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Andrew Gregg 9201 University City Blvd Lynch Hall #438 Charlotte, NC 28223 September 11, 2013 To:

The Department of Housing at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte Dear Sirs or Madams: I would like to start off this letter by saying how pleased I am with the remarkable campus of the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. It is fairly newer than some of the other campuses in North Carolina, which is why I chose this school over the other universities this state has to offer. However, there has been a problem in Lynch Hall that I think should not be taken lightly. One of the elevators has not been working properly, and I think it should be fixed immediately. It is unsafe to ride, since every time I have ridden on the elevator it shakes as it makes its way up to the fourth floor. I also noticed that there is not a certificate in this particular elevator to show that it has been inspected. This needs to be taken care of before someone gets hurt. I have heard plenty of stories where people get stuck on elevators for days because of malfunctions. I have also heard of people riding the elevator to the top floor and then the cables give out and the elevator plummets down to the bottom, seriously injuring the people inside. I do not want to be in fear of my life every time I ride the elevator. I have also noticed there was a panel that fell from the ceiling of the elevator and it is propped up inside the elevator. It seems like there is not a person always looking out for things like this. I pay too much money to come to this school to have to deal with these problems that are unrelated to the reasons why I am coming to this school, to get good grades and a valuable education. I think the amount of money the 500 students in Lynch Hall pay per semester should cover the expense of an elevator inspection. I understand that this is a big school and there are a lot of problems that are needed to be taken care of, but this should be on the top of UNC Charlottes list of priorities. I would like to hope this issue gets resolved immediately. Sincerely, Andrew Gregg

Andrew Gregg Mr. Padgett English 1101 September 11, 2013 Rhetorical Analysis I wrote my complaint letter to the Department of Housing at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte regarding the problems I have with the elevator not working properly in Lynch Hall, the residence hall I live in. The letter encompasses the three main aspects of rhetoric: ethos, pathos, and logos, which are used to help draw the reader in. The Ethos aspect of rhetoric is used when I ask the reader if they think it would be okay if someone is seriously injured riding the elevator. Pathos is also used in my letter because I tell the reader that I do not want to be afraid for my life every time I ride the elevator. Lastly, I explain the rhetorical aspect of Logos by explaining to the reader that I pay too much money to have to deal with problems like the elevator. I think all of the aspects of rhetoric used in my letter were used effectively in order to get my point across. The Ethos aspect of rhetoric appeals to one persons ethics and morals, in which I used to help draw the reader in. Why is it so hard to have a properly working elevator in a building that I pay enough money for every semester? Im sure the money me and the other 500 students in the building pay can be used to get an elevator inspector out to the building. These are some of the rhetorical questions and statements that I used in my letter because I demand to live in a safe environment that I pay money for. Appealing to a persons ethics and morals allows the writer to

get the reader to put themselves in the situation of the writer and see if they would accept the issue of the subject matter. The Pathos aspect of rhetoric is used to appeal to a persons emotions. In the letter I use Pathos to get the reader to feel bad about my anxiety about riding an elevator that, at any moment, can suddenly stop working and/or collapse without warning. I am not really deathly afraid of the elevator, obviously, since I still ride the broken elevator, but the reader doesnt know that and they might feel bad and be more inclined to get the issue taken care of. I also use the fact that I am not the only one who pays money to stay in the building, as well as the fact that there are multiple amounts of people who are also dissatisfied with the uninspected elevator. Sometimes, writers who are demanding something to be changed or fixed need to exaggerate a little bit about the situation, no matter how big or small the issue is, to appeal to the readers emotions. The Logos aspect of rhetoric is used to appeal to a persons logic, the way things are just supposed to happen. Its a pretty simple explanation, the elevator is supposed to take passengers up and down the different floors of a building. There are stairs on the side of the building, but we have to carry 15-20lbs of materials in our book bag everywhere. After walking almost a mile to get to one class and walking up and down the stairs that are around the entire campus, all of us students would like to have a break by using the elevator. I also think that it is very logical for someone to want a properly working elevator because that is how they are meant to work. The three main aspects of rhetoric and some of my own statements of rhetoric were meant to blend well together in order to get my point across. The best way for a reader to want to be interested in what you, as the writer, are speaking about is to appeal to their Ethos, Pathos,

and Logos. I hope the issue regarding the elevator I addressed in my letter will soon come to a resolution so me and the other 500 students in Lynch Hall will not have to worry about it anymore.