto

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Interaction with the public space


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facade construction diagram

generative diagram

O P E N T OWA R D S T H E P A R K

+ + + + + + + + + + ++ ++ + + ++ + + + + + ++ + + + + ++ + + ++ + + + ++ ++ + + ++ + + + + + + + + + + ++ + + + + + + + + + ++ ++ + + + + + + + + + ++ + + ++ + + ++ + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + ++

12

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12.

MAIN ENREANCE WASH AREA PRAY ROOM SECOND ENTRANCE OUTDOOR ACCESS KITCHEN, DINING WASH AREA WOMENS PRAY ROOM BATHROOMS LIBRARY APARTMENT CHILDRENS ROOM

T R A N S PA R E N C Y

interaction with the facade and upper floor space, model

PARAMETRIC
floorplans, bottom to top
1. 2. 1. 3. 2. 4. 3. 5. 4. 6. 5. 7. 6. 8. 7. 9. 8. 10. 9. 11. 10. 12. 11. 12. MAIN ENREANCE WASH AREA MAIN ENREANCE PRAY WASHROOM AREA SECOND ENTRANCE PRAY ROOM OUTDOOR ACCESS SECOND ENTRANCE KITCHEN, OUTDOORDINING ACCESS WASH AREA KITCHEN, DINING WOMENS PRAY ROOM WASH AREA BATHROOMS WOMENS PRAY ROOM LIBRARY BATHROOMS APARTMENT LIBRARY CHILDRENS APARTMENT ROOM CHILDRENS ROOM

11

10

12 12

communicative by FACADE
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7 8 9 11 11

10 10

long section entrance facade view, model


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S PA C E S O F L I G H T

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10

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Dominican Republic

The project would cater to visitors on their way into the park, taking them through the history of wind farm technologies with hands-on installations. Though perhaps more importantly, the site would be used as a hub, where international and local experts would be able to share ideas and develop workshops with the people of Juancho. The goal is to establish a knowledge base, with the help of local participation, which would in turn aid communities and farmers in gaining access to modern environmental strategies. The project would be a social, as well as economic and cultural catalyst to this impoverished region of the country. Providing a zero carbon footprint, the building utilises natural ventilation assisted by solaractivated cooling towers. The landscape design incorporates a reed-bed water ltration system for the treatment of greywater which would later be used for irrigation. All waste would be recycled. The intensive green roof is designed as a carpet sweeping over the building, visually bonding it to the ground. At the highest point of the building, a viewing platform cantilevers from a central turret, offering unobstructed views of the wind-turbine array, setting the Baoruco Mountain range and the Jaragua park as a backdrop beyond it.

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Pedernales up Wind

PEREZ MORALES y ASOCIADOS


DATE OF COMPLETION :

--LOCATION :

Juancho, Pedernales
CONSTRUCTED AREA:

In a country where the word sustainable is used as decoration to hollow rhetoric, this building, will not be implemented, but if it were it would help mark the steps of a country returning to a life of communion with nature.

1500M2
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The Museum for Renewable Energy Technologies is a project located within the rst ever Wind Farm of the Dominican Republic. The desire of the client was twofold: rst, to create a building that could be the agship of clean energy in the DR; and second, to establish a platform for discussion and education in the topics of sustainable strategies. Located near the main gates of the Wind Farm grounds, the project sits strategically between two important sites: the small town of Juancho, with its population of approximately 5,500; and the large natural reserve of the Jaragua National Park.

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text by Adolfo Despradel

L ooking T owards T H e Baoruco Mountain


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MAIN ENTRANCE

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PLAN
0 50m

The Museum for Renewable Energy Technologies sits between the small town of Juancho, and natural reserve of the Jaragua National Park

An international hub for LOCAL sustainability

International and local experts would share ideas and develop workshops with the people of Juancho

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Providing a zero carbon footprint, the building utilises natural ventilation assisted by solar-activated cooling towers

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The project would cater to visitors on their way into the park, taking them through the history of wind farm technologies with hands-on installations

Cuba

vanguard and tradition, the new and the old, the universal and the local, rupture and continuity, and symbolism and abstraction has been recurrent. Made possible by an open and integrative approach that facilitates the use of forms, materials and contents which the Studio assumes as appropriate for each specic situation, without surrendering in advance to a specic aesthetic or a preconceived line of thought. Herein lies the richness of its works: each one brings an element of surprise capable of enriching its physical and cultural environment, and the expectation before each new commission is always fullled with the conrmation of the success of the nal work. The Prado y Malecn hotel project is located in what is now, probably, the most valuable urban lot in Havana. Such a site, in an area of great historical and environmental value, adjacent to the bay and surrounded by several emblematic buildings, has allowed the architects to create a new architectural counterpoint that enhances its neighbourhood and promises to become a new and necessary urban landmark and a symbol of the most advanced Cuban architecture.

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CHoY-Len Estudio de ArQuitectura

Prado y Malecn Hotel

DATE OF COMPLETION :

(2009)
LOCATION :

Havana, Cuba
CONSTRUCTED AREA:

31 731,00 M2
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The Choy-Len Architectural Studio stands out in Cubas contemporary scene thanks to its designs for some of the most important buildings erected in the country during the past decade. Since its beginnings, its projects have become known for their conceptual and formal richness, and its work can be classied as avant-garde while being, at the same time, inclusive. This dual approach to the making architecture is expressed in a constant game of apparently contradictory ambivalences that in the nal project are integrated through an appropriate balance between antagonistic pairs in a balanced tension. Thus, throughout its production, an enriching dialogue between

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text by Eduardo Luis Rodrguez

CLIMATIC ELEMENT

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URBAN CONDITION PLAN


0 20m 200 rooms in the perimeter

A spray of water is produced and the building works as a cooling tower

The building positions itself as a dialogue between vanguard and tradition, the new and the old, the universal and the local

Creation of a symbolic landmark


The design of a large atrium and its roof has been conceived as an artistic element that takes as a reference the waves hitting the Malecon

INTEGRATION

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Integration and respect to the inherited patrimony

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An exceptional visual environment from and to the hotel

Taking advantage of the long and interrupted views

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Colombia

public use. The system of public pools of the Complejo acuatico Atanasio Girardot in Medellin is spatially organised by a novel three-dimensional play of levels all of the services are located, as in Mies Neue Nationalgalerie in Berlin, at a lower level, almost concealed, and overlooking a system of triangular patios that, associated with a powerful and evocative vision of the landscape and a system of public circulation on grade, generates a modern and inviting aquatic facility in a central and strategic part of the city.

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PaisaJes EMergentes
DATE OF COMPLETION :

Aquatic Centre

2010.2
LOCATION :

Medellin
CONSTRUCTED AREA:

16000M2
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Paisajes emergentes is made by Edgar Mazo, Sebatian Mejia, and Luis Callejas, three young and brilliant architects, intellectuals, artists and dreamers. The Atanasio Girardot Aquatic Complex they realised in Medellin, Colombia winner of the Concurso internacional de escenarios deportivos para los IX Juegos Suramericanos is one of the most interesting and experimental contemporary urban landscapes in recent years. I have never before seen a sports centre with such dynamic, democratic and aesthetic qualities, and which manages to perfectly fuse the aspects of sport and education with those of recreation and

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text by Luca Bullaro

childrens pool

warm up patio changing rooms entrance

adults pool

warm up patio changing rooms entrance

olympic pool / underwater depot

toilets -3m

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secondary entrance

public terrace +5.5m primary circulation cafeteria warm up patio entrance/offices synchronized swimming tribune +5.5m

PLAN
A flooded landscape planted with species typical of tropical wetlands provides separation of private and public spaces

synchronized swimming pool

The project is articulated by a system of garden through which the four pools are connected

Plunge, dive, SWIM and dance


The centre is made for future competitions as well as new swimming teaching facility and public pools Swimming turns into a spectacle
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SUNKEN PATIOS

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Water as welfare
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education as architects. Meeting with Enrique Ciriani, after having completed their studies, further enabled them to assimilate the necessary skills to complete the De la Piedra Chapel. With this commission of minimal dimensions, they have found the precise position within the territory to place the intervention, where it becomes not only the center of the countryside plot, but tames the mountains that surround it and concentrates their presence on the chapel, creating a spherical space. The architectural promenade required to reach the chapel introduces the notion of time, pulls us away from the everyday and submerges us in a heterotopic atmosphere. Devices such as the spiral, a multiplier of travel and time, and the set of canchas or strategically placed esplanades that show us the way, are just some of the elements in common with PreColumbian architecture. However, the architects have had the insight to take only the strategies used by our ancestors and not the forms. In this intervention, the spiral does not prevent spatial expansion, the symbolism does not hinder the abstraction, and historical references do not restrain modernity. The result shows a rare maturity that I hope to be the start of a successful and responsible patient search in Peruvian architecture.

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Peru

b
Hctor Loli Rizo Patrn + XiMena Alvarez de la Piedra
DATE OF COMPLETION :

De la Piedra Chapel

2009-2010
LOCATION :

Bridge to Manchay, Cieneguilla, Lima


CONSTRUCTED AREA:

85 M2
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What has distinguished Peruvian architecture for the past 50 centuries is its sensitive relationship with territory and landscape, regardless of the size or symbolic importance of the intervention. Unfortunately, this innate Peruvian ability is disappearing quickly. The schools of architecture do not care to pass on this knowledge and sensitivity, instead focusing on urban planning as a functional tool and landscape as a matter of composition of green areas. Hctor Loli and Ximena lvarez are among the few young Peruvian architects who have acquired this sensibility (or have not lost it) despite their

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text by Jean Pierre Crousse

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The chapel is located at the margin of the Lurn river and beside the Lomas de Castilla hill. Credit pictures: Juan Solano

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PLAN

50m

PASEO DE PURIFICATION

This continuous spiral creates an enclosure within the vastness of the plot the transition from the profane of everyday life

The patio provides the necessary pause for reflection

Reflection and surprise


A profoundly sacred space where verticality is the means to approach the divine

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Chile

g
BENJAMN MURA RODRIGO VALENZUELA
DATE OF COMPLETION :

wide, the secondary walls, 40 meters long, would have generated an important visual impact within the urban context: these walls, almost without openings as per building regulations, on three stories as per the project brief, would have clashed with a more or less homogenous residential fabric with an average height of some three metres. An elongated form and blind walls would have also generated serious issues in relation to the illumination of the spaces at grade. For these reasons Mura and Valenzuela proposed the large skylights on the top level, realised in steel and using forms that, in addition to resolving issues of natural lighting, could also characterise the massive building as a landmark in Taltal. The large concrete walls acquire the characteristic colours of the desert landscape. The surfaces were also nished with bas-reliefs of abstract allusions to the forms of traditional local architecture. The merit of this work by Mura and Valenzuela is to be found not only in the indisputable quality of the design of the library, capable of converting the defect of a morphological anomaly into a tectoniclandscape virtue, but above all their capacity to convince us of the value of an innovative work of architecture that, furthermore, is well structured at a range of scales in relationship to the territorial palimpsest.

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Public Library

2008.9
LOCATION :

Taltal, Antofamagosta
CONSTRUCTED AREA:

463M2
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The Taltal Public Library is the work of Benjamin Mura and Rodrigo Valenzuela, two young architects from Santiago. The project is situated in the small city of Taltal, home to 14,000 people and located along the Pacic Coast, in the midst of the desert regions of Northern Chile, some 300 kilometres from Antofagasta. The commission was awarded after a public competition held by the City Government in 2008. The architects rst concern was that of the proportions generated by the narrow and elongated lot, positioned at the centre of a block in front of a public square. Though the building would face this space with a faade only 7 meters

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text by Fulvio Rossetti

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Free up the interior Space


Large skylights illuminate the main hall

W A L L S A S F ACA D E S

PLAN
0 5m

R oof T errace

Spaces of varied height depend on the type of reading room

40 meters long and 7 meters wide

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The building is higher than the the citys average

SECTION

VISIBLE

The new librarys site was a municipal plot, facing the central square Suited for everybody

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A place to read
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Nicaragua

and continue to be collected in fundraising events, mostly in the USA. Most of its users are women of modest means from the countryside. For their comfort, the architects placed an interior garden in the patient oriented ground oor. Administration areas are located on the smaller upper oor. In a country were shade and air-conditioning are thought off as luxury items, using natural light and ventilation is a bold move. Furthermore, as to be close to a hospital in case of emergencies the project had to strife for a site in a residential area. Young Nicaraguan architects born in the midst of their 1970s political and military struggles possess an intuitive and present drive. Thus, unlike their contemporary Western counterparts, they do not tend to operate behind the scenes. In this light, the breast cancer clinic is a highly representative example. It is namely the anecdote of a motivated architect and a erce client, who together want to showcase a more developed image of Nicaragua.

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Breast Cancer Clinic

Kelton Villavicencio ArcHitects


DATE OF COMPLETION :

2010.10
LOCATION :

Montoya, Managua
CONSTRUCTED AREA:

325M2
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An informal sector that almost exclusively directs the Nicaraguan construction industry makes a discussion on architectural tendencies in this country an intricate matter. Adverse factors for constructive innovation include a staggering economy, traditional clients along with a harsh tropical climate. Within this context, the practice of Kelton Villavicencio Architects was commissioned to build the rst breast cancer clinic in Central America. The clients, namely the Ortiz Gurdian Foundation, a prominent Nicaraguan womens association that want to combat the disease. Construction as well as maintenance costs were

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text by Jeronimo Mejia

STREET SIDE
To be close to a hospital in case of emergencies the project had to strife for a site in a residential area
276

WAITING ROOM
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Be treated and feel like at HOME


The form followed the circulation, ventilation and illumination of the site
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Light well

THERAPY REST ROOM

PLAN

5m
277

Groundfloor

Mexico

PRODUCTORA
DATE OF COMPLETION :

land just at the shore of the lake in Valle de Bravo, one of the quintessential Mexico City weekend retreat destinations. Productora, a young, up and kicking architects quartet, has taken advantage of the large slope of the site to accommodate the weekend house programme. The shifting of the volumes creates a house in which almost all the spaces have a direct view of the spectacular sights of the beautiful lake, either from the inside or the outside. As one enters the house the rst volume holds the main, generous dormitory and the garage, along with a terrace formed by the main living space, the dining room, the kitchen, a porch-terrace, the guests room and a large underground home cinema. The upper volume holds 3 rooms and a terrace/roof garden, while the in-between spaces generated by the irregular placement of the volumes create a series of inner-space patios, which somehow offer more intimacy and privacy to the guest room and the back of the porch. Complementing the over exposition of the ever present sight of the lake. This design was done by PRODUCTORA (Carlos Bedoya, Victor Jaime, Wonne Ickx, Abel Perles) in collaboration with Felix Guillen, Diego Escamilla, Oscar Trejo, Ivn Villegas, Diseo e Ingenieras EMET (Leonardo Len) .

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Three Zig Zag Living Spaces

2011
LOCATION :

Valle de Bravo, State of Mexico


CONSTRUCTED AREA:

450 M2
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Approaching it from the back street that leads to the main and garage door, the Casa Diaz looks just like any other house in the neighbourhood, a local stone wall holding the entrance doors, the discrete and almost anonymous character that the main faade exposes to the exterior with only a few small windows facing the street from the second oor, might seem a humble act of complying with the citys urban regulations: sloped ceilings and the use of Spanish tile. But after entering the door, the singular stack of three zigzagging prisms is revealed slowly as one enters the space. The stacking prisms recongure a quite small, but strategically located piece of

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text by Edgar Gonzalez

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Multiplying the VIEW


0

280

PLANs

5m

Located in the shore of the lake in Valle de Bravo

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Three zig-zaging prisms accommodate a weekend house. Credit pictures: Rafael Gamo and Paul Czitrom

Almost all the spaces have direct view of the lake

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Comply but do not obey

ARCHITECTURAL CRITICS
284

Hong Kong
Annette Pui Man CHu

Jordan
Sandra Hiari

Cyprus Israel
GILAD-SHiFF CHrYso OnisiForou

India
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Russia New Zeland


ReBecca Roke AnASTASIA ALBOKRINOVA
Architect Founder of Eureka Design www.eurekadesign.hk

Gaurav RoYcHoudHurY

South Korea
BaerYo KYung

Architectural critic and urban planner, Tareeq www.tareeq.me Architects | Founders Gilad-shiff Private and public projects | Teaching and academic research

Architect and Environmental Designer, Msc www.conisiforou.wordpress.com

Taiwan
Designer and curator at MONOstudio www.mono-studio.org fochka@gmail.com

Architect | Founder DESIGNETHER gauravroychoudhury@gmail.com

Kuwait

Ricardo CaMacHo www.gilad-shiff.com

CHang Fang Luo

South Africa Bangladesh


MD. RAFIQ AZAM

Editor |Architect at Foster Partners BArch (Hons) March rebecca.roke@gmail.com

Indonesia
DAliana SurYAwInata
baeryo@hotmail.com

Lebanon
Jad SeMaan

Blacklines

Australia
MArtYn Hook
M.arch. | Co-founder Architecture In Development | Space curator Nest Project w w w. a rc h i te c t u re i n d eve lopment.org www.nestproject.nl Founder MultitudeAgency | CasaGranturismo Research Institute www.multitudeagency.com Principle Architect SHATOTTO Architecture for Green Living www.shatotto.com

China
FU MING CHENG
Architect | Founder SHAU | Chief Ofcer IAI-EU | Researcher at TU Delft www.shau.nl Professor of Architecture at RMIT University Melbourne | Director of Iredale Pedersen Hook architects www.iredalepedersenhook.com

Turkey
Sevin Yildiz

Architect and urban planner at OMA semaan.jad@gmail.com

Urban design architecture, blacklinesonwhitepaper w w w. b l a c k l i n e s w o r k s .

blogspot.com

Vietnam
KellY SHannon

Greece Romania
SaBin Bors Katita CHrYsantHopoulou
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Iran
HouMaYoun Askari Sirizi

Japan
Salvator Liotta ToMoko Kawai
Registered Architect and Urban Designer. M.Arch fumingcheng@gmail.com

Professor at AHO (Oslo School of Architecture & Design) www.jola-lab.eu Salvator Liotta, Architect | Senior researcher at the University of Tokyo, PhD Tomoko Kawai, Artist sja.liotta@gmail.com tomoko.kawai@gmail.com

Architect | Lecturer at COAD NJIT/PhD Candidate at Urban Systems (Rutgers University & NJIT Joint Program) www.sevinyildiz.blogspot.com Architect | Media artist, BA www.homayounsirizi.com Anti-Utopias curator | Art and architecture critic www.anti-utopias.com

Architect and urban planner katita30@gmail.com

285

Bulgaria
286

Norway
TYIN Tegnestue Arkitekter AS

Nigeria
RacHel StellA Jenkins

Spain Algeria
SaMia Henni Graziella Trovato

Stella Andonova

Slovenia Poland
B AC K S TAG E A R C H I T E C T U R E 2 0 1 2

Germany
Monica ZerBoni

Ernest MilCinoviC

SeBastian Januz

Engineer | Furniture and interior designer www.andonovadesign.com Architect deernest.milcinovic@gmail. com

Architects at TYIN tegnestue Arkitekter AS post@tyintegnestue.no

African Architecture Matters & genuinefake rachel.s.jenkins@gmail.com Journalist m.zerboni@mclink.it Architect and researcher | Co-founder SMART Planning | International Open Network for the Global South www.samiahenni.com

The Netherlands
GiaMpiero Sanguigni

PhD Architect and Urban Planner at Moya Trovato Arquitectos http://moyatrovatoarquitectos. blogspot.com.es

Serbia
Vesna Vucinic

Architect and urban planner OMA www.sebastianjanusz.com

Austria
Anne Isopp

Denmark
KristJn Eggertsson

Portugal France
LA ArcHitectures Ricardo CaMacHo

Czech Republic Hungary


Sandor Finta AleXandr SkalickY

Architect at Arhikulture and 360BEOGRAD www.arhikulture.net www.360beograd.org

Finland
PirJo SanaksenaHo

Chief architect of Budapest | Architect at sporaarchitects | Head of Hungarian Contemporary Architecture Centre www.sporaarchitects.hu www.kek.org.hu

Architect at ASMM www.a-skalicky.cz

Professor of Architecture at RMIT University Melbourne | Director of Iredale Pedersen Hook architects a.isopp@morgenbau.net

Architect | Founding partner of KRADS www.krads.info

Architect co-founder DEMOarchitects | architecture critic and writer | PhD sanguingi@demoarchitects.com

Belgium
Bernardina Borra

Co-founders LA Architectures www.la-architectures.com

MultitudeAgency | Casa Granturismo Research Institute www.multitudeagency.com

Italy Sweden
Susanna MalzacHer Diego BarBarelli

Ireland Switzerland
Cornelia Tapparelli Portilla KawaMura SaraH CreMin

United Kingdom
ToBias Goevert

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Croatia
Krunoslav Ivanisin

Architect and urban designer co-founder DEMOarchitects | Delft PhD candidate www.demoarchitects.com Engineer diego.barbarelli@libero.it Architect and graphic designer susanna191@gmail.com

Architect at Sanaksenaho Architects | Lecturer at AaltoUniversity www.kolumbus./sanaksenaho

Architect at IVANIIN. KABASHI.ARHITEKTI www.ivanisin-kabashi.hr

Architect and researcher EPF Lausanne | M arch | MAS arch theory | EPFL PhD candidate cornelia.tapparelli@ep.ch

Architect and Urbanist at Design for London | GLA Tobias.Goevert@designforlondon. gov.uk

Director at CAST architecture| Design teacher at University College Dublin www.castarchitecture.ie

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USA
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Brazil
Flavio Coddou

SteFano Ceccotto

Nicaragua
JeroniMo MeJia

Colombia
Luca Bullaro

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Architect sc2523@caa.columbia.edu Architect at Fira Barcelona | Vitruvius editor www.vitruvius.es

Architect | Urban Planner | Researcher jeronimomh@gmail.com Architect | Phd | Teaching at Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Medellin lucabullaro@hotmail.com

Dominican Republic
AdolFo Despradel

Mexico
Edgar Gonzalez

Venezuela
Fundacion Espacio

Peru
Jean Pierre Crousse

Architect www.adolfodes.wordpress.com A common platform design in Venezuela www.espacio.net.ve co-founder and co-director of Barclay & Crousse | professor at Ponticia Universidad Catlica del Per | Co-founder and co-director of Atelier Nord Sud, Paris, France www.barclaycrousse.com

Architect | Editor in chief of edgargonzalez.com a tangential weblog of architecture www.edgargonzalez.com

Cuba
Eduardo Luis Rodrguez

Bolivia
StepHanie LaMa

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Chile
Fulvio Rossetti

Architect and urban planner at Architectuurstudio HH www.spaceinmotion.org

Freelance architect | Architectural historian and curator | Editor in chief of the journal Arquitectura Cuba www.ivanisin-kabashi.hr Architect and Landscape Architect | PhD candidate

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www.d-arq.cl

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