You are on page 1of 49

APPLICATION NOTE

PO Box 531, Cambridge, NZ Telephone + 64 7 827 4142

Cleanroom Standards and Classifications
Cleanroom technology has developed into a specialist field with its own technical journals, its own conferences and exhibitions, and its own language of technical terms and classifications. This application note covers relevant standards and attempts to clarify the myriad classification systems. Cleanroom Standards

Facsimile + 64 7 827 8435 www.aircaretechnology.co.nz Ph 0800 774 100 Fax 0800 774 101

The main cleanroom standards of interest in New Zealand are as follows: AS 1386:1989 This standard in seven parts has been widely used in New Zealand as a reference for design, operation and validation of cleanrooms. FED-STD-209E:1992 Until recently, this standard was used throughout the US and by auditors from the US. It was cancelled in November 2001 in favour of ISO 14644, but its classification system will undoubtedly be used for years to come. ISO 14644 Cleanrooms and associated controlled environments (8 parts) ISO 14698 Biocontamination control (3 parts) These 11 documents will make up a set of global cleanroom standards. They are still being developed, with some already released and most of the others available in draft form. Ref
ISO 14644-1 ISO 14644-2 ISO 14644-3 ISO 14644-4 ISO 14644-5 ISO 14644-6 ISO 14644-7 ISO 14644-8 ISO 14698-1 ISO 14698-2 ISO 14698-3

Title
Classification of Air Cleanliness Specifications for testing and monitoring to prove continued compliance with ISO 14644-1 Metrology and test methods Design, construction and start-up Operations Vocabulary Separative devices (clean air hoods, glove boxes, isolators, mini-environments) Classification of airborne molecular contamination General principles Evaluation and interpretation of biocontamination data Measurement of the efficiency of cleaning processes

Status
Released May 1999 Released Apr 2000 Draft under discussion Released Apr 2001 Draft Available Draft Available

Draft Available Draft Available Draft Available

May 2003

© Air Care Technology Ltd

Cleanroom Classifications Cleanrooms are classified according to the concentration of airborne particles. The following table shows the ISO 14644-1 classification for the main particle sizes of interest together with comparable AS1386 and FED-STD-209E classifications. ISO Class
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

Max concentration (particles/m3 of air) for particles equal to or greater than size shown 0.1µm 0.3µm 0.5µm 5µm
10 100 1000 10000 100000 1000000 10 102 1020 10200 102000 4 35 352 3520 35200 352000 3520000 35200000

FED-STD-209E Class

AS1386 Class

29 293 2930 29300 293000

1 10 100 1000 10000 100000

0.035 0.35 3.5 35 350 3500

ISO classes 1-4 are mainly applicable to the semi-conductor industry and we are not aware of any such cleanrooms in New Zealand. Classes 5, 7 and 8 are most common. The airborne particle concentration in a cleanroom is highly dependent on the occupancy of the room because occupants are major particle sources. So the classification of the cleanroom must be defined at one or more of the room’s occupancy states, viz. “as-built”, “at rest”, or “operational”. For example, a cleanroom may be class 7 (= class 10000 = class 350) in the “operational” state and class 5 (= class 100 = class 3.5) in the “at rest” state. Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) There are two methods by which cleanrooms and semi-clean rooms have been specified in New Zealand. For the Food Industry, MAF have traditionally specified the air filters required. For example air filtration of EU5 or better for processing areas is specified in the Meat Industry Agreed Standard 2 – Design and Construction (1). This may be appropriate for low-level clean spaces, but is not ideal. The filtration efficiency is only one factor determining the cleanliness of the space – the airflow, the room construction, the room pressurisation and the operations in the room are also important factors. Furthermore, unless the air filters are well manufactured and properly installed, a significant proportion of air can bypass the installed filters. The other method is to specify the air quality using a cleanroom classification system as described above. The Australian Therapeutic Goods Association use the AS1386 classification. For example, in the code of GMP for medicinal products (2), the general requirement is “Class 7000” which is extrapolated from AS1386. This requirement is commonly used in New Zealand for food processing areas. Also commonly used in New Zealand is the UK (European) “Orange Guide” (3) which defines 4 grades of cleanrooms for manufacture of sterile medicinal products according to air quality in both the “at rest” and “in operation” states.

May 2003

© Air Care Technology Ltd

Orange Guide Grade
A B C D

At rest In operation 3 Max permitted particles /m equal to or larger than 0.5µm 5µm 0.5µm 5µm
3 500 3 500 350 000 3 500 000 0 0 2 000 20 000 3 500 0 350 000 2 000 3 500 000 20 000 Not defined

Max permitted viable microorganisms /m3
<1 10 100 200

Beware of using grades for cleanrooms! Although the definitions above are commonly used, other codes for GMP such as TGA (4) and MAF – ACVM (5) define grades A to D slightly differently. References (1) Industry Agreed Standard 2 – Design and Construction, Animal Products Group, New Zealand Food Safety Authority. Section 5.3 ( available on-line at http://www.nzfsa.govt.nz/meatdoc/meatman/manual-2v ) (2) Australian Code of Good Manufacturing Practice For Therapeutic Goods – Medicinal Products, Therapeutic Goods Association, 1990. Page 11. (3) Rules and Guidance for Pharmaceutical Manufacturers and Distributors, (known as “The Orange Guide”) Medicines Control Agency, The Stationery Office, London, 1997. Annex 1. (4) Australian Code of Good Manufacturing Practice For Therapeutic Goods – Medicinal Products, Therapeutic Goods Association, 1990. Page 56. (5) ACVM (Agricultural Compounds & Veterinary Medicines) – Guideline for Good Manufacturing Practice, Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry, Wellington, NZ, 1999, Annex 1. ( available on-line at http://www.nzfsa.govt.nz/acvm/publications/standardsguidelines )

May 2003

© Air Care Technology Ltd

Ultra-clean environments for the biopharma industry

ISO cleanroom classifications

ISO standards for controlled environments Adoption of ISO standards makes national standards such as AS 1386 redundant. The ISO standards shown below are complemented by ISO-14698, dealing with bio-contamination control and monitoring. ISO-14644-1 Classification by Airborne Particles ISO-14644-3 Measurement & Testing ISO-14644-5 Cleanroom Operations ISO-14644-7 Separative Enclosures ISO-14644-2 Monitoring for Compliance ISO-14644-4 Design, Construction and Start-up ISO-14644-6 Terms, Definitions & Units ISO-14644-8 Molecular Contamination

ISO air cleanliness classifications – Class limits (particles/m3) Maximum concentration limits (particles/m3) for particles ≥ particle sizes Classification number shown 0.3 µm 0.5 µm 1 µm 5 µm (N) 0.1 µm 0.2 µm ISO Class 1 10 2 10 4 ISO Class 2 100 24 102 35 8 ISO Class 3 1000 237 1020 352 83 ISO Class 4 10000 2370 10200 3520 832 29 ISO Class 5 100000 23700 102000 35200 8320 293 ISO Class 6 1000000 237000 352000 83200 2930 ISO Class 7 3520000 832000 29300 ISO Class 8 35200000 8320000 293000 ISO Class 9 Note: Uncertainties related to the measurement process require that data with no more than three (3) significant figures be used in determining the classification level. EU CGMP classifications Maximum concentration limits (particles/m3) for particles ≥ sizes shown Grade At rest (b) In operation ≥ 0.5µm ≥ 5.0µm ≥ 0.5µm ≥ 5.0 µm 3500 0 3500 0 A B (a) 3500 0 350000 2000 C (a) 350000 2000 3500000 20000 D (a) 3500000 20000 not defined (c) not defined (c) Notes:
(a) For B, C and D, the number of air changes should be related to the size of the room and the equipment and personnel present. The HVAC system should be provided with appropriate filters, e.g. HEPA for Grades A, B and C. (b)The maximum permitted number of particles in the "at rest" condition correspond approximately to the US Federal Standard 209E & the ISO classifications as follows: Grades A and B ≈ Class 100, M 3.5, ISO 5; grade C ≈ Class 10 000, M 5.5, ISO 7 and Grade D ≈ Class 100 000, M 6.5, ISO 8. (c) The requirement and classification limit for the area will depend on the nature of the operations carried out.

Cross-reference to AS 1386 and other standards Standard ISO 14644-1 3 4 AS 1386 0.035 0.35 BS 5295 C D Federal Standard 209E 1 10 EU CGMP -

Classification 5 6 3.5 35 E/F G/H 100 1,000 A/B -

7 350 J 10,000 C

8 3,500 K 100,000 D

Vilair-AAF Pty Ltd 20 Tucks Road Seven Hills NSW 2147 ABN: 88 094 594 402

Tel: (02) 8811 3703 Fax: (02) 8811 3799 Web: www.vilair-aaf.com.au e-mail: info@vilair-aaf.com.au

It is available from: Institute of Environmental Sciences and Technology 940 East Northwest Highway Mount Prospect Illinois. a Class M3 room has a particle limit for particles ? 0. 60056 USA Tel: 0101 708 255 1561 Fax: 0101 708 255 1699 e-mail: iest@iest. WA16 9RS Tel: +44 (0) 1565 722609 Fax: +44 (0) 1565 722758 www. e. i. 3044718 © Moorfield 2001 .000 5. The method most easily understood and most universally applied is the one suggested in the earlier versions (A to D) of Federal Standard 209 of the USA. Cheshire United Kingdom. GB616324166 Reg No.000 10.000 NA NA NA 100.g.000 CLASS 1 10 100 1.3 0. Table 1: Federal Standard 209D Class Limits MEASURED PARTICLE SIZE (MICROMETERS) 0. Federal Standard 209 This standard was first published in 1963 in the USA and titled "Cleanroom and Work Station Requirements.2 0. 1988 (D) and 1992 (E).5 ? m of 1000/m Moorfield Associates Moorfield House Plumley Moor Road Plumley.moorfield.CLASSIFICATION OF CLEANROOMS Cleanrooms are classified by the cleanliness of their air.5 35 7.co. This standard is about to be superseded by BS EN ISO 14644-1.000 NA NA NA 10.e per m3 and the classifications of the room defined as the logarithm of the airborne concentration of particles ? 0. This is shown in Table 2.uk VAT No.1 0.000 100. 1973 (209B).5 ? m is measured in one cubic foot of air and this count used to classify the room. Controlled Environments". In the UK the British Standard 5295. published in 1989. The most recent 209E version has also accepted a metric nomenclature.0 NA NA NA 7 70 700 In the new 209E published in 1992 the airborne concentrations in the room are given in metric units. In this old standard the number of particles equal to and greater than 0.co.5 3 1 350 75 30 10 NA 750 300 100 NA NA NA 1.5 ? m 3 .uk sales@moorfield. is also used to classify cleanrooms.org: The cleanroom classifications given in the earlier 209 A to D versions are shown in Table 1. It was revised in 1966 (209A). 1987 (C).

.

7 265 757 2 650 7 570 26 500 75 700 ------(ft 3 ) 2.5 70.Cleanroom Standards Table 2: Federal Standard 209E Airborne Particulate Cleanliness Classes Class Name 0.4 75.3? m Volume Units (m3 ) 30.9 106 309 1 060 3 090 10 600 30 900 ------(ft 3 ) 0.875 3.5 M6 M 6.0 28.5 M4 M 4.moorfield.0 87.5? m Volume Units (m3 ) 10. WA16 9RS Tel: +44 (0) 1565 722609 Fax: +44 (0) 1565 722758 www.co.5 M3 M 3. Cheshire United Kingdom.2? m Volume Units (m3 ) 75.3 100 353 1 000 3 530 10 000 35 300 100 000 353 000 1 000 000 3 350 000 10 000 000 (ft 3 ) 0. GB616324166 Reg No.5 M2 M 2.0 175 700 1 750 SI M1 M 1.0 99. 3044718 © Moorfield 2001 .00 17.0 35.co.00 2.14 7.0 214 750 2 140 ------- Class Limits 0.00 8.1 350 991 --------- Moorfield Associates Moorfield House Plumley Moor Road Plumley.5 M5 M 5.83 10.3 100 283 1 000 2 830 10 000 28 300 100 000 283 000 5? m Volume Units (m3 ) -------247 618 2 470 6 180 24 700 61 800 (ft 3 ) -------7.5 300 875 ------- 0.91 35.1? m Volume Units 0.283 1.5 M7 English 1 10 100 1 000 10 000 100 000 (m3 ) 350 1 240 3 500 12 400 35 000 --------- (ft 3 ) 9.75 30.uk sales@moorfield.uk VAT No.50 21.

construction and commissioning of cleanroom and clean air devices. (14 pages) Part 3 .moorfield.General introduction and terms and definitions for cleanrooms and clean air devices.Specification for cleanrooms and clean air devices. (14 pages) Part 2 .Specification for monitoring cleanrooms and clean air devices to prove continued compliance with BS 5295. (6 pages) Part 4 .uk sales@moorfield. All classes have particle counts specified for at least two particle size ranges to provide adequate confidence over the range of particle size relevant to each class.co. Cheshire United Kingdom. (10 pages) Part 1 of the standard contains ten classes of environmental cleanliness. These are: Part 0 . stated size) 0.co.3 ? m 0.5 ? m 5 ?m 10 ? m 25 ? m Maximum floor area per sampling position for cleanrooms (m2) 10 10 10 25 25 25 25 50 50 50 Minimum pressure difference* Between Between classified classified area areas and and adjacent unclassified areas of lower areas classification (Pa) (Pa) 15 10 15 10 15 10 15 10 15 10 15 10 15 10 15 10 10 10 10 NA Class of environmental cleanliness C D E F G H J K L M 100 1 000 10 000 NS 100 000 NS NS NS NS NS 35 350 3 500 3 500 35 000 35 000 350 000 3 500 000 NS NS 0 0 0 0 200 200 2 000 20 000 200 000 NS NS NS NS NS 0 0 450 4 500 45 000 450 000 NS NS NS NS NS NS 0 500 5 000 50 000 Moorfield Associates Moorfield House Plumley Moor Road Plumley. Parts will be superseded by the ISO standards as they appear as an EN standard. The British Standard is in five parts.uk Because of the imminent publication of EN ISO 14644-1 parts of this British Standard have a limited life.Guide to operational procedures and disciplines applicable to cleanrooms and clean air devices. Table 3 BS 5295 Environmental cleanliness classes Maximum permitted number of particles per m3 (equal to. (4 pages) Part 1 .Method for specifying the design.org.British Standard 5295:1989 This standard is available from: B S I Standards 389 Chiswick High Road London W44 AL Tel 0181 996 9000 Fax 0181 996 7400 e-mail: info@bsi. WA16 9RS Tel: +44 (0) 1565 722609 Fax: +44 (0) 1565 722758 www. or greater than. Shown in Table 3 are the classes given in the standard.uk © Moorfield 2001 .

co.1 is a constant with a dimension of ? m. ISO 5 is equivalent to the old FS 209 Class 100.moorfield. with 0. This standard is available from standard organisations throughout the world and in the UK is available from the BSI. Intermediate ISO classification numbers may be specified. Shown in Table 4 is the classification that has been adopted. Cheshire United Kingdom.1 the smallest permitted increment of N.co.3? m 0. materials.0? m The table is derived from the following formula: 0. Classification numbers numbers (N) Maximum concentration limits (particles/m3 of air) for particles equal to and larger than the considered sizes shown below 0. Table 4. The occupancy state is defined in this standard as follows: As built: the condition where the installation is complete with all services connected and functioning but with no production equipment.g. Table 4 shows a crossover to the old FS 209 classes e. which shall not exceed the value of 9.1? m ISO 1 ISO 2 ISO 3 ISO 4 ISO 5 ISO 6 ISO 7 ISO 8 ISO 9 10 100 1 000 10 000 100 000 1 000 000 0.BS EN ISO Standard Because of the large number of cleanroom standards produced by individual countries it is very desirable that one world-wide standard of cleanroom classification is produced.5? m 1? m 5. or personnel present. The first ISO standard on cleanrooms has been published (June 1999) as 14644-1 ‘Classification of Air Cleanliness’.1 ? Cn = 10 N ? ? ? ?D ? ? where: 2 . Moorfield Associates Moorfield House Plumley Moor Road Plumley.08 Cn represents the maximum permitted concentration ( in particles/m3 of air ) of airborne particles that are equal to or larger than the considered particle size. It is about to be adopted as a European standard and hence a standard for all countries in the EU. 0.uk sales@moorfield.uk . Selected ISO 209 airborne particulate cleanliness classes for cleanrooms and clean zones. D is the considered particle size in ? m. WA16 9RS Tel: +44 (0) 1565 722609 Fax: +44 (0) 1565 722758 © Moorfield 2001 www.2? m 2 24 237 2 370 23 700 237 000 10 102 1 020 10 200 102 000 4 35 352 3 520 35 200 352 000 3 520 000 35 200 000 8 83 832 8 320 83 200 832 000 8 320 000 29 293 2 930 29 300 293 000 0. Cn is rounded to the nearest whole number. N is the ISO classification number.

It also includes a method for specifying a room using particles outside the size range given in the table 4.e. Operational : The condition where the installation is functioning in the specified manner. but with no personnel present. This is contained in a ‘Revision of the Annexe to the EU Guide to Good Manufacturing PracticeManufacture of Sterile Medicinal Products’.5? m 3 500 350 000 3 500 000 not defined (c) 5. The method employed with macroparticles is to use the format: ‘M(a. the number of air changes should be related to the size of the room and the equipment and personnel present in the room. b).0? m 0 2 000 20000 not defined (c) 3 500 000 Tel: +44 (0) 1565 722609 Fax: +44 (0) 1565 722758 © Moorfield 2001 . Fibres can also be used. The air system should be provided with appropriate filters such as HEPA for grades A.c’ where a is the maximum permitted concentration/m3 b is the equivalent diameter. B and C. where small particles are of no practical importance. These are similar to FS 209. WA16 9RS www. Smaller particles (ultrafine) will be of particular use to the semiconductor industry and the large (? 5 ? m macroparticles) will be of use in industries such as parts of the medical device industry. Moorfield Associates Moorfield House Plumley Moor Road Plumley. Pharmaceutical Cleanroom Classification EU GGMP The most recent set of standards for use in Europe came into operation on the 1st of January 1997. sampling locations.moorfield. c is the specified measurement method.co. An example would be: ‘M(1 000.5? m A B(a) C(a) D(a) Notes: (a) In order to reach the B. The following is an extract of the information in the standard that is relevant to the design of cleanrooms : For the manufacture of sterile medicinal products four grades are given. The airborne particulate classification for these grades is given in the following table. Cheshire United Kingdom. with the specified number of personnel present and working in the manner agreed upon. 10? m to 20? m).At-rest: The condition where the installation is complete with equipment installed and operating in a manner agreed between the customer and supplier.uk in operation 5? m 3 500 3 500 350 000 0 0 2 000 20 000 0. sample volume etc.uk sales@moorfield. The standard also gives a method by which the performance of a cleanroom may be verified i. C and D air grades. cascade impactor followed by microscopic sizing and counting’. maximum permitted number of particles/m3 equal to or above Grade at rest (b) 0.co.

g. (c) The requirement and limit for this area will depend on the nature of the operations carried out. ISO 5. 12) Aseptic preparation and filling. M 6. 90 mm). (see par. ISO 8.5. when unusually at risk. ISO 7 and grade D with class 100 000. Isolator and Blow Fill Technology (extract only) The air classification required for the background environment depends on the design of the isolator and its application. after validation of systems. Cheshire United Kingdom. after completion of operations. It is accepted that it may not always be possible to demonstrate conformity with particulate standards at the point of fill when filling is in progress. 11) Filling of products.cfu/glove GRADE A B C D ?1 10 100 200 ?1 5 50 100 ?1 5 - Notes: (a) These are average values. due to the generation of particles or droplets from the product itself.55 mm). cfu/4 hours(b) contact plates (diam. Additional microbiological monitoring is also required outside production operations. 5 fingers.5. Preparation of solutions.moorfield. It should be controlled and for aseptic processing be at least grade D. The particulate conditions given in the table for the “at rest” state should be achieved in the unmanned state after a short “clean up” period of 15-20 minutes (guidance value). Preparation of solutions and components for subsequent filling. Examp les of operations to be carried out in the various grades are given in the table below. grade C with class 10 000. WA16 9RS www. If these limits are exceeded operating procedures should prescribe corrective action. (see par.uk Tel: +44 (0) 1565 722609 Fax: +44 (0) 1565 722758 © Moorfield 2001 . M 3. Grade A C D Grade A C D Examples of operations for terminally sterilised products.. Filling of products.uk sales@moorfield. M 5. Preparation of solutions to be filtered. when unusually at risk. 11 and 12). (b) Individual settle plates may be exposed for less than 4 hours. (c) Appropriate alert and action limits should be set for the results of particulate and microbiological monitoring. e.5. Examples of operations for aseptic preparations. cleaning and sanitisation.(b) The guidance given for the maximum permitted number of particles in the “at rest” condition corresponds approximately to the US Federal Standard 209E and the ISO classifications as follows: grades A and B correspond with class 100. Moorfield Associates Moorfield House Plumley Moor Road Plumley. The particulate conditions for grade A in operation given in the table should be maintained in the zone immediately surrounding the product whenever the product or open container is exp osed to the environment. cfu/plate ?1 5 25 50 glove print. Recommended limits for microbial contamination (a) air sample cfu/m3 settle plates (diam. (see also par.co.co. Handling of components after washing.

The agency recognizes that some powder filling operations may generate high levels of powder particulates which. The environmental requirements for these two areas given in the Guide are as follows: Critical areas ‘Air in the immediate proximity of exposed sterilized containers/closures and filling/closing operations is of acceptable particulate quality when it has a per-cubic -foot particle count of no more than 100 in a size range of 0. provided that grade A/B clothing is used.5 micron and larger (Class 100) when measured not more than one foot away from the work site. in-process materials. containers. In order to maintain air quality in controlled areas. Critical areas should have a positive pressure differential relative to adjacent less clean areas. With regard to microbial quality.moorfield. during filling/closing operations. having a velocity sufficient to sweep particulate matter away from the filling/closing area. are acceptable.5 micron and larger (Class 100. The environment should comply with the viable and non viable limits at rest and the viable limit only when in operation. Two areas are defined. The ‘critical area’ is where the sterilized dosage form. it is important to achieve a sufficient air flow and a positive pressure differential relative to adjacent uncontrolled areas. It may not.Blow/fill/seal equipment used for aseptic production which is fitted with an effective grade A air shower may be installed in at least a grade C environment. a pressure differential of at least 0.000) when measured in the vicinity of the exposed articles during periods of activity. in these cases. When doors are open.uk © Moorfield 2001 .000 in a size range of 0. Air should also be of a high microbial quality. Air in critical areas should be supplied at the point of use as HEPA filtered laminar flow air. An incidence of no more than one colony forming unit per 10 cubic feet is considered as attainable and desirable. be feasible to measure air quality within the one foot distance and still differentiate "background noise" levels of powder particles from air contaminants which can impeach product quality. an incidence of no more than 25 colony forming units per 10 cubic feet is acceptable. in general.uk sales@moorfield.05 inch of water is acceptable’. to the extent possible. and closures are exposed to the environment. by their nature. although higher velocities may be needed where the operations generate high levels of particulates or where equipment configuration disrupts laminar flow. Guideline on Sterile Drug Products Produced by Aseptic Processing.co. In this regard. a pressure differential of 0. an air flow sufficient to achieve at least 20 air changes per hour and. a velocity of 90 feet per minute. plus or minus 20%. Moorfield Associates Moorfield House Plumley Moor Road Plumley. outward airflow should be sufficient to minimize ingress of contamination’. WA16 9RS Tel: +44 (0) 1565 722609 Fax: +44 (0) 1565 722758 www. is adequate. and container/closures are prepared.05 inch of water (with all doors closed). and upstream of the air flow. Cheshire United Kingdom. it is nonetheless important to sample the air in a manner which. do not pose a risk of product contamination. Controlled areas ‘Air in controlled areas is generally of acceptable particulate quality if it has a percubic-foot particle count of not more than 100. characterizes the true level of extrinsic particulate contamination to which the product is exposed. This document is produced by the FDA in the USA and published in 1987.co. Normally. Blow/fill/seal equipment used for the production of products for terminal sterilisation should be installed in at least a grade D environment. In these instances. The ‘controlled area’ is where unsterilized product.

Country and standard Date of current issue U.uk © Moorfield 2001 .2083 1990 onwards 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 ISO standard 1997 1 10 100 1 000 10 000 100 000 M1. Cheshire United Kingdom.co.5 C D E or F G or H J K 0. Table 5: A comparison of international standards.A.035 0.5 M4.moorfield.uk sales@moorfield.co.5 M2.S.5 M5.5 M3.35 3. Moorfield Associates Moorfield House Plumley Moor Road Plumley.S.5 M6. 209E 1992 Britain BS 5295 1989 Australia AS 1386 1989 France AFNOR X44101 1972 Germany VD I.5 35 350 3500 4 000 400 000 4 000 000 3 4 5 6 7 8 The above information has been extracted from the handbook ‘Cleanroom Technology’ written by Bill Whyte.A.Comparison of Various Standards Shown in Table 5 is a comparison of the classes given in the standards discussed above. WA16 9RS Tel: +44 (0) 1565 722609 Fax: +44 (0) 1565 722758 www. 209D 1988 U.

000  ­­  35.000  100.180  24.1  350  991  ­­  ­­  ­­  ­­  ­­  ­­  ­­  ­­  >=0.0µm  3  3  pié  3  m  3  350  1.5µm  >= 5.3 µm  >= 0.060  3.5                   1  M  2  M  2. guía para Buenas P rácticas de Fabricación  3  N umero m áximo de partículas permitidas  x m   iguales a o sobre  Grado  en descanso  en operación  >= 0.930  3.0 µm  A  350  0  3.000  8.283  1. ISO 8 .7  265  757  2.000  28.5  3  1  NA  75  30  10  NA  750  300  100  NA  NA  NA  1.00  35.000  D  3.500  12. M 3.500  75.5            1.000  C  350.0  3.5         100000  M  7  m  3  >= 0.000  29.000.000  300  3.5 µm  >= 5.CLASI FI CACI ON DEL AI RE ­ ESTANDARES ­ CLASES ­ SALAS LI M P I AS ­ TESTS  ◊ Limites de las Clases del Federal Standard 209D  Clase  Tamaño  1  10  100  1.5.000  M  6  M  6.200  2.5               100  M  4  M  4.0µm  10  2  100  24  10  4  1.830  10.600  30.200.2 µm  >= 0.240  3.000  20.000  20.000.0  353  87.000  Clase 8  Clase 100.000  2.200  3.500  0  B  3.300  100.470  6.75  100  30.000  700  3  >= 0.320.5µm  3  3  >=5.2m  >= 0.000  2. M 6.000  23.14  7.900  ­­  ­­  ­­  ­­  ­­  ­­  pié  m  0.320  293  352.5µm  >= 1µm  >= 5.700  10.800  ◊ Límites de las Clases del Estándar I SO 14644­1  N úmero de la  Clasificación I SO  ISO Clase 1  ISO Clase 2  ISO Clase 3  ISO Clase 4  ISO Clase 5  ISO Clase 6  ISO Clase 7  ISO Clase 8  ISO Clase 9  3  Límites m áximos de concentración (P articulas/ m  de aire) de particulas " iguales  a"  y " mayores que"  los tamaños m ostrados abajo  >= 0.650  7.00  2.875  10.000  832.83  10.520.020  352  83  100.5.000  ­­  353.000  2.000  70  NA  NA  100.5  1.400  35.000.300  ­­  100.520  832  29  1.000  ­­  1.090  10.000  P articulas/ pié  >= 0.570  26.000  ­­  10.2µm  >= 0.000  237  102  35  8  10.700  61.000 not defined  not defined  N ote  Grado A y B corresponde a clase 100.5          10.3  8. ISO 5  Grado C corresponde a clase 10000.000  3.000  237.0µm  >= 0.000  83.200  8.0  214  750  2140  ­­  ­­  ­­  ­­  ­­  ­­  30.300  35.500.000  m  3  ­­  ­­  ­­  ­­  ­­  ­­  ­­  247  618  2.000  10.0 µm  7.4  75.000  ­­  ­­  ­­  ­­  ­­  ­­  ­­  ­­  75.000  ­­  3.700  ­­  ­­  ­­  ­­  ­­  ­­  2.000  102.3µm  Volume Units  pié  3  N ombre de la Clase  SI                English  M  1  M  1.3  100  283  1.370  1. M 5.0  28.500.3µm  >= 0.000  ◊ Clasificación del A ire en la Unión Europea.5µm  >= 5.000  7  NA  NA  10.000  Clase 10.50  21.000  35.1µm  >= 0.000  pié  0.350. ISO 7  Grado D corresponde a clase 100000.1 µm  35  350  NA  NA  NA  NA  ◊ Límites de las Clases del Federal Standard 209E  Limites de la Clase  >=0.9  106  309  1.5.000  ◊ Comparación entre las clases equivalentes del Federal Standard 209 y de la I SO 14644­1  Clase I SO 14644­1  Federal Standard  Clase 3  Clase 1  Clase 4  Clase 10  Clase 5  Clase 100  Clase 6  Clase 7  Clase 1.1µm  m  9.000  283.000  M  5  M  5.530  875  10.5                 10  M  3  M  3.000  293.91  35  99.500  0  350.000  2.

000.◊ Clasificación de contaminación de Salas Limpias  Sustancia  Química  Compuestos orgánicos  Sales inorgánicas  Vapor  Mist  Fume  Humo  Energía  Biológica  Bacteria  Hongos  Esporas  Polen  Virus  Celulas de piel humana  Térmica  Luz  Electromagnetica (EMI)  Electrostática (ESD)  Radiación  Electrica  Física  Polvo  Suciedad  Arenilla  Fibra  Lint  Ceniza volatil  ◊ P articulas en el aire exterior  N umero de P articulas/ m  en el aire exterior  Tamaño en Micrones  Sucio  Normal  Limpio  >0.000  1.000  >0.5  30. ISO 8  .000  >0. M 5.5  4000  G or H  35 ­  J  350  400000  K  3500  4000000  USA 209D  USA 209E  Alemania  VDI 2083  ISO  1988  1 M 1.5  1000 M 4.5  10 M 2. ISO 7  Grado D corresponde a clase 100000.000.5  1990  1  2  3  4  5  6  3  4  5  6  7  8  1999  ◊ EUGGM P  2002 Límites recomendados de Contaminación M icrobiana  contact  Plates Diam  Glove Print  55 mm  5 fingers  3  cfu/m  cfu/glove  <1  <1  5  5  25  ­  50  ­  Grade  A  B  C  D  Air Sample  3  cfu/m  <1  10  100  200  Settle Plates  Diam 90 mm  3  cfu/m  <1  5  50  100  N ote  Grado A y B corresponde a clase 100.000.000.5  10000 M 5.35 ­  E or F  3.000.000.5  100 M 3. ISO 5  Grado C corresponde a clase 10000.5.000.000  20.000  3  ◊ Calendario de tests OBLI GA TORI OS para demostrar el cumplimiento continuo de salas limpias  P arámetro  Conteo de Partículas Diferencia presión aire  Flujo de Aire  Clase  <= ISO 5  >ISO 5  Todas las Clases  Todas las Clases  M áximo I ntervalo de Tiempo  6 Meses  12 Meses  12 Meses  12 Meses  ◊ Calendario de tests OP CI ON A LES para demostrar el cumplimiento continuo de salas limpias  P arámetro  Installed Filter Leakage Fugas  Containment Leakage  Recovery  Airflow Visualization  Clase  Todas  Todas  Todas  Todas  M áximo I ntervalo de Tiempo  24 Meses  24 Meses  24 Meses  24 Meses  ◊ Comparación de estándares I nternacionales P aís y Estándar  Inglaterra BS  Australia  AS  Francia  5295  1386  AFNOR NFX  44­101  Fecha de emisión  1992  1989  1989  1981  C  0.035 ­  D  0.000  7.000.000  3.000  500.000. M 3.5.000.5  100000 M 6.1  10.5.000  90.000. M 6.3  300.

5.5µm  5. M 3. ISO 7  Grado D corresponde a clase 100000.5. y menor  frecuencia en  asépticas  otras áreas .5.0µm  A  (LA F)  350  0  B  3.5.520  293  B  3. M 3.5µm  5.5. M 6.5.300  D  3.  Filling of products when unusually at risk  moulding. ISO 5  Grado C corresponde a clase 10000. ISO 5  Grado C corresponde a clase 10000.5. M 6.000  2. M 5. ISO 7  Grado D corresponde a clase 100000.520.5. M 3.5. ISO 5  Grado C corresponde a clase 10000.N o  1  2  3  4  5  6  Test  Frecuencia  Monitoreo de partículas en suspensión  6 meses  Test de integridad del filtro HEPA  Anualmente  Cálculo de la tasa de cambios de aire  6 meses  Diferenciales de Presión de Aire  Diaria  Temperatura y Humedad  Diaria  Monitoreo  microbiológico  por  placas/o  muestras  en  áreas  Diaria.930  3.0µm  A  352  29  3.5. preparation of solutions.500  0  C  350. M 5.5. when unusually at risk. ISO 8  ◊ Tipos de Operaciones para preparaciones asépticas. ISO 8  ◊ Tipos de Operaciones para productos esterilizados terminales  Grade  A  C  D  Types of Opeartions for Terminally Sterilised P roducts  Relleno de productos.  Grade  A  B  C  D  Types of Opeartions for A septic P reparations  Preparación aséptica y relleno  Background room conditions for activities requiring Grade A  Preparacion de Soluciones para ser filtradas  Manipuleo de componentes después del lavado  N ote  Grado A y B corresponde a clase 100.000  29. ISO 8  3  M icro  organismos  <1  5  100  500  ◊ Clasificación del A ire por el " Schedule M "   3  N úmero M áximo P ermitido de partículas/ m  igual o m ayor  Grado  en descanso  en operación  0.◊ Clasificación del A ire por la Organización M undial de la Salud (W HO) 2002  N úmero M áximo P ermitido /  m   P artículas  0.000  2  D  3.000  20  Grado  N ote  Grado A y B corresponde a clase 100.  Preparation  of  solutions  and components for subsequent filling  N ote  Grado A y B corresponde a clase 100. no usualmente riesgosos  Placement of filling and sealing machines.5.000  2.520  293  352.0µm  0.300  not defined  not defined  N ote  Grado A y B corresponde a clase 100.500.930  C  352. M 6.  blowing  (pre­forming)  opearions  of  plastic  containers. M 6. ISO 7  Grado D corresponde a clase 100000. M 5. ISO 7  Grado D corresponde a clase 100000. M 3. ISO 5  Grado C corresponde a clase 10000.000  29. M 5.5µm  5.520. ISO 8  ◊ M onitoreo ambiental de Salas Limpias  Sl.

 directrices para productos con drogas estériles  Límites Microbiológicos  <0.5 µm  3  3  3  ³ cfu/ft  cfu/m  Límpia  Partículas /ft  Partículas /m  100  100  3.◊ Clasificación del A ire por la US FDA .500.01 µ (Equipamiento) rms  < 55 dbA  0.000 <2  <7  10000  10000  350.5 m³ /min x m² de área de sala limpía  <0.500 <1  <3  1000  1000  35. A ire Fresco  Vibración  Ruido  Temperatura  Humedad  Variación M agnética  Carga Estática  3  Total Hidrocarbonos <1 ppm; Na <0.1 ºC  < 2%  < 1 mG  < 50 v  ◊ Cleanroom I ndustry Design Thumb Rule  I SO Clase  Velocidad del  Cambios de  %  de  A ire a nivel  A ire por  cobertura  mesa en FP M   Hora  Cielo con  filtro HEP A   Riguroso  70 ­ 130  >750  100  Riguroso  70 ­ 130  >750  100  Riguroso  70 ­ 130  >750  100  Riguroso  70 ­ 110  500 ­ 600  100  Riguroso  70 ­ 90  150 ­ 400  100  Intermedio  25 ­ 40  60 ­ 100  33 ­ 40  Intermedio  10 ­ 15  25 ­ 40  10 ­ 15  Menos riguroso  3 ­ 5  10 ­ 15  5 ­ 10  Controles  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  .000 <25  <88  ◊ Requerimientos especiales para I SO Clase 3 Salas Límpias  Calidad del A ire  I ngr.5 µm  Clasificación de Area  <0.000 <3  <18  100000  100000  3.1 µg/m  0.1 µ (Edificio); <0.

750 3  .0  175  700  1.5  70.0µm  pié  ­­ ­­ ­­ ­­ ­­ ­­ ­­  7.>=5.00  17.

.

.

.

de norma de aplicación de cualquier En el diseño de una planta de HVAC (“Heated and Ventilated Air Conditioned”) para una instalación farmacéutica deben considerarse varios aspectos. the protection of the product. la protección del personal y la protección del medio ambiente. que se indican a continuación: “Baseline” Volumen 1: Productos químicos-farmacéuticos a granel (“bulk”) – junio de 1996. “Baseline” Volumen 3: Instalaciones de fabricación estériles – enero de 1999. “Baseline” Volumen 2: Dosificación de formas sólidas de orales – febrero de 1998.ISO 14644-1: “Classification of air cleanliness” (Clasificación de la limpieza del aire). otro aspecto importante a considerar son las normas. the protection of operators and the protection of the environmental. Entre los años 97 y 98. El alcance de este trabajo es explicar el propósito de un sistema de HVAC en una instalación farmacéutica considerando las normas que lo regulan mostrando algunos esquemas funcionales. En el dominio internacional. el ISPE (“International Society of Pharmaceutical Engineers”) publicó las líneas a seguir sobre instalaciones farmacéuticas. La relación de las normas ISO es la siguiente: . Estas normas se han publicado incorporando comentarios de la FDA. Beside of them an important aspect to consider are the standard. (volumen 4: Buenas Prácticas de Fabricación) dedicado a productos estériles. Es interesante hacer notar que el ISPE publicó inicialmente las normas para productos químicos a granel y. a saber: la protección del producto. cuya misión era establecer los criterios que debían regir las salas limpias sin hacer referencia específica a un campo particular (esto quiere decir que son igualmente válidas para la industria farmacéutica). constituidas por los libros. The scope of this paper is to explain the target of the HVAC plant for a pharmaceutical facility considering the governing standard and giving some functional example. la última norma publicada fue la aplicable a los productos estériles para los cuales ya existían unas líneas a seguir de la FDA de fecha 1987. llamados “Baseline”. preparadas para su publicación bajo la forma de proyecto final y después como norma ISO. consecuentemente. reimpresas en junio de 1991). . Introducción Las normas han sido actualizadas o publicadas hace dos años: las relativas a las buenas prácticas de fabricación de la Comunidad Europea (EECGMP) se actualizaron en el 97 y figuraban en el anexo 1. Los trabajos sobre las normas siguen en progreso: algunas de ellas ya están casi terminadas. que regulan el proceso farmacéutico. Publicada en mayo de 1999. para los sólidos de administración oral porque eran las dos tipologías de planta que carecían. internacionales o europeas. el Comité de la ISO decidió redactar una norma internacional sobre salas limpias. The design of an HVAC plant for a pharmaceutical facility should take into account several aspect that are. revisada en junio de 1991 (Fármacos estériles producidos por procesos asépticos de junio de 1987. Además de estas consideraciones.ISO 14644-2: “Specifications for testing and monitoring to prove continued compliance with . international or European ones.ISO 14644-I” (Especificaciones de prueba y control para demostrar el continuo cum- 1. en su diseño. that govern the Pharma process.Tecnologia Industrial El criterio de diseño de una sala limpia farmacéutica The design criteria of a pharmaceutical clean room Emilio Moia Foster Wheeler clase. 55 .

ISO 14644-5: “Operations” (Operaciones). En caso de salas con distintos niveles de temperatura.R. El sistema HVAC deberá ser de evacuación total en caso de que en la misma sala se manipulen dos o más tipos de productos diferentes.. el aire no debe retornar a estos espacios.45 m/s caliente de tipo convectivo) Diseño del sistema de Control de las condicioDiseño y situación del filtración (prefiltración nes termohigrométripunto de y filtración cas. % H. T. a unidireccional corrientes de aire (LAF) a 0. construction and start-up” (Diseño. la planta de HVAC debe subdividirse en sistemas más pequeños. (2) Concepto de contaminación cruzada. Propósito de una planta de HVAC En una instalación farmacéutica deben considerarse tres aspectos principales: la protección del producto. La contaminación cruzada puede tener su origen en el entorno interno o en el exterior. aunque tengan filtros tipo HEPA. En todos los sistemas de acondicionamiento de aire.ISO 14644-7: “Enhanced clean devices” (Dispositivos de limpieza). debe prever la retención apropiada de las partículas proce- dentes del exterior. . y en distintas campañas. 56 . . el sistema de filtración a seleccionar. Borrador. . Borrador. para el aspiración final. por requerimientos del proceso. Versión del proyecto del Comité.ISO 14644-4: “Design. la planta de recirculación de aire debe diseñarse con un sistema de filtración adecuado. la protección del personal y la protección del medio ambiente. . El riesgo de contaminación cruzada debe ser necesariamente evaluado para diseñar correctamente la planta de HVAC. Versión del proyecto final. 2. es interesante describir con el mismo ejemplo lo que se entiende por “Control de la dirección del flujo de aire”. construcción y puesta en marcha). El sistema de evacuación total evita así la posibilidad de contaminación cruzada del producto que se está manipulando con el polvo del producto manipulado con anterioridad. Si los productos no muestran tolerancia a la contaminación cruzada con otros productos.plimiento de la norma ISO 14644-I). . A continuación se dan las cifras usadas en la Norma ISO ISO-14644-4 “Diseño. Después de la explicación del concepto de protección del medio ambiente. En caso de no existir riesgo o de que los productos puedan tolerar este tipo de contaminación cruzada con otros productos. Versión del borrador final.ej. La planta de HVAC debe ser diseñada teniendo en cuenta estos tres aspectos: a continuación se incluyen tres tablas que explican el papel que desempeña la planta de HVAC. p. según se indica en la Tabla II titulada “Protección del operador”.ISO 14644-3: “Metrology and test method” (Metrología y método de prueba). Borrador. construcción y puesta en funcionamiento de instalaciones de salas limpias” al objeto de Tabla I.ISO 14644-6: “Terms and definitions” (Términos y definiciones). la planta de HVAC debe considerar un aire totalmente fresco. considerando la dirección del viento y el punto de evacuación (1) El control del modelo del flujo de aire implica la selección del difusor y su colocación con la rejilla de retorno para evitar que el aire contaminado sea devuelto a una zona de actividad crítica.Protección del producto: propósito de la planta HVAC Contaminación de la superficie interna Contaminación desde el exterior Control de la contaContaminación debiminación debida al da al producto en el operador y de otras proceso (contaminafuentes contaminanción cruzada)(2) tes internas Control de flujo de aire (evitar cualquier retroceso de caudal de aire Control de la configuradesde el suelo al techo ción del flujo de aire Control de la presión Control del modelo de o por las paredes en (1)Flujo de aire local de la sala flujo de aire (1) vertical debida. HEPA) confort del operador Evacuación local cuando se identifica la fuente de Tipo de planta de HVAC contaminación (recirculada o directa) Situación de la toma de admisión de aire.

las figuras 1 y 2 muestran varios conceptos distintos de control de la contaminación que deben ser considerados.2. los procedimientos de trabajo. como son los equipos de proceso.. La transferencia de contaminantes a una zona de protección de un proceso y/o de personal puede evitarse utilizando medidas de tipo aerodinámico. Barrera física entre el operador y el lugar de trabajo: los aisladores. prever un filtro de carbón activo marzo/abril 00 57 .Tabla II. explicar los conceptos de “Perturbación del flujo de aire unidireccional”. y “control de la contaminación”. 2.1. La figura 1 muestra la influencia de los obstáculos físicos (en Figura 1 Influencia del personal y de los objetos sobre el flujo de aire unidireccional Para seleccionar la técnica apropiada en caso de un determinado problema de control de la contaminación. deben considerarse requisitos aerodinámicos básicos en el diseño de los obstáculos físicos. movimientos del personal y manipulación de los productos. Perturbación del flujo de aire unidireccional ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– lencias en las proximidades de los lugares donde se desarrolla una actividad sensible a la contaminación. Protección del operador: Propósito de la planta de HVAC Evitar cualquier concentración peligrosa de gases que pudiera causar graves problemas para la salud del operador Contaminación debida al producto Contaminación debida al producto (desde el punto de vista del mantenimiento) la columna de la izquierda) y las medidas apropiadas para reducir al mínimo su impacto (en la de la derecha). Protección del medio ambiente: Propósito de la planta de HVAC Evitar la descarga de cualquier contaminante que pudiera perjudicar el medio ambiente Prever la adecuada eficacia del filtro del sistema de evacuación de aire Si es necesario.Control de la dirección del flujo para cambiar los componentes culación o directa) de aire del sistema HVAC Control de la fuente de contaCálculo de dilución del contamiminación local posicionando la nante en la sala para mantener campana de aspiración conecuna concentración inferior a tada al sistema de evacuación TLV-TWA de polvo. a fin de evitar serias turbuTabla III. debe considerarse igualmente la evacuación de las zonas de proceso para evitar la contaminación del medio ambiente exterior. 2. En las salas limpias con flujo de aire unidireccional. Si es necesario. Conceptos de control de la contaminación ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– Prever un sistema de seguridad Tipo de planta de HVAC (recir.

Simposio 1989). una diferencia de presión entre una sala limpia y el aire ambiente de 15 Pa es suficiente para eliminar la migración de partículas. R3 celebrado en En términos generales. El gradiente de presión en exceso de 25 Pa puede dificultar la apertura y cierre de las puertas. El máximo valor de presión estática debe ser 45 Pa para evitar problemas mecánicos con la estructura de obra civil (falsos techos y resistencia de las paredes divisorias). Tolliver de Motorola. aproximadamente. que es. es el control de la presión estática en la sala. análogos incrementos de diferencia de presión son aplicables a cada una de las salas sucesivas. podemos referirnos al gráfico que se muestra a continuación en el que la presión en la sala se compara con la concentración de partículas.000 veces superior (ø > = 0. Presión en la sala Figura 2. la diferencia de presión podría ser 7 Pa en lugar de 15 Pa. 17 Pa. Conceptos de control de la contaminación utilizando medidas aerodinamicas lor de partículas 1. La alta presión puede crear también ruido cuando se producen fugas de aire a alta velocidad en la sala limpia a través de muchas pequeñas aberturas. Cuando hay dos espacios contiguos. en el período diurno. Para comprender las razones por las que es tan importante controlar la presión en la sala. consecuentemente. si- Un parámetro importante que tiene su influencia en la clase de limpieza del aire y. en la calidad del producto farmacéutico. 3.01 (m) (experiencia presentada por Donald L. en el En caso de dos salas del mismo nivel de limpieza y contiguas. el espacio que deba ser más limpio tiene que mantenerse a una diferencia de presión aproximada de 15 Pa con respecto a la zona contigua. 58 . creando una va- Figura 3. la sobrepresión es menor (5 Pa) que durante la noche.

convirtiéndose en una prescripción importante basada en la experiencia acumulada por los técnologos farmacéuticos.Q: caudal de fuga. la EEC-GMP. materiales o productos patógenos. Además. a diferencia de la FDA que considera únicamente la condición operacional. En la Tabla VI se muestra un ejemplo de las actividades farmacéuticas que se llevan a cabo en salas con distintos grados de limpieza para EEC-GMP y FDA GMP. o aberturas en las cintas transportadoras). 0. marzo/abril 00 59 . y la ISO 14644 para salas limpias. muy tóxicos. la gran diferencia entre la norma europea y la FDA es que la norma europea hace referencia a los productos estériles. peligrosos para la salud o bacterianos”. anexo 1 dice así en el punto 29: “Debe prestarse particular atención a la protección de la zona de mayor riesgo. de la norma generalmente válida para cualquier tipo de sala limpia. m3/s . conocida como “Buenas Prácticas de Fabricación”. en la Tabla IV. mientras que la FDA se refiere sólo a la forma aséptica. Este tipo de líneas a seguir no constituyen una norma. Pa .UU. PAÍS EE. forma de dosificación de productos sólidos de administración oral. REINO UNIDO ALEMANIA EUROPA BS 5295 VDI 2083: parte 2 EEC-GMP 15-25 12 10(15Pa tuando la sala más crítica a mayor presión que la otra.A: área de fuga. por ejemplo. A continuación en la Tabla V. escotillas u otras aberturas (la boca del túnel de esterilización.(p: presión diferencial. en forma finalmente estéril y aséptica. se prevé un sistema de control de presión con registros automáticos: esto es necesario cuando se instalan en la vía de evacuación filtros cerrados con la rejilla de retorno/ evacuación.87 Como valor de referencia para la fuga de aire a través de una puerta con una diferencia de presión de 15 Pa se consideran 35 m3/h por grieta lineal de puerta. en reposo y en trabajo.A: coeficiente de descarga.Tabla IV. En las salas consideradas críticas. es decir. En caso de manipular un producto tóxico. los criterios para las formas no estériles fueron válidos hasta que el ISPE. que es la FS 209E. con los comentarios de la FDA. Pa 12 ----12 12 Cuando hablamos de norma. La presurización de una sala se realiza equilibrando los caudales de aire de suministro y retorno para que haya una sobrepresión o una infrapresión. aunque en la primera parte de las mismas se dice que se sugiere encarecidamente seguir los criterios explicados para facilitar así la aprobación de la FDA. 4. Las normas existentes para instalaciones farmacéuticas se refieren casi exclusivamente al proceso de los formas estériles. m2 . se puede estimar el caudal de fugas aplicando la siguiente fórmula: Q = A .1 FDA-GMP AÑO 1973 1988 1992 1993 1987 (reimpresa en 1991) 1989 1991 1997 Anexo 1 ∆p. en lugar de serlo para el proceso de otros productos no estériles. Esta fuga tiene lugar por las puertas. es necesario considerar un concepto de presión distinto: en lugar de un gradiente de presión desde la sala de inferior clase a las zonas circundantes. a√Ap siendo: . Norma El diseño de la planta de HVAC impone conocer la norma existente que regula una planta farmacéutica. NORMA 209 B 209 D 209 E IES-RP-CC012. Volviendo a los productos estériles. desarrolló las líneas a seguir para instalaciones farmacéuticas no estériles. tenemos que segregar la norma válida para la industria farmacéutica. Las distintas recomendaciones relativas a los suministros de aire y a las diferencias de presión pueden requerir modificación cuando se hace necesario almacenar algunos materiales. El valor de referencia del gradiente de presión ha sido asentido y reflejado en las normas para salas limpias como se indica a continuación. la diferencia entre los caudales de aire de suministro y retorno constituye la fuga encontrada en la sala. radiactivos. la norma europea considera las dos posibles condiciones de ocupación. se muestra una tabla comparativa entre las GMP’s europeas y estadounidenses. al entorno ambiental inmediato al que están expuestos un producto y los componentes limpios que entran en contacto con él.

donde .000/m3 a ≥ 0.20% Filtros HEPA (99. 1) Grado Parámetro FDA-GMP 1987 (Rev.5 µm φ a ≥ 5.donde .000/m3 a ≥ 0.000 a ≥ 5.5 µm 20.0 µm .000 a ≥ 5.velocidad del aire .gradiente de presión .calidad microbiana del aire .velocidad del aire . No requerida + 10-15 Pa según las salas de distintos grados D (EEC-GMP) .eficiencia del filtro .45 m/s +/.0 µm . 200 cfu/m3 Para conseguir la clase de limpieza deseada.calidad microbiana del aire .000/m3 a ≥ 0.0 µm En operación 3.500/m3 a ≥ 0. 100 a ≥ 0.calidad aceptable de las partículas A (EEC-GMP) Area crítica (FDA-GMP) .calidad microbiana del aire . el número de reno vaciones de aire debe relacionarse con el volumen de la sala y los equipos y personal presentes en ella.500/m3 a ≥ 0.0 µm B (EEC-GMP) .5 µm A un pie (1 ft) del lugar de trabajo aguas arriba del flujo de aire.000/m3 a ≥0.gradiente de presión .500.tipo de flujo Condición inatendida tras un corto período de limpieza de 15-20 minutos después de terminar las operaciones.000/m3 a ≥ 0.eficiencia del filtro . 4 cfu/m3 Laminar 0.5 Pa < 1 cfu/m3 Laminar 0.cuando Filtros HEPA (99.000 a ≥ 0. 10 cfu/m3 Para conseguir la clase de limpieza deseada.tipo de flujo .eficiencia del filtro . Condición inatendida tras un corto período de limpieza de 15-20 minutos después de terminar las operaciones.3 mm) + 12.gradiente de presión . el número de renovaciones de aire debe rela cionarse con el volumen de la sala y los equipos y personal presentes en ella.5 Pa .5 µm 2.donde .cuando C (EEC-GMP) Area controlada (FDA-GMP) .tipo de flujo 88 cfu/ m3 20 vol/h como mínimo Condición inatendida tras un corto período de limpieza de 15-20 minutos después de terminar las operaciones. HEPA apropiados + 10-15 Pa según las salas de distintos grados 3.cuando .tipo de flujo .0 µm 350.velocidad del aire . HEPA apropiados + 10-15 Pa según las salas de distintos grados Cl.5 µm En las proximidades de los artículos expuestos Durante períodos de actividad.Tabla V.calidad microbiana del aire .donde . 350.5 µm No definida.gradiente de presión 60 .5 µm φ a ≥ 5. 1991) EEC-GMP edición 1997 En reposo 3.5 µm 3.cuando Cl.calidad aceptable de las partículas .eficiencia del filtro .500/m3 a ≥ φ a ≥ 5.500.000/m3 a ≥ 0. el número de renovaciones de aire debe relacionarse con el volumen de la sala y los equipos y personal presentes en ella. Durante las operaciones cerradas de llenado. Comparación entre EEC-GMP 1997 y FDA-GMP 1987 (Rev.calidad aceptable de las partículas .45 m/s +/.97% a 0.calidad aceptable de las partículas .3 µm) + 12.5 µm No definida.velocidad del aire .20% HEPA apropiados + 10-15 Pa según las salas de distintos grados 3. 100.97% a 0. 20.5 µm 2. 200 cfu/m3 Para conseguir la clase de limpieza.

a.000 M 6.300 * n.0 µm que inmediatamente se aprecia es que en la norma ISO clase ISO 5 se permite un contaje de 29 partículas de 5 µm.000 3. Tabla VII. podrían liberarse en caso de movimientos bruscos de ésta. Al realizar una comparación entre las dos tablas.530. ya ha mostrado algunas dudas la Asociación de Medicamentos Parenterales (PDA) (Anon. en caso de riesgo accidental Llenado de productos Preparación de soluciones componentes para posterior llenado Grado Proceso aséptico Ejemplo de operación Preparación llenado y aséptica Acción de llenado Preparación de la solución a filtrar Manipulación de componentes después del lavado A B C D Actualmente la ISO 14644-1 es la única ya publicada.5 µm 5. Está dedicada a especificar el valor límite de la posible concentración de partículas en suspensión para una determinada clase de limpieza del aire.: Comentarios de la PDA sobre la “Guía de la UE para la buenas prácticas de fabricación”.0 µm en la clase 100 (M 3.0 µm * n. 2.5 10. US FS 209E 0.930 29. en materiales de proceso y contenedores. Por lo que respecta a la norma generalmente válida para todo tipo de salas limpias.45 m/s (20% sin distinción alguna entre flujo horizontal o vertical. = no aplicable marzo/abril 00 61 .La clase de limpieza en condiciones de reposo debe alcanzarse en un período corto de limpieza de 15 a 20 minutos. el muestreo de determinación del ø de las partículas requiere un período muy largo y es razonable la duda que se suscita sobre la necesidad real de hacer este esfuerzo adicional para obtener información sobre partículas tan grandes. ISO 14644-1 Clase de limpieza del aire ISO 5 ISO 7 ISO 8 0. 50 (1996) 3. Anexo sobre la fabricación de productos médicos estériles. El filtro HEPA no se menciona para el grado D. en caso de riesgo accidental Preparación de soluciones. B y C”. la FS209E señala “no aplicable”. En la Tabla VIII se muestra una comparación entre la ISO 14644-1 y la FS209E. por tanto. la organización ISO ha decidido preparar la norma internacional para salas limpias. Journal of Pharmaceutical Science & Technology de la PDA. Además.Las dos grandes novedades de que se informa en la norma europea es el concepto de aislador (“isolator”) y las tecnologías de llenado/cierre y soplado.La clasificación del grado de limpieza del aire es objeto de referencia no sólo en FS209E.520. FS209E e ISO 14644-1 y la tabla EECGMP. el sistema de aire debe tener filtros apropiados como los HEPA para los grados A. sino también en la nueva norma ISO 14644-1: clarificación de la limpieza del aire.El valor fijo de 20 v/h de las renovaciones de aire por hora ha sido sustituido por una expresión más flexible: “Para alcanzar los grados de aire B. el número de renovaciones de aire debe estar relacionado con la dimensión de la sala y los equipos y personal presentes en ella.470 24. En relación con este punto. Lo Tabla VIII.000 5. .5 100. C y D. . EEC-GMP Grado Productos estériles Ejemplo de operación A C C D Llenado del producto. 138143).700 3. y la ISO 14644-1 prevé 29 partículas.000 29 2.a.300 3. se observa que mientras la EEC-GMP prevé una contaje de ø de partículas de 5. Areas críticas Operación: manipulación de materiales/productos estériles antes y durante las operaciones cerra das/de llenado.5 µm Clase de limpieza del aire 100 M 3.000 M 5. a saber: .520 352. Areas controladas .5). Se corresponde con la FS209E. FDA-GMP Tabla VI.5 3. en tanto que en la EEC-GMP se indica ø: esto tiene sentido porque la norma ISO considera que estas partículas grandes tienden a depositarse a lo largo de la superficie interna de la tubería y.530 35. Operación: preparación de productos no estériles. Además hay algunos cambios de los que se ha informado en la revisión de 1997 de EEC-GMP sobre la revisión previa de 1992.La velocidad del aire en caso de flujo unidireccional es 0.

La localización de los puntos de admisión y evacuación del aire tiene que diseñarse considerando la dirección del viento y la dilución de los contaminantes evacuados a fin de evitar cualquier recirculación de estos últimos. La comodidad de éste depende del nivel de temperatura y del de trabajo sin olvidar los buenos métodos utilizados. Para el personal que realiza trabajos ligeros y lleva prendas como batas o protectores del calzado.R. Otro parámetro importante es la presión que ejerce el viento sobre el edificio. en cuanto a temperatura. generalmente. y se estima el valor C para compararlo con el permitido.2. como la baja humedad relativa (25÷30%) para la fabricación de productos higroscópicos.5.. consecuentemente.7 brisa fresca 17 viento entre moderado y fuerte Cálculo de la presión dinámica Pa 1 18 70 176 62 . considerar los datos ASHRAE con las frecuencias de 1% en verano y 99% en invierno para que el nivel de riesgos sea mínimo (los porcentajes se refieren a las horas durante el invierno y el verano en que las condiciones externas son más severas que las indicadas). la temperatura especificada se reduce frecuentemente a un valor entre 18° y 22°C. La admisión de aire fresco situada en este campo aspira el aire concentrado “C”. incluidas las coberturas de la cabeza y de los pies. El proceso del producto podría requerir las condiciones interiores apropiadas para un proceso en seco. Cuando se requieren prendas especiales sueltas en la sala limpia. es común una temperatura de 20° a 25°C. La emisión de una mezcla de efluentes propiamente dicha con el aire atmosférico para formar un campo de concentración “C” alrededor del edificio. pero esto no puede adecuarse a la comodidad del trabajo. deberán seleccionarse las condiciones termohigrométricas de modo que se tengan en cuenta los requisitos del proceso. sobre la presión que ejerce en la sala si las aberturas de entrada/evacuación de la planta de HVAC no estuvieran correctamente situadas. Además. contaminación) cualesquiera que sean las externas.4 brisa suave 10.1. deberá haber en ella una temperatura menor que en las zonas generales donde los trabajadores llevan ropa ligera). La planta de HVAC se diseñará para alcanzar la temperatura y humedad relativa necesarias para asegurar la comodidad del personal. esta presión podría influir en los caudales de entrada y salida de aire y. Por lo que respecta a la temperatura y la humedad relativa. Estos valores se derivan de la norma australiana AS 2252 para “Biohazard Benches”. Velocidad media m/s 1. es mejor. así como de la AS 1170 Parte 2. Por otra parte.R. Criterios de diseño de la planta de HVAC En esta parte se señalan algunos aspectos prácticos para el diseño de una planta de HVAC. en la sala limpia el operador usará ropa muy ajustada y. hay que considerar que en una sala limpia pueden proliferar rápidamente organismos perjudiciales Cuando se nos solicita que diseñemos una planta de HVAC para una instalación farmacéutica. y este aire así aspirado se dice que está contaminado si “C” excede de una concentración permisible especificada. En la Tabla IX que sigue se dan algunas cifras para mostrar las fuerzas del viento (normalmente no se tienen en cuenta en el diseño). 5. por tanto.. H. etc.. considerando que éste llevará diferentes tipos de ropa según los lugares en los que traTabla IX. Para la comodidad del personal suele ser aceptable una humedad de entre el 30% y el 55%. H. tenemos necesariamente que considerar las condiciones externas. Los niveles de baja humedad pueden presentar riesgo de deshidratación del personal. En este capitulo del manual de ASHRAE se hacen algunas sugerencias para colocar el sistema de evacuación y la admisión de aire fresco considerando el efecto del viento sobre el edificio. 5..3 5. Condiciones internas –––––––––––––––––––––––––––– bajen (por ejemplo. para disponer de una planta de HVAC que pueda mantener las condiciones interiores (temperatura. Condiciones externas ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– En el capitulo “Flujo de aire alrededor del edificio” del manual “FUNDAMENTALS” de ASHRAE se explica un método para calcular la dispersión del contaminante. este tipo de criterio es especialmente válido para el control de la humedad. presión. viento.

5 µm por minuto. pero pueden representar cientos de millones de partículas ≥ 0.85 y 6.G: relación de partículas generadas: partículas/min. ≥ 5. botas hasta la rodilla. temperatura y humedad relativa) no se alcanzará el propósito pretendido.000 partículas de 5.5 (Clase 100) – ISO 5 (según ISO-146441) o más limpia es típicamente unidireccional. La selección de una configuración de flujo de aire debe basarse en los requisitos de limpieza y en la disposición de los equipos del proceso. El valor mínimo es 20 V/h. respectivamente. En caso de que se conozca la proporción de contaminantes generados en la sala limpia. lo que no es real. etc. 88% y 92%. la cantidad de flujo de aire se calcula según la experiencia.C: concentración final: partículas/m3 Esta fórmula proporciona dos clases de información: a) El tiempo de recuperación (que es el requerido por la instalación para pasar de una determinada concentración de partículas en suspensión a otra más limpia) y: b) El nivel de clase de la sala en condiciones constantes. que depende de la posición de los dispositivos de alimentación y retorno. unas 300.si se permite que la humedad relativa sea superior al 55%. caudal. No es mucha la información de que se dispone sobre la generación de partículas desde los equipos utilizados en la sala limpia. Cantidad de flujo de aire ––––––––––––––––––––––––––– te fórmula para calcular la cantidad de flujo de aire que mantiene bajo el límite de clase la concentración de partículas en suspensión: La fórmula que se aplica es la siguiente: -Rt G C = Coe-Rt + ––––– VR (1-e ) como blusas o batas de laboratorio generan una media aproximada de 2 x 106 partículas de 0. .V: volumen de la sala: m3 . de las renovaciones de aire por hora. normalmente. es necesario hacer una breve introducción sobre la configuración del flujo de aire. la humedad se mantiene por encima del 25% para limitar sus efectos. después de transcurrido totalmente el tiempo de recuperación. podemos ver que la limpieza depende de la generación de contaminantes en la sala. Las personas que se mueven por la sala limpia con prendas Antes de explicar el concepto implícito en la definición de cantidad de flujo de aire. El flujo de aire en una sala limpia se describe muy frecuentemente por el tipo de modelo empleado.3.20%. es fundamental la experiencia del ingeniero y su conocimiento de la actual GMP y de las normas. es decir.0 µm y de las transportadoras de bacterias será aproximadamente del 50%.45 m/s +/. en tanto que en salas limpias clase M4. clase de contaminación.Co: concentración inicial: partículas/m3 . Conclusión En la introducción se ha dicho que la exposición se iba a orientar hacia la planta de HVAC: después de esta presentación técnica. Es posible llegar a un grado de acabado muy bueno de la sala utilizando materiales excelentes. Establecida la clase de limpieza requerida. parece evidente la importancia que tiene esta planta de HVAC. deben definirse los cambios de aire teniendo en cuenta la fuente de contaminación. Para ello. no unidireccional o mixta. La configuración del flujo de aire en una sala limpia puede ser unidireccional.) hechas de tejido fuerte. Para el caso real hay que aplicar un factor corrector. de los equipos farmacéuticos y del personal. en el no unidireccional.0 µm/min y aproximadamente 160 partículas transportadoras de bacterias por minuto.R: cambios de aire: V/min. que son el personal y los equipos. . y que varía entre 0.5 (Clase 1000) – ISO 6 (según ISO-146441) o menos limpias se utiliza un flujo de aire no unidireccional y mixto. Una humedad insuficiente en el aire puede también ser causa de electricidad estática. . pero si el equipo de HVAC no puede mantener los parámetros críticos (presión. Siendo: . Volviendo a las fórmulas. Este primer aspecto es esencial si se considera que no basta el simple conocimiento si no se traslada a una solución práctica. y en el caso realista de que no se introduzcan contaminantes desde la planta de HVAC (debido al filtro HEPA) se utilizará la siguien- marzo/abril 00 63 .T: tiempo : min.5 µm/min. 6.5 µm. Si las personas usan ropa bien diseñada (batas. La configuración del flujo de aire en una sala limpia clase M3. Esta segunda información se obtiene haciendo t muy largo (infinito) con lo que la fórmula se transforma en la siguiente: G C = –––– VR Las fórmulas anteriores se refieren al caso de mezclas de aire perfectas. la reducción de partículas ≥ 0. la velocidad de éste es 0. En el flujo de aire unidireccional. 5. capuchas.

Los cuartos limpios son clasificados de acuerdo a la limpieza del aire.. KEYWORDS: Air Cleanroom.Scientia et Technica Año XIV. Profesor Titular. Estos documentos contienen principios que aún hoy son relevantes. HEPA Filter. “Contamination control of aerospace facilities.co Proyecto Colciencias Jóvenes Investigadores 2006. Contrato UTP 5094. It presents subjects such as Cleanrooms classification. en la cual el numero de partículas igual o superior a 0. such as pressurization. Universidad Tecnológica de Pereira corozco@utp. La ISO/TC209 14644-1 es la designación internacional de la limpieza de un cuarto limpio e incorpora las unidades métricas utilizadas en otras partes del mundo. Este artículo presenta los criterios para la clasificación de los cuartos limpios. moisture. El paso final. It emphasizes on industrial applications. kinds of contamination. patrones de flujo de aire. tiempos de recuperación.com CARLOS ALBERTO OROZCO HINCAPIÉ. ULPA Filter JUAN CARLOS CASTAÑO SÁNCHEZ. Junio de 2008. humedad temperatura. La norma Británica BS 5295 define un cuarto limpio como una habitación con control de contaminación de partículas. Fecha de Recepción: 25 de Enero de 2008 Fecha de Aceptación: 11 de Marzo de 2008 2. Asistente de Investigación. Filtro HEPA. tipos de contaminación PALABRAS CLAVES: Aire. humedad y presión son controlados como sea necesario” [4] 2. Universidad Tecnológica de Pereira Casancho_2@ hotmail. el desarrollo del filtro HEPA se dio en los lavatorios SANDIA para la comisión de energía atómica después de la segunda guerra mundial. US Air Force”. 1. Finalmente la era espacial con sus requerimientos de limpieza promovió la tecnología de control de contaminación. Partículas nucleares que habrían sido mortales para el personal fueron aisladas en áreas de procesos con filtros HEPA mientras se permitía el aire circular en ellos. Ingeniero Mecánico. “contamination control principles” y “AF-TO-00-25-203. El método más aplicado es que se indica en las versiones de la US FEDERAL STANDARD 209 hasta la edición “E” Tabla 1. M. Sc.2 Clasificación De Cuartos Limpios.edu. sus aplicaciones. se hace énfasis en las aplicaciones en la industria. como efectuar el control de partículas y las consideraciones y metodología o pasos a seguir en el diseño racional de los mismos. Partículas. según normas técnicas europeas y americana. movimiento del aire y presión son controlados. humedad y presión son controlados según especificaciones [7] y en la ISO 14644-1 como: “Un cuarto en el cual la concentración de partículas en el aire es controlada.5 micrones . CLASIFICACION DE LOS CUARTOS LIMPIOS En 1945 la necesidad de hacer pruebas a filtros en las máscaras de gas contra partículas y materiales biológicos llevo al desarrollo de contadores de partículas dispersas en el ambiente. temperature. El método más fácilmente entendible y universalmente aplicado es el sugerido por la norma Federal Standard 209E. Facultad de Ingeniería Mecánica. ABSTRACT This document exposes basic concepts that should be kept in mind when developing Cleanrooms. Otros parámetros relevantes como temperatura. y en el cual la temperatura. elaborada y utilizada de manera tal que se minimice la introducción. que garantice un ambiente seguro para el paciente. la concentración de partículas en el aire es controlada para limites específicos. NASA SP-5045. Willis Whitfield fue pionero en el campo de limpieza para realizar trabajo limpio en espacios reducidos. fundamental design considerations. according to American and European standards for Clean rooms design. Universidad Tecnológica de Pereira. humedad. los trabajadores y los visitantes. recovery time. INTRODUCCIÓN 2. NASA SP-4074. y la cual es elaborada y utilizada de manera que se minimice la introducción. define un cuarto limpio como una habitación en la cual. generación y retención de partículas en el interior del cuarto y en el cual otras partículas y parámetros relevantes. No 38. En los años 60s se escribieron documentos como FED STD 209ª. como temperatura. Facultad de Ingeniería Mecánica. Cuarto limpio. consideraciones de diseño fundamentales como presurización. presenta temas como clasificación de cuartos limpios.[6] Por lo dicho es fundamental contar con un sistema certificado de acondicionamiento de aire y ventilación. La Tabla 1 muestra la clasificación simplificada de clase de cuarto limpio de acuerdo con la US FEDERAL STANDARD 209E. “Contamination Control Handbook “. clases de cuartos limpios.1 Definición De Cuartos Limpios: La norma Federal Standard 209E. ISSN 0122-1701 187 METODOLOGÍA PARA EL DISEÑO DE CUARTOS LIMPIOS Methodology for Cleanrooms Design RESUMEN Este documento expone los conceptos básicos que se deben tener en cuenta en el desarrollo de cuartos limpios. generación y retención de partículas en el interior del cuarto. NASA SP-5045. Ingeniero Mecánico. “Clean Room Technology”.

600 3.000 limita la concentración de partículas de aire igual o superior a 0.470 100000 3. Distribución de cuartos limpios de acuerdo al tipo de industria. designa el numero de clase. en el sistema ingles la clase indica el número de partículas por pie cubico. También se requiere para cirugías de implante o transplante.188 Scientia et Technica Año XIV.2 0. Clase 3 Tabla 1B . redondeado al número entero. Comidas 3% Automotive 3% Aeroespacio 6% Proveedores de semiconductores 3% Medical Device 9% Electronica 7% Hospitales 4% Clase ISO 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Semiconductor 58% Farmaceutica 7% Figura 1. o que requieren facilidades de control de contaminación. válvulas de servo-control. Máximo # de Partículas en el aire (Partículas en cada m3 ).000 Tamaño de partícula medida (µm) (Partículas en cada m3 ) Class 0.320. ISSN 0122-1701 medidos en un pie cúbico de aire. En la figura 1 se puede ver la demanda de cuartos limpios según [9]. [3]. Productores de semiconductores que producen circuitos integrados con anchos de líneas inferiores a 2 (µm) Manufactura de medicinas inyectables producidas de manera aséptica.[15] Tabla 1A .000 8.000 237. 08 EC 1 N ⎛ 0 .300 293.3 10 12. Ensamble de equipo hidráulico o neumático.060 353 100 26. Universidad Tecnológica de Pereira.000 2.020 100.000 3. Entre más susceptible sea el producto a ser contaminado. Máximo # de Partículas en el aire (Partículas en cada m3 ). dispositivos de medición de tiempos y engranajes de alto grado. Trabajo general de óptica.000 2. Tamaño de Partícula >0. APLICACIONES DE LOS CUARTOS LIMPIOS 100000 1000 10000 Tipo de Industria Circuitos integrados y de geometrías de submicron.320 83.5 µm 5 µm µm 1 1. La tabla siguiente muestra una selección de productos que ahora se están fabricando en cuartos limpios. Clase y partículas por cada m 1 10 3.200 1.700 10.2µm >0. Junio de 2008. Clase Limite según US Federal Standard 209E para cuartos limpios [15] Por ejemplo un cuarto limpio de clase 100.650 1. Muchas industrias e instituciones utilizan laboratorios y cuartos limpios. [15] 2 .000 35..200 352.5 µm >1 µm >5 µm 4 35 352 3520 35.[15] Tabla 2 Clasificación Norma ISO 14644-1 [3].240 265 106 35.370 1.000 Clase ISO 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 8 83 832 8.5 micrones a 100.300 247 10000 353.3 µm 10 2 100 24 10 1000 237 102 10.000 29 293 2930 29. ensamble de componentes electrónicos y ensamble .000 24.000.000 partículas en un pie cúbico de aire..000 102. Tabla 2 Clasificación Norma ISO 14644-1 [3].500 10.520.1µm 0. [7]. N =Es el numero de clase de la ISO.400 2.700 4.1 ⎞ C n = 10 ⎜ ⎟ ⎝ D ⎠ 100 donde: Cn =Número máximo permitido de partículas por metro cúbico igual o superior al tamaño de partícula especificado. No 38. Tamaño de Partícula >0.1 µm >0.3µm 0. CLASE LIMITE DE CUARTOS LIMPIOS SEGÚN ISO14644-1 En la clasificación estándar ISO 14644-1"Classification of Air Cleanliness" se basa en la formula.1 y debe ser 9 o menos.530 1000 35. D =es el tamaño de partícula en micrómetros. [15] 4.200. el cual debe ser un múltiplo de 0.1 Cuartos Limpios Para Diferentes Industrias.200 832.000 23. Ensamble y prueba de precisión de giroscopios.350. Manufactura de equipo óptico de alta calidad. Ensamble de rodamientos miniatura.000 más estricto será el estándar.

tendría entre 2 y 10 cambios de aire por hora. Líneas de Flujo en Cuartos Limpios (a) unidireccional y (b) no-unidireccional 4. se controla para permitir no más de 10. Un operador de cuarto limpio típicamente vestido generará.3 micrones. [7]. pisos. Un filtro adecuado para una sala de cirugía cuesta alrededor de $1 millón y medio de pesos. Los dos normas mas usados concernientes a cuartos limpios para industria farmacéutica son la European Union Guide to Good Manufacturing Practice (EU GGMP) y la Federal Drug Association (FDA) en Estados Unidos. Las infecciones en los hospitales se encuentran dentro de las diez causas más importantes de muerte en los Estados Unidos. La generación interna es la que proviene de los elementos de construcción tales como paredes.3 CLASES DE CUARTOS LIMPIOS. usualmente horizontal o vertical Figura 2a a una velocidad uniforme entre 0. y tormentas de polvo. Un cuarto de flujo de aire turbulento típico como oficinas. circulación de múltiples . [9] 4. la sobrepresión debe ser superior a 10 Pascales. El flujo de aire laminar es utilizado cuando se requieren bajas concentraciones de partículas y bacterias en el aire. un cuarto limpio ISO 7. Es no unidireccional por tener velocidad variante. Estas fuentes incluyen polución de aire en general. la generación interna de los operadores puede minimizarse con el vestuario apropiado para cubrir el cuerpo y el vestuario de calle. 5. [2]. La figura 2b es un diagrama de un cuarto limpio simple ventilado convencionalmente. Clases 100 y más bajas tienen arreglos de flujo de aire unidireccional o laminar. Tabla 3.2 Flujo de aire turbulento. La generación interna de los elementos de construcción puede minimizarse usando superficies duras. de los equipos y lo más importante. pasos. una partícula en el rango de 50 micrones podría tomar 60 segundos para que se asiente.1 Hospitales.5 micras ó mas grandes por pie cúbico de volumen de aire. 10000.000 partículas de 0. Flujo de aire vs Clase de Cuarto Limpio La Figura 3 muestra la relación entre los requerimientos de flujo de aire de un cuarto limpio vs la clase del cuarto limpio como se especifica bajo la Federal Estándar 209E. Los fundamentos del diseño de cuartos limpios son para controlar la concentración de partículas aero-transportadas. Figura 2.5 metros por segundo y a través de todo el espacio. [7] 4.2 Fuentes Internas. y una sala de cirugía requiere un banco de filtros. El flujo convencional en cuartos de clase 1000. Las curvas muestran el rango entre las condiciones ideales. La mínima de pureza del aire que entra al quirófano es del aire que entra al quirófano es del 95%.1 Cuartos de flujo de aire unidireccional. Clases de cuartos limpios aplicables a la industria según Federal Standard 209E 4. Los cuartos limpios en los hospitales son indispensables para el control de las bacterias que pueden generar infecciones en pacientes en terapia o recuperación.2 Consideraciones para la aplicación 4. La contaminación externa es traida sobre todo a través del sistema de aire acondicionado. Son cuartos limpios de flujo de aire turbulento y flujo de aire laminar. Junio de 2008. o dirección de flujo no paralelo. etc. Esto puede ser fácilmente logrado supliendo más aire del que se retorna. con filtro de partículas hasta de 0. que se controlan controlando las fuentes. podría tomar 15 horas para que se asiente. Figura 3. almacenes.3.3 y 4.000 partículas de 0.1 Fuentes Externas. 6. las condiciones estándar y las comprometidas.[2] 4. Por ejemplo.2 Industria Farmacéutica.2.2. Universidad Tecnológica de Pereira.5 micras o mayores por hora por pie cúbico (352800 partículas/h por metro cúbico de volumen de aire). cielo falso.000 tienen no unidireccional o arreglos mezclados. CONTROL DE PARTÍCULAS. Un cuarto limpio tendría entre 20 y 60. el filtro). [7]. mientras una partícula de un micrón. [15] Las guías de la FDA. 5. METODOLOGIA Y CONSIDERACIONES DE DISEÑO DE UN CUARTO LIMPIO. Este suministro de aire adicional se provee diluir hasta una concentración aceptable [7]. de los operadores.Scientia et Technica Año XIV. ISSN 0122-1701 189 hidráulico y neumático. presurizando así el cuarto. En un cuarto de 8 pies de alto.[2] 5.3. No 38. [15]. El conteo de partículas en un cuarto limpio es periódicamente realizado para mantener el cuarto estéril. La mayoría de centros hospitalarios de Bogotá adolecen de los sistemas de acondicionamiento de aire y ventilación que cumplan con los valores de seguridad. (prefiltro 33% y 66% o 95%.. solamente especifican un mínimo de 230 cambios por hora para áreas controladas sin concretarlo específicamente. Este patrón de flujo de aire es en una dirección. aproximadamente 10. 100. .

Se requiere control de temperatura para suministrar condiciones estables para Tabla 4 Velocidad y cambios por hora para cuartos limpios. Los volúmenes de ventilación y aire de reposición son dictados por la cantidad requerida para mantener la calidad del aire interior. Condiciones de espacio (área y volumen) H. Si un cuarto ISO 6 debe recuperarse de una condición ISO 8 con la misma rata de cambio de aire.083 horas es decir 5 min si la rata de cambio se dobla a 60. D. estancamiento de material. más o menos 20%. Diferencial de presión entre cuartos limpios in wc= Pulgadas columna de agua. Utilizar datos de temperatura de bulbo seco y humedad relativa o bulbo húmedo externas y diseñar para las condiciones más extremas que se puedan presentar en un periodo no menor a 24 horas. E. Todos los valores medidos deben posicionarse dentro del promedio medido con un.5) Tabla 5. El tiempo de recuperación es inversamente proporcional a la rata de cambio aire. Clase ISO 8(100. Sin embargo un ISO 6 tiene al menos el doble de cambios de aire y así. Establecer niveles de control y tolerancias.45 m/s) aún es ampliamente utilizada en cuartos limpios. etc) C. Identificar el tipo de industria o aplicación donde se va a realizar el proyecto. acorde con referencias [2] y [14] y los criterios establecidos en las secciones siguientes. Los cuartos en una instalación limpia deben mantenerse a presiones estáticas superiores o mayores a la atmosférica para prevenir infiltración por viento. El diseño de flujo de aire en cuartos limpios. Junio de 2008. [2] 6. N=no unidireccional. se requieren solamente 2. US Federal Standard 209E no especifica requerimientos de velocidad. Identificar las condiciones internas de temperatura y humedad del espacio. y luego diferentes porcentajes de cubierta de cielorraso para diferentes niveles de clasificación.02-0. [7] 6. El aprovechamiento común en diseñar un cuarto limpio con . Es notable que el tiempo de recuperación para un zona ISO 5 es casi instantánea ya que toda la zona está cubierta por suministro de aire libre de partículas y no es un proceso de dilución si no de desplazamiento.000) ISO 6(100.2 Flujo de aire. B.5 (5-7.03) Pa 12. La única excepción para utilizar una presión diferencial negativa es cuando se esta lidiando con materiales específicos donde las agencias gubernamentales requieren que el cuarto este a una presión negativa.4 Tiempo de Recuperación. y que los cambios de aire ocurran con suficiente frecuencia para minimizar el riesgo de una alta concentración de polución en el aire al interior del edificio. se deben tener en cuenta los siguientes aspectos generales: A. El tiempo de recuperación de una clase superior (digamos desde ISO 8 a ISO 7) puede estimarse usando la siguiente fórmula: 2 . el tiempo de recuperación es aproximadamente el mismo.000) ISO 7(100.190 Scientia et Technica Año XIV.05 (0.5 EC 2 t= V Por ejemplo. HVAC Applications.5 Pa) a través de puertas que separan cuartos con diferentes clasificaciones. acorde con criterios de [2] y [14] 6. que el formaldehído y otros vapores generados por materiales de edificio y los muebles sean diluido. I. 6. G. F. Diseñar aplicando proceso de deshumidificación mixta.5 Temperatura y Humedad. Definir el propósito del proyecto(prevención de condensación. Es obvio que la mayoría de los cuartos limpios se pueden recuperar en un tiempo razonablemente corto. el tiempo para que un ISO 7 se recupere desde una condición de parada desde un nivel 100000 a un nivel operacional 100.1 Ventilación y aire de reposición.000) ISO 4(100. La cifra de 90 fpm (0.00.000) ISO 5(100. [9] Diferencial de presión Entre Cuartos Limpios Y espacio no limpio Entre cuartos limpios Y cuartos menos limpios in wc 0.3 Presurización. Los siguientes diferenciales de presión son utilizados a menudo. Pa= Pascales Todas las guías recomiendan un diferencial de 0. 6. reemplazar el aire y presurización del edificio esto asegura que el dióxido de carbono y el oxigeno permanezcan en balance. U= unidireccional. sigue como se muestra en la Tabla 4.000) Mejor que ISO 3 Tipo de Flujo N/M N/M N/M U/N/M U U U Velocidad (fpm) 1-8 10-15 25-40 40-80 50-90 60-90 60-100 Cambios Hora 5-48 60-90 150-240 240-480 300-540 360-540 360-600 flujo de aire unidireccional es de simplemente arreglar la velocidad del filtro a 90 fpm.000) ISO 3(100. se requiere el doble de tiempo. De acuerdo con ASHRAE Handbook 1999. [7] Uno de los parámetros más importantes en el diseño de HVAC para un cuarto limpio es el diferencial de presión en el cuarto. Realizar un proceso exhaustivo para el cálculo de cargas térmicas y humedad internas y externas. asumiendo 30 cambios por hora es aproximadamente 0. Presiones diferenciales positivas deben mantenerse entre los cuartos para asegurar los flujos de aire desde el espacio mas limpio al espacio menos limpio. No 38. ISSN 0122-1701 Para diseñar sistemas de aire acondicionado para cuartos limpios.05 in WC (12.5 min. Universidad Tecnológica de Pereira. Seleccionar los equipos y componentes.

Para que esto pueda ser así hay una esclusa o una zona de transición separando un cuarto de llenado aséptico típicamente una zona ISO 5 (y sus espacios adyacentes ISO 7) es absolutamente aceptable tener una zona de flujo unidireccional ISO 5 dentro de una cuarto ISO 7. T=temperatura. si la rata se incrementa a 50. Algunas aplicaciones estándar típicas. RH= humedad relativa Porque la falla en un proceso se puede atar directamente al control del nivel de la humedad en el ambiente circundante. la rata de cambio de aire sería aproximadamente de 30 por hora. instrumentos y el confort del personal. como elegir los equipos y cómo utilizar con eficacia el equipo para controlar la humedad en el área de proceso. En muchas industrias. v = es la rata de flujo del aire de suministro en términos del número de cambios por hora. la ecuación diferencial de arriba pude resolverse como: EC 3 dx = [( s − x )vdt + gdt ] ∫ ∫ . x = es la concentración en el cuarto o aire de retorno en partículas por pie cúbico. el control de la humedad es necesario para terminar un proceso particular con éxito. Ejemplo: Usando un ejemplo específico de cuarto limpio como el mencionado ISO 7 ( x = 10. La zona de confort humano esta generalmente en el rango de 30% a 70% de humedad relativa. puede expresarse en la siguiente ecuación. 6. eliminar electricidad estática y suministrar confort al personal. asumiendo que no hay infiltración puesto que el cuarto está presurizado: 6. El control de la humedad es necesario para prevenir corrosión.Scientia et Technica Año XIV. x. 6. el aire de suministro puede considerarse prácticamente libre de partículas. s. Valores recomendados de Tbs y HR se debe consultar las fuentes citadas entre ellas Bry-air y [2] se citan estas pocas: Condiciones T HR (°F) (%) 80 75 80 70 90 68 35 5-15 35-40 40 30 15 15-20 10-50 x = ( x0 − s − g g ) exp( −vt ) + s + v v Cuando el tiempo t aumenta y el sistema alcanza el estado estacionario la concentración final simplemente se g convierte en: EC 4 x = + s v v = g (x − s) EC 5 Con la ecuación anterior la rata de cambio de aire puede ser fácilmente calculada como una función de g. la cuenta real de partículas sería mejorada del valor previo de 6003 a 6000. Por consiguiente un mejoramiento de la eficiencia de los filtros HEPA no ayuda a mejorar la limpieza de un cuarto limpio.97 % ( s = 3 ). para esto es vital saber el tipo de acondicionamiento. es decir una mejoría insignificante. con la misma rata de cambio de aire (50) y una rata de generación interna de (5000*60).6 Controles de cuarto limpio. Sin embargo. No 38. muy pocos espacios farmacéuticos son clasificados como ISO 6 (no hay clasificación ISO 6 en EU/MCA). condensación sobre superficies de trabajo. la lectura del contador de partículas estará dispersa dentro de un cierto rango.0009 = 6000 50 En el mismo cuarto limpio cuando se usan filtros HEPA dobles como defienden algunos Ingenieros Farmacéuticos (s = 0.8 Rata de Cambio de Aire Para un espacio típico ISO 6 con una generación interna típica de 5000 partículas por minuto por pie cúbico y aire de suministro a través de filtros HEPA de 99. asuma g = 1000 * 60 dx = ( S − X ) * V * dt + g * dt Donde.000 ) con filtros HEPA del 99. Junio de 2008.0009). (En realidad.7 Efecto de la Filtración. Para aire bien mezclado en cualquier momento dado la concentración de partículas x. Universidad Tecnológica de Pereira. Los requerimientos para el confort humano usualmente requieren temperaturas en el rango de 72ºF a 75ºF. el conteo de partículas real en el cuarto será de aproximadamente 6003. con una generación interna típica ( g = 5000 * 60 ). ya que los trabajadores frecuentemente utilizan vestimentas para el cuarto limpio sobre su ropa habitual. no necesitan ser separados por una esclusa intermedia ISO 6 en este caso la generación de partículas internas es muy pequeña debido a la ausencia de operadores.) x = 5000 * 60 + 3 = 6003 50 Tabla 4. por una cosa. Para ser conservativos.97 % para un espacio ISO 6 (clase 1000) requiere casi 10 veces más que para un espacio ISO 7. Aunque los Cuartos limpios ISO 1 hasta ISO 5 usan diseños de flujo unidireccional la mayoría de los cuartos limpios farmacéuticos dependen del principio de dilución para controlar sus partículas. 5000 * 60 x= + 0. Una vez que se usen filtros farmacéuticos estándar grado HEPA. s = concentración de partículas en el aire de suministro en partículas por pie cúbico. ISSN 0122-1701 191 los materiales. 000 − 3 ) Aplicación Farmacéutica Empaque de penicilina Almacenamiento de cápsulas Jarabes para la tos Gotas para la tos Efervescentes Laminación de vidrio Frabicaciòn explosivos Siguiendo el mismo esquema. en la realidad no es así. v = 5000 * 60 = 30 (10 . g = es la generación interna de partículas por pie cúbico por hora. Asumiendo que la concentración inicial en el cuarto es x0 y despreciando la variación de g con el tiempo t.

phoenixcontrols. Esto sería un error fundamental en el diseño de un cuarto limpio 8. [en línea].10] Disponible en: http://www. año XIV. Disponible en: http://www.com. cumpliendo especificaciones. [3] THE ENGINEERING TOOLBOX. [citado en 2007-05-14.com/INetDomino/files_01/Cleanroom_ Technology_Handbook. Climatización en cuartos limpios. 7. s.html#Hospital [12] Biological Containment Laboratories. I.5 m ) la rata de cambio de aire se incrementaría a 540. [en línea].com/solutions. [citado en 2007-04-11] Disponible en: http://www. Colombia: UTP.Sc Ingeniería Térmica. s. Texas.5/v por recuperación de clase. El reto de HVAC es mantener costos bajos. [2]. [citado en 2007-04-16]. s.uk/monitor/tcm39/history. el volumen de suministro de aire es típicamente 72 cfm / pie2.wikipedia.f.I. REFERENCIAS BIBLIOGRAFICAS [1] Cuarto Limpio. Pereira.. http://www.pe/FA. Octubre 18 de 2006. No.html#Hospital [6] History of Contamination. Kansas City. s.html [4] Clean Room Technology. aire de infiltración y generación interna. concentración permisible de partículas..html [7] MARINERANELA Abraham.pennnet. No. Carlos Alberto y Juan Carlos Castaño Optimización Financiera de Sistemas de Aire Acondicionado para cuartos limpios. De esta última son los operarios y por tanto el vestuario apropiado y los procedimientos de operación son críticos.I.co.com/files/news8. Bogota. Típicamente tal espacio esta 100 % cubierto por filtros HEPA. A menudo la condición contraria si es posible. este diseño daría 480 cambios por hora.f. Cleanroom Technology.10-11.festo. Filtración Ambiental.. La mayoría de los cuartos limpios deben recuperarse desde la parada.com/solutions. es obvio que el modo más efectivo de controlar la calidad del cuarto limpio es minimizar la generación interna y suplir aire con filtración HEPA para limitar la cuenta real de partículas al límite especificado por un particular estándar ISO. Para los espacios ISO 5 se aplica el principio de desplazamiento el cual vuelve irrelevante la ecuación previa. s. Una rata alta de cambios de aire no puede ser sustituida usando filtros HEPA de eficiencia extremadamente alta. ltda.39.f. [Citado en 2007-04-2] Disponible en: http://cr. Un espacio ISO 5 muy raramente tiene un cielo falso alto. procesos de manufactura y por supuesto costos. 2008 [15] W. Fundamentals of Desing. A la luz de este análisis un espacio ISO 5 típico tiene aproximadamente 500 cambios de aire por hora.ISSN 0124-7158.phoenixcontrols. Junio de 2008.. El mejor lugar para controlar partículas es el punto de generación.I. México. s. http://www.I. [en línea].f. [en línea]. [citado en 2007-0321]. Si la altura del cielo falso es solamente 8 pies ( 2. ISSN 0122-1701 por hora. Los análisis hasta aquí fueron basados únicamente en el principio de dilución que es aplicado solamente a ISO 6 y superior. s. Normalmente un espacio / zona ISO 5 está completamente cubierto por un cielo falso HEPA. [en línea]. [citado en 2007-04-12] http://www.s2c2.I. Puede enfatizarse que filtros HEPA de mayor eficiencia no sirven para reducir la rata de cambio de aire de diseño. CleanRooms: Six important things to know about preventing hospital infections [en línea]. Laboratorios Farmacéuticos.html#Hospital [13] INTERPLANT S.. Clean Rooms – ISO Standard 14644 [en línea].35 (Jun. s. 1805 (x − s) 1000 − 3 Cuando hay operadores presentes y el espacio debe ser validado como operacional. en menos de 10 min si son diseñados apropiadamente. Memorias seminario de cuartos limpios.com/clean-roomsd_932.. s. CONCLUSIONES Existen tres fuentes de contaminación principales de partículas: aire de suministro. M.I. ni el numero de partículas.sI.phoenixcontrols. Del análisis previo. También los tamaños reales de los filtros son normalmente solo el 80 % del espacio del cielo falso nominal y la velocidad de cara de diseño para el filtro es 90 pies por minuto.f.. http://www. ubicación. Por consiguiente. Chapter 3. Asumiendo un cielo falso de 9 pies ( 2.f. Noviembre de 2005. un cuarto ISO 6 requiere un número de cambios mucho más alto que el de 60 discutido aquí.com/solutions. En: Acaire. [en línea] s. 2005).htm [14] OROZCO HINCAPIE.engineeringtoolbox.pdf [5] Hospital Isolation Suites [en linea ]. Engineering Bath Group: Cleanroom Guidelines [en línea].f. p 21-30. Cali junio de 2005. [10] Cleanroom Applications.192 Scientia et Technica Año XIV. [Citado en 2007-03.I. 9. En hospitales: Una buena ventilación puede determinar la supervivencia. s. [en línea]. s.bathgroup. 2001.interplant. Scientia et Technica. WHYTE.I. Por consiguiente la rata de cambio de aire requerida sería: v = g 1000 * 60 = = 60 . s.f. El diseño de un cuarto limpio requiere consideración cuidadosa del uso para que se pretenda. [citado en 2007-04-12] Disponible en: http://www.pdf [8] ABBY BERG Hammond. Universidad Tecnológica de Pereira. No 38. RECOMENDACIONES DE DISEÑO estimar el tiempo de recuperación usando: t = 2. s.A.org/wiki/Cuarto_limpio [2] BOTERO Camilo. Se requiere investigación exhaustiva para alcanzar los parámetros óptimos de diseño. Mantener la presurización apropiada es importante para mantener la limpieza en el cuarto limpio y como regla práctica .M. Testing and Operation.75 m ). USA. P.com/solutions. 16 de abril de 2007 [Citado en 200704-20] Disponible en: http://es.html#Hospital [11] Laboratory Animal Facilities. Los cambios de aire sugeridos para varias clases de cuartos limpios son basados solamente en la práctica común.com/display_article/289198/15/ARTCL/none/none/Six -important-things-to-know-about-preventing-hospital-infections/ [9] MENDEZ Medardo.phoenixcontrols. [citado en 200704-12]. [citado en 2007-04-12] Disponibleen: http://www. s. s. England: Jhon Wiley & sons.

mini-environments) Classification of airborne molecular contamination General principles Evaluation and interpretation of biocontamination data Measurement of the efficiency of cleaning processes Status Released May 1999 Released Apr 2000 Draft under discussion Released Apr 2001 Draft Available Draft Available Draft Available Draft Available Draft Available More resources at www. Cleanroom Standards The main cleanroom standards of interest in New Zealand are as follows: AS 1386:1989 This standard in seven parts has been widely used in New Zealand as a reference for design. but its classification system will undoubtedly be used for years to come. its own conferences and exhibitions. this standard was used throughout the US and by auditors from the US. They are still being developed.org . Ref ISO 14644-1 ISO 14644-2 ISO 14644-3 ISO 14644-4 ISO 14644-5 ISO 14644-6 ISO 14644-7 ISO 14644-8 ISO 14698-1 ISO 14698-2 ISO 14698-3 Title Classification of Air Cleanliness Specifications for testing and monitoring to prove continued compliance with ISO 14644-1 Metrology and test methods Design. and its own language of technical terms and classifications.GSFCC. It was cancelled in November 2001 in favour of ISO 14644. FED-STD-209E:1992 Until recently. operation and validation of cleanrooms. isolators. construction and start-up Operations Vocabulary Separative devices (clean air hoods. ISO 14644 Cleanrooms and associated controlled environments (8 parts) ISO 14698 Biocontamination control (3 parts) These 11 documents will make up a set of global cleanroom standards.APPLICATION NOTE Cleanroom Standards and Classifications Cleanroom technology has developed into a specialist field with its own technical journals. with some already released and most of the others available in draft form. glove boxes. This application note covers relevant standards and attempts to clarify the myriad classification systems.

GSFCC. 7 and 8 are most common. The following table shows the ISO 14644-1 classification for the main particle sizes of interest together with comparable AS1386 and FED-STD-209E classifications.035 0.5 35 350 3500 ISO classes 1-4 are mainly applicable to the semi-conductor industry and we are not aware of any such cleanrooms in New Zealand. For the Food Industry. the general requirement is “Class 7000” which is extrapolated from AS1386. but is not ideal.Cleanroom Classifications Cleanrooms are classified according to the concentration of airborne particles. This may be appropriate for low-level clean spaces.3µm 0. This requirement is commonly used in New Zealand for food processing areas.35 3. The filtration efficiency is only one factor determining the cleanliness of the space – the airflow. Classes 5. More resources at www.5) in the “at rest” state.1µm 0. For example air filtration of EU5 or better for processing areas is specified in the Meat Industry Agreed Standard 2 – Design and Construction (1). For example.5µm 5µm 10 100 1000 10000 100000 1000000 10 102 1020 10200 102000 4 35 352 3520 35200 352000 3520000 35200000 FED-STD-209E Class AS1386 Class 29 293 2930 29300 293000 1 10 100 1000 10000 100000 0. a significant proportion of air can bypass the installed filters. ISO Class 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Max concentration (particles/m3 of air) for particles equal to or greater than size shown 0. or “operational”. The airborne particle concentration in a cleanroom is highly dependent on the occupancy of the room because occupants are major particle sources. the room pressurisation and the operations in the room are also important factors. in the code of GMP for medicinal products (2). unless the air filters are well manufactured and properly installed. viz. The other method is to specify the air quality using a cleanroom classification system as described above. “as-built”. “at rest”. The Australian Therapeutic Goods Association use the AS1386 classification. the room construction. For example. So the classification of the cleanroom must be defined at one or more of the room’s occupancy states. Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) There are two methods by which cleanrooms and semi-clean rooms have been specified in New Zealand. a cleanroom may be class 7 (= class 10000 = class 350) in the “operational” state and class 5 (= class 100 = class 3. Furthermore. Also commonly used in New Zealand is the UK (European) “Orange Guide” (3) which defines 4 grades of cleanrooms for manufacture of sterile medicinal products according to air quality in both the “at rest” and “in operation” states. MAF have traditionally specified the air filters required.org .

Annex 1.GSFCC. Animal Products Group. Therapeutic Goods Association. References (1) Industry Agreed Standard 2 – Design and Construction. New Zealand Food Safety Authority. 1999. (known as “The Orange Guide”) Medicines Control Agency. 1990. (3) Rules and Guidance for Pharmaceutical Manufacturers and Distributors. Wellington. More resources at www.3 (2) Australian Code of Good Manufacturing Practice For Therapeutic Goods – Medicinal Products. Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry. 1997. 1990. NZ. Section 5.5µm 5µm 0. Annex 1. (5) ACVM (Agricultural Compounds & Veterinary Medicines) – Guideline for Good Manufacturing Practice. The Stationery Office.5µm 5µm 3 500 3 500 350 000 3 500 000 0 0 2 000 20 000 3 500 0 350 000 2 000 3 500 000 20 000 Not defined Max permitted viable microorganisms /m3 <1 10 100 200 Beware of using grades for cleanrooms! Although the definitions above are commonly used.Orange Guide Grade A B C D At rest In operation 3 Max permitted particles /m equal to or larger than 0. other codes for GMP such as TGA (4) and MAF – ACVM (5) define grades A to D slightly differently. (4) Australian Code of Good Manufacturing Practice For Therapeutic Goods – Medicinal Products. Therapeutic Goods Association.org . London. Page 56. Page 11.

000 1.9 16 309 1.000 28.4 75 214 750 2.5μM VOLUME UNIT 1.300 100.0μM VOLUME UNIT (M3) (FT3) Table 2: ISO 14644-1 ISO 14644-1 Cleanroom Classification ISO Classification Number 0.3μM VOLUME UNIT 0.000 (FT3) 0.5μM VOLUME UNIT (M3) 10 35.400 35.0μM VOLUME UNIT 5.000 4 35 352 3.283 1 2.500 75.200 102.000 10.000 100.650 7.000 .5 70 175 700 17.5 300 875 0.320 83.530 10.5 M2 M2.930 29.5 M4 M4.300 283.I.000 3.3 100 353 1.060 3.7 265 757 2.000 3.Cleanroom Standards Table 1: FED-STD 209E FED-STD 209 Cleanroom Classification CLASS NAME 0.470 6.000 (FT3) 2.000 353.320.200 352.3μM VOLUME UNIT (M3) 30.000.000 10.500 5.700 237.530.800 7 17.75 30 87.300 247 618 2.5 M3 M3.000 1.2μM VOLUME UNIT 0.5 21.000 8.180 24.0μM VOLUME UNIT ISO 1 ISO 2 ISO 3 ISO 4 ISO 5 ISO 6 ISO 7 ISO 8 ISO 9 10 100 1.520 35.200 832.000 35.000.900 (FT3) 0.14 7.300 100.000 2 24 237 2.000 10.000 10 102 1.000 3.1μM VOLUME UNITS (M3) (M3) (M3) (M3) (M3) (M3) 0.1 350 991 0.700 61.600 30.91 35 99.000 29 293 2.000 (FT3) 9. M1 M1.830 10.000.140 0.090 10.875 3 8.000 1000 100 10 1 ENGLISH (M3) 350 1240 3500 12.1μM VOLUME UNITS S.5 M7 100.000 2.520.570 26.000 35.000 283.5 M6 M6.2μM VOLUME UNIT (M3) 75.5 M5 M5.020 10.200.83 10 28.370 23.3 100 283 1.000 8 83 832 8.

Table 3: FED-STD 209E Recommended limits for microbial contamination (a) GRADE air sample cfu/m3 1 10 100 200 settle plates (diam.cfu/glove 1 5 - A B C D .55 mm). cfu/4 hours(b) 1 5 50 100 contact plates (diam. 90 mm). cfu/plate 1 5 25 50 glove print. 5 fingers.

Contamination Control Consulting Langwisstrasse 5 CH-8126 Zumikon E-mail dr. the European Committee for Standardization. Volume 8(2) pages 37-42. international harmonisation of standards is driven by two entities: on a European level by CEN. 94 are full members enjoying voting rights. technological and economic activity. 2. standardization and guidance work in cleanroom technology was handled almost exclusively by national bodies. construction. An international family of contamination control standards is now emerging. the International Organization for Standardization. The benefits they offer are indeed welcome: internationally agreed definitions. and then their present status of development will be assessed. Dr. Its objective is to promote standardization on a world wide basis: it aims at facilitating international exchange of goods and services. Its objective is the elimination of technical barriers to trade between the CEN member nations through . ISO is independent from the various political and economical blocks in existence throughout the world. the European Committee for Standardization. for measurement procedures and many other topics. International cleanroom standards – why? Until a decade ago.schicht@bluewin. a different set of rules had to be observed.hans. quality determinations such as air cleanliness classification. and at developing co-operation in the spheres of intellectual. basic criteria for design. scientific. both technically developed nations and nations in development. Of these. established in 1947. Schicht. on the other hand. This led ultimately to a grand total of more than 350 national standards and guidelines1. For enterprises serving the world market via production facilities spanning the entire globe. International standardisation – objectives and procedures In the field of cleanroom technology.ch Adapted by W.and it comprises at present 146 members3. the remaining member bodies being correspondent and subscriber members. As an important side effect. the Technical Committee responsible for the development of these standards.The ISO contamination control standards Hans H. with their kind agreement The elaboration of international standards for cleanroom technology is a joint effort of ISO. ISO. Hans Schicht Ltd. Whyte from a publication in European Journal of Parenteral Sciences 2003.one per nation . The scope of activities covers all kinds of technical standardization except electrical engineering and electronics. CEN. this was a most inconvenient situation: for each site. they will also help to eliminate technical barriers to trade. This situation was no less unsatisfactory for the designers and builders of clean facilities: undesirable and counter-productive technical barriers to trade were to be overcome. on a totally global level by ISO. and ready to serve globally minded industries. sc. the International Organization for Standardization and CEN. has been established in 1975 as a common organ of the European Community (now European Union EU) and the European Free Trade Association EFTA. This paper gives a brief review of the objectives and guidance principles for work of ISO/TC 209. techn. start-up and operation of cleanrooms. is a worldwide confederation of national standards bodies . Dr.

the ISO and CEN approval procedures will be triggered in parallel. Application-specific standardisation remains outside the brief of ISO/TC 209. It entered into force in 1991 and establishes procedures for the mutual recognition of standards developed within one or the other of the two organisations. the CEN activities were fully integrated into the ISO effort. the following general guidance principles have been agreed: The series of standards to be developed shall address only subjects of general applicability to all cleanroom usage areas. then all CEN nations are bindingly obliged to include this standard into their national standards collections as European Standards. and promote understanding between nations. This gives tremendous weight to the standards thus approved. Its scope of work is identical with that of ISO. Without much delay. Malta and Slovakia. The standards should promote and encourage progress. The standards should neither favour nor prejudice individual nations. rather than impeding it. If through this procedure a standard is approved on ISO level. Each nation is then free to decide whether it wishes also to include it in its own national collection of standards. it will be published in the ISO collection of standards as International Standard. all national standards conflicting with the European Standard thus adopted must be withdrawn.harmonisation of the European technical standards. No better point of departure for broad international recognition can be imagined. International cleanroom standards: the first steps The first step towards international harmonisation of standards in the field of contamination control technology took place in 1990: the establishment of the European Technical Committee CEN/TC 243: Cleanroom Technology. If the standard has also been approved during the parallel CEN voting. What is the impact of this agreement on mutual recognition of standards? If ISO and CEN agree on the development of standards for a given technical field. Presently. and soon paved the way for a proposal by the United States of America to upgrade these efforts to a truly international level. a common approach to cleanroom technology standardization was agreed between ISO and CEN. ISO and CEN have harmonised their standardization activities to the widest possible extent through the Vienna Agreement on Technical Co-operation between ISO and CEN. As a consequence. Furthermore. Hungary. Its dynamic style and the speedy progress of work was recognised throughout the contamination control world. the International Technical Committee ISO/TC 209: Cleanrooms and associated controlled environments was launched in 1993 . to join before long. Scope and guidance principles for work The ISO cleanroom standards are intended to cover all relevant aspects of contamination and biocontamination control technology. . The standards should contribute to the elimination of technical barriers to trade. and indeed required. so that the parallel approval procedures as established by the Vienna Agreement apply. as the inclusion into 20 national collections of standards is guaranteed right from the beginning. The standards to be prepared should be target oriented and establish objectives to be met. Thus. and no new national standards on the same subject may be elaborated henceforth.a mere three years after CEN/TC 243 had been created. it embraces the 18 standardization bodies of the EU and EFTA nations plus those of the Czech Republic. For their development. As much freedom as possible should be granted regarding the path leading to the goal. The other nations now applying for EU membership are expected.

constructors and users. but also the emerging nations: their role in cleanroom technology is constantly increasing. is represented by a single.01 CD 06. glove boxes. as a rule. minienvironments Molecular contamination Surface cleanliness Convenorship BSI / United Kingdom BSI / United Kingdom JISC / Japan DIN / Germany ANSI / USA SNV / Switzerland ANSI / USA BSI / United Kingdom SNV / Switzerland in formation The individual standards are elaborated by internationally composed Working Groups (Table 1. This serves to eliminate vague and prejudiced determinations from the drafts and this is a most important factor for ensuring future acceptance of the standard by the world’s community of professionals.00 DIS 09.Target orientation ensures maximum freedom regarding the path how the target is reached. Matthews Short title Air cleanliness classification Biocontamination control Metrology and test methods Design. construction and start-up Operations Terms and definitions Status 04. A broad base in competence and experience – gained under most differing circumstances – forms the background for the technical deliberations and ensures a high quality level of the determinations arrived at.02 Std. construction and start-up Operations Terms and definitions Clean air hoods. 05. Membership should comprise not only the highly developed.01 . the Working Groups should combine the expertise of designers.01 DIS 07.03 Std. Also furthering acceptance is. 04. the national standardization bodies entrusted with convenorship are identified in brackets). of course.99 Std. Table 1: The working groups of ISO/TC 209 and their allotment of convenorship Secretariat: Chairman: Working Group WG 1 WG 2 WG 3 WG 4 WG 5 WG 6 WG 7 WG 8 WG 9* * IEST/USA (on behalf of ANSI) Richard A. The present status of international cleanroom standardisation Table 2 summarises the present state of development of the international cleanroom standards. the democratically transparent approval procedure established for the ISO and CEN standardization effort. Table 2: ISO/TC 209: Cleanrooms and associated controlled environments: Standards in development Document-No. ISO 14644-1 ISO 14644-2 ISO 14644-3 ISO 14644-4 ISO 14644-5 ISO 14644-6 Short Title Air cleanliness classification Specification for testing cleanrooms to prove continued compliance with ISO 14644-1 Metrology and test methods Design. In their personal composition. isolators. highly competent professional. 09. providing an automatic incentive for technical progress. Each nation. This quality level is further enhanced by the requirement of consensus decisions on Working Group level.

03 FDIS 04. with the objective of inviting technical comments from the nations actively involved in the ISO/TC 209 work. these international standards merit priority over national standards and over guidelines and recommended practices elaborated by professional societies. liquids and textiles Biocontamination control: Evaluation and interpretation of biocontamination data Biocontamination control: Measuring the efficiency of cleaning and disinfection processes for inert surfaces DIS 02. With 9 international cleanroom standards now in the DIS stage and beyond. . three documents have already achieved the status of formally approved International and European Standards. and finally the second formal circulation as Final Draft International Standard FDIS. can be used as reference documents and as base documents for projects and for customer/supplier agreements. The column 'Status 04. these standards: are publicly and freely available and can be purchased through the national standardisation bodies and their outlets. inviting technical and editorial comments and requesting a generic statement on the merits of the draft by means of a preliminary vote. - As is evident. In addition to the work items listed in Table 2. for the parallel ISO and CEN voting leading – if successful – to approval and subsequent publication in the ISO and CEN collections of standards. minienvironments Classification of molecular contamination Biocontamination control: General principles and measurement of biocontamination of air.01 CD 12. are considered to represent the state-of-the-art in any legal dispute.03' in Table 2 identifies the actual state of approval of each work item on the 12th February 2003. work is soon to commence on an international standard devoted to the important issue of surface cleanliness. surfaces. glove boxes. and an ad-hoc task force has recently been established by ISO/TC 209 for assessing whether the subject of cleanroom garments also merits the elaboration of an international standard. Therefore.03 DIS 02. from DIS status onwards. The impact of the ISO standards on contamination control practice What is the impact of the new ISO family of cleanroom technology standards upon industry? From DIS status onwards. isolators. a comprehensive collection of guidance documents is already available to serve industry. and others are to follow soon.ISO 14644-7 ISO 14644-8 ISO 14698-1 ISO 14698-2 ISO 14698-3 Clean air hoods. a first formal circulation as Draft International Standard DIS for the parallel ISO and CEN enquiry.99 The standardization effort is split into two families of standards: the ISO 14644 series covering general contamination control topics. the ISO 14698 series on biocontamination control issues.02 FDIS 04. the approval procedure being subdivided into three stages: an informal circulation as Committee Draft CD.

Federal Standard 209E. been officially withdrawn. and ISO 8 substitutes class 100 000 (U.thus overcoming elegantly the principal drawback of the metric air cleanliness classes according to the now defunct U.S.08 where Cn N D 0. Its nominated replacements are ISO 14644-15 for air cleanliness classification and ISO 14644-27 for proving continued compliance of a cleanroom with ISO 14644-1. it is focussed upon the detection capabilities of the discrete-particle counter which has been . The range of particle diameters for air cleanliness classification extends from 0. Government.1/D)2. replaces class 100 (U. This event definitely marks the breakthrough of the ISO air cleanliness classification scheme. however. by the General Services Administration of the U. The air cleanliness classification scheme according to ISO 14644-1 is distinguished by a mathematically coherent approach and based upon a formula: Cn = 10N (0. Table 3 shows the ISO class limits in tabular form. Thus. metric class M 3.S. Simple. on 29 November 2001.2 µm ≥ 0. single-digit class denominations now correspond with the traditional classes of said standard: ISO 5.S.S. This standard has. considered particle diameter.1 µm ≥ 0. for example. rounded to a maximum of 3 digits.5).1 = = = = maximum number concentration of particles per m3 with diameter ≥ the considered particle diameter.1 to 5 µm. Federal Standard 209 E4. metric class M 6.5 µm ≥ 1 µm ≥ 5 µm N ISO Class 1 ISO Class 2 ISO Class 3 ISO Class 4 ISO Class 5 ISO Class 6 ISO Class 7 ISO Class 8 ISO Class 9 10 100 1 000 10 000 100 000 1 000 000 2 24 237 2 370 23 700 237 000 10 102 1 020 10 200 102 000 4 35 352 3 520 35 200 352 000 3 520 000 35 200 000 8 83 832 8 320 83 200 832 000 8 320 000 29 293 2 930 29 300 293 000 With the selection of 0.Air cleanliness classification according to ISO 14644-1 It had been common practice throughout industry to classify cleanrooms according to U. the reference diameter.3 µm ≥ 0.1 µm as the reference particle diameter for air cleanliness classification purposes a very straightforward denomination scheme results . Table 3: Air cleanliness class limits according to ISO 14644-1 in tabular form ISO Maximum concentration limits classifica(particles/m3 of air) tion number for particles of the considered sizes shown below ≥ 0.S.5). ISO classification number. a constant with the dimension µm.

ISO/DIS 14644-37 provides most welcome guidance for the acceptance and qualification tests of physical parameters as well as for the corresponding measuring activities related to process monitoring. the minimum performance requirement for the test instruments are specified systematically. In addition. Federal Standard 209E at that standard's reference particle diameter of 0. The interval between reclassifications can be extended in case of continuous performance monitoring of the installation. The remaining parts of the ISO 14644 series . and reclassification of existing cleanrooms according to the ISO determinations is very straightforward.an overview The following compilation is intended as a highly concentrated insight into the contents of the remaining standards of the ISO 14644 series on general cleanroom technology. It is condensed into a comprehensive checklist covering 12 subject areas with a grand total of 151 items! If the design activities are cross-checked with its help. 10 B. 8 B. it is almost impossible that something of importance has been overseen! . 9 B.S. 7 B. and 12 months for all other classified areas. It covers a total of 14 measurement tasks (Table 4) such as particle counting. 11 B. 4 B. 3 B. Measuring parameter B. very comprehensive guidance for approval and qualification of cleanrooms. Thus.5 µm. 1 B. Table 4: Measuring parameters covered by ISO/DIS 14644-3 Annex no. 12 B. a harmonious connection to previous generations of standards is assured. Periodical reclassifications are recommended in intervals of 6 months for areas classified ISO Class 5 or better. These tests shall be conducted with calibrated instruments. air velocity measurements. Class limits must be met with the rigours of the 95 % upper confidence limit.08 of the correlation between particle concentration and particle diameter ensures the best possible coincidence with the particle concentrations according to U. 14 Airborne particle count for classification and test measurement of cleanrooms and separative devices Airborne particle count for ultrafine particles Airborne particle count for macroparticles Airflow test Air pressure difference test Installed filter system leakage test Airflow visualisation Airflow direction test Temperature test Humidity test Electrostatic and ion generator test Particle deposition test Recovery test Containment leak test ISO 14644-48 offers. 5 B. filter integrity tests. 2 B. 13 B.identified as the reference test method for demonstrating compliance with ISO 14644-1. flow visualisation and the measurement of recovery times. ISO 14644-26 establishes the minimum requirements for reclassification and requalification work as well as the minimum time intervals between subsequent reclassifications. for example. 6 B. Another highlight of ISO 14644-4 is a systematic compilation of all the determinations having to be agreed between customer and supplier during design and development of a cleanroom system. The exponent 2.

and five contaminant categories: biotoxics. It will therefore not proceed into FDIS voting. education and training is identified as a key factor in controlling the hazards capable of prejudicing cleanroom operation. It provides guidance on the measurement of airborne biocontamination as well as of the biocontamination of surfaces. gloveboxes. and cleanroom cleaning. the contamination risks caused by airborne molecules . ISO/DIS 14644-711 addresses the generic and application-neutral requirements on clean air hoods. bases.e.ISO/DIS 14644-59 addresses the operational aspects of cleanrooms with a focus on the principal hazards: cleanroom clothing. A specific Annex is devoted to each of these risk areas. each of them contains a compilation of the definitions relevant for it. In this document. but so far of less impact for the pharmaceutical industry. As initial acceptance of this draft was lukewarm. It has since passed the second enquiry successfully and has recently been circulated for the formal FDIS vote.213 is devoted to the general principles of the measurement of biocontamination. It also covers the validation of air sampling and of laundering processes. ISO/CD 14644-812 addresses molecular contamination. Guidance is limited to issues not covered in ISO/DIS 14644-3 and ISO 14644-4. This fact causes no problems for the readability of these other standards: presently. for example isolator-specific measurement tasks such as integrity testing of containments and glove-sleeve systems. it will be published. ISO/DIS 14698-315 on the measurement of the efficiency of processes of cleaning and/or disinfection of inert surfaces bearing biocontaminated wet soiling or biofilms limits itself to the description of a single assessment procedure. . This highly specialised document was deemed by ISO/TC 209 to be of limited interest only to the contamination control community as a whole. stationary equipment. In addition. a brief summary of the contents of the ISO 14698 series of biocontamination control standards is compiled. The biocontamination control standards reviewed Under this heading. personnel. ISO/CD 14644-610 is devoted to terms and definitions. all terms and definition used in the other standards prepared under the auspices of ISO/TC 209 will be compiled. condensables. materials as well as portable and mobile equipment. isolators and mini-environments. i. as an ISO Technical Report. This standard will focus on classification as well as on measurement and analysis issues. the subject of personnel training is briefly addressed. it had to be submitted twice to the DIS enquiry procedure. organics and inorganics. corrosives. ISO/DIS 14698-1. For this reason. Instead. This draft is presently being readied for the formal FDIS vote.an area of utmost relevance in microelectronics and aerospace. as soon as ISO 14698-1 and -2 have been formally approved. textiles and liquids. this standard can only be finalised when work on all these other standards has been terminated. Four classes of compounds are distinguished: acids. ISO/DIS 14698-214 on evaluation and interpretation of biocontamination data has also recently been submitted to the formal FDIS vote. dopants and oxidants.

Ibid. Whyte W). Cleanrooms and associated controlled environments – Part 2: Specifications for testing and monitoring to prove continued compliance with ISO 14644-1. International standards for the design of cleanrooms. 21-50. Chichester.. gloveboxes. 8. methods.. September 2002. December 2002. 3.. ISO/CD 14644-8. construction and start-up. ISO/DIS 14644-5.Part 2: Evaluation and interpretation of biocontamination data. Cleanrooms and associated controlled environments – Part 3: Metrology and test methods. Ibid. ISO/DIS 14644-7. July 2001. International Organization for Standardization ISO. 11..Part 3: Measurement of the efficiency of processes of cleaning and/or disinfection of inert surfaces bearing biocontaminated wet soiling or biofilms.S. 5. 4. U. 1993. Federal Standard 209E. 2. Geneva. practices. IEST-RD-CC009. April 2003. EN ISO 14644-1. isolators. Ibid. John Wiley & Sons.References 1. February 1999. 13. 15. ISO/CD 14644-6. 14. EN ISO 14644-2. 11 September 1992. Geneva. and Brussels. 2003. ISO/FDIS 14698-2. International Organization for Standardization ISO. May 1999. September 2000.. Ibid. Ibid..2. Cleanrooms and associated controlled environments – Part 8: Classification of airborne molecular contamination.. ISO Memento 2003. April 2003. mini-environments). Cleanrooms and associated controlled environments – Part 1: Classification of air cleanliness. 10. Ibid.Part 1: General principles and methods. Ibid.. NOTE: All EN ISO and ISO standards referred to above are available from S2C2 . April 2001. June 2001. ISO/DIS 14698-3. 1999. and similar documents relating to contamination control. withdrawn 29 November 2001. Compendium of standards. European Committee for Standardization CEN. Ibid. 6. 7. Cleanrooms and associated controlled environments – Biocontamination control . EN ISO 14644-4. Ibid. Institute of Environmental Sciences and Technology IEST.. Cleanrooms and associated controlled environments – Part 4: Design.. Cleanrooms and associated controlled environments – Part 7: Separative enclosures (clean air hoods. Cleanrooms and associated controlled environments – Part 6: Terms and definitions. Cleanrooms and associated controlled environments – Part 5: Operations. Washington DC/USA. 2nd edition. Mount Prospect. IL/USA. Ibid. Cleanrooms and associated controlled environments – Biocontamination control . 12. ISO/FDIS 14698-1. 9. Airborne particulate cleanliness classes in cleanrooms and clean zones. In: Cleanroom Design ( ed. February 2001. ISO/DIS 14644-3. Möller ÅL. Cleanrooms and associated controlled environments – Biocontamination control .