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SORTING BY COLOR

BIG IDEA 8: PROPERTIES OF MATTER BENCHMARKS AND TASK ANALYSES SC.K.P.8.1 Sort objects by observable properties, such as size, shape, color, temperature (hot or cold), weight (heavy or light), and texture. The student: • explores a variety o objects that are di erent sizes, shapes, colors, temperatures (hot or cold), weights (heavy or light), and textures. • sorts objects by one property at a time ( or example: size). • sorts objects by two or more properties at a time ( or example: size and color). SC.K.N.1.1 !ollaborate with a partner to collect in ormation. The student: • wor"s with a partner to gather in ormation during classroom investigations. SC.K.N.1.5 #ecognize that learning can come rom care ul observation. The student: • observes a variety o objects (living and nonliving). • discusses observations o objects. • states what was learned rom observations. KEY QUESTION $ow can you sort objects by color% TEACHER BACKGROUND INFORMATION Things in our environment can be sorted by di erent attributes or properties (such as color, shape, size, temperature, weight, and texture). &t is also important to realize that objects are o ten sorted by more than one attribute at a time (such as size '() color). MATERIALS Teache *ni ix cubes Pe ! "#$ Station +: one bag o +, bean soup ( ound in the bean-soup aisle o grocery stores) Station ,: pattern bloc"s Station .: die cut shapes (ma"e sure they are various sizes, shapes, and colors) Station /: oam stic"y shapes 0 ound in cra t stores and large discount stores (ma"e sure they are various sizes, shapes, and colors) SAFETY • 'lways ollow 1!2S science sa ety guidelines. • #emind students to not place objects in their mouths. • !hoose objects that do not have sharp edges. TEACHING TIPS • 3eep materials in baggies or use in the next several lessons as well as or years to come. • 'llow ample time or all students to verbalize their reasoning.
4rade 3, 5ig &dea 6 1range !ounty 2ublic Schools 7une ,8+8 +

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9our role during the stations is to rotate and as" :uestions about how and why the students are sorting their objects. The objects at the stations can be modi ied as long as the materials you choose have di erent sizes, shapes, and colors. 5e care ul to choose things that are solid colors (no stripes or multicolored items as these can be con using).

ENGAGE !hoose even amounts o our colors o uni ix cubes. 4ive one cube to each child. 's" the children to move to designated parts o the room or each color. (;veryone who has a blue cube come to this side o the room<etc.) 1nce the children are grouped by color o their cubes, discuss what attribute or property (color) was used to sort the class. E%PLORE Set up our stations: one with beans (+, bean soup bag has various sizes, shapes, and colors), one with pattern bloc"s, one with die cuts (various shapes, sizes, and colors), and one with oam stic"y shapes (various shapes, colors, and sizes). 'ssign children to starting station. 4o over sa ety reminders. Tell students that they will be sorting the objects by !1=1#. 'llow students time to sort by color (approximately > minutes per station). $ave students rotate through all our stations. )uring the station rotations, go to groups and as" the ollowing :uestions: What are you sorting by? (color) Tell me about the groups you have. (These are all red<etc.) Pick up one item and ask: Where would I put this one? ?ollow up with: Why would I put it there? Place one item in the wrong group and ask if they agree that it goes there. Why or why not? ?ocus on sorting by !1=1#. ?or students that are struggling with the tas" o sorting by color, you may need to as" more :uestions a ter showing one example. 2ut a ew red bloc"s in a pile and as": How are these blocks the same? an you add more to this group? 's" student to sort by green. !ontinue process until student is able to sort independently by color. This may need to be repeated rom station to station. E%PLAIN 4ather students away rom the stations and as" the ollowing :uestions: How did you decide to group your ob!ects? (color) How did you sort your ob!ects? (color) Which ob!ects were the easiest to sort by color? (various answers< ollow up with @$9%) Which ob!ects were the hardest to sort by color? "various answers#follow up with WH$?% E%TEND AND APPLY 's" students how we could sort ourselves (boy-girl, glasses-no glasses, hair color, eye color, shirt color, type o shoe, etc.) 'llow time to sort by the attributes suggested by your students. !hoose one attribute (example: hair color) and designate places in the room ( ront o room or blonde hair, bac" o room or brown hair, side o room or blac" hair, other side o room or red hair). 'llow students to );!&); what group they belong in. )iscuss how they made their decision. ASSESSMENT 's you observe your students (as you rotate stations), loo" or these behaviors: • 're they sorting by color% • !an they verbalize that they sorted by color% • 1nce given a method or sorting (extend and apply section), can the student place themselves in the correct group%
4rade 3, 5ig &dea 6 1range !ounty 2ublic Schools 7une ,8+8 ,

SORTING BY SHAPE
BIG IDEA 8: PROPERTIES OF MATTER BENCHMARKS AND TASK ANALYSES SC.K.P.8.1 Sort objects by observable properties, such as size, shape, color, temperature (hot-cold), weight (heavy or light), and texture. The student: • explores a variety o objects that are di erent sizes, shapes, colors, temperatures (hot or cold), weights (heavy or light), and textures. • sorts objects by one property at a time ( or example: size). • sorts objects by two or more properties at a time ( or example: size and color). SC.K.N.1.1 !ollaborate with a partner to collect in ormation. The student: • wor"s with a partner to gather in ormation during classroom investigations. SC.K.N.1.5 #ecognize that learning can come rom care ul observation. The student: • observes a variety o objects (living and nonliving). • discusses observations o objects. • states what was learned rom observations. SC.K.N.1.& 3eep records as appropriateAsuch as pictorial recordsAo investigations conducted. The student: • records in ormation, using pictures, journals, or class data tables about classroom investigations. KEY QUESTION $ow can you sort objects by shape% TEACHER BACKGROUND INFORMATION Things in our environment can be sorted by di erent attributes or properties (such as color, shape, size, temperature, weight, and texture). &t is also important to realize that objects are o ten sorted by more than one attribute at a time (such as shape '() color). MATERIALS Teache round crac"ers (butter crac"ers), rectangular crac"ers (graham crac"ers), s:uare crac"ers (soda crac"ers), and triangle crac"ers (corn chips). Pe ! "#$ Station +: one bag o +,0bean soup ( ound in the bean-soup aisle o grocery stores) Station ,: pattern bloc"s Station .: die cut shapes (ma"e sure they are various sizes, shapes, and colors), paper and pencils Station /: various sizes, shapes, and colors o oam stic"y shapes ( ound in cra t stores and large discount stores SAFETY • 'lways ollow 1!2S science sa ety guidelines.
4rade 3, 5ig &dea 6 1range !ounty 2ublic Schools 7une ,8+8 .

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#emind students to not place objects in their mouths. !hoose objects that do not have sharp edges. *se only pre0pac"aged oods.

TEACHING TIPS • 3eep materials in baggies or use in the next several lessons as well as or years to come. • 'llow ample time or all students to verbalize their reasoning. • 9our role during the stations is to rotate and as" :uestions about how and why the students are sorting their objects. • The objects at the stations can be modi ied as long as the materials you choose have di erent sizes, shapes, and colors. 5e care ul to choose things that are solid colors (no stripes or multicolored items as these can be con using). ENGAGE !hoose even amounts o our di erent shapes o crac"ers. 4ive one crac"er to each child. 's" the children to move to designated parts o the room or each shape o crac"er. (;veryone who has a s:uare crac"er should come to this side o the room, etc.) 1nce the children are grouped by the shape o their crac"er, discuss what attribute or property (shape) was used to sort the class. & you choose, allow students to eat the crac"er they touched only. To review the lesson prior, as": How did we sort our ob!ects yesterday? (color) How are we sorting the ob!ects today? (shape) E%PLORE Set up our stations (same as last lesson): one with beans (+,0bean soup bag has various sizes, shapes, and colors), one with pattern bloc"s, one with die cuts (various shapes, sizes, and colors), one with oam stic"y shapes (various shapes, colors, and sizes), paper, and pencils. 'ssign children to starting station. 4o over sa ety reminders. Tell students that they will be sorting by S$'2;. 'llow students time to sort by shape (approximately > minutes per station). $ave students rotate through all our stations. )uring the die cut shape station, give students paper and re:uest that they draw the sorted shape groups. This can be used as an assessment. )uring the station rotations, go to groups and as" the ollowing :uestions: How are you sorting? (shape) Tell me about the groups you have. (These are all s:uares, etc.) Pick up one item and ask: Where would I put this one? &ollow up with: Why would I put there? 2lace one item in the wrong group and as" i they agree that it goes there. Why or why not? ?ocus on sorting by S$'2;. ?or students that are struggling with the tas" o sorting by shape, you may need to as" more :uestions a ter showing one example (put a ew circles in a pile and as": How are these the same? an you add more to this group? 's" student to sort by s:uares. !ontinue process until student is able to sort independently by shape. This may need to be repeated rom station to station. E%PLAIN 4ather students away rom the stations and as" the ollowing :uestions: How did you decide to group your ob!ects? (shape) How did you sort your ob!ects? (shape) Which ob!ects were the easiest to sort by shape? (various answers< ollow up with @$9%) Which ob!ects were the hardest to sort by shape? (various answers< ollow up with @$9%)

4rade 3, 5ig &dea 6 1range !ounty 2ublic Schools 7une ,8+8

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E%TEND AND APPLY Tell students that we are going to loo" around the room and create a Thin"ing Bap (Tree Bap) to identi y and sort things in the classroom by shape. 's" the students to name things in the room that are the shape o a circle. #ecord answers on Tree Bap. #epeat process with other shapes. 9ou may also choose to go on a shape wal" to recognize shapes outside your classroom. ASSESSMENT 's you observe your students (as you rotate stations), loo" or these behaviors: • 're they sorting by shape% • !an they verbalize that they sorted by shape% • 1nce given a method or sorting by shape (extend and apply section), can the students recognize di erent shapes in the classroom%

4rade 3, 5ig &dea 6 1range !ounty 2ublic Schools 7une ,8+8

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SORTING BY COLOR AND SHAPE
BIG IDEA 8: PROPERTIES OF MATTER BENCHMARKS AND TASK ANALYSES SC.K.P.8.1 Sort objects by observable properties, such as size, shape, color, temperature (hot-cold), weight (heavy or light), and texture. The student: • explores a variety o objects that are di erent sizes, shapes, colors, temperatures (hot or cold), weights (heavy or light), and textures. • sorts objects by one property at a time ( or example: size). • sorts objects by two or more properties at a time ( or example: size and color). SC.K.N.1.1 !ollaborate with a partner to collect in ormation. The student: • wor"s with a partner to gather in ormation during classroom investigations. SC.K.N.1.5 #ecognize that learning can come rom care ul observation. The student: • observes a variety o objects (living and nonliving). • discusses observations o objects. • states what was learned rom observations. KEY QUESTION $ow can you sort objects by color and shape% TEACHER BACKGROUND INFORMATION Things in our environment can be sorted by di erent attributes or properties (such as color, shape, size, temperature, weight, and texture). &t is also important to realize that objects are o ten sorted by more than one attribute at a time (such as shape '() color). MATERIALS Teache )uplos or =egos (red s:uares and blue rectangles) buttons or mosaic tile beads (di erent shapes '() colors) Pe ! "#$ Station +: one bag o +, bean soup ( ound in the bean-soup aisle o grocery stores) Station ,: pattern bloc"s Station .: various sizes, shapes, and colors o die cut shapes, paper and pencils Station /: various sizes, shapes, and colors o oam stic"y shapes ( ound in cra t stores and large discount stores) SAFETY • 'lways ollow 1!2S science sa ety guidelines. • #emind students to not place objects in their mouths.
4rade 3, 5ig &dea 6 1range !ounty 2ublic Schools 7une ,8+8 C

!hoose objects that do not have sharp edges.

TEACHING TIPS • 3eep materials in baggies or use in the next several lessons as well as or years to come) • 'llow ample time or all students to verbalize their reasoning. • 9our role during the stations is to rotate and as" :uestions about how and why the students are sorting their objects. • The objects at the stations can be modi ied as long as the materials you choose have di erent sizes, shapes, and colors. 5e care ul to choose things that are solid colors (no stripes or multicolored items as these can be con using). ENGAGE The teacher will pile the )uplos or =egos in a place where can see that they are di erent shapes and colors. 's": How could we sort these? (color, shape) ould we sort them any other ways? (various answers) ould we sort them by color '() shape? 'llow a student to attempt and as" guiding :uestions until the )uplos or =egos are sorted by color '() shape ( or example: a pile o s:uares that are red and a pile o rectangles that are blue). )iscuss what is the same or each group and how they were sorted. To review the lesson prior, as": What did we sort our ob!ects by yesterday? (shape) What are we sorting by today? (color and shape) E%PLORE Set up our stations (same as last lesson): one with beans (+,0bean soup bag has various sizes, shapes, and colors), one with pattern bloc"s, one with die cuts (various shapes, sizes, and colors, paper and pencil), and one with oam stic"y shapes (various shapes, colors, and sizes). 'ssign children to starting station. 4o over sa ety reminders. Tell students that they will be sorting by shape '() color. 'llow students time to sort by shape '() color (approximately > minutes per station). $ave students rotate through all our stations. )uring the station rotations, go to groups and as" the ollowing :uestions: What are you sorting by? (shape '() color) Tell me about the groups you have. (These are all red s:uares<etc.) 2ic" up one item and as": Where would I put this one? ?ollow up with: Why would I put it there? 2lace one item in the wrong group and as" i they agree that it goes there. Why or why not? ?ocus on sorting by shape '() color. ?or students that are struggling with the tas" o sorting by shape and color, you may need to as" more :uestions a ter showing one example. 2ut a ew red circles in a pile and as": How are these the same? an you add more to this group? 's" student to sort by red s:uares. !ontinue process until student is able to sort independently by shape '() color. This may need to be repeated rom station to station. E%PLAIN 4ather students away rom the stations and as" the ollowing :uestions: How did you decide to group your ob!ects? (shape '() color) How did you sort your ob!ects? (shape '() color) Which ob!ects were the easiest to sort by shape '() color? (various answers< ollow up with @$9%) Which ob!ects were the hardest to sort by shape '() color? (various answers< ollow up with @$9%) E%TEND AND APPLY *se buttons or mosaic tile beads and allow students to sort by shape '() color. Ba"e sure the buttons are di erent shapes and colors (example: heart shaped or s:uare as well as circle).
4rade 3, 5ig &dea 6 1range !ounty 2ublic Schools 7une ,8+8 D

ASSESSMENT 's you observe your students (as you rotate stations), loo" or these behaviors: • 're they sorting by shape '() color% • !an they verbalize that they sorted by shape '() color% • @hen given a new set o items (extend and apply), were they able to sort by shape '() color%

SORTING BY SI'E
BIG IDEA 8: PROPERTIES OF MATTER BENCHMARKS AND TASK ANALYSES SC.K.P.8.1 Sort objects by observable properties, such as size, shape, color, temperature (hot-cold), weight (heavy or light), and texture. The student: • explores a variety o objects that are di erent sizes, shapes, colors, temperatures (hot or cold), weights (heavy or light), and textures. • sorts objects by one property at a time ( or example: size). • sorts objects by two or more properties at a time ( or example: size and color). SC.K.N.1.1 !ollaborate with a partner to collect in ormation. The student: • wor"s with a partner to gather in ormation during classroom investigations. SC.K.N.1.5 #ecognize that learning can come rom care ul observation. The student: • observes a variety o objects (living and non living). • discusses observations o objects. • tells what was learned rom observations. KEY QUESTION $ow can you sort di erent objects by size% TEACHER BACKGROUND INFORMATION Things in our environment can be sorted by di erent attributes or properties (such as color, shape, size, temperature, weight, and texture). &t is also important to realize that objects are o ten sorted by more than one attribute at a time (such as shape '() color). MATERIALS Teache di erent size boo"s (big, small, thic", thin) toys o di erent sizes Pe ! "#$ Station +: one bag o +,0bean soup ( ound in the bean-soup aisle o grocery stores) Station ,: pattern bloc"s Station .: various sizes, shapes, and colors o die cut shapes Station /: various sizes, shapes, and colors o oam stic"y shapes ( ound in cra t stores and large discount stores)
4rade 3, 5ig &dea 6 1range !ounty 2ublic Schools 7une ,8+8 6

SAFETY • 'lways ollow 1!2S science sa ety guidelines. • #emind students to not place objects in their mouths. • !hoose objects that do not have sharp edges. TEACHING TIPS • 3eep materials in baggies or use in the next several lessons as well as or years to come) • 'llow ample time or all students to verbalize their reasoning. • 9our role during the stations is to rotate and as" :uestions about how and why the students are sorting their objects. • The objects at the stations can be modi ied as long as the materials you choose have di erent sizes, shapes, and colors. 5e care ul to choose things that are solid colors (no stripes or multicolored items as these can be con using). ENGAGE Show the di erent sized boo"s to your students. 's": How could I sort these? (various answers) an you tell me about the si*e of this book? (small) an you tell me about the si*e of this book? (big) ould I sort them by si*e? (yes) 'llow students to demonstrate sorting boo"s by size. )raw attention to sorting by thic" or thin as well. To review the lesson prior, as": What ways have we sorted our ob!ects by so far? (color '() shape) E%PLORE Set up our stations (same as last lesson): one with beans (+,0bean soup bag has various sizes, shapes, and colors), one with pattern bloc"s, one with die cuts (various shapes, sizes, and colors), and one with oam stic"y shapes (various shapes, colors, and sizes). 'ssign children to starting station. 4o over sa ety reminders. Tell students that they will be sorting by S&E;. 'llow students time to sort by size (approximately > minutes per station). $ave students rotate through all our stations. )uring the station rotations, go to groups and as" the ollowing :uestions: What are you sorting by? (size) Tell me about the groups you have. (These are all big<etc.) 2ic" up one item and as": Where would I put this one? ?ollow up with: Why would I put it there? 2lace one item in the wrong group and as" i they agree that it goes there. Why or why not? ?ocus on sorting by S&E;. ?or students that are struggling with the tas" o sorting by size, you may need to as" more :uestions a ter showing one example. 2ut a ew small items in a pile and as": How are these the same? an you add more to this group? 's" student to sort by big items. !ontinue process until student is able to sort independently by size. This may need to be repeated rom station to station. E%PLAIN 4ather students away rom the stations and as" the ollowing :uestions: How did you decide to group your ob!ects? (size) How did you sort your ob!ects? (size) Which ob!ects were the easiest to sort by si*e? (various answers< ollow up with @$9%) Which ob!ects were the hardest to sort by si*e% (various answers< ollow up with @$9%) E%TEND AND APPLY 4ive students an assortment o toys and as" them to sort by size. )iscuss methods used to sort by size.

4rade 3, 5ig &dea 6 1range !ounty 2ublic Schools 7une ,8+8

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ASSESSMENT 's you observe your students (as you rotate stations), loo" or these behaviors: • 're they sorting by size% • !an they verbalize that they sorted by size% • 1nce given a method or sorting by size (extend and apply section), can the students sort by size%

SORTING BY TEMPERATURE
BIG IDEA 8: PROPERTIES OF MATTER BENCHMARKS AND TASK ANALYSES SC.K.P.8.1 Sort objects by observable properties, such as size, shape, color, temperature (hot or cold), weight (heavy or light), and texture. The student: • explores a variety o objects that are di erent sizes, shapes, colors, temperatures (hot or cold), weights (heavy or light), and textures. • sorts objects by one property at a time ( or example: size). • sorts objects by two or more properties at a time ( or example: size and color). SC.K.N.1.1 !ollaborate with a partner to collect in ormation. The student: • wor"s with a partner to gather in ormation during classroom investigations. SC.K.N.1.5 #ecognize that learning can come rom care ul observation. The student: • observes a variety o objects (living and nonliving). • discusses observations o objects. • states what was learned rom observations. KEY QUESTION $ow can you sort objects by temperature (hot and cold)% TEACHER BACKGROUND INFORMATION Things in our environment can be sorted by di erent attributes or properties (such as color, shape, size, temperature, weight, and texture). &t is also important to realize that objects are o ten sorted by more than one attribute at a time (such as size '() color). MATERIALS Teache , identical plastic cups Pe ! "#$ tray ice cube marble *ni i cube cotton ball paper clip toy car bloc"
4rade 3, 5ig &dea 6 1range !ounty 2ublic Schools 7une ,8+8 +8

picture cards SAFETY • 'lways ollow 1!2S science sa ety guidelines. • #emind students to not place objects in their mouths. • !hoose objects that do not have sharp edges. • #emind students that they have to use care when observing warm objects. TEACHING TIPS 2ut ice cubes in a cup o water ahead o time. & cubes have not melted by the time the lesson is beginning, scoop them out. 2ut a cup o water in the microwave or less than a minute. Ba"e sure that the water is lu"ewarm and not hot be ore sharing with students. 5e care ul microwaving the waterG i the cup you choose to use is not sturdy it will melt. !reate or use premade picture cards but ma"e sure each set o cards has a ew hot and cold items that will be obvious or your students. ENGAGE $old up two identical clear cups o water, one warm and one cold. 's": What do you observe "notice% about what I+m holding up? 'ccept student responses. 's": )o you think these are e,actly the same or different? Why? 2lace cups on table and allow students to touch the outside o each cup. 's": )o you think they are the same or different? Why? (1ne is hot and one is cold) Separate the cups rom one another. If we wanted to sort ob!ects by temperature- what else could I put with the warm cup? What else could I put with the cold cup? E%PLORE 4ive students a tray o items, some that have been in the reezer and some that have been outside with sunlight shining on them (paper clips, marbles, bloc"s, ice cubes, toy car, etc). )irect students to sort the items by temperature into two piles: hot and cold. E%PLAIN How did you decide to sort your ob!ects by temperature? How could you tell if an ob!ect belonged in the hot or cold pile? (by touching) What sense did you use to tell if the ob!ects were hot or cold? (touch) What body part did you use for the sense of touch? (S"in, not just hands) What other things could go in a hot or cold pile? There are things that are hot and cold that we cannot put in a pile. an you think of some? (Sun, planets, air, etc.) E%TEND AND APPLY 4ive students picture cards and have them sort into piles o things that could be hot and things that could be cold. #e:uire an explanation rom students or the pictures in each pile, sometimes the justi ication ma"es sense in a way adults do not expect. ?or example, a student may place an ice cube in the hot pile but the reasoning may be that the picture shows the ice cube in a puddle o water and the child "nows that when ice cubes get warm they start to melt, or a student may place a car in the cold pile with the justi ication that cars get cold in the winter (i they are rom out o state). ASSESSMENT 's you observe your students, loo" or these behaviors: • 're they sorting by temperature% • !an they verbalize that they sorted by temperature (hot and cold)%

4rade 3, 5ig &dea 6 1range !ounty 2ublic Schools 7une ,8+8

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SORTING BY (EIGHT
BIG IDEA 8: PROPERTIES OF MATTER BENCHMARKS AND TASK ANALYSES SC.K.P.8.1 Sort objects by observable properties, such as size, shape, color, temperature (hot or cold), weight (heavy or light), and texture. The student: • explores a variety o objects that are di erent sizes, shapes, colors, temperatures (hot or cold), weights (heavy or light), and textures. • sorts objects by one property at a time ( or example: size). • sorts objects by two or more properties at a time ( or example: size and color). SC.K.N.1.1 !ollaborate with a partner to collect in ormation. The student: • wor"s with a partner to gather in ormation during classroom investigations. SC.K.N.1.5 #ecognize that learning can come rom care ul observation. The student: • observes a variety o objects (living and nonliving). • discusses observations o objects. • states what was learned rom observations. KEY QUESTION $ow can you sort objects by weight (heavy or light)% TEACHER BACKGROUND INFORMATION

Things in our environment can be sorted by different attributes or properties (such as color, shape, size, temperature, weight, and texture). It is also important to realize that objects are often sorted by more than one attribute at a time (such as size !" color).
MATERIALS Teache bric" eather picture cards (see teaching tips) Pe ! "#$ balance cotton ball marble paper clip toy car tennis ball
4rade 3, 5ig &dea 6 1range !ounty 2ublic Schools 7une ,8+8 +,

ping pong ball eather doll box o mar"ers box o crayons SAFETY • 'lways ollow 1!2S science sa ety guidelines. • #emind students to not place objects in their mouths. • )o not let students handle the bric" unless an adult is assisting. TEACHING TIPS The objects in the material list can be modi ied as long as they have varying weights. 4ather group materials ahead o time and place in a bag or on a tray. ?or the extend and apply portion o this lab, create or use pre0made picture cards and ma"e sure that each set has obvious examples that students would "now are heavy or light (e.g., elephant and eather). ENGAGE $old up a bric" and a eather. 's": What can you tell me about these two items? 'llow students to pic" up both items. Show students how an empty balance scale is balanced (arrow pointing to line and buc"ets are even) and place the bric" in one buc"et and the eather in the other buc"et. What happened? Why is that bucket higher than the other bucket? What could we say about the brick? What could we say about the feather? What else could we say is heavy? What else could we say is light? Show students how to use the balance to compare the objects to the tennis ball. 2ut the ball in one buc"et and the bric" in the other. What can we say about the tennis ball and the brick? (The ball is lighter than bric", or the bric" is heavier than the ball.) #epeat the procedures with the eather. E%PLORE 4ive students a balance that is balanced, toy car, cotton ball, eather, tennis ball, ping pong ball, paper clip, doll, crayons, mar"ers, etc. )irect students to sort objects into two piles: heavier than a tennis ball and lighter than a tennis ball. E%PLAIN How did you decide to sort your ob!ects by weight? How could you tell if an ob!ect belonged in the heavy or light pile by comparing it to a tennis bal? What other things could go in a heavy or light pile? There are things that are heavy and light that we cannot put in a pile. an you think of some? (' car is too big or us to compare and measure in the classroom, and germs are too small, etc.) E%TEND AND APPLY 4ive students picture cards and have them sort into piles o things that could be heavy and things that could be light. #e:uire an explanation rom students or the pictures in each pile, sometimes the justi ication ma"es sense in a way adults do not expect. ASSESSMENT 's you observe your students loo" or these behaviors: • 're they sorting by weight% • !an they verbalize that they sorted by weight (heavy-light)%

4rade 3, 5ig &dea 6 1range !ounty 2ublic Schools 7une ,8+8

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SORTING BY TE%TURE
BIG IDEA 8: PROPERTIES OF MATTER BENCHMARKS AND TASK ANALYSES SC.K.P.8.1 Sort objects by observable properties, such as size, shape, color, temperature (hot or cold), weight (heavy or light), and texture. The student: • explores a variety o objects that are di erent sizes, shapes, colors, temperatures (hot or cold), weights (heavy or light), and textures. • sorts objects by one property at a time ( or example: size). • sorts objects by two or more properties at a time ( or example: size and color). SC.K.N.1.1 !ollaborate with a partner to collect in ormation. The student: • wor"s with a partner to gather in ormation during classroom investigations. SC.K.N.1.5 #ecognize that learning can come rom care ul observation. The student: • observes a variety o objects (living and nonliving). • discusses observations o objects. • states what was learned rom observations. KEY QUESTION $ow can you sort objects by texture (smooth, rough, so t, hard)% TEACHER BACKGROUND INFORMATION Things in our environment can be sorted by di erent attributes or properties (such as color, shape, size, temperature, weight, and texture). &t is also important to realize that objects are o ten sorted by more than one attribute at a time (such as size '() color). MATERIALS Teache bric" eather Pe ! "#$ cotton ball scraps o velvet abric aluminum oil burlap dried lea sandpaper cotton abric
4rade 3, 5ig &dea 6 1range !ounty 2ublic Schools 7une ,8+8 +/

Pe )*#+e,* paper crayons or chal"

"nitted abric marble sponge plastic bag carpet s:uare tile roc" shell stu ed animal SAFETY • 'lways ollow 1!2S science sa ety guidelines. • #emind students to not place objects in their mouths. TEACHING TIPS • 4ather group materials ahead o time and place in a bag or on a tray. • The objects can be modi ied as long as you choose di erent textures. ENGAGE $old up a bric" and a eather. 'llow students to touch but not pic" up both items. 's": We said before that the brick was heavy and the feather was light. There are other things that are different about them. What do you think it is? 'ccept accurate responses, but lead students to realize that they eel di erent. Tell me something about how they feel. (The eather is so t and the bric" is hard. The bric" is also rough or bumpy, not li"e a table or des". )es"s are smooth.) E%PLORE 4ive each group materials to sort into texture groups. 'llow students to decide which items belong together and re:uire them to explain why each item belongs in that group. ?or example, the marble belongs in the smooth group because it eels li"e the tin oil. E%PLAIN How did you decide to sort your ob!ects? "te,ture.how they feel% Tell me some words you used to describe your ob!ects? "soft- hard- smooth- rough% Which ob!ects felt smooth to you? /ough to you? 0oft to you? Hard to you? 'llow students to choose one item rom the group sorting activity. 'llow students to search or something in the classroom that has the same texture as the item they chose. ?or example: i someone chose the marble, they may thin" its texture matches the computer screen because they are both smooth. E%TEND AND APPLY Tell students that you will be going on a nature wal" to hunt or items that have di erent textures. 's": What types of items might we find on our te,ture hunt? What te,tures do you think those items would be? (leaves0smooth, dirt0rough, grass0so t). Tell students that they will be doing nature rubbings o as many di erent textures in nature as they can ind using the paper and colored pencils or crayons. & they can, have them label each rubbing to help them remember what item was rubbed. 1nce inside, as": What kinds of items did you gather rubbings of? What te,tures did those items have? Which one is your favorite? Why? Which one was hard to get? Why do you think that one was hard to get? What does it mean to sort? What could we sort our rubbings by today? (texture, color, item, etc.)
4rade 3, 5ig &dea 6 1range !ounty 2ublic Schools 7une ,8+8 +>

ASSESSMENT 's you observe your students loo" or these behaviors: • 're they sorting by texture% • !an they verbalize that they sorted by texture (hard, so t, rough, smooth)%

4rade 3, 5ig &dea 6 1range !ounty 2ublic Schools 7une ,8+8

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