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Integrated Unit Plan: Chicago Sports

Group Members: Stephanie Sabbath, Megan Casady, Beth McGreal, Ryan Robertson UBD Template
Integrated Lesson Plan Sports Unit Stage 1 - Desired Results

Enduring Understanding: Sports have become a major part of the dominant culture in America. Students will also understand the different details about different sports. Essential Questions: How did sports evolve in America? How have sports affected our society? How do forces of motion affect the way sports are played? How is geometry incorporated in sports? Common Core and/or Illinois Standards (depending on subject be sure to include all content areas): Math Standards: CCSS.Math.Content.4.G.A.1 Draw points, lines, line segments, rays, angles (right, acute, obtuse), and perpendicular and parallel lines. Identify these in twodimensional figures. CCSS.Math.Content.4.OA.A.3 Solve multistep word problems posed with whole numbers and having wholenumber answers using the four operations, including problems in which remainders must be interpreted. Represent these problems using equations with a letter standing for the unknown quantity. Assess the reasonableness of answers using mental computation and estimation strategies including rounding. CCSS.Math.Content.4.NBT.B.4 fluently add and subtract multi-digit whole numbers using the standard algorithm.

Grade Level: 4th Grade

Content Areas Addressed (at least 2): Social Studies Math Science English Language Arts Unit Objectives (label with the assessment number in Stage 2): objectives: The student will be able to draw lines, line segments, angles, perpendicular and parallel lines accurately to construct the area and perimeter of a sports stadium when given rulers, protractors, and graph paper. The student will be able to solve algebraic word problems to figure out real life examples given specifics about the sports arena with 80% accuracy. Students will be able to precisely determine the force

CCSS.Math.Content.4.MD.A.1 Know relative sizes of measurement units within one system of units including km, m, cm; kg, g; lb, oz.; l, ml; hr, min, sec. Within a single system of measurement, express measurements in a larger unit in terms of a smaller unit. Record measurement equivalents in a two-column table. For example, know that 1 ft is 12 times as long as 1 in. Express the length of a 4 ft snake as 48 in. Generate a conversion table for feet and inches listing the number pairs (1, 12), (2, 24), (3, 36), ... CCSS.Math.Content.4.MD.A.2 Use the four operations to solve word problems involving distances, intervals of time, liquid volumes, masses of objects, and money, including problems involving simple fractions or decimals, and problems that require expressing measurements given in a larger unit in terms of a smaller unit. Represent measurement quantities using diagrams such as number line diagrams that feature a measurement scale. CCSS.Math.Content.4.MD.A.3 Apply the area and perimeter formulas for rectangles in real world and mathematical problems. For example, find the width of a rectangular room given the area of the flooring and the length, by viewing the area formula as a multiplication equation with an unknown factor. CCSS.Math.Content.4.MD.B.4 Make a line plot to display a data set of measurements in fractions of a unit (1/2, 1/4, 1/8). Solve problems involving addition and subtraction of fractions by using information presented in line plots. For example, from a line plot find and interpret the difference in length between the longest and shortest specimens in an insect collection.

needed to get a ball into the goal using force and energy of the object, given the ball has to go from point A to point B. The student will be able to coherently construct a persuasive essay and hold a discussion on their opinion of which sport is best, with the provided support from their peers and teacher. Students will be able to research and collect historical information concerning their sport and team when provided with the necessary resources to accurately incorporate into their writing and presentation.

Science Standards: (From Next Generation Science Standards) Students who demonstrate understanding can: 4-PS3-1. Use evidence to construct an explanation relating the speed of an object to the energy of that object. [Assessment Boundary: Assessment does not include quantitative measures of changes in the speed of an object or on any precise or quantitative definition of energy. Students who demonstrate understanding can: 3-5-ETS1-1.Define a simple design problem reflecting a

need or a want that includes specified criteria for success and constraints on materials, time, or cost. 3-5-ETS1-2. Generate and compare multiple possible solutions to a problem based on how well each is likely to meet the criteria and constraints of the problem. 3-5-ETS1-3. Plan and carry out fair tests in which variables are controlled and failure points are considered to identify aspects of a model or prototype that can be improved. Social Studies Standards: (From the Illinois State Standards) 16.A.2a Read historical stories and determine events which influenced their writing. 16.A.2c Ask questions and seek answers by collecting and analyzing data from historic documents, images and other literary and non-literary sources. Language Arts/Reading Standards: CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.4.1 Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 4 topics and texts, building on others ideas and expressing their own clearly. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.4.4 Report on a topic or text, tell a story, or recount an experience in an organized manner, using appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive details to support main ideas or themes; speak clearly at an understandable pace. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.4.4 Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development and organization are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.4.5 With guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, and editing CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.4.1 Write opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point of view with reasons and information. o CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.4.1a Introduce a topic or text clearly, state an opinion, and create an organizational structure in which related ideas are grouped to support the writers purpose.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.4.1b Provide reasons that are supported by facts and details. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.4.1c Link opinion and reasons using words and phrases (e.g., for instance, in order to, in addition). CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.4.1d Provide a concluding statement or section related to the opinion presented.

WIDA STANDARDS: Should be at level 3:Developing English Language Development Standard 1: English language learners communicate for social and instructional purposes within the school setting. Level 3: Developing- Students will communicate with the teacher, using complete sentences, questions, concerns, and information about the topic. English Language Development Standard 2: English language learners communicate information, ideas and concepts necessary for academic success in the content area of Language Arts. Level 3: Developing- Students will use the information collected to compose a simple and clear presentation to the class using complete sentences. English Language Development Standard 4: English language learners communicate information, ideas and concepts necessary for academic success in the content area of Science. Level 3: Developing- Given resources, collect evidence/information about sea creatures and the ocean using photos, illustrations, or videos and a graphic organizer with a group. Listening: Infer from and act on oral information. Listen to teacher give directions as well as listen to group discuss the sports. Speaking: Discuss issues and concepts by presenting

information on sports team. Reading: Find details that support main ideas. Read articles, books, and information on the internet to find detail and ideas about sports. Writing: Practice with rough drafts to write and organize main ideas and details about sports. Complete a final paper after writing and re-writing rough drafts. Stage 2 Assessment Evidence (name the three kinds of assessment you have chosen and provide a brief description of these assessments) Assessment #1: Pre-assessment: Assess if they know perpendicular or parallel lines, what they know about forces & motion, history of sports in America, persuasive essays & writing process (technology polls) Assessment #2: Formative: Walking around and listen to discussions and asking them questions Having them complete worksheets that will get them thinking about the topics will also be a way to informally assess Stadium layout plan with written explanation and justification. Persuasive essay drafts in parts. Students will write specific paragraphs to turn in to be reviewed by the teacher. The teacher will use a checklist to make sure students have all of the parts. Assessment #3 Summative: The end project/presentation about what sport is better and why with supporting details and completed persuasive essay.

Stage 3 Learning Plan Remember: W: (where/what)

H: (hook/hold) E: (equip/experience/explore) R: (rethink/revise) E: (evaluate) T: (tailored) O: (organized) How Many Lessons of What Length? 3 weeks 10 lessons (30-45 minute lessons) Lots of time for students to work on collection of information to use on final project. Bullet Your Lesson Plans (bolded lesson is detailed lesson plan submitted): 1. Introduce algebra and geometry concepts focusing on area, perimeter, and shapes in relation to sports stadiums. 2. Introduce force and motion pertaining to how players play the game. 3. Introduce the writing process, specifically persuasive writing components. 4. Show how the math and science concepts are related and fit together. 5. Introduce the culminating project and explain how each previous lesson and subject connects to the unit and overall project. 6. Have a day where groups are chosen, and then in groups pick a sport for them to do their project on. 7. Teach students how to look for research, what sources are reliable, how to a computer and library for research. Also, include how to 8. Students will do research on current state of sports and the history of their sport and compare and contrast the two.

Week 1 Introduce and learn the math and science concepts Introduce and review the writing process (persuasive essay components) Introduce and explain the final project for the unit. By Friday students need to decide their topic for the final project. Week 2 Begin researching what they want to do for their final culminating project Do research to compare and contrast history of chosen sport to what it is today. Start writing their persuasive essay Continue to work on math and science topics Week 3 Finish all elements of project (writing process and presentation), and present to class

W - in the classroom, learning about Chicago sports, what goes into creating a stadium, how much force is needed to hit/kick a ball, how to do research on a topic, how to write a persuasive essay, and how to present an argument orally. H - video on Chicago sports to grab the attention of the class. E - explore the history of Chicago sports R - rethink their stance on favorite Chicago sport and why. Also, revise their persuasive essay before submitting it.

E - evaluate through pre-assessment, formative (ongoing), and summative assessment at the end with their oral presentation. T - tailored to meet the students needs by pacing and spreading out subject areas, making connections between each area, time to work on and collaborate with group for final project, peer and teacher support. O - organized by week on the outcomes of what we want to accomplish and how long the unit will take the students to complete. Details above and to the right.

9. Introduce behaviors for giving a presentation/speech. 10. Work on putting together their presentations and practicing them.

Assessments:
Pre-assessment: Assess if they know perpendicular or parallel lines, what they know about forces & motion, history of sports in America, persuasive essays & writing process (technology polls) Poll questions: 1. Which picture represents perpendicular lines?

A.

B.

C.

D.

2. Which picture represents parallel lines?

A.

B.

C.

D.

3. True or false: In baseball, the motion of the bat is influenced by the force of a batters swing. True 4. True or false: When a ball collides with another rolling ball, both balls will stop instantly. False 5. Which professional sport is the oldest sport in America? A. Soccer B. Football C. Baseball D. Volleyball Formative: Walking around and listen to discussions and asking them questions Having them complete worksheets that will get them thinking about the topics will also be a way to informally assess Stadium layout plan with written explanation and justification. Persuasive essay drafts in parts. Students will write specific paragraphs to turn in to be reviewed by the teacher. The teacher will use a checklist to make sure students have all of the parts. Summative: The end project/presentation about what sport is better and why with supporting details and completed persuasive essay.

Oral Presentation Rubric:

CATEGORY Content

4
Shows a full understanding of the topic.

3
Shows a good understanding of the topic.

2
Shows a good understanding of parts of the topic. Sometimes (7080%) speaks in complete sentences.

1
Does not seem to understand the topic very well. Rarely speaks in complete sentences.

Uses Complete Sentences Enthusiasm

Always (99100% of time) speaks in complete sentences. Facial expressions and body language generate a strong interest and enthusiasm about the topic in others.

Mostly (80-98%) speaks in complete sentences.

Facial expressions and body language sometimes generate a strong interest and enthusiasm about the topic in others. Stays on topic most (99-90%) of the time.

Facial expressions and body language are used to try to generate enthusiasm, but seem somewhat faked.

Very little use of facial expressions or body language. Did not generate much interest in topic being presented. It was hard to tell what the topic was.

Stays on Topic

Stays on topic all (100%) of the time.

Stays on topic some (89%75%) of the time.

Essay Rubric:

LESSON PLAN Megan Casady, Ryan Robertson, Beth McGreal, and Stephanie Sabath Grade Level/Subject: 4th grade Social Studies/Language Arts Prerequisite Knowledge: Students will know how to research topics on the computer or in the library. Students will know how to create complete sentences and an organized paragraph. Students will know what the steps in the writing process is and the components that are included in persuasive writing. Students will know what sport and team they are completing their project on so they can conduct their research. Approximate Time: Spread throughout the day 20 minutes for introduction to articles and group discussion (Part 1) 40 minutes for them to do research on their own and fill out T-chart (Part 2) 25 minutes to sample write a paragraph (Part 3) What Lesson is this in your Unit: Lesson #8 Enduring Understandings: Sports have become a major part of the dominant culture in America. Students will also understand the different details about different sports. Essential Questions: How did sports evolve in America? How have sports affected our society? How do forces of motion affect the way sports are played? How is geometry incorporated in sports? Student Objectives: Students will be able to research and collect historical information concerning their sport and team when provided with the necessary resources to accurately incorporate into their writing and presentation. The student will be able to coherently construct a persuasive essay and hold a discussion on their opinion of which sport is best, with the provided support from their peers and teacher. Language Objectives (WIDA standards): Students will ask questions about how to conduct research given their research topic and resources. Students will discuss the research they collect in their groups and how it applies to their end project given the final requirements of the project. Students will discuss in groups how they will apply what they found during their research to the compare/contrast paragraph they are to create using the t-chart they have filled out.

Common Core/Illinois Standards: Social Studies 16.A.2a Read historical stories and determine events which influenced their writing. 16.A.2c Ask questions and seek answers by collecting and analyzing data from historic documents, images and other literary and non-literary sources. Language Arts CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.4.4 Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development and organization are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.4.5 With guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, and editing CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.4.1 Write opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point of view with reasons and information. Materials/Resources/Technology: Current Event articles on Chicago sports teams Computers to use for research Paper and pencils Library and sports books YouTube video List of websites to start research Websites: o o o o o o o o http://blackhawks.nhl.com/ http://www.chicagowolves.com/ http://chicago.cubs.mlb.com/index.jsp?c_id=chc&sv=1 http://chicago.whitesox.mlb.com/index.jsp?c_id=cws&sv=1 http://www.chicagobears.com/ http://www.chicago-fire.com/ http://www.wnba.com/sky/ http://www.nba.com/bulls

Implementation: Two Days Before Lesson Two days before the lesson the teacher will have told students that they are to find an article in a newspaper or on the internet on the sports team they are doing the final project on. They will need to bring this article into class. The possible sports teams they have picked are Cubs, White Sox, Bears, Bulls, Sky, Blackhawks, Wolves, and Fire. Teacher Preparation The teacher will have reserved enough laptops for each student to get one. The teacher will also have checked out sport books from the library.

Opening of Lesson The teacher will start by showing students a YouTube video of a Chicago sports team montage. The video shows footage of all the different teams. The video will show what the sports are currently like today. Procedure Part 1 After watching the video the teacher will ask students to take out their current sports article and a blank sheet of paper. The teacher will then tell the students to find the other students who have the same sports team as them (also will be in the same group for the final project). Once in their groups the teacher will tell the students that they are going to go around and share their article with their fellow group members. The teacher will tell them that while they are sharing they are going to be making T charts. The teacher will tell students to draw a T chart on their paper. At the very top they will write their sports team. Above the left hand column they will write 2013, and above the right column they will write past. The teacher will tell the students that while sharing they need to write notes on what their sports team is like today (2013 column). Some things they may want to take note of are the uniforms, the stadiums, the fans, the players, the rules of the game, the way people watch the game (TV, internet, etc.), and the role the team/sport has in society. The teacher will then give the students about 15 minutes to share their articles with their group, and take notes on the left hand side of the T chart. The teacher will constantly be moving around the room to check in to student conversations, ask questions, and to make sure they are filling out the chart.

Part 2 After the article sharing time is over the teacher will tell students that they are going to do some research on their teams past. The students will be looking up how things in their 2013 column were different in the past. They are allowed to pick any time period, but all past notes need to be from before 2000. The students should also specifically look at the things they already took notes on so they can see a change. The teacher will remind students to use the skills and strategies they learned the day before about doing research on the internet. This includes writing down the name of the website when they take a fact from it to avoid plagiarizing. The teacher will then call up students by group to each get their own laptop from the laptop cart. As students are getting the laptops the teacher will remind students how they are supposed to treat the computers. The teacher will also make sure that sports books from the library and available for students to use.

The students will get about 40 minutes to do all of their research. While they do research they should be filling in the right hand column of the T chart. They also may quietly communicate with the other members in their group when they find useful websites. The teacher will have a list of sites students may want to start off which. These sites are all of the official sport websites. The following Chicago Sports Team Sites are: o o o o o o o o http://blackhawks.nhl.com/ http://www.chicagowolves.com/ http://chicago.cubs.mlb.com/index.jsp?c_id=chc&sv=1 http://chicago.whitesox.mlb.com/index.jsp?c_id=cws&sv=1 http://www.chicagobears.com/ http://www.chicago-fire.com/ http://www.wnba.com/sky/ http://www.nba.com/bulls

After researching the students will need to carefully put their computers away in the cart and return to their seats.

Part 3 The teacher will then inform the class that their next activity is to write a draft of one paragraph of their essay. In their essays they will need one paragraph on something that has changed from the past to the present. The students are to pick one thing from their T chart that changed from past to present. Then in their paragraph they will explain how it changed, and why they think it changed. They also need to use correct grammar and spelling. The draft will be edited and reviewed by the teacher. The teacher will then give the students about 20 minutes to write the rough draft to their history paragraph. When the 20 minutes is up they will turn their first draft in.

Summary/Closing When all students have turned in their rough draft the teacher will bring the class together to talk about some of the changes they found from the past to present in their sport. The teacher will call on several students to hear what big changes they observed. The teacher will also ask the class why they think these changes may have occurred. Students Assessment The teacher will constantly be informally assessing students while they work. The teacher will be asking questions, listening to student conversations, and observing research to ensure that students are on task and learning about current and past about their sport. The teacher will also be doing an informal checklist assessment on the students rough draft paragraphs. The teacher will just be checking to make sure students had all of the details necessary. The checklist the teacher will use is below:

Checklist: Yes (included) Grammar/Spelling Complete Sentences Change from pastpresent and how Why with supporting details Needs more detail/support No (not included)

Accommodations:
For ELLs and lower leveled students, the teacher can slow down the pacing of the lesson, providing more individualized support, provide mini-lessons on how to conduct research with each group, use of more visual aids for the research process, using gestures to convey certain steps, explicit vocabulary instruction, modeling of the research process, and tiered lessons.