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Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
Wednesday • Dec. 4, 2013 • Vol XIII, Edition 93
Family Owned & Operated
Established: 1949
SURVIVOR STORY
WORLD PAGE 17
MENLO KNIGHTS:
NORCAL CHAMPS
SPORTS PAGE 11
ICE WINES ARE
COOL FAVORITE
FOOD PAGE 22
MAN SURVIVES THREE DAYS AT BOTTOM OF ATLANTIC
SAMANTHA WEIGEL/DAILY JOURNAL
John Schrup, president of United American Bank, helps Lorna Watt, downtown San Mateo’s artist in residence, pull together
a yarn tree sock on Third Avenue yesterday morning.
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
A former political consultant to the mil-
lionaire businesswoman who unsuccessful-
ly ran for the presidency of Madagascar is
suing the Belmont resident over more than
$165,000 in unpaid bills.
In the lawsuit filed by Los Altos-based
Global Policy Strategies, APC, firm presi-
dent George “Duf” Sundheim claims he
served as Roseline Emma
Rasolovoahangy’s prin-
cipal advisor, laid out her
strategy and introduced
her to an extensive polit-
ical network including
secretaries of state and
public figures like former
California first lady
Maria Shriver. Sundheim
served as chairman of the
California Republican Party from 2003-
2007.
According to published reports earlier
this year, Rasolovoahangy’s platform
included drawing overseas investment to
the poverty-stricken country.
But Rasolovoahangy was disqualified
from the October 2013 presidential race in
August 2012 because she no longer had
established residency and has not yet paid
the $165,809 she owes, according to the
suit filed Monday in San Mateo County
Superior Court.
A 2010 constitutional referendum barred
candidates that had had not lived in the
county for the previous six months.
Rasolovoahangy did not respond to an
inquiry for comment.
Rasolovoahangy was a bookkeeper and
accountant at the law firm of Doty &
Former Madagascar presidential candidate sued
Political strategist Duf Sundheim seeking unpaid bills from Belmont resident
Roseline
Rasolovoahangy
Bohannon
matriarch
dies at 91
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
Frances Bohannon Nelson, family
matriarch and Peninsula real estate icon,
died peacefully in her sleep Saturday,
Nov. 23, 2013, after a brief illness.
Born in Oakland in 1922, Frances was
the eldest daughter of the late Ophelia
Bohannon and legendary real estate
developer David D. Bohannon. Frances
graduated from the University of
California at Berkeley and began work-
ing with the Bohannon companies in
1943, where her leadership guided the successful growth of
Bohannon Development Company since being named pres-
ident in 1975. Bohannon Development Company owns and
operates the Hillsdale Shopping Center in San Mateo.
Amajor triumph in her business life included the expan-
sion and enclosure of Hillsdale Shopping Center in 1981,
amid a daunting economic recession.
As a devoted wife to husband Howard Nelson, Frances par-
See LAWSUIT, Page 23
Frances
Bohannon
Nelson
County businesses among
top state tax delinquents
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Two San Mateo County businesses are among the 48 new
state taxpayers added to the list of California’s top 500
sales and use tax delinquents.
Pacific Printing & Fulfillment, Inc. of Redwood City owes
$431,868.30 and Platinum Motor Group of San Bruno owes
$427,803.76, according to the State Board of Equalization.
By Samantha Weigel
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Traditional ornaments and
Christmas lights will seem old school
when compared to the new festive
decor with which the streets of down-
town San Mateo are being adorned.
Local artist Lorna Watt and a team of
volunteers are taking to the streets to
yarn bomb 30 Third Avenue trees.
Some of Watt’s yarn bombed
endeavors included knitting cozy
socks for mailboxes in front of the
post office, turning a B Street magno-
lia tree into a giant squid, revamping
old parking meters and covering graf-
fiti ridden utility boxes.
“We like to think of public objects,
and imagine how we can transform
them in a new way,” Watt said.
What started out as a sneaky guerril-
la-style hobby, Watt’s creative adorn-
ment of public objects in the area led
the Downtown San Mateo Association
to reach out and join in the fun, Watt
said.
In April, she was asked to become
the DSMA’s artist in residence and
commissioned to provide locals and
visitors with eye-catching public art,
Watt said.
“It’s so great to have [Watt] as our
artist in residence, she’s making
magic in downtown,” said Nancy
Bush, president of the DSMA board of
directors.
Watt and local volunteers began
installing the colorful knitted tree-
sweaters on Monday and will be con-
tinuing through 11 a.m. today. She and
her sister Jill Watt used a loom to knit
about 40 miles of yarn donated by the
United American Bank, Watt said. Each
sweater took about an hour to pre-knit
and another half-hour to install, Watt
said.
Volunteers from DSMA, United
American Bank and the community at
large stepped up with crochet hooks in
More than a pop of color
Downtown San Mateo Association pairs up with local artist to yarn bomb trees
See YARN Page 23 See TAXES, Page 23
See OBIT, Page 22
FOR THE RECORD 2 Wednesday • Dec. 4, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
800 S. Claremont St., Suite 210, San Mateo, CA 94402
Publisher: Jerry Lee Editor in Chief: Jon Mays
jerry@smdailyjournal.com jon@smdailyjournal.com
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As a public service, the Daily Journal prints obituaries of approximately 200 words or less with a photo one time on the date of the family’s choosing.To submit obituaries, email
information along with a jpeg photo to news@smdailyjournal.com.Free obituaries are edited for style, clarity, length and grammar. If you would like to have an obituary printed
more than once, longer than 250 words or without editing, please submit an inquiry to our advertising department at ads@smdailyjournal.com.
Actress Marisa
Tomei is 49.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1619
A group of settlers from Bristol,
England, arrived at Berkeley Hundred
in present-day Charles City County,
Virginia, where they held a service
thanking God for their safe arrival.
“There’s much to be said for challenging
fate instead of ducking behind it.”
— Diana Trilling, American author (1905-1996)
Actor Jeff Bridges
is 64.
Rapper Jay-Z is 44.
Birthdays
TOM JUNG/
DAILY JOURNAL
Micah
Standridge,
left, watches
as Rabbi Levi
Potash
concludes the
ceremonial
lighting of the
candles
during a
Hanukkah
celebration
held at the
Courthouse
Square in
Redwood City
on Tuesday.
The 12 foot
tall menorah
— made
completely of
Lego pieces
— was
assembled by
the children
who attended
the event.
Wednesday: Sunny. Highs in the upper
40s. North winds 5 to 15 mph.
Wednesday night: Mostly clear. Lows
in the 30s. Northeast winds 10 to 20
mph.
Thursday: Sunny. Patchy frost in the
morning. Highs in the upper 40s.
Northeast winds around 10
mph...Becoming northwest in the afternoon.
Thursday night: Mostly clear. Lows in the lower 40s.
West winds 5 to 10 mph.
Friday: Mostly cloudy. A chance of rain. Highs in the
lower 50s.
Friday night: Rain likely. Lows in the lower 40s.
Saturday: Partly cloudy. Aslight chance of rain. Highs in
the upper 40s.
Local Weather Forecast
I n 1783, Gen. George Washington bade farewell to his
Continental Army officers at Fraunces Tavern in New York.
I n 1816, James Monroe of Virginia was elected the fifth
president of the United States.
I n 1912, Medal of Honor recipient Gregory “Pappy”
Boyington, the Marine Corps pilot who led the “Black
Sheep Squadron” during World War II, was born in Coeur
d’Alene, Idaho.
I n 1918, President Woodrow Wilson left Washington on a
trip to France to attend the Versailles (vehr-SY’) Peace
Conference.
I n 1942, U.S. bombers struck the Italian mainland for the
first time in World War II. President Franklin D. Roosevelt
ordered the dismantling of the Works Progress
Administration, which had been created to provide jobs dur-
ing the Depression.
I n 1945, the Senate approved U.S. participation in the
United Nations by a vote of 65-7.
I n 1965, the United States launched Gemini 7 with Air
Force Lt. Col. Frank Borman and Navy Cmdr. James A.
Lovell aboard.
I n 1978, San Francisco got its first female mayor as City
Supervisor Dianne Feinstein was named to replace the assas-
sinated George Moscone.
I n 1984, a five-day hijack drama began as four armed men
seized a Kuwaiti airliner en route to Pakistan and forced it to
land in Tehran, where the hijackers killed American passen-
ger Charles Hegna.
I n 1991, Associated Press correspondent Terry Anderson,
the longest held of the Western hostages in Lebanon, was
released after nearly seven years in captivity. Pan American
World Airways ceased operations.
In 1877, the two moons of the planet
Mars were discovered and named
Phobos, which means fear, and Deimos,
which means panic. They were named
after the mythical horses that drew the
chariot of the Roman god, Mars.
***
The largest volcano in our solar system
is on the planet Mars. Olympus Mons is
373 miles wide and 13 miles high. It is
three times as tall as Mt. Everest.
***
Mt. Wai-’ale-’ale in Kauai, Hawaii, is
the wettest place in the world. The
ancient volcanic crater sits 5,148 feet
over sea level and has moe than 350
days of rain each year.
***
The highest grossing movie of the year
1952 was “The Greatest Show on Earth”
(1952) starring Charlton Heston (1923-
2008). The fifth highest grossing
movie of 1952 was “Singin’ in the
Rain,” starring Gene Kelly (192-1996)
and Debbie Reynolds (born 1932).
“Singin’ in the Rain” cost $2.5 million
to produce, running more than
$600,000 over budget.
***
Gene Kelly was enlisted in the Navy dur-
ing World War II. His service was
delayed because he was considered more
useful in Hollywood as an actor, to dis-
tract the population with his movies.
Kelly did go through boot camp and did
his duty for the war by making training
films.
***
In the movie “At War With the Army”
(1950), Jerry Lewis (born 1926) sang
the song “The Navy Gets the Gravy but
the Army Gets the Beans.” Lewis and
Dean Martin (1917-1995) starred in the
musical comedy about soldiers in an
army training camp. Lewis is the bum-
bling private, Martin is a confident
ladies man.
***
In the 1963 movie “The Nutty
Professor,” Jerry Lewis is a nerdy chem-
istry professor. He creates a potion that
temporarily turns him into a handsome,
obnoxious alter ego called Buddy Love.
***
The college kids in the movie “The
Nutty Professor” hang out at a local
watering hole called the Purple Pit.
***
Many television shows and sitcoms
establish a favorite meeting spot for
their characters. In the television series
“Beverly Hills 90210” (1990-2000)
the high school kids hung out at a
restaurant called the Peach Pit. The char-
acters of “Seinfeld” (1989-1998) often
ate at a diner called Monk’s Café. Acof-
fee shop called Café Nervosa was
Frasier’s favorite place to meet his
brother in “Frasier” (1993-2004). The
friends on “Friends” (1994-2004)
always went to a coffee shop called
Central Perk.
***
The iconic television series “Happy
Days” was set in the 1950s and revolved
around a small-town family, the
Cunninghams. Ron Howard (born
1954) starred as teenager Richie
Cunningham.
***
The father was named Howard, the
mother was Marian and the sister was
Joanie. Can you name their cool,
leather-jacket wearing friend? Can you
name the restaurant that was the kid’s
hangout? Remember the theme song?
See answers at end.
***
Actor Henry Winkler (born 1945) has
written fictional books for children that
deal with the topic of dyslexia. Winkler
suffered from dyslexia as a child.
***
Dyslexia is a general term for learning
difficulties in reading or interpreting
words, letters and symbols. The word is
derived from the Greek word “dys,”
meaning poor or inadequate, and
“lexis,” meaning word or language.
***
Some celebrities that were dyslexic as
children were Tom Cruise (born 1962),
Danny Glover (born 1947), Jay Leno
(born 1950) and Cher (born 1946).
Answer: The cool friend was Fonzie,
played by Henry Winkler. Fonzie’s full
name was Arthur Fonzerelli. The name
of the restaurant was Arnold’s. The
theme song was “Rock Around the
Clock” (1955) recorded by Bill Haley
(1925-1981).
Know It All is by Kerry McArdle. It runs in
the weekend and Wednesday editions of the
Daily Journal. Questions? Comments?
Email knowitall(at)smdailyjournal.com or
call 344-5200 ext. 114.
(Answers tomorrow)
CURRY PANTS EQUATE PARLOR
Yesterday’s
Jumbles:
Answer: The novice mountain climber needed to —
LEARN THE ROPES
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
RIGEM
RUBBL
JOANID
NIVTEN
©2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
All Rights Reserved.
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Ans.
here:
Game show host Wink Martindale is 80. Pop singer Freddy
Cannon is 77. Actor-producer Max Baer Jr. is 76. Actress
Gemma Jones is 71. Rock musician Bob Mosley (Moby
Grape) is 71. Singer-musician Chris Hillman is 69. Musician
Terry Woods (The Pogues) is 66. Rock singer Southside
Johnny Lyon is 65. Rock musician Gary Rossington (Lynyrd
Skynyrd; the Rossington Collins Band) is 62. Actress
Patricia Wettig is 62. Actor Tony Todd is 59. Jazz singer
Cassandra Wilson is 58. Country musician Brian Prout
(Diamond Rio) is 58. Rock musician Bob Griffin (The
BoDeans) is 54.
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are Big Ben ,No.4,
in first place; Gorgeous George, No. 8, in second
place; and Solid Gold, No. 10, in third place. The
race time was clocked at 1:49.68.
6 9 4
7 12 41 44 59 3
Mega number
Dec. 3 Mega Millions
5 26 44 45 57 29
Powerball
Nov. 30 Powerball
10 16 17 26 35
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
5 6 2 7
Daily Four
4 1 6
Daily three evening
2 11 13 16 22 23
Mega number
Nov. 30 Super Lotto Plus
3
Wednesday • Dec. 4, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
these
outstanding
Events!
Coming
to you
soon
San Mateo County Event Center
1346 Saratoga Drive, San Mateo
650.574.3247
T
o
A
t
t
e
n
d
Your
Chance
D
o
n
t
m
i
s
s
www.smeventcenter.com – Signup for our SMCEC newsletter and enter for a chance to win Free Admission and Parking to shows!
Real Estate Auction
December 10 & December 31
Registration starts at 12:00 p.m.
Auction starts at 1:00 p.m.
Cypress Hall
Free Admission
www.auction.com
Northern California
Volleyball Association
December 14 & December 15
For information call (415)550-7582
or email vball@ncva.com
www.ncvacom
REDWOOD CITY
Burglary. Two guns, a specialty knife, 300
rounds of ammo and cash were stolen from a
home on East Bayshore Road before 8:28
a.m. Tuesday, Nov. 26.
Disturbance. Loud talking and laughter
was coming from a parking lot on Marshall
Street before 12:47 a.m. Monday, Nov. 25.
Vandalism. Gang graffiti was sprayed on a
fence on Sprint Street before 9:29 a.m.
Monday, Nov. 25.
Disturbance. Aperson threw rocks at pass-
ing trains on Brewster Avenue and Arguello
Street before 9:54 a.m. Sunday, Nov. 25.
Accident. A bicyclist suffered a cut above
their eye after an accident occurred involv-
ing a silver Lexus on Whipple Avenue and El
Camino Real before 1:51 p.m. Monday,
Nov. 25
Petty theft. Ared backpack was stolen on
Middlefield Road before 2:50 p.m. Monday,
Nov. 25.
SAN BRUNO
Vandalism. Gang graffiti was painted on to
the side of a building on the 1100 block of
San Mateo Avenue Monday, Nov. 25.
Vandalism. Gang graffiti was painted on to
the bridge at the intersection of First and
Angus avenues before 11:54 a.m. Monday,
Nov. 25.
Vandalism. Graffiti was reported on the
300 block of Amador Avenue before 8:23
a.m. Monday, Nov. 25.
Petty theft. Aman was arrested for stealing
$256 on the 1100 block of El Camino Real
before 2:16 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 24.
Vandalism. Gang graffiti was painted on
the rear of a building on the 900 block of
San Mateo Avenue before 4:19 a.m. Sunday,
Nov. 24.
Police reports
They’re gonna clean up this city
Two young children were sweeping the
streets on McGarvey Avenue and
Alameda de las Pulgas in Redwood City
before 11:52 p.m. Monday, Nov. 25.
By Chris Cooney
BAY CITY NEWS SERVICE
Travel at San Francisco International
Airport just got a lot more cuddly thanks to
a team of therapy dogs who began interact-
ing with passengers at the Bay Area’s
busiest airport yesterday.
The Wag Brigade, a new branch of the
San Francisco SPCA’s Animal Assisted
Therapy Program, brings nine certified
therapy dogs and their volunteer owners to
SFO’s check-in areas, terminals and gates
to spread a little four-legged affection to
passengers feeling the stress of holiday
travel.
Petting a dog for just a couple of minutes
has been proven to lower a person’s heart
rate, relieve anxiety and reduce stress,
according to the SPCA.
The three therapy dogs who launched
SFO’s Wag Brigade have been regular visi-
tors to Bay Area hospitals, rehabilitation
centers and youth facilities.
“These are pooches that have very high
credentials,” SFO spokesman Doug Yakel
said.
“Jenna,” a 6-year-old white curly-haired
cockapoo whose full name is “Lady Jenna
Barbara,” frequently visits hospitals to
snuggle with patients, and loves children,
according to her owner, Fabio Giuntarelli.
“She’s very cuddly,” Giuntarelli said.
“She has a good, mellow temperament and
I want to share her qualities with people.”
During a test visit through SFO on
Monday, Giuntarelli said several passen-
gers flocked to Jenna for a few quick pats,
some of them saying that they missed their
own dogs at home.
“She’s a total babe magnet,” he said.
Another member of the Wag Brigade
named “Toby,” a lanky 3-year-old golden-
doodle with a broad smile, wasn’t a perfect
fit for hospital visits because he occasion-
ally drooled on patients, according to
owner Shari Marks.
However, Toby has become a big favorite
among students of all ages at Bay Area
schools, Marks said. This week, he’s
scheduled to go to the California College
of the Arts to interact with students who are
studying for finals.
“He’s totally mellow and incredibly well-
trained,” Marks said with Toby panting at
her side. “The kids love him.”
At least one of the Wag Brigade dogs will
be touring the airport seven days a week
during peak times through the holidays,
Yakel said.
The dogs vary in size, but each will be
wearing a gray vest that says “Pet Me!” and
has the dog’s name on the back.
If the Wag Brigade program goes well,
there is a possibility that it will continue
after the holidays, Yakel said.
“The goal is to have it running all year, ”
he said.
Wag Brigade therapy dogs come to SFO
NICK ROSE/DAILY JOURNAL
Shari Marks gets kisses from Toby, a 3-year-old golden-doodle, who is part of a therapy dog
team that began interacting with passengers at San Francisco International Airport yesterday.
4
Wednesday • Dec. 4, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
Masked gunman robs liquor store
A South San Francisco liquor store was robbed by a
masked gunman Monday night.
Aman brandished a black revolver while confronting the
store clerk at D&M Liquor on 211 Spruce Ave. around 10:47
p.m., according to the South San Francisco Police
Department.
The robber took an undisclosed amount of cash then fled
the scene on foot, according to police. The suspect is
described as in his early 20s, standing between 5 feet 10
inches to 6 feet tall and weighing approximately 200
pounds. At the time of the crime, the suspect was wearing a
black mask, black hooded sweatshirt, jeans and dark tennis
shoes, according to police.
Anyone with information regarding the crime should call
the South San Francisco Police Department at (650) 877-
8900.
Pregnant woman robbed of smartphone
Aman stole a pregnant woman’s iPhone Sunday Dec. 1, at
the Kaiser Hospital in South San Francisco, according to
the South San Francisco Police Department.
The woman was sitting alone in the main lobby around
2:37 p.m., when a man grabbed her phone from her hands
and fled through the northern part of the hospital next to El
Camino Real. The man is described as having medium to
light complexion, is approximately 5 feet 8 inches tall
with a thin to medium build and was wearing jeans, a dark
jacket and black shoes at the time of the crime.
Anyone with information regarding the incident should
contact the South San Francisco Police Department at (650)
877-8900.
Equity office sold for $66.5M
Equity Office has sold its 14-story high rise near down-
town San Mateo to real estate investment firm Romel
Enterprises for $66.5 million.
Romel is an existing tenant in the 130,000-square-foot
building at 400 S. El Camino Real. The sale reportedly
occurred last week and comes on the heels of Equity also
selling properties in San Jose.
The San Mateo property includes a parking garage and is
near Central Park. The tower is one of the city’s rare tall
buildings on El Camino Real.
Local briefs
By Angela Swartz
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Two new tenants may soon be join-
ing the commercial building at 1395
El Camino Real in Millbrae, the for-
mer home to Shaw’s Candy.
The Little Gym franchise and
Tutoring Club got the go-ahead to
move forward with plans to open since
the Millbrae Planning Commission
unanimously approved the conditional
use permits at its Monday night meet-
ing. Openings could be in early
spring, if not sooner, said Zeden
Jones, a consultant working with the
new The Little Gym.
The 22,000-square-foot space on the
corner of El Camino Real and
Millwood Drive was originally con-
structed in the 1950s as a candy facto-
ry, but closed due to leasing issues in
2010, according to a staff report. The
current owner, Carl Chen, purchased
the property thereafter and has com-
pleted major renovation of the build-
ing site, including parking, landscap-
ing and signs and is in the process of
leasing it out. The Sherwin Williams
on site will stay in place, Jones said.
The Planning Commission initially
had concerns about the parking associ-
ated with the new businesses coming
in to the space. This was addressed
with the modification of an approved
conditional use permit for the plaza
which called for reduced parking, said
Planning Commissioner Jean Joh.
“They tried to alleviate the parking
issue and addressed that,” she said.
“They are businesses without too much
traffic or parking problems.”
The Little Gym is relocating from its
existing location at 979 Broadway, as
it wanted a larger facility for its indoor
recreation, Jones said. The children’s
gymnasium and physical development
center is for those age 4 months to 12
years old. Average class attendance is
about 10 to 16 per class, the staff
report stated.
The Little Gym would occupy a
5,159-square-foot space and operate
9 a.m.-noon, along with 3 p.m.-
7:30 p.m. Monday through Friday,
according to the report. It would
also have hours Saturday and Sunday
from 8 a.m.-7 p.m., with parties
from varying times on each day,
according to the report.
Meanwhile, the Tutoring Club is a
franchise based in San Francisco and
offers an educational tutoring service
to grades kindergarten through 12th-
grade. Its new Millbrae location would
take up 2,100 square feet of the plaza.
It would be open 3 p.m.-6 p.m.
Monday through Friday and 10 a.m.-1
p.m. on Saturdays during the school
year. During the summer, it would be
open 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Monday through
Thursday. Average attendance per class
is 15 to 18 students with six to seven
tutors onsite most times, according to
the report.
Two new businesses filling Shaw’s Plaza
ANGELA SWARTZ/DAILY JOURNAL
The Little Gym and Tutoring Club will be two new businesses in the former Shaw’s
Candy factory space in Millbrae.
5
Wednesday • Dec. 4, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
Winter Holiday Promotions
Beauty & Skin Care
- Slgnature lydratlng laclal $38/90min (Reg:$68)
- lydra0ermabraslon lull Jreatment (lncludes eyes,
neck 8 shoulders) $69/90min (Reg.$138 50% of)
Spa Packages
- Aroma laclal (60mln) 8 Aromatherapy Vassage (60mln)
$88/120min (Reg.$146)
- le Juln ßody Salt Scrub (30 mln) Vud wraps (30mln) 8
Vassage (60mln) $99/120mln (Reg.$198 50% of)
We carry SOSKIN (Made in France)
Skin Care Products for Holidays on Sale 20% Of
L sal on & col or gr oup
2 2 3 S o u t h S a n Ma t e o Dr i v e
S a n Ma t e o , CA 9 4 4 0 1
Te l e p h o n e 6 5 0 . 3 4 2 . 6 6 6 8
www. l s a l o n . c o m
STATE GOVERNMENT
• Covered California enroll-
ment counselors will be at the South
San Francisco Public Library,
840 W. Orange Ave., to assist indi-
viduals in learning about their health
coverage options as well as enroll-
ment 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Dec. 7 and Dec.
14.
Bring current income of all family members including tax
return, W-2, recent pay stubs, legal resident card or
Certificate of Naturalized Citizenship, copy of U.S. citizen-
ship and residency status and a copy of a Social Security
card and date of birth for each family member in the house-
hold.
CITY GOVERNMENT
• The Belmont City Council designated its portion of
the San Juan Canyon as parkland by proceeding with fis-
cal improvements at a meeting last week.
In 2009, the city purchased 35 acres in the canyon for
$1.5 million and created a new zoning designation to pro-
tect it as open space in October. The city sold 8 acres for $2
million with the stipulation that six needed to be main-
tained as open space.
With councilmembers fearful that the land could be
rezoned or sold off in the future, they tasked the Parks and
Recreation Department to outline ways to identify it as
parkland in an attempt to safeguard it as permanent open
space.
The majority of the department’s recommendations were
approved, including developing a trail map and installing
trailhead signage, an informational kiosk and benches,
said Parks and Recreation Department Director
Jonathan Gervais.
Trailhead signage will be placed on the publicly accessi-
ble Steep, Sugarloaf Spur and Saddle trails.
However, Saddle Trail will have to wait for signage until the
nearby residential development is completed, Gervais said.
The interpretive program that would include guided hikes
and informative panels will be held for further considera-
tion during the city’s next budget cycle, Gervais said.
6
Wednesday • Dec. 4, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
Michael Anthony Bregante
Michael Anthony Bregante, 56, of San
Carlos died unexpectedly Nov. 27, 2013.
Born Aug. 7, 1957, in
San Francisco to
Georgia and late
Augustine (Gus)
Bregante. In 1976, Mike
met the love of his life,
Debbie, to whom he was
happily married for 30
years. His greatest joys
were his daughters,
Jennifer and Lisa. He was a devoted father,
husband, son and friend. His charismatic
nature was such that everyone who met
him loved him.
Mike worked at AAA for 32 years before
his retirement in 2012 and went from entry
level to market president of Northern
California, Nevada and Utah. He was
known for his inspirational leadership and
integrity.
“He’s remembered for his compassionate
soul, kind heart, great sense of humor and
sharp wit, which truly made our world
brighter. ”
Mike leaves behind wife Debbie, daugh-
ters Jennifer and Lisa, future son-in-law
Steve Beyers, mother Georgia, father-in-
law Al (Laura) Parmisano, Aunt Lou
Bregante, Uncle Angelo Zervas and mem-
bers of the Parmisano, Zervas, Caruso and
Balestrieri families.
Services are 10 a.m. Friday, Dec. 6 at
Saint Charles (880 Tamarack Ave., San
Carlos), followed by a celebration of life
and then burial at Holy Cross Cemetery.
In lieu of flowers, contributions in
Mike’s memory may be made to the
Nicholas Colby Fund at
http://www.nicholascolbyfund.org, the
American Heart Association or any other
organization of your choice.
Robert ‘Bob’ Rebolini
Robert “Bob” Rebolini, a native San
Franciscan, died peacefully at his home in
Millbrae Dec. 1, 2013, at age 80.
He is survived by his beloved wife
Virginia of 58 years; his loving children
Robert (Bonnie) Rebolini, Ron Rebolini
and Terri (Richard) Montoya. He also
leaves behind many happy memories for
his cherished grandchildren, Erica
Rebolini and Richard and Nicole Montoya.
They brought much joy to his life. He was
also the dear brother of the late Theresa
Cistulli. Bob is also survived by many
nieces and nephews.
“He will be sorely missed.”
He was a graduate of the last class of
Commerce High School, and served in the
U.S. Army during the Korean War. Bob
retired after 40 years with PG&E. His
favorite past times were golf and social
events with his buddies. He was a member
of the Old Timers, Friends of Marino
Pieretti and the SOBs.
Friends and family may visit beginning
9 a.m. Friday, Dec. 6 at the Chapel of the
Highlands, 194 Millwood Drive at El
Camino Real in Millbrae, then to the
Italian Cemetery in Colma for a Liturgy
Service at 11 a.m. with a committal to fol-
low.
In lieu of flowers, donations to your
favorite charity are preferred.
Luisa Maria Bascaran Grodzicki
Luisa Maria Bascaran Grodzicki, born
March 22, 1912, died peacefully in
Belmont Nov. 17, 2013.
She is survived by her
three children Charles
(Winnie), Mary Ann
(Bill), and Michael
(Deborah), four grand-
children, five great-
grandchildren and many
nieces and nephews. She
was predeceased by her
husband Carlos in 1999.
She was born in northern Luzon,
Philippines, on a hemp plantation and was
of Spanish/Basque descent.
During the devastation of World War II,
Carlos and Luisa struggled in Manila with
their two toddlers, yet survived the deaths
of family and friends during the war.
The family began a new life in 1956,
immigrating to Vancouver, Canada. In
1963, Carlos, Luisa and Michael settled in
San Francisco.
“Nothing gave Luisa more satisfaction
than helping her children and grandchil-
dren and seeing them prosper in the United
States and Canada. She was the emotional
backbone of her family. ”
The family would like to thank staff of
the Carlmont Gardens Nursing Home and
Kaiser Hospice Program for their skillful
and compassionate care. Amemorial mass
will take place Dec. 9 at St. Roberts
Catholic Church in San Bruno.
As a public service, the Daily Journal
prints obituaries of approximately 200
words or less with a photo one time on the
date of the family’s choosing. To submit
obituaries, email information along with a
jpeg photo to news@smdailyjournal.com.
Free obituaries are edited for style, clarity,
length and grammar. If you would like to
have an obituary printed more than once,
longer than 200 words or without editing,
please submit an inquiry to our advertising
department at ads@smdailyjournal.com.
Obituaries
By Angela Swartz
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Hillsdale High School is marrying real
world architecture skills with students in the
classroom.
Hillsdale teacher Melissa Poblete’s junior
and senior English classes are designing
their own versions of a new two-story, 20-
classroom wing that will soon be added to the
school to address growth. At the same time,
the administration and Quattrocchi Kwok
Architects are making plans for the wing. It
will likely contain science classrooms and
labs, world language classes, some office
spaces, outdoor learning areas and a day care.
Students attend design committee meetings
and give their own feedback on the plans.
“Whenever schools can include students in
‘real life’ career experiences, they provide an
opportunity for them to grow personally and
professionally,” said Liz McManus, associ-
ate superintendent of business services for
the San Mateo Union High School District,
in an email. “The district sees these situa-
tions as incredible opportunities and may
impact our students’ decisions with career
choices.”
Students in teams of about six will present
their own graphic design plans Dec. 11 to a
panel of experts made up of Quattrocchi
Kwok Architects and architects from other
firms. Students are also incorporated writing
into the project, with arguments supporting
their plans. Quattrocchi Kwok Architects will
take the students’ ideas into consideration for
their own plans.
“It gives students some input,” said junior
Dylan Sievert, who is in one of Poblete’s
classes. “It’s a huge respect thing. We’re
being treated more as equals than in the
past.”
Other students in Poblete’s classes like
junior Carolyn Siu said she looked into dif-
ferent styles of learning that could be incor-
porated into the building through the project
and enjoyed expressing her views on learn-
ing styles. Fellow junior Ryan Fong is inter-
ested in architecture and said it’s really cool
to be doing something that makes an impact.
Principal Jeff Gilbert said it’s important to
try to have students invested in their schools
and any time you give students a voice in
shaping the school environment it engages
them in the school. He also says exposure to
professionals sets a good example for the
students.
“High schools have to work really hard to
make sure relationships are attended to,” he
said. “When students are brought into the
place, there’s much better learning.
Curriculum is always more effective when it’s
real and goes beyond the abstract.”
Mark Quattrocchi, principal at Quattrocchi
Kwok Architects, said his firm asks schools
if it can meet with students in any design
project.
“I happened to run across Melissa (Poblete)
and I started chatting with her,” he said. “She
wanted to turn it into a real world example of
project-based learning. It’s a great example
of 21st-century learning skills teachers are
trying to use.”
The building is set to open in fall 2016.
angela@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 105
Students help design new wing
Hillsdale High School upperclassmen
are contributing to architect’s plans
Comment on
or share this story at
www.smdailyjournal.com
LOCAL/STATE/NATION 7
Wednesday • Dec. 4, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The seeds for a community garden in
San Carlos — namely, the desire for
such a public space — may be in place
but actually finding a suitable and avail-
able space could determine if the idea
actually takes root.
“We really need a vacant lot some-
where but no one knows where that
might be,” said former mayor Tom
Davids who is also president of the
Civic Garden Club of San Carlos.
Davids said the suggestion of a com-
munity garden goes way back, maybe
15 to 20 years, but that backers could
never pin down a satisfactory spot.
“I’m not sure there is such a space but
we’ll see if we can carve out an area,”
Davids said.
The city’s Parks, Recreation and
Culture Commission will take up the
idea at its Wednesday night meeting.
The commission will try to zero in on a
potential location with details like size
and costs worked out later, said Parks
and Recreation Director Christine
Boland.
Boland ballparked about $5,000 just
to put a number in the budget with plans
to seek community donations after a
location is set.
Both Boland and Davids think the
city of San Carlos would embrace the
idea of a community garden. Those who
live in apartments and condominiums
could particularly support the idea,
Boland said.
Such a garden would be a place to
grow community — along with what is
actually planted in the ground — and
appeal to both those with an existing
green thumb and those who would like
to learn, Davids said.
He’d also like to make the communi-
ty garden part of the garden club’s agen-
da and responsibility.
But first up is finding the place to
make that happen.
The best possibility would be vacant
public land, per-
haps adjacent to a
park or in the rail-
road right-of-way,
because it would
be better suited for
a long-term com-
mitment in com-
parison to a pri-
vate lot whose
owners may favor
other uses in the
future, Davids
said.
Actual size
remains up in the air — largely depend-
ent upon availability — but Davids
would like to see a dozen or so plots to
encourage greater community participa-
tion.
“Whatever works, works,” he said.
If San Carlos is successful, the garden
will be in good company. San Mateo
County has 15 community gardens and
more than 50 percent of the county’s
public schools also have gardens,
according to Get Healthy San Mateo
County.
The San Carlos Parks, Recreation and
Culture Commission meets 7 p.m.
Wednesday, Dec. 4 at City Hall, 600
Elm St., San Carlos.
City may plant seeds for community garden
Union official says NYC train engineer ‘nodded’
YONKERS, N.Y. — An engineer whose speeding commuter
train ran off the rails along a curve, killing four people, nod-
ded at the controls just before the wreck, and by the time he
caught himself it was too late, a union official said Tuesday.
William Rockefeller “basically nodded,” said Anthony
Bottalico, leader of the rail employees union, relating what
he said the engineer told him.
“He had the equivalent of what we all have when we drive a
car,” Bottalico said. “That is, you sometimes have a momen-
tary nod or whatever that might be. How long that lasts, I
can’t answer that.”
Rockefeller’s lawyer did not return calls. During a late-
afternoon news conference, federal investigators said they
were still talking to Rockefeller, and they wouldn’t comment
on his level of alertness around the time of the Sunday morn-
ing wreck in the Bronx.
Illinois Legislature OKs fix for $100B pension crisis
SPRINGFIELD, Ill. — The Illinois Legislature approved a
historic plan Tuesday to eliminate the state’s $100 billion
pension shortfall, a long-delayed decision proponents
described as critical to repairing the state’s deeply troubled
finances but that faces the immediate threat of a legal chal-
lenge from labor unions.
The House voted 62-53 in favor of the plan, which makes
deep cuts in state employees’ retirement benefits, minutes
after it was approved by a more union-friendly Senate, 30-
24. Both chambers are controlled by Democrats, traditional
allies of the unions.
Judge: Detroit can use bankruptcy to confront debt
DETROIT — Afederal judge ruled Tuesday that Detroit can
use bankruptcy to cut employee pensions and relieve itself
of other crushing debts, handing a defeat to the city’s unions
and retirees and shifting the case into a delicate new phase.
Judge Steven Rhodes, who wondered aloud why the bank-
ruptcy had not happened years ago, said pensions can be
altered just like any contract because the Michigan
Constitution does not offer bulletproof protection for
employee benefits.
Around the nation
By Alicia A. Caldwell
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — With the advent of
3-D printers capable of producing plas-
tic weapons, the House voted Tuesday to
renew a 25-year-old prohibition against
firearms that can evade metal detectors
and X-ray machines.
A bipartisan bill extending the
Undetectable Firearms Act was passed
on a voice vote, a first for gun legisla-
tion since last year’s massacre at a
Connecticut elementary school.
The Senate is expected to act on the
legislation when it returns from a two-
week Thanksgiving recess next
Monday, a day before the current law
expires.
Sen. Charles Schumer, D-N.Y., said he
and others will try then to add a new
requirement that at least one component
of the firing mechanism contain enough
metal to be detectable in a magnetome-
ter and also be undetachable. But with
the National Rifle Association opposed
to any change in the statute and many
Democrats eager to avoid a new fight
over gun controls going into an elec-
tion year, the Senate is more likely to
just pass the House version unamended.
The House bill only requires that a plas-
tic gun have some piece of metal in or
on it, but it can be removable and does-
n’t have to be used to fire the weapon.
“The House bill is better than noth-
ing, but not by much,” Schumer said
Tuesday. “It’s certainly not enough.”
Schumber said plastic guns were “the
thing of science fiction” when the ban
was first passed in 1988 but such
weapons are now a worrisome reality.
Brian Malte, a director of the Brady
Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence, said
his group’s worries about the availabili-
ty of plastic guns are “no reason to hold
up renewal.”
The use of 3-D printers to manufacture
guns received heightened attention in
May when Cody Wilson, then a
University of Texas law student, posted
blueprints online for using the printers
to make the Liberator pistol, which he
says he designed. Wilson, founder of
Defense Distributed, a nonprofit that
advocates the free distribution of infor-
mation on 3-D printed weapons, was
ordered by the State Department to take
down the instructions after two days
because of allegedly violating arms
export controls, he said.
By then, the plans had already been
downloaded more than 100,000 times
and they remain available on file-shar-
ing websites, he said.
“If you want to do this, it’s plainly
obvious there’s no one standing
between you, your computer and your 3-
D printer. Anyone can make this gun,”
Wilson said Monday.
House votes to renew all-plastic gun ban
“If you want to do this, it’s plainly
obvious there’s no one standing between you, your
computer and your 3-D printer. Anyone can make this gun.”
— Cody Wilson
LOCAL/STATE/NATION 8
Wednesday • Dec. 4, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Terry Collins
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
OAKLAND — San Francisco Bay
Area Rapid Transit’s two largest
unions filed a lawsuit Tuesday
against the agency, claiming its
board of directors broke state law
when it approved a contract with-
out a key provision.
Members of Amalgamated
Transit Union Local 1555 and
Service Employees International
Union Local 1021 filed the suit in
Alameda County Superior Court
less than two weeks after BART’s
board approved a new labor deal
but stripped a Family Medical
Leave Act provision that the
unions and the agency’s top nego-
tiators signed off on during con-
tentious talks to end a strike in
October.
The unions say the lawsuit will
not affect train service for the
nation’s fifth-largest commuter rail
service with an average weekday
ridership of 400,000, but they’re
asking the court to force BART t o
honor the full contract the parties
all agreed to. The attorneys say the
BART board’s vote is unprecedent-
ed as it cannot “cherry-pick” which
provisions it wants to honor with
a “take-it-or-leave it” attitude.
BART officials say the family
leave provision had been inadver-
tently included in the tentative
contract due to an error by a tempo-
rary employee, which led the board
to approve the contract, minus the
provision.
Democrats prominent
in race for Assembly seat
SACRAMENTO — ADemocrat is
all but certain to win a special
election for a vacant Southern
California legislative seat, bol-
stering the party’s supermajority
in the state Assembly.
The question is whether the out-
come will be decided in Tuesday’s
primary or will stretch to a Feb. 4
special runoff election.
Three Democrats are seeking to
fill the Assembly District 54 seat
vacated this summer when then-
Assemblywoman Holly Mitchell,
a Democrat, resigned after she was
elected to the state Senate. Afourth
candidate with no political affilia-
tion qualified to run as a write-in.
Cold snap felt across
western half of nation
HELENA, Mont. — An icy
blast of arctic air sent tempera-
tures plunging as much as 40
degrees below normal Tuesday
across the western half of the
nation soon after a storm
snarled roads in the Rockies and
threatened citrus crops in
California.
The cold snap was expected to
spread as far south as Texas by the
weekend before turning east,
AccuWeather meteorologist Tom
Kines said.
BART unions sue over contract
By Jule Pace
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Seeking to
regroup from his health care law’s
disastrous rollout, President
Barack Obama on Tuesday insisted
that the sweeping overhaul is
working and warned Republican
critics that he would fight any
efforts to strip away its protec-
tions.
“We’re not repealing it as long
as I’m president,” Obama said dur-
ing a health care event at the
White House. “If I have to fight
another three years to make sure
this law works, then that’s what
I’ll do.”
Earlier Tuesday, the administra-
tion released a 50-state report say-
ing that nearly 1.5 million people
were found eli-
gible for
Medicaid during
October. As
website prob-
lems depressed
sign-ups for
subsidized pri-
vate coverage,
that safety-net
program for
low-income people saw a nearly
16 percent increase in states that
have agreed to expand it, accord-
ing to the Department of Health
and Human Services.
The White House is trying to
cast the health care law in a posi-
tive light after the first two
months of enrollment for the cen-
terpiece insurance exchanges were
marred with technical problems.
With the majority of problems
with the sign-up website resolved,
by the accounting of administra-
tion officials, Obama and his team
plan to spend much of December
trying to remind Americans why
the administration fought for the
law in the first place.
“We believe that in America,
nobody should have to worry
about going broke because some-
body in their family or they got
sick,” Obama said, flanked by peo-
ple the White House says have
benefited from the law.
Despite Obama’s sunny presen-
tation, officials are furiously
working behind the scenes to rec-
tify an unresolved issue with
enrollment data that could become
a significant headache after the
first of the year.
Obama: Health care law is working
By Stephen Ohlemacher
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Government
subsidies to help Americans buy
insurance under the health care
overhaul may be vulnerable to
fraud, a Treasury Department
watchdog warned on Tuesday in the
latest indication that troubles are
far from over for President Barack
Obama’s signature legislation.
The rollout of the law has been
hurt by canceled policies and
problems with the federal website
used by people to enroll in health
plans, causing political headaches
for the White House and for
Democrats in Congress. The new
problems concern subsidies that
are available to low- and medium-
income people who buy insurance
through state-based exchanges
that opened in October.
Those subsidies are administered
by the Internal Revenue Service in
the form of tax credits, and that’s
where the trouble arises.
“The IRS’ existing fraud detec-
tion system may not be capable of
identifying (Affordable Care Act)
refund fraud or schemes prior to the
issuance of tax return refunds,”
said the report by J. Russell
George, the Treasury inspector
general for tax administration.
“The IRS reported that the long-
term limitations of its existing
fraud detection system include its
inability to keep pace with
increasing levels of fraud,” the
report said.
Audit: Health care subsidies vulnerable to fraud
Around the state
Barack Obama
OPINION 9
Wednesday • Dec. 4, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Saints and sinners
Editor,
What’s in a name? The Daily
Journal reported in the Dec. 3 brief
item “Sacramento atheists spark
debate with billboards” that a group
of Sacramento atheists have pur-
chased billboard space to let the
world know a person can be “good
without God.” The name of the
spokeswoman for the atheists is Judy
Saint. No kidding.
James O. Clifford Sr.
Redwood City
Obamacare
Editor,
After reading Sue Lempert’s column
“Young, healthy and uninsured” in the
Dec. 2 edition of the Daily Journal, I
can see she is still out in left field.
I agree with trying to offer afford-
able health insurance to everyone in
this country; Obamacare does not
offer this. If she had really looked
into some of the health plans, she
will see that they are not affordable
and ones that are have very high
deductibles. Some companies have
already dropped some of their
employees because of Obamacare and
I’m one of them. Anyone who thinks
that we can find an insurance plan that
is just as good, or better, has been
hoodwinked.
I’m sure Sue Lempert has her health
safety net being Medicare, but not all
of us are at that age. I have a couple
of years to get Medicare and hope to
get insured. You see, I’m not young,
healthy and insured. I’m a baby
boomer and uninsured because of
Obamacare.
President Obama did not do any-
thing to tackle the problem with our
health care system in this country.
Obamacare will not bring cost down
for anyone and that has to be correct-
ed. If you want socialized health care
maybe one should live in a socialized
country. I’m just wondering what
health care plan President Obama
chose for his family from Obamacare.
Linda Medrano
San Mateo
Presidents Clinton
and Obama on nuclear deals
Editor,
President Clinton once promised
the American people he would negoti-
ate with North Korea and vowed he
would never let them get the nuclear
bomb. Look what happened then.
Now President Obama is appeasing
Iran’s wish for an end to sanctions
and all they have to do is delay their
quest for nuclear weapons. It’s almost
as if he is telling them “If you like
your nuclear bombs, you can keep
them.”
Scott Abramson
San Mateo
Iran
Editor,
Let’s stop playing games and look
at the real world. Your readers who
wish us to perceive Iran as just anoth-
er peace loving country that wants
nuclear power to run its growing
economy take us for fools.
With all the oil that Iran has, why
would they be spending billions of
dollars and sacrificing their economy
and citizens’ welfare from sanctions?
The answer should be obvious. Their
goal is to become a nuclear military
power. With that capability, they can
threaten the entire world just as North
Korea does. Why do two enemies like
Israel and Saudi Arabia fear a nuclear
Iran? Iran has armed Hezbollah terror-
ists in Lebanon and aggravated an
already sectarian conflict. She is arm-
ing Hamas in Gaza, causing conflict
with Egypt and the Palestinian
Authority as well as Israel. She is
actively assisting the Assad regime in
Syria. Moreover, Iran has declared its
intent to wipe Israel off the map. Iran
has been implicated in the bombing
of a Jewish community center in
Argentina and an assassination
attempt of a Saudi diplomat. Iran is a
bad actor. She is a menace to the
world. Despite having elections she
is a theocracy with the mullahs call-
ing the shots.
So think about this when you see a
letter in the newspaper calling for fair
treatment of Iran. It’s not a game
where we have a set of rules. This is a
matter of world security and we can-
not ignore Iran’s conduct on the world
stage.
Gil Stein
Aptos
Letters to the editor
T
his past Saturday was Small
Business Saturday, an move-
ment sponsored by American
Express to celebrate and promote
small businesses.
The idea, of course, is to highlight
what makes small mom-and-pop busi-
nesses unique and special and to
encourage us to avoid the Internet and
large chain businesses for our holiday
shopping needs.
It’s an idea we can support, despite
its obvious ties to a large corporate
credit card company, but one we ques-
tion should have a specific day tied to
it.
Why? Because every day should be
about small businesses. And we don’t
just say this because the Daily Journal
is a small, locally-owned business.
OK, maybe a little. But we do have a
large appreciation for locally-owned,
independent businesses not just
because they are like us, but rather
because they are cool.
You can go anywhere in the United
States, the world even, and shop at a
Gap or Ann Taylor. But local shops
only found here in San Mateo County
have many of the same styles and
even items you can’t find anywhere
(or everywhere else). Example:
Downtown San Mateo is known for
its lack of chains and that’s because
of its proximity to both the Hillsdale
Shopping Center and Burlingame
Avenue. That has been seen as a hin-
drance, but really, it’s an asset. There
are a number of unique and interesting
shops with a large variety of hard-to-
find items found just by walking down
the street. And there are a large num-
ber of restaurants in case you get hun-
gry looking for that perfect gift. So
why just limit the support for small
businesses to this past Saturday? You
can do it every day.
And just to be clear, we are not
bashing the chains at the Hillsdale
Shopping Center or Burlingame
Avenue. Hillsdale is locally owned
and the tax revenue it generates helps
fund city services. Burlingame Avenue
is also a large revenue producer for
Burlingame and that tax money goes
to fund street repairs, libraries, parks
and public safety.
Even the Internet is an option for
local businesses. Most small busi-
nesses have Internet sites you can
visit for convenience and, if the gift
is not quite right, a local storefront
available for exchanges or returns.
So while we hope you got out this
Saturday to support a local business,
we also hope it’s something you do
all the time. The Internet is conven-
ient, but so is walking to a local shop
and seeing what may pique your inter-
est. You may find something unique,
support a local business, keep your
tax revenue local and maybe even
meet a cool shop owner who will
remember your face. Maybe even your
name.
And that’s worth it right there.
Shop local every day
Holiday karma
“T
he more wealth we have, such as friends,
skills, libraries, wilderness and afternoon
naps, the less money we need in order to be
happy.” — John DE Graaf, author of “Affluenza.”
Did you see on TV news broadcasts all of the shoppers
who were squeezing into the stores on Black Friday, the
day after Thanksgiving? “Like a hungry pack of wolves,”
as one commentator described it. “Capitalism at its
height,” he continued. “Credit cards burning hot in their
pockets.”
It’s obscene how the holiday season has become a shop-
ping orgy. When you think about those who have lost
their jobs, their homes and even some who have to make
do with less Supplemental Nutritional Assistance (food
stamps) because of the ridiculous government sequester, it
boggles the mind that so many others can sashay through
Nordstrom or Walmart purchasing gifts for themselves and
people that have everything without shame or guilt and
without feeling exploited and used by giant corporations
that are only concerned
with padding their bottom
line. Santa Claus has
become their shill and it
seems that many people are
mindlessly caught up in the
hype.
Tension is high! This
year there is less time
between Thanksgiving and
Christmas for shoppers to
spend their money! Heaven
forbid! Stock market ana-
lysts hover over sales
reports like anxious
Scrooges. The spirit of the
season — religious or not — gets lost in the shuffle. A
time traditionally celebrated with warm hearths, warm
hearts, family closeness and love has become an orgy of
consumerism. Corporate interests are thrilled, of course.
What more than a cock-eyed bunch of shoppers excites
them and sends them giggling to the bank? As Piero
Ferrucci wrote in his wonderful book, “The Power of
Kindness,” many of us have lost contact with our soul and
are fleeing toward the chimera of consumerism, or else are
lost in a fog of depression.”
There are many gifts that we can bestow upon our loved
ones that cost nothing but contribute greatly to the quali-
ty of life all year long. How about time? If we were to use
the time and energy with our families that is normally
used for shopping and wrapping gifts and searching for
the perfect decorations, think of the possibilities! First,
the decrease in stress would benefit everyone. Add more
time to create projects together, contemplate life, play
games or just enjoy each other’s company.
How do we justify thinking that we are so entitled when
there are many people in this country and the world who
do not have enough food or a decent place to live? How
much stuff do we think we have to have before we feel
secure or satisfied or superior? All of this sacrifice on the
altar of corporate interests is a huge indication of a gnaw-
ing emptiness within those consumers who never seem to
have enough.
As Ferrucci asks: “How can we sit down to eat peacefully
knowing that 15 million children die of hunger or malnu-
trition every year?” Just think how much good could be
accomplished if most of the money spent for gifts that no
one needs were to be contributed to charities devoted to
improving life for those who have very little! Just think
of how much better the karma of whatever we are com-
memorating if we were to create a way to celebrate or
observe without exchanging material gifts. Few see virtue
in prudence, living simply, sacrificing anything for the
good of all or a sense of responsibility to teach our chil-
dren that the good life is not in what you have but in what
you are. Instead, we have self-serving modern vices that
include instant gratification, indulging yourself and get-
ting all you can while the getting’s good.
Instead of spending on gifts for those who have every-
thing, wouldn’t it make more sense to donate generously
to Second Harvest Food Bank, St. Anthony’s Dining
Room, the Philippine Relief Fund or similar? Wouldn’t it
be better to use Christmas as an opportunity to teach the
children by example that having everything is not really
what makes for life satisfaction, but sharing what we have
with others who may be in need? Would that the message
of Christmas would revert to that of the old days when
people felt that they were all in this together and we must
do what we can to generate love, compassion, empathy,
etc.
“Humility is a precious attitude in times such as ours
when waste is the very basis of economic development,
greed a lifestyle and demand for new privileges a social
deity. Those who make do with what they have are often
considered losers. Yet they are the ones most likely to be
serene and happy.” — Ferrucci.
Since 1984, Dorothy Dimitre has written more than 700
columns for various local newspapers. Her email address is
gramsd@aceweb.com.
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BUSINESS 10
Wednesday • Dec. 4, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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I n s u r a n c e S e r v i c e s
Dow 15,914.62 -94.15 10-Yr Bond 2.775 -0.03
Nasdaq 4,037.20 -8.06 Oil (per barrel) 96.76
S&P 500 1,795.15 -5.75 Gold 1,223.50
Stocks that moved substantially or traded heavily Tuesday on the New
York Stock Exchange and the Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
Krispy Kreme Doughnuts Inc., down $4.96 to $19.59
The doughnut chain’s third-quarter net income rose 34 percent, but its
guidance for the upcoming fiscal year was below expectations.
Roundy’s Inc., up 57 cents to $9.06
The grocery store operator bought 11 Dominick’s stores in Chicago from
Safeway Inc. and will convert them to its Mariano’s brand shops.
Nasdaq
Tesla Motors Inc., up $20.53 to $144.70
The electric car maker said a German investigation into fires involving its
Model S sedan found no manufacturer-related defects.
Groupon Inc., up 34 cents to $9.09
The online deal service said that its billings were up 30 percent from a
year ago during the four days after Thanksgiving.
Isle of Capri Casinos Inc., down 18 cents to $7.70
The casino operator returned to a profit in its fiscal second quarter, but
its adjusted results and revenue missed expectations.
Medallion Financial Corp., down $1.54 to $16
The lender for taxi operators will sell 2.9 million shares in a stock offering
to help it offer more loans to its customers.
Good Times Restaurants Inc., up 5 cents to $2.51
The regional hamburger chain said that sales from stores open at least
a year rose 14.1 percent in November.
Unilife Corp., up 69 cents to $4.84
The medical device maker,which is based in York,Penn.,said that it signed
a supply deal with Swiss drugmaker Novartis.
Big movers
By Ken Sweet
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — After eight straight
weeks of gains, the stock market pull-
back long anticipated by investors
may have arrived.
Stocks fell Tuesday, dragged lower
by the Detroit automakers and con-
sumer-focused companies such as
GameStop and Amazon.com. The mar-
ket could be headed for its first weekly
decline since early October, putting at
risk a remarkable rally that has sent
indexes to record highs.
The declines do not come as a sur-
prise to large investors, many of
whom have predicted a pullback. The
Standard & Poor’s 500 index has
surged 26 percent in 2013, on track
for its best year in a decade.
If stocks paused, declined or even
entered a “correction,” a Wall Street
term for when an index falls 10 per-
cent or more, it would be normal after
eight straight weeks of gains.
“The markets may have stalled out
here, but that must be taken in the
context of what has been a great year, ”
said Alec Young, global equity strate-
gist with S&P Capital IQ.
The Dow Jones industrial average
lost 94.15 points, or 0.6 percent, to
15,914.62. The S&P 500 index fell
5.75 points, or 0.3 percent, to
1,795.15 and the Nasdaq composite
fell 8.06 points, or 0.2 percent, to
4, 037. 20.
Companies that depend heavily on
consumer spending had some of the
biggest losses. GameStop, the video
game retailer, sank $1.02, or 2 per-
cent, to $45.95, one of the worst
declines in the S&P 500 index.
Amazon.com fell $7.64, or 2 percent,
to $384.66.
Automakers fell. General Motors
lost 97 cents, or 3 percent, to $38.14.
Ford fell 50 cents, or 3 percent, to
$16.56, despite what auto industry
analysts considered mostly positive
sales reports for November.
The sell-off in auto stocks was a sur-
prise to industry analysts. Chrysler
sales rose 16 percent in November
compared with a year earlier, while
GM and Ford’s sales increased 14 per-
cent and 7 percent, respectively.
Overall, the industry reported a 9 per-
cent year-over-year sales gain.
Investors are waiting for several
economic reports later this week that
could influence whether the Federal
Reserve will pare back its $85 bil-
lion-a-month bond-buying program.
The program is designed to keep
interest rates low and stimulate the
economy.
“When you look at how markets
have performed this year, some
investors may have decided to cash in,
put their feet up and drink eggnog,”
said Lawrence Creatura, a portfolio
manager with Federated Investors.
On Friday, the government will
release its monthly job market survey,
one of the most closely watched indi-
cators of the U.S. economy.
Economists expect that employers
created 180,000 jobs last month
while the unemployment rate
remained steady at 7.2 percent,
according to FactSet, a financial infor-
mation provider.
Investors have seen encouraging
economic news recently. Atrade group
reported Monday that manufacturing
was growing in the U.S. at the fastest
pace in two and a half years. The group
also said factories were hiring at the
quickest rate in 18 months.
A strong economy is good for cor-
porate profits — and stocks — over
the long term. But if the economy is
getting stronger, it means the Fed
could pull back its stimulus, which has
supported financial markets. The Fed’s
huge bond-buying program has been
giving investors an incentive to buy
stocks by making bonds look more
expensive in comparison.
“The concern in the near term is
that, since the economic data is pick-
ing up steam, the Fed could pull back
as soon as January,” Young said.
Stocks sink as consumer spending worries grow
By Michael Liedtke
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO — Tumblr is where the
Internet’s cool kids hang out. That’s why
Yahoo paid $1.1 billion to buy the blog-
ging site in one of this year’s most buzzed-
about deals.
Now, Tumblr is flaunting its hipster cre-
dentials with a first-ever breakdown of the
year’s hottest trends, topics and celebrities.
The retrospective starts Tuesday at
http://YearinReview.tumblr.com with an
exploration of 20 categories ranging from
the most popular musical groups to the
most interesting architecture of 2013.
Boasting a plethora of images, the review
will continue through December with daily
posts that will culminate on New Year’s Eve
with the best fireworks displays featured on
Tumblr during the year.
Similar end-of-the-year lists are annual
rites at Yahoo, Google and other websites
equipped with search engines that sort
through billions of requests for information
to determine which topics piqued people’s
interests.
Tumblr’s musings figure to stand out
because they are drawn from a younger audi-
ence that differs from the more convention-
al crowds that flock to general-purpose
search engines.
More than half of Tumblr’s 170 million
users are under 35 years old, a demographic
that has helped turn the service into a free-
wheeling forum filled with provocative
imagery, snarky humor and occasionally
ribald commentary.
“The people on Tumblr never cease to
amaze me with their creativity and their wit
and the amount of fun they are having
online,” said Danielle Strle, Tumblr’s direc-
tor of product for content and community.
“There are certain things they are crazy
about that I am sure that a more general
Internet audience is not super nuts about.”
Tumblr’s eclectic tastes are evident in
some of the categories featured in the ser-
vice’s year-end roundup. Entire sections
will be devoted to photo bombing, finger-
nail art, unicorns, bacon, pretty colors, stu-
dent loans and the lesbian, gay, bisexual
and transgender communities.
In contrast, the annual lists released by
the mainstream search engines tend to be
more prosaic and predictable recitations
that pore through the most popular celebri-
ties, movies, singers, TV shows, and news
stories.
Tumblr brings hipster twist to year-end lists
By Justin Pritchard
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES — A California
woman pleaded not guilty Tuesday to
what is believed to be the first traffic
citation alleging a motorist was using
Google’s computer-in-an-eyeglass.
The device, known as Google Glass,
features a thumbnail-size transparent
display above the right eye.
The technology will not be made
widely available to the public until
2014, but defendant Cecilia Abadie
was one of about 10,000 “explorers”
who received the glasses earlier this
year as part of a tryout.
Her case touches several hot-button
issues, including distracted driving,
wearable technology that will one day
become mainstream, and how laws
often lag technological develop-
ments.
Abadie was pulled over in October on
suspicion of going 80 mph in a 65
mph zone on a San Diego freeway. The
California Highway Patrol officer saw
she was wearing Google Glass and
tacked on a citation usually given to
people driving while a video or TV
screen is on in the front of their vehi-
cle.
Abadie, a software developer and
tech true believer, pleaded not guilty to
both charges in San Diego traffic court.
Her attorney William Concidine told
the Associated Press that she will testi-
fy at a trial scheduled for January that
the glasses were not on when she was
driving, and activated when she looked
up at the officer as he stood by her win-
dow.
The device is designed to respond to
a head tilt by waking itself up.
Concidine also said the vehicle code
listed in the citation applies to video
screens in vehicles and is not relevant
to mobile technology such as Google
Glass.
The CHP declined comment on
Concidine’s assertions.
“This has to play out in court,”
spokeswoman Fran Clader said.
At the time of Abadie’s citation, the
agency said anything which takes a
driver’s attention from the road is dan-
gerous and should be discouraged.
23andMe faces class
action lawsuit in California
WASHINGTON — Genetic testing
company 23andMe is facing a class
action lawsuit alleging that the
Silicon Valley startup misled cus-
tomers about its test kit.
The test is promoted as helping pre-
dict users’ disease risk based on their
DNA.
The lawsuit, filed in U.S. district
court in California last week, comes
days after the Food and Drug
Administration ordered 23andMe to
halt sales of its personalized test, say-
ing the company failed to show that
the technology is supported by sci-
ence.
23andMe sells its $99 test online.
Customers receive a small tube in the
mail, which they return to the compa-
ny with a saliva sample for DNAanaly-
sis.
The lawsuit by San Diego resident
Lisa Casey alleges that the test results
are “meaningless.”
23andMe said Tuesday that it would
not comment on legal matters.
Hotfile ordered to
pay $80M in copyright suit
WASHINGTON — Hollywood stu-
dios have won a copyright case
against Hotfile Corp. after a Florida
judge on Tuesday ordered the file-host-
ing website to pay $80 million in dam-
ages.
The court also ordered Hotfile to shut
down within 20 days unless the web-
site uses “state-of-the-art content iden-
tification and filtering technology” to
weed out pirated copies of movies and
other material that users upload.
The judgment, by U.S. District Judge
Kathleen Williams of the Southern
District of Florida, said that Hotfile
and its principal, Anton Titov, had
waived their right to appeal.
Motion Picture Association of
America CEO Chris Dodd said in a
statement that the judgment was
another step “toward protecting an
Internet that works for everyone.”
Woman fights ticket for driving with Google Glass
Business briefs
<<< Page 15, Down 27?
No problem for Warriors
Wednesday, Dec. 4, 2013
BUSY A’S: OAKLAND ONCE AGAIN WHEELING AND DEALING AS HOT STOVE HEATS UP >> PAGE 13
LADIES KNIGHT
49ers prepare to
stay composed in
emotional game
By Janie McCauley
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SANTA CLARA — The San Francisco
49ers are ready for some serious chatter
coming from that brash, big-talking Seattle
secondary.
And 49ers fullback Bruce Miller insists
cornerback Richard Sherman and the play-
off-bound Seahawks (11-1) have more than
earned the right to speak up on the field.
“So far they have a reason to,” Miller said
Tuesday. “They’ve played great on defense
and we’ll just have to take
care of that in between
whistles.”
The way emotions tend
to run higher than usual
in this heated NFC West,
Miller, tight end Vernon
Davis and their team-
mates are guarding
against getting so hyped
up it hurts the cause. Jim
Harbaugh also appreci-
ates the energy and physical play by his
guys, along with proper celebration on big
plays — such as wideout Anquan Boldin flex-
ing his muscles and cheering when he makes
a clutch reception.
“It might be the most intense game this
season. I think so,” Davis said. “Because
those guys, they don’t like us and we don’t
like them.”
Not to mention the Seahawks embarrassed
San Francisco 29-3 in Week 2 at Seattle and
have outscored the 49ers 71-16 over the
past two matchups.
“Any time you play a team and you lose,
the next time you face them is definitely a
statement game,” Davis said. “Not just for
us, but for anybody. So we have to go into
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
Menlo football’s Michele Canali was
recently announced as a 2013 Capital One
Academic All-America First Team College
Division selection in a vote by the College
Sports Information Directors of America.
The Capital on Academic All-America
football team is comprised of student-ath-
letes from the NAIA, Canadian and other
two-year institutions.
To be eligible for Academic All-America
consideration, a student-athlete must be a
varsity starter or key reserve, maintain a
cumulative GPAof 3.30 on a scale of 4.00,
have reached sophomore athletic and aca-
demic standing at his or her current institu-
tion and be nominated by his or her sports
information director.
One of just 24 student-athletes in the U.S.
and Canada to earn a place on the team, the
senior defensive had a tremendously suc-
cessful senior season that included 39 total
tackles and a team-high 7.5 sacks as part of
the 37th best defense in the nation.
His .800 sacks per game were good for a
No. 18 ranking nationally while his 7.5
total sacks placed him at No. 21 in the coun-
try. The Parma, Italy native also led the team
in fumbles recovered (2) and blocked kicks
(1) while helping Menlo to a 5-5 record in
2013.
By Terry Bernal
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT
You want drama? You got it.
Last night, Menlo had to do something
it hasn’t done all season — take it to five
sets. But after playing from behind in
four of the five sets, the top-seed Knights
celebrated a Nor Cal championship by
defeating No. 2-seed Sonora in an
absolute thriller — 25-12, 22-25, 25-15,
22-25, 15-7.
The victory is the fifth Nor Cal champi-
onship in Menlo history. Next up for the
Knights (32-5) is the Division IV State
Championship. Menlo will take on So
Cal top-seed Francis Parker of San Diego,
Saturday at Santiago Canyon College.
Game time is set for 12:30 p.m.
“Right now we’re ecstatic, obviously, ”
Menlo senior Morgan Dressel said.
“We’ve had this goal since the beginning
of the season. Now that we’re finally
going to state, no matter what happens,
we’re so glad we’ve achieved that.”
See 49ERS, Page 16
See CANALI, Page 16
See MENLO, Page 14
Canali named
All-American
Vernon Davis
Menlo wins Northern California volleyball title
LADIES KNIGHT
SPORTS 12
Wednesday • Dec. 4, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Graham Dunbar
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
COSTADO SAUIPE, Brazil — The United
States could wind up in a group with powers
Brazil, Italy and the Netherlands after FIFA
tinkered with its format for Friday’s World
Cup draw.
The Americans also could be in a Brazil-
Portugal-Netherlands group for next year’s
tournament in Brazil.
Or they could end up with what would
appear to be a relatively easy pairing with
Switzerland, Greece and Algeria.
FIFAcould have placed France, the lowest-
ranked unseeded European team, into a pot
with Africa and the unseeded South American
teams. Instead, the nine unseeded European
teams will go into a bowl and one will be
selected for that pot at the start of the draw.
FIFAPresident Sepp Blatter said the deci-
sion followed talks with confederation pres-
idents, including Michel Platini, the French
president of Europe’s governing body.
Blatter sidestepped a question asking him to
explain a procedure that seemingly ignored
FIFA’s own precedent and favored France.
“Let us (hold the) draw and not let us speak
of teams,” Blatter said.
Each group will include a team from each
of the four pots.
Argentina, Belgium, Brazil, Colombia,
Germany, Spain, Switzerland and Uruguay
are the seeded teams and will be in Pot 1.
Chile and Ecuador will be in Pot 2, along
with the selected European team and Algeria,
Cameroon, Ghana, Ivory Coast and Nigeria.
Making its seventh straight World Cup
appearance, the U.S. will be in Pot 3 along
with regional rivals Costa Rica, Honduras
and Mexico, and Asian nations Australia,
Iran, Japan and South Korea.
France, Greece, Italy, the Netherlands and
Portugal will start in Pot 4 along with
Bosnia-Herzegovina, Croatia, England and
Russia.
No more than one team from a region may
be in the same group, except for Europe,
which may have two teams in a group.
FIFA’s World Cup organizing committee
also declined to switch 1 p.m. kickoffs in
Fortaleza, Natal, Recife and Salvador
despite concerns by the international play-
ers’ union FIFPro over heat and humidity in
tropical areas.
FIFA General Secretary Jerome Valcke
confirmed FIFA’s budgeted commitment to
increase World Cup prize money by around
one-third, but the exact breakdown will be
decided later this week. FIFA shared $348
million among the 32 participating federa-
tions in 2010, including a minimum $8 mil-
U.S. WCup draw could be brutal
Sports Brief
New WCup ball ’Brazuca’ unveiled
RIO DE JANEIRO — The new ball for next
year’s World Cup — called the “Brazuca,” in
honor of Brazil, of course — was unveiled at
a ceremony Tuesday in Rio de Janeiro.
“Brazuca” has a double meaning, used as a
term for Brazilians living abroad, but also
as slang to describe national pride.
Manufacturer Adidas says the ball offers
“breakthrough innovation” featuring what
it calls a “revolutionary six-panel design.”
The ball is decorated with a ribbon design
in shades of blue, gold and green, which
Adidas says symbolizes the traditional
“wish bracelets” worn in Brazil.
The ball makes its debut on June 12 in the
opening game in Sao Paulo, and the tour
ends July 13 at the final in Rio de Janeiro.
NY football fan
pleads not guilty in stadium fall
ORCHARD PARK, N.Y. — Afootball fan
who slid down a stadium railing during a
Buffalo Bills game and fell onto a spectator
below pleaded not guilty Tuesday to misde-
meanor charges.
Robert Hopkins, 29, was released without
bail following his appearance in Orchard
Park Town Court on charges of assault and
reckless endangerment.
He declined to speak with reporters.
SPORTS 13
Wednesday • Dec. 4, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Janie McCauley
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
OAKLAND — Billy Beane is busy dealing
in December once again.
In one whirlwind stretch of less than 24
hours, the Oakland general manager pulled
off a trio of trades with
three different clubs and
upgraded Oakland’s
bullpen in the process.
Beane believes his over-
all roster might be even
better heading into
2014, with the front
office determined to keep
the low-budget club a
contender after consecu-
tive AL West crowns.
“In the time I’ve been here, we won the
West in ‘12 and Billy didn’t stand pat,”
manager Bob Melvin said Tuesday. “He
always looks to improve the team.”
First, the A’s acquired AL saves leader Jim
Johnson from Baltimore late Monday as the
replacement for All-Star closer Grant
Balfour. Then on Tuesday, the two-time
defending division champions traded for
San Diego right-handed reliever Luke
Gregerson in a swap that sent outfielder Seth
Smith to the Padres.
That move became a viable option after
outfielder Craig Gentry was acquired from
Texas earlier Tuesday with top outfield
prospect Michael Choice going to the divi-
sion rival Rangers.
Oakland also is waiting on lefty Scott
Kazmir’s physical to finalize a $22 million,
two-year contract.
“It’s fun. We’ve always had a pretty frater-
nal group,” Beane said. “We had some spots
we needed to fill. I think we addressed the
areas we needed to and in some cases I think
maybe even upgraded, particularly when
you look at the bullpen with the addition of
both Jim Johnson and Luke Gregerson. We
all feel real good about where we are. The
next step is putting it on the field.”
It’s been a busy couple of days for Beane
and his staff to say the least, building the
2014 team through calculated additions and
subtractions via trade. That has long been
Beane’s offseason approach — and he
insists even with all of these moves he
might not be done.
Baseball’s annual winter meetings begin
Monday in Lake Buena Vista, Fla.
“I don’t think it’s in our interest to sit
here and take the winter off,” Beane said.
“There’s a lot of winter left and a lot can
happen.”
While the A’s have their starting outfield
returning in center fielder Coco Crisp, left
fielder Yoenis Cespedes and right fielder
Josh Reddick, Gentry provides an option
off the bench and creates depth. The
returnees have dealt with injuries in recent
seasons.
Melvin and Beane have watched the versa-
tile Gentry for years. They also received
right-hander Josh Lindblom in the deal.
Texas gets Choice and minor league infield-
er Chris Bostick.
The deal to acquire Johnson “came togeth-
er pretty quickly,” Beane said, noting he
was a pitcher on the team’s radar.
“As you can imagine, it was a pretty fre-
netic pace and we have a lot of satisfaction
we were able to pull everything together, ”
Beane said.
Just in the short time since he switched
teams, Johnson noticed how active Beane
and his staff have been.
“It’s a team that’s competitive and they’re
making more moves to be competitive,”
Johnson said. “They’ve been busy and
they’re trying to build some excitement.
I’m excited to start a new chapter in my
career and personally. ”
Melvin is thrilled to add Johnson as his
closer while being afforded the luxury of
keeping his other important bullpen
options — Ryan Cook, Sean Doolittle, Dan
Otero and Jerry Blevins — in their regular
roles.
“That’s another key acquisition for us
with Balfour going into free agency, ”
Melvin said of Johnson. “We did it with a
proven guy, with a track record who has 101
saves the past two years. We could have
done that with any number of guys, but this
allows us to keep these major pieces in
roles they’ve succeeded in — getting us to
the ninth inning.”
AL West champion A’s make 3 trades in 2 days
Bob Melvin
After dropping just one set through five
previous postseason games, Menlo dropped
two sets last night to go the distance. But
the Knights showed up with authority in
Game 5 by jumping out to a 3-0 lead. Sonora
rallied to tie it 3-3, but Menlo setter Elisa
Merten answered right back with a tremen-
dous hook-style kill to take the lead, and
the Knights would not again relinquish it.
Menlo won the match on a left-side kill
by senior Maddy Frappier, who took her cue
after a dig by Maddie Huber, and Merten’s
70th set of the match. Frappier got air and
fired short to spark the celebration.
“That same spot has been working for us
the entire night — down the line, a little
more towards area six,” Frappier said. “So, I
just decided to swing hard because at that
point there’s nothing else you can do. You
just have to kind of go for it.”
Sonora (31-7) proved a worthy opponent
though. The Wildcats made very few mis-
takes, and forced Menlo to beat them.
Sonora showed up at net with 22 match
blocks, doubling that of Menlo’s 11
blocks.
“We had trouble blocking them, and we
had to compensate, and I think we really
pulled together as a team,” Dressel said. “We
swung as hard as we possibly could and we
did what we had to do to get the job done,
even though we weren’t always blocking at
the net. They had a good blocking team, and
I think it was a very competitive front-row
match.”
In Game 1, Sonora stormed out to a 10-4
lead before Menlo rallied from behind. The
Knights played without senior opposite
hitter Lida Vandermeer in the set, but her
replacement, freshman Jessica Houghton,
showed up with some clutch defensive digs
to help get Menlo rolling. Menlo went on
an eight-point run before taking the lead on
a hook-style kill by Huber. With the score
later tied 12-12, Huber fired another one of
her set-high seven kills to give the Knights
a lead from which they would not look back.
In Game 2, the Knights again found them-
selves trailing. With Sonora holding an 11-
6 lead, Menlo played catch-up before finally
evening the score at 17-17. Wi t h
Vandermeer back on the floor, the 6-foot
senior scorched a right-side kill to give the
Knights an 18-17 edge. But Sonora rallied
back and took advantage of a pair of Menlo
violations, including a backrow-attack vio-
lation to end it, evening the match at 1-1.
In Game 3, Menlo hitter Maddie Stewart
continued a steadily exceptional perform-
ance from the left side. The sophomore
tabbed 17 match kills, including five in the
pivotal third set. Stewart gave the Knights
an early 3-2 edge, and they led the rest of the
way to cruise to a 2-1 match lead.
In Game 4, Sonora came right back. The
Wildcats tallied eight blocks in the set,
with junior opposite Angela Gardella show-
ing up in the clutch. Gardella tabbed a block
to tie it at 10-10, then a kill to tie it 11-11.
Sonora junior Shannon Friend followed by
firing one of her team-high 17 match kills
to give the Wildcats the lead for good to tie
it at 2-2.
“Sonora played really well,” Menlo head
coach Steve Cavella said. “They were com-
peting really hard. They played some great
defense. They also blocked really well. ...
It’s our first five-game match of the season.
I don’t know if it was the best time to have
it, but at least we came out on top.”
Huber fired a match-high 19 kills for
Menlo, while Vandermeer tallied 16 kills
and Dressel had 14 kills. Dressel had one of
her most sensational performances of the
postseason thus far, totaling a .382 hitting
percentage and three blocks.
“Obvisouly when Morgan Dressel is on,
it turns the light on for the rest of our
offense,” Frappier said “And [with the rest
of our team] it’s kind of a snowball effect. I
definitely think that when our main offen-
sive players are on, everyone else will be
on. And hopefully during state they will
be.”
Menlo girls’ volleyball appeared in four
state championships from 1999-2002, but
the program has yet to win the state crown.
SPORTS 14
Wednesday • Dec. 4, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Continued from page 11
MENLO
JULIO LARA/DAILY JOURNAL
Menlo’s Maddie Huber goes up for a kill in
Menlo’s 3-2 victory over Sonora High School.
SPORTS 15
Wednesday • Dec. 4, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SF Giants minor league
players in Arizona crash
SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. — The San
Francisco Giants say some of the
baseball club’s minor league play-
ers were treated for minor injuries
after a traffic collision in
Scottsdale, Ariz.
The crash occurred Tuesday
morning when a team van collided
with a car after pulling out of a
hotel’s driveway.
Team officials say five Giants
minor league players were taken to
a Scottsdale hospital where they
were treated for minor injuries. By
Tuesday afternoon, they were back
at the hotel resting.
Team doctors plan to check the
players over the next 24 hours.
The Giants conduct training in
Scottsdale for their minor league
teams. The club’s major league
team also conducts its spring
training in the desert city.
The team says the minor lea-
guers were just beginning a three-
week conditioning camp.
Sports Brief
Warriors return home and
rally from 27 down for win
By Michale Wagaman
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
OAKLAND — Klay Thompson
made four 3-pointers in the fourth
quarter to fuel an improbable
comeback, Stephen Curry added a
pair of shots from beyond the arc
down the stretch and the Golden
State Warriors rallied from 27
points down in the second half to
beat the Toronto Raptors 112-103
Tuesday night.
Thompson finished with 22
points and seven assists, nearly
matching Curry’s 27 and 10. David
Lee added 18 points and eight
rebounds for the Warriors.
Toronto led 75-48 with 9:20 left
in the third quarter and took an 18-
point lead into the fourth.
Golden State made eight 3s over
the final 12 minutes, the last com-
ing from Harrison Barnes with
47.2 seconds remaining to give
the Warriors a 109-103 lead.
DeMar DeRozan had 26 points
to pace Toronto, which lost its
fourth straight. Kyle Lowry added
20 points and nine assists despite
being knocked out of the game
briefly following a collision with
Golden State center Andrew Bogut.
Coach Mark Jackson’s team was
down and nearly out before storm-
ing back.
The Raptors scored 65 points in
the first half and were scoring
almost at will against a Golden
State defense that had allowed 100
points or more in six straight
games. Toronto made it seven
despite scoring just nine points
over the final 8:45.
That cold snap opened the door
for the Warriors’ biggest come-
back of the season and extended
the Raptors’ losing streak in
Oakland to nine games.
Curry nearly brought his team
back in record-breaking fashion.
He made three 3-pointers and
needs three more to break Jason
Richardson’s franchise record of
700.
He got plenty of support drain-
ing 3s.
Thompson went 6 of 12 from
beyond the arc, Barnes added two
and Draymond Green had one.
Barnes finished with 19 points,
while Jermaine O’Neal added 11
points and eight rebounds off the
bench.
The Warriors were sloppy on
both ends of the court in the first
quarter when the Raptors built a
17-point lead.
Rudy Gay and Lowry had seven
points apiece as part of a 22-5 run
by Toronto. Lowry, who had 11
points in the opening 12 minutes,
capped the streak with a buzzer-
beating 3-pointer from 26 feet.
Barnes helped Golden State chip
away at the lead. He scored nine of
the team’s first 11 points then
added three free throws to pull the
Warriors within 48-39.
Toronto’s Steve Novak answered
with three 3s in 97 seconds, Lowry
added a driving layup and Toronto
took a 65-48 halftime lead.
EASTERNCONFERENCE
ATLANTICDIVISION
W L Pct GB
Boston 8 12 .400 —
Philadelphia 7 12 .368 1/2
Toronto 6 11 .353 1/2
Brooklyn 5 13 .278 2
New York 3 13 .188 3
SOUTHEASTDIVISION
W L Pct GB
Miami 14 4 .778 —
Washington 9 9 .500 5
Atlanta 9 10 .474 5 1/2
Charlotte 8 11 .421 6 1/2
Orlando 6 12 .333 8
CENTRALDIVISION
W L Pct GB
Indiana 16 2 .889 —
Detroit 8 10 .444 8
Chicago 7 9 .438 8
Cleveland 5 12 .294 10 1/2
Milwaukee 3 14 .176 12 1/2
WESTERNCONFERENCE
SOUTWESTDIVISION
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 15 3 .833 —
Houston 13 6 .684 2 1/2
Dallas 11 8 .579 4 1/2
New Orleans 9 8 .529 5 1/2
Memphis 9 8 .529 5 1/2
NORTHWEST DIVISION
W L Pct GB
Portland 15 3 .833 —
Oklahoma City 13 3 .813 1
Denver 11 6 .6473 1/2
Minnesota 9 10 .4746 1/2
Utah 4 15 .2111 1 1/2
PACIFICDIVISION
W L Pct GB
L.A. Clippers 12 6 .667 —
Golden State 11 8 .579 1 1/2
L.A. Lakers 9 9 .500 3
Phoenix 9 9 .500 3
Sacramento 4 12 .250 7
Tuesday’sGames
Philadelphia 126, Orlando 125,2OT
Denver 111, Brooklyn 87
Boston 108, Milwaukee 100
Detroit 107, Miami 97
Memphis 110, Phoenix 91
Dallas 89, Charlotte 82
Oklahoma City 97, Sacramento 95
Golden State 112,Toronto 103
Wednesday’sGames
Denver at Cleveland, 4 p.m.
L.A. Clippers at Atlanta, 4:30 p.m.
Phoenix at Houston, 5 p.m.
Detroit at Milwaukee, 5 p.m.
Dallas at New Orleans, 5 p.m.
Indiana at Utah, 6 p.m.
SanAntoniovs.Minnesotaat MexicoCity,Mexico,6:30
p.m.
Oklahoma City at Portland, 7 p.m.
Thursday’sGames
New York at Brooklyn, 4 p.m.
L.A. Clippers at Memphis, 5 p.m.
Miami at Chicago, 6:30 p.m.
NBA GLANCE
EASTERNCONFERENCE
ATLANTICDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Boston 27 18 7 2 38 75 55
Montreal 28 16 9 3 35 76 59
Detroit 28 14 7 7 35 78 73
Tampa Bay 27 16 10 1 33 76 67
Toronto 28 14 11 3 31 77 77
Ottawa 28 11 13 4 26 82 92
Florida 28 7 16 5 19 61 95
Buffalo 28 6 20 2 14 48 85
METROPOLITANDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Pittsburgh 29 19 9 1 39 89 66
Washington 28 14 12 2 30 83 82
N.Y. Rangers 28 14 14 0 28 62 71
New Jersey 28 11 12 5 27 61 67
Carolina 28 11 12 5 27 61 79
Philadelphia 27 12 13 2 26 57 65
Columbus 28 11 14 3 25 68 80
N.Y. Islanders 28 8 15 5 21 74 96
WESTERNCONFERENCE
CENTRALDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Chicago 29 20 5 4 44 105 80
St. Louis 26 18 5 3 39 91 60
Colorado 25 19 6 0 38 76 52
Minnesota 29 16 8 5 37 70 67
Dallas 26 13 9 4 30 74 76
Winnipeg 29 13 12 4 30 78 82
Nashville 28 13 12 3 29 63 78
PACIFICDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
San Jose 27 19 3 5 43 96 62
Anaheim 30 18 7 5 41 93 80
Los Angeles 29 18 7 4 40 76 62
Phoenix 27 16 7 4 36 91 86
Vancouver 30 15 10 5 35 80 78
Calgary 26 9 13 4 22 70 93
Edmonton 29 9 18 2 20 75 101
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime
loss.
Tuesday’sGames
Los Angeles 3, Anaheim 2, SO
San Jose 4,Toronto 2
Pittsburgh 3, N.Y. Islanders 2, OT
Carolina 4,Washington 1
Columbus 1,Tampa Bay 0
Ottawa 4, Florida 2
Dallas 4, Chicago 3
Vancouver 3, Nashville 1
Phoenix 6, Edmonton 2
Wednesday’sGames
Montreal at New Jersey, 4 p.m.
Philadelphia at Detroit, 5 p.m.
Phoenix at Calgary, 7 p.m.
Thursday’sGames
N.Y. Rangers at Buffalo, 4 p.m.
Dallas at Toronto,4 p.m.
San Jose at Pittsburgh, 4 p.m.
Boston at Montreal, 4:30 p.m.
Ottawa at Tampa Bay, 4:30 p.m.
Winnipeg at Florida, 4:30 p.m.
N.Y. Islanders at St. Louis, 5 p.m.
Carolina at Nashville, 5 p.m.
Chicago at Minnesota, 5 p.m.
Colorado at Edmonton, 6:30 p.m.
NHL GLANCE
NATIONALCONFERENCE
EAST
W L T Pct PF PA
Dallas 7 5 0 .583 329 303
Philadelphia 7 5 0 .583 300 281
N.Y. Giants 5 7 0 .417 237 297
Washington 3 9 0 .250 269 362
SOUTH
W L T Pct PF PA
New Orleans 9 3 0 .750 312 230
Carolina 9 3 0 .750 285 157
Tampa Bay 3 9 0 .250 217 285
Atlanta 3 9 0 .250 261 340
NORTH
W L T Pct PF PA
Detroit 7 5 0 .583 326 287
Chicago 6 6 0 .500 323 332
Green Bay 5 6 1 .458 294 305
Minnesota 3 8 1 .292 289 366
WEST
W L T Pct PF PA
Seattle 11 1 0 .917 340 186
San Francisco 8 4 0 .667 297 197
Arizona 7 5 0 .583 275 247
St. Louis 5 7 0 .417 279 278
AMERICANCONFERENCE
EAST
W L T Pct PF PA
New England 9 3 0 .750 322 261
Miami 6 6 0 .500 252 248
N.Y. Jets 5 7 0 .417 189 310
Buffalo 4 8 0 .333 267 307
SOUTH
W L T Pct PF PA
Indianapolis 8 4 0 .667 285 274
Tennessee 5 7 0 .417 264 267
Jacksonville 3 9 0 .250 174 352
Houston 2 10 0 .167 230 323
NORTH
W L T Pct PF PA
Cincinnati 8 4 0 .667 292 216
Baltimore 6 6 0 .500 249 235
Pittsburgh 5 7 0 .417 263 278
Cleveland 4 8 0 .333 231 297
WEST
W L T Pct PF PA
Denver 10 2 0 .833 464 317
Kansas City 9 3 0 .750 298 214
San Diego 5 7 0 .417 279 277
Oakland 4 8 0 .333 237 300
Monday’sGame
Seattle 34, New Orleans 7
Thursday, Dec. 5
Houston at Jacksonville, 5:25 p.m.
Sunday, Dec. 8
Atlanta at Green Bay, 10 a.m.
Minnesota at Baltimore, 10 a.m.
Kansas City at Washington, 10 a.m.
Buffalo at Tampa Bay, 10 a.m.
Miami at Pittsburgh, 10 a.m.
Detroit at Philadelphia, 10 a.m.
Indianapolis at Cincinnati, 10 a.m.
Cleveland at New England, 10 a.m.
Oakland at N.Y. Jets, 10 a.m.
Tennessee at Denver, 1:05 p.m.
Seattle at San Francisco, 1:25 p.m.
N.Y. Giants at San Diego, 1:25 p.m.
St. Louis at Arizona, 1:25 p.m.
Carolina at New Orleans, 5:30 p.m.
Monday, Dec. 9
Dallas at Chicago, 5:40 p.m.
NFL GLANCE
16
Wednesday • Dec. 4, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SPORTS
this game playing hard, playing fast, and
initially we have to make some noise right
away. That’s going to be the challenge for
us. We have to go in and play this game
the way it’s supposed to be played.”
That means avoiding mistakes such as
the nine penalties for 85 lost yards San
Francisco committed in beating St. Louis
on Sunday.
The reigning NFC champion Niners (8-
4) still have plenty of work to do this
month to secure their own playoff posi-
tioning, and a win against Seattle would
help make a statement that San Francisco
is still in the mix to chase another Super
Bowl berth.
“You definitely want to come out and
play well, at home, and show everybody
what we can do against a really good
team,” Miller said. “Right now, our goal is
to finish out the year and keep winning
games and get to the postseason. Nothing
extra on this one because it’s Seattle. It’s
just the next game.”
Enough of the 49ers caught glimpses of
Seattle’s 34-7 Monday night rout of New
Orleans to know a tall task awaits them
this weekend. At 5-1 on the road, the
Seahawks have already matched the fran-
chise record also done in 1984 and 2005
and now will look to better that mark.
The crowd noise at Candlestick Park
might not be on the same meter as
Seattle’s record-setting 12th man, yet San
Francisco’s players are counting on that
home-field advantage in what might be the
final meaningful NFL game during the sta-
dium’s farewell season. Arizona visits for
a Monday night game Dec. 23, but the
Niners are unlikely to host a playoff game
as they have in each of the past two
Januarys.
“You just have to just keep your compo-
sure and know what we’re trying to get
done, and that’s win football games,”
Miller said. “We’re not trying to win
tough-guy battles in between the whistles.
We’re trying to win ‘em during the play. ”
At this stage of the season, players
come to expect plenty of trash-talking and
hard hits in all phases.
“Yeah, you’ll see pretty much any-
thing,” Davis said. “You never know what
you’re going to get.”
NOTES: DeMaurice Smith, executive
director of the NFL Players Association,
visited the locker room and spoke to sev-
eral players. ... Left tackle Joe Staley, who
was undergoing treatment on his injured
right knee, declined to provide an update
on his status. “I’m not talking about it,”
he said. ... Davis still has “just a few abra-
sions left” after a painful, prolonged tack-
le in the crotch area from St. Louis S T. J .
McDonald. No apology yet from
McDonald — not that Davis expects such a
gesture. “He’s a young guy,” Davis said.
“It’s all good. It’s one of the them things,
man.”
Continued from page 11
49ERS
Abusiness management major with a 3.87
GPA, Canali concluded his two-year stint at
Menlo with 54 tackles, 13 tackles for loss
and 8.5 sacks in 18 games played. He is the
only player from a school located in the
state of California to earn this accolade.
Canali joins men’s soccer’s Giuseppe
Fratarolli as a Capital One Academic All-
America selection. With the naming of
Canali to the first team, Menlo becomes one
of just five schools in the U.S. and Canada
to place a player on both the football and
soccer All-America teams.
The 24 members of the 2013 Capital One
Academic All-America College Division
Football team have a 3.80 average GPA.
Since the program’s inception in 1952,
CoSIDA has bestowed Academic All-
America honor on more than 20,000 stu-
dent-athletes in Divisions, I, II, III and
NAIA, covering all NCAA championship
sports.
BASKETBALL IS HERE
The first basketball scores of the 2013-14
season are starting to come in.
The Menlo boys’ basketball team dropped
a tough 60-42 season opener against Sacred
Heart Cathedral in non-league play at home
Monday night.
Menlo seniors Bobby Roth contributed
13 points and Ryan Young added 12 more.
The Irish came out with a 26-point first
quarter and held a 14-point edge at the half.
The Knights came within 10 in the fourth
with free throws by Young and Roth, but
Sacred Heart Cathedral’s David Parsons
countered with consecutive shots.
Menlo hits the road for a matchup with St.
Mary’s on Thursday and Salesian on
Tuesday, Dec. 10. — a very tough two-
game swing.
Continued from page 11
CANALI
MENLO COLLEGE ATHLETICS
Michel Canali recorded 7.5 sacks last season.
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
TORONTO — Midway through the game,
the San Jose Sharks felt the Toronto Maple
Leafs gaining momentum. Atimeout helped
turn things around.
Mike Brown had a goal against his former
team and Joe Thornton scored on a 5-on-3
power play, leading the Sharks past Toronto
4-2 Tuesday night for their sixth straight
win.
“I think we maybe got a bit lackadaisical
at the start of the second period for about 10
minutes and they really gave it to us,”
Thornton said.
“The 10-minute mark it kind of switched.
We had a timeout and we kind of flipped it
back on them,” he said.
Brad Stuart and Logan Couture scored for
the Sharks, winners of nine of 10. Phil
Kessel netted his 200th career goal and
Mason Raymond also scored in Toronto’s
fifth straight loss.
Brown opened the scoring midway
through the first period, tipping a shot from
defenseman Jason Demers past Leafs goal-
tender James Reimer.
The Sharks had a two-man advantage for
76 seconds when Jay McClement and Mason
Raymond were penalized 33 seconds apart.
And Joe Pavelski found Thornton with plen-
ty of room at the side of the net, and San
Jose’s captain made it 2-0 at 14:31.
“Discipline’s a huge part,” Raymond said.
“You’re killing penalties, you’re not play-
ing offense and you’re playing in your own
zone, so we’re kind of shooting ourselves in
the foot there.”
Sharks goalie Antti Niemi made 28 saves.
The Leafs, meanwhile, had three shots in
the first 1:31, then went 17:17 without one.
With Dan Boyle in the penalty box for
interference, Raymond scored off the rush
2:44 into the second.
Sharks take
down Toronto
WORLD 17
Wednesday • Dec. 4, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Tu – F: 10 -5; Sa 10-3
D|amonds º Go|d º O|d Jewe|ry
Appra|sa| Serv|ces º Jewe|ry Repa|r
By Michelle Faul
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LAGOS, Nigeria — Entombed at the bot-
tom of the Atlantic Ocean in an upended tug-
boat for three days, Harrison Odjegba Okene
begged God for a miracle.
The Nigerian cook survived by breathing
an ever-dwindling supply of oxygen in an air
pocket. Avideo of Okene’s rescue in May —
http://www.youtube.com/watch?vArWGILm
KCqE — that was posted on the Internet more
than six months later has gone viral this
week.
As the temperature dropped to freezing,
Okene, dressed only in boxer shorts, recited
the last psalm his wife had sent by text mes-
sage, sometimes called the Prayer for
Deliverance: “Oh God, by your name, save
me. ... The Lord sustains my life.”
To this day, Okene believes his rescue after
72 hours underwater at a depth of 30 meters
(about 100 feet) is a sign of divine deliver-
ance. The other 11 seaman aboard the Jascon
4 died.
Divers sent to the scene were looking only
for bodies, according to Tony Walker, project
manager for the Dutch company DCN Diving,
who were called to the scene because they
were working on a neighboring oil field 120
kilometers (75 miles) away.
The divers had already pulled up four bodies.
So when a hand appeared on the TV
screen Walker was monitoring in the res-
cue boat, showing what the diver in the
Jascon saw, everybody assumed it was
another corpse.
“The diver acknowledged that he had seen
the hand and then, when he went to grab the
hand, the hand grabbed him!” Walker said in a
telephone interview Tuesday.
“It was frightening for everybody,” he said.
“For the guy that was trapped because he did-
n’t know what was happening. It was a shock
for the diver while he was down there looking
for bodies, and we (in the control room) shot
back when the hand grabbed him on the
screen.”
On the video, there’s an exclamation of fear
and shock from Okene’s rescuer, and then joy
as the realization sets in. Okene recalls hear-
ing: “There’s a survivor! He’s alive.”
Walker said Okene couldn’t have lasted
much longer.
“He was incredibly lucky he was in an air
pocket but
he would
have had a
limited time
(before) ...
he wouldn’t
be able to
breathe any-
more.”
Man survives three days at bottom of Atlantic
Harrison Odjegba Okene survived three days at the bottom of the Atlantic Ocean in an
upended tugboat.
18
Wednesday • Dec. 4, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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REUTERS
Protestors wave flags and shout slogans outside parliament in Kiev, Ukraine.
By Maria Danilova
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
KIEV, Ukraine — Ukraine appeared mired
in a political standoff Tuesday, as massive
protest rallies showed no sign of letting up
and the government warned of its capability
for force after a failed attempt to take it
down.
The opposition lost its attempt to topple
the government by parliamentary means
when a vote of no-confidence failed by a
sizeable margi n.
President Viktor Yanukovych left on an
official visit to China, where he is expected
to sign an array of economic agreements,
his office said. He is expected to be gone
until Friday and the prospects for a defini-
tive development in the next few days seem
small.
Protest leaders vowed to continue their
demonstrations, which have brought as
many as 300,000 people to the streets of
Kiev, in the largest outpouring of public
anger since the 2004 Orange Revolution.
Soon after Tuesday’s vote, about 5,000
protesters gathered outside the presidential
administration building, then moved to the
capital’s central Independence Square, where
the crowd grew to more than 10,000, accord-
ing to police estimates.
The opposition called for the parliamen-
tary vote over Yanukovych’s shelving of a
long-anticipated agreement to deepen polit-
ical and economic ties with the European
Union and the violent tactics used by police
to disperse demonstrators protesting the
decision.
Yanukovych has sought to quell public
anger by moving to renew talks with
Brussels. The government appears to recog-
nize that the police violence may have gal-
vanized long-brewing frustrations rather
than stifle protests.
But while Prime Minister Mykola Azarov,
attending the parliamentary session with
his Cabinet, apologized for the violence, he
also made a tough vow.
“We have extended our hand to you, but if
we encounter a fist, I will be frank, we have
enough force,” he said.
There is a question as to how long pro-
testers’ determination will last as winter
sets in and the holiday period approaches,
noted Adrian Karatnycky, a Ukraine analyst
at the Atlantic Council think tank.
In addition to Yanukovych’s trip to
China, “these things suggest Yanukovych
is playing for time,” he said.
The no-confidence measure got the sup-
port of 186 members of the Verkhovna
Rada, 40 shy of the majority needed. Even if
it had passed, Yanukovych would have
remained president, but the prime minister
and Cabinet would have been ejected.
In turn, Vitali Klitschko, the super heavy-
weight world boxing champion and leader
of the opposition party Udar, vowed that the
action would continue.
“We will peacefully blockade the govern-
ment building and not allow them to work,”
he told demonstrators at Independence
Square after the no-confidence motion
failed.
Oleg Tyahnybok, leader of the nationalist
Svoboda party, accused Russia of having
“an interest in a situation where more and
more blood flows in Ukraine.
Massive protests resume after
Ukraine government wins vote
By Josh Lederman
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
TOKYO — In what was supposed to be a
warm reunion, Vice President Joe Biden and
Chinese President Xi Jinping meet instead
Wednesday in a climate fraught with tension
over an airspace dispute that has put Asia on
edge. Aday before seeing Xi, Biden stood in
Japan and publicly rebuked China for trying
to enforce its will on its neighbors, escalat-
ing the risk of a potentially dangerous acci-
dent.
Although Biden had hoped to focus on
areas of cooperation as the U.S. seeks an
expanded Asia footprint, China’s declaration
of a new air defense zone above disputed
islands in the East China Sea has pitted the
U.S. and China against each other, creating a
wide gulf that Biden will seek to bridge dur-
ing his two-day trip to Beijing.
Despite Washington’s preference not to
get involved in a territorial spat, concerns
that China’s action could portend a broader
effort to assert its dominance in the region
has drawn in the U.S., putting Biden in the
middle as he jets from
Japan to China to South
Korea on a weeklong tour
of Asia.
“We, the United States,
are deeply concerned by
the attempt to unilaterally
change the status quo in
the East China Sea,”
Biden said after meeting
in Tokyo on Tuesday with
Japanese Prime Minister
Shinzo Abe. “This action has raised regional
tensions and increased the risk of accidents
and miscalculation.”
To that end, Biden said he would raise
those concerns with China’s leaders “with
great specificity” during his Beijing visit.
Although the U.S. has repeatedly said it
rejects the zone, Biden has avoided calling
publicly for Beijing to retract it, wary of
making demands that China is likely to
snub. Rather, the U.S. hopes that with
enough pressure, China will refrain from
strictly enforcing the zone, essentially nul-
lifying it for practical purposes.
For Biden in China, tense
reunion with Xi Jinping
Joe Biden
FOOD 19
Wednesday • Dec. 4, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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ABC’s ‘The Chew’ biting into its 500th episode
By Frazier Moore
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — When ABC’s “The Chew” premiered in
September 2011, it begged the question: Was it biting off
more than a show like this could chew?
Here was a rollicking weekday feast devoted to “every-
thing food” — not just cooking but home entertaining, din-
ing out, healthy diets and a satisfying culinary lifestyle
overall. And it came with a menu of five — count ‘em, FIVE!
— co-hosts. Too many cooks in that kitchen?
Well, maybe not. On Tuesday in its regular 1 p.m. EST
time slot, “The Chew” marks its 500th edition with a spe-
cial hour as its co-hosts savor their chat-and-chew success.
“‘The Chew’ was never about food, it was about these five
people,” says executive producer Gordon Elliott before a
recent taping at the show’s Manhattan studio.
Roughly 59 minutes later (to keep the energy flowing,
each show is taped in front of a studio audience from start to
finish, with no retakes or down time slowing the pace), the
hosts — Mario Batali, Michael Symon, Carla Hall, Clinton
Kelly and Daphne Oz — relocate to a nearby conference
room, with a reporter in tow:
“What makes the show work,” says Symon (a star of Food
Network’s “Iron Chef America” and owner of six restau-
rants), “is that it literally feels like all of us are hanging
out, cooking some food and telling stories. We’re busting
each other’s chops, but we all know we’ve got each other’s
back.”
“And by now, it happens naturally,” adds Batali (the co-
owner of 17 restaurants nationally as well as a Food
Network star and best-selling author). “We all know when
it’s each person’s turn to talk, and we know we’ll all get our
turn.”
“We always tell each other before the show starts, ‘Party
in the kitchen,”’ says Kelly (who was also a host of TLC’s
recently concluded “What Not to Wear”). “That’s what we
want: for people to come into our kitchen and have a good
time.”
When ‘The Chew’ was first announced, naysayers warned the show was a mistake. Now the show is on its 500th episode.
See CHEW, Page 22
FOOD 20
Wednesday • Dec. 4, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO — Judy Rodgers, the
award-winning chef-owner of San
Francisco’s Zuni Cafe, has died. She was 57.
Gilbert Pilgram, her business partner and
longtime friend, said Rodgers died Monday
after succumbing to cancer of the appendix.
The James Beard Foundation named the
Zuni Cafe 2003’s Outstanding Restaurant in
America.
Rodgers won Beard’s Outstanding Chef
award a year later, beating out notable chef
Mario Batali and others.
Rodgers started cooking in the 1970s
after being inspired by Alice Waters’ Chez
Panisse, where she met her business partner
Pilgram.
Pilgram says he’ll continue to run Zuni’s
kitchen.
Award-winning S.F. chef
Judy Rodgers dead at 57
Judy Rodgers
FOOD 21
Wednesday • Dec. 4, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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12/11 Calamari Steak
12/25 Merry Christmas - Closed
By Sara Moulton
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Who doesn’t love chocolate truffles?
They are the essence of chocolate, and
a sure-fire mood enhancer. Pop even
one into your mouth and see if you
don’t get happy.
Given the richness of a chocolate
truffle — a blend of chocolate, sugar
and cream — it’s nice that chocolate
has been found to be good for us. Still,
assuming you wanted to jettison some
of the calories in this treat without sac-
rificing a molecule of its lush flavor,
where would you start? Cutting the
chocolate or sugar would be a bad idea.
Both are needed. But how about the
cream?
The trick to cutting cream is that you
don’t want to sacrifice the creaminess
of the truffle in the process. The solu-
tion? Chestnuts.
This brilliant work-around was dis-
covered years ago by Sally Schneider,
the author of a great healthy cookbook
called “The Art of Low-Calorie
Cooking.” In fact, this recipe is my
adaptation of Sally’s recipe for choco-
late truffles. She found that roasted and
pureed chestnuts provide a super-
creamy texture for treats such as truf-
fles.
And because chestnuts don’t actually
taste like much, they don’t compete
with the truffle’s chocolate essence.
Added benefits? Unlike most nuts,
chestnuts are low in fat and high in
complex carbohydrates.
Of course, chestnuts — or at least
those roasted on an open fire — have
figured in Christmas lore for ages (and
got a boost when Nat “King” Cole
recorded his hit version of Mel Torme’s
“The Christmas Song” in 1946). And
indeed, during winter you still could
buy that treat from street vendors in
New York when I was growing up.
Though street vendors selling roast-
ed chestnuts have disappeared from
21st century New York, peeled and
roasted chestnuts are now widely avail-
able in grocers everywhere during the
holiday season. That’s what I’ve used
in this recipe. But be sure to properly
simmer the nuts in water as directed in
the recipe. This guarantees they’ll
puree smoothly. You don’t want chest-
nut chunks in your truffles.
You’ll notice instant espresso in the
list of ingredients. It’s there to ampli-
fy the chocolate flavor while adding a
hint of coffee flavor. But you can leave
it out if you don’t like coffee.
Likewise, I suggest adding a couple of
teaspoons of any of several different
liquors, all of which pair up nicely
with chocolate. But feel free to swap in
any of your favorites, or none at all if
you prefer. Either way, you’ll be
happy, guaranteed.
SPIKED MOCHA
CHESTNUT TRUFFLES
Start to finish: 4 hours (25 minutes
active)
Creamy truffles without
cream? Turn to chestnuts!
Add a couple of teaspoons of any of several different liquors, all of which pair up nicely with chocolate. But feel free to swap
in any of your favorites, or none at all if you prefer.
Bourbon mixes it up: New
styles, flavors and brands
By Michelle Locke
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Picking a bourbon isn’t the one-two-three choice it used
to be. There’s been a boom in brands, especially from
small, premium producers, not to mention a flood of new
styles. Will you go for a barrel-aged version? Honey fla-
vored? How about a bourbon that’s been aged at sea?
No doubt about it, bourbon is branching out.
“The biggest thing right now is people are looking to
stand out,” says Andrew Abrahamson, general manager of
the Seven Grand Downtown LAwhiskey bar. “Before it was
all about brand loyalty. Now, the consumer base is looking
for something new, something different and something
really cutting edge.”
By law, bourbon, a type of whiskey, must be produced in
the United States, made of a grain mix of at least 51 percent
corn, distilled at less than 160 proof, made without addi-
tives save for water to reduce proof where necessary, and
aged in new, charred white oak barrels. Aminimum of two
years aging is required to call the liquor “straight bourbon.”
It’s at the barrel level that a lot of the innovation is occur-
ring.
Some of the extra touches producers are trying include
selling single-barrel bourbons, made as the name suggests
from a single barrel rather than being a blend of many. A
popular way to enjoy this trend is to visit the distillery and
pick out your own barrel. Abrahamson does this at Seven
Grand, sending the staff out to pick their favorite barrels.
The result is a slight price break and a chance to offer cus-
See BOURBON, Page 22
See TRUFFLE, Page 22
FOOD
22
Wednesday • Dec. 4, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
“We have five distinctly different charac-
ters, versus a single-host show,” notes Hall
(a memorable past competitor on Bravo’s
“Top Chef” and the owner of an artisan
cookie company). “That means we have five
different ways of doing things. So we are
saying to the viewer, ‘If YOU have a sixth
way, that’s OK, too.’ We empower the view-
ers to have their own perspectives.”
“The ensemble setup gives us all an
opportunity to do some learning on TV, as
well as some teaching,” says Batali.
Item: Hall adores a certain trick for peel-
ing lemons she learned on the air from
Symon. And Kelly confides, “I didn’t like
quinoa until Daphne (the “Chew” resident
health-and-wellness guru) kept shoving it
down my throat. I actually like quinoa now. ”
Each hour has a theme (not just broad
ideas like how to fix the perfect turkey but
also conceptual side dishes like “Picnic
Essentials” or “Leftover Makeover”) that
the show’s producers cook up.
Symon: “They give us themes, and then
we give them our recipes.”
Batali: “Along with our thoughts on each
segment.”
Hall: “We make each idea work, based on
our experiences.”
“But I’ve said no to a segment,” Kelly
points out. “It just wasn’t in my wheel-
house, and I didn’t want to pretend to do
something that I wouldn’t actually be doing
at home.”
“Manscaping?” cracks Batali.
When “The Chew” was first announced,
naysayers warned its hosts they were mak-
ing a mistake.
“Abunch of my friends were saying, ‘This
is career suicide,”’ Batali recalls with a
laugh, “and I was like, ‘I think I could prob-
ably still make it as a cook.’ Now we know
unmistakably, indubitably, that we have the
best jobs in food programming.”
“Ahundred percent!” Hall chimes in.
“Without a doubt,” says Kelly. Plus they
each have four new pals: “Away from the
show, we really do hang out. You can look at
our phones and see how much we text and
email each other. ”
While the pace of “The Chew” has eased a
bit from its hyperactive early days, each
hour has plenty going on.
But as Batali has learned, “you can say a
lot without too many words or having to
rush if you’re editing in your mind: What
exactly is my message here?”
“My message,” says Hall, “is that home
cooking is the end-all and be-all, and it
doesn’t require chef’s skills or chef’s ingre-
dients. Once you’re comfortable with a
basic dish and a basic technique, the poten-
tial variations are huge.”
“What’s the connection between ‘What
Not to Wear’ and ‘The Chew’?” poses Kelly.
“There’s a very strong common denomina-
tor: to be the best version of you, whether
it’s with the clothes you put on your body or
the food you’re putting in your body. To be
conscious in every aspect of your life.”
“I’m just saying, ‘This is simple to make
and your guests will love eating it,”’ sums
up Batali. “I think that’s what we’re all sell-
ing on ‘The Chew’ all the time: ‘Yes, you
can’ and ‘Why don’t you?”’
Continued from page 19
CHEW
Makes 20 truffles
5.2-ounce package roasted and peeled
chestnuts, medium chopped
3/4 cup water
1/3 cup low-fat evaporated milk
4 ounces bittersweet chocolate, medium chopped
1 teaspoon instant espresso powder or 1
tablespoon instant coffee
Pinch of table salt
2 tablespoons light corn syrup
2 teaspoons Tia Maria, Kahlua, Baileys,
brandy or rum
1 tablespoon unsweetened cocoa powder
In a small saucepan over medium heat,
combine the chestnuts and water. Bring
to boil, then reduce the heat to maintain
a simmer, cover and cook until the
chestnuts are very tender and all the
water has been absorbed, about 30 min-
utes.
Add the milk and heat the mixture until
it just comes to a simmer. Remove the pan
from the heat, add the chocolate, then
recover the pan. Let stand off the burner
until the chocolate is melted, about 3 to 4
minutes. Stir and transfer to a blender
along with the espresso powder, salt, corn
syrup and liquor. Blend until very smooth.
Transfer to a bowl, cover tightly with
plastic wrap and chill until very firm, at
least 3 hours. Form the mixture into small
balls (about 2 teaspoons each) and roll the
balls in the cocoa powder until they are
coated, shaking off the excess. Chill until
ready to serve. Will keep, refrigerated, for 2
weeks.
Nutrition information per truffle: 50 calo-
ries; 25 calories from fat (50 percent of
total calories); 2.5 g fat (1.5 g saturated; 0 g
trans fats); 0 mg cholesterol; 8 g carbohy-
drate; 0 g fiber; 4 g sugar; 1 g protein; 15
mg sodium.
Continued from page 21
TRUFFLES
tomers something unique.
Another, smaller, trend is the practice of
finishing off standard bourbons in different
types of barrels, like Angel’s Envy, which
is finished in ruby port wine casks.
Meanwhile, Maker’s Mark has Maker’s 46,
which is aged in barrels containing seared
French oak staves. And Woodford Reserve
has its Double Oaked bourbon, which is
made as a standard bourbon, then put into a
second barrel.
“Distillers are really pushing them-
selves,” says Abrahamson.
And, like vodka, bourbon has been get-
ting in on the flavor craze with honey prob-
ably the most popular. But other flavors are
available, too, such as the black cherry
infused bourbon from Red Stag by Jim
Beam.
The growing popularity of bourbon is not
an overnight thing, points out Mike Veach,
bourbon historian at the Filson Historical
Society in Louisville, Ken., and author of
“Kentucky Bourbon Whiskey: An American
Heritage.”
Several factors are at play, he said via
email, including the growth of super-premi-
um brands as well as the craft distilling
movement, increased interest in bourbon
tourism, and the role of social media in pub-
licizing bourbons in ways that weren’t pos-
sible 25 years ago.
In 2012, nearly 17 million 9-liter cases
of bourbon were sold in the United States,
generating more than $2.2 billion in rev-
enue for distillers, according to the Distilled
Spirits Council of the United States, with
the strongest growth at the high end of the
market.
Trey Zoeller, founder of the small premi-
um producer Jefferson’s Bourbon, has seen
that trend first hand.
“We grew 70 percent last year and we
could be growing at that pace again this
year if we didn’t have out-of-stock situa-
tions, which is mainly due to our growth,”
he says.
Zoeller has been trying new things with
his product, including putting barrels on a
friend’s ship and having them aged at sea for
four years. The result, called Jefferson’s
Ocean and released in very small quantities,
was a darker, more complex spirit as sugars
caramelized in the barrel and the liquor
sloshed around, in constant contact with the
wood, he said. Now, he has ships going
around the world including a batch that went
in and out of the Panama Canal.
Bourbon has changed a lot in the past
decade, and so has its audience, says Zoeller.
“There’s so much information so readily
available,” he says. “They know how much
goes into it. They know about the different
char levels in the barrels, they know about
aging it in different locations, they know
what types and grains and percentages. It’s
amazing. It’s fun.”
Continued from page 21
BOURBON
ented three children, Patricia Atassi,
Linda Davis and Steven Nelson.
Balancing work and family, Frances
also established an extraordinary record
of philanthropic service. She served as
regent and trustee of Santa Clara
University, she was on the Board of
Governors of the Urban Land Institute and
the Advisory Board of Peninsula
Volunteers, she was honorary chairman of
the Capital Campaign for the Second
Harvest Food Bank in San Mateo County,
and generously supported Planned
Parenthood and woman’s reproductive
rights, notwithstanding her staunch sup-
port of the Republican Party.
Frances was voted into the San Mateo
County Women’s Hall of Fame in 1990. In
her leisure time, one might have found
Frances trying new recipes in the kitchen
or fishing and hunting with her family on
expeditions to Alaska, Canada, Cabo San
Lucas, India and Africa.
Frances is survived by daughters
Patricia Atassi and Linda Davis, and
grandchildren Tarek Atassi, Jennifer
Davis, Blair Nelson and Eric Nelson. A
resident of Woodside for 55 years, Frances
is predeceased by her husband Howard
Nelson, sister Barbara Carleton, brother
David E. Bohannon, son Steven Nelson
and grandson Ramzi Atassi.
A celebration of her life will be held
Jan. 27, 2014, at the Peninsula Golf and
Country Club. For those who wish, in lieu
of flowers, the family suggests that dona-
tions should be made in her name to
Planned Parenthood, 1691 The Alameda
San Jose, CA 95126; Second Harvest
Food Bank of Santa Clara and San Mateo
Counties, 750 Curtner Ave. San Jose, CA
95125; or a charity of your choice.
Continued from page 1
OBIT
By Michelle Locke
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Leaving grapes to freeze on the vine seems
like a recipe for stone cold failure. But under
the right conditions, the grapes that come in
from the (extreme) cold can produce delicious
dessert wines that are a cool favorite for holi-
day pairings.
What to call it? It depends on where you
are. It’s called eiswein in Austria and
Germany, where it began; icewine, one word,
in Canada, where it’s become something of a
signature wine; and ice wine, two words, in
the United States, where vintners in New York
state and few other regions are experimenting
with the hard-to-make, easy-to-drink product.
Whatever you call it, interest in the wine is
heating up as producers experiment with new
grapes and new winemaking styles — how
about some sparkling ice wine with those
gingerbread men?
“The icewine category in Canada is contin-
uing to evolve with new and innovative prod-
ucts entering the market each vintage,” says
Franco Timpano, director of marketing for
Inniskillin, a leading producer of ice wine,
selling roughly 5,000 9-liter cases annually
in Canada and about the same amount in the
United States. “We’re seeing icewines made
from varieties that we haven’t typically
seen.”
Typically, ice wines are made from riesling
and cabernet franc, as well as Vidal, a winter-
hardy French-American white hybrid grape
developed by Jean Louis Vidal in the 1930s.
But lately, Timpano’s been seeing ice wines
made from merlot, sauvignon blanc and
cabernet sauvignon. Inniskillin has made a
sparkling Vidal icewine and this year came
out with a sparkling cabernet franc icewine
available mostly in Canada and at duty-free
stores.
Making ice wine is not for the faint of
heart, points out Steve DiFrancesco, wine-
maker at Glenora Wine Cellars and Knapp
Winery and Vineyards in New York’s Finger
Lakes wine-growing region.
First, the grapes are left on the vine for
months after regular harvest is over. The
leaves are gone and vines are dormant, pro-
viding little protection, and though the
grapes are bundled in netting to ward off the
advances of nature winged and clawed, they
are still vulnerable. The benefit to all this
grape hardship is that the sugars and other
dissolved solids don’t freeze, but the water in
the grape does, which means when the frozen
grapes are pressed they produce a more con-
centrated, sweeter juice.
DiFrancesco likes to pick at around a chilly
13 degrees Fahrenheit. He’s also made wines
with grapes frozen post-harvest. Wines made
that way can’t be labeled as “ice wine” in the
U.S. or Canada; though they may have the
word “iced” on the label.
Ice wines are a cool favorite for holiday menus
Wines from artificially frozen grapes are a technically sound product,while naturally frozen wines
have more richness and depth, but possibly more funkiness, too.
DATEBOOK 23
Wednesday • Dec. 4, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
WEDNESDAY, DEC. 4
Free Job Search Assistance. 10 a.m.
to noon. Peninsula JCC, 800 Foster
City Blvd., Foster City. Free. For more
information email jcowan@jvs.org.
Book Sale. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Belmont
Library, 1110 Alameda de las Pulgas,
Belmont. All books, CDs, tapes and
DVDs are 20 to 50 percent off.
Facebook information session.
10:30 a.m. Belmont Library, 1110
Alameda de las Pulgas, Belmont.
Previous computer basics suggest-
ed. For more information contact
conrad@smcl.org.
Teen Movie: ‘American Graffiti.’
3:30 p.m. Belmont Library, 1110
Alameda de las Pulgas, Belmont. A
couple of high school grads spend
one final night cruising the strip with
their buddies before they head off to
college. Rated PG. 110 minutes. For
more information contact
conrad@smcl.org.
Christmas at Kohl Holiday
Boutique. 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. Kohl
Mansion, 2750 Adeline Drive,
Burlingame. Get a jump start on hol-
iday shopping with more than 60
vendors. No reservations necessary.
$10 admission fee.
Tree Lighting Ceremony. 6 p.m.
Lagoon Room Patio of the Foster
City Recreation Center, 650 Shell
Blvd., Foster City. There will be music,
light refreshments, a countdown to
light the holiday tree, and a visit
from Santa. Free. Please bring a
canned good or non-perishable
item to donate to local charity. For
more information go to www.foster-
city.org or call 286-3380.
Small Business Networking Mixer.
6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Redwood City
Public Library, 1044 Middlefield
Road, Redwood City. Free. For more
information go to
www.phase2careers.org.
The Karen Lovely Band Hosts the
Club Fox Blues Jam. 7 p.m. to 11
p.m. 2209 Broadway, Redwood City.
$5. For more information go to
rwcbluesjam.com.
THURSDAY, DEC. 5
The Americas — A Plethora of
Business Opportunity. 9 a.m. to 5
p.m. NestGSV, 425 Broadway,
Redwood City. Free. For more infor-
mation call (831) 335-4780.
Opportunities in Big Data. 6:30
p.m. to 9 p.m. Capgemini, 4000
Shoreline Court, South San
Francisco. Join this panel of distin-
guished experts who will share their
experience and insights in Big Data.
$20 for Members, $35 for Non-
Members, $45 at the Door, $5 Early
Bird discount until Nov 28. For more
information call 386-5015.
Hillsdale High School Presents ‘In
The Heights.’ 7 p.m. Hillsdale High
School Theatre, 3115 Del Monte St.,
San Mateo. $17 for adults and $12 for
students and seniors. Tickets can be
purchased at
hhs.schoolloop.com/drama. For
more information email hillsdaledra-
matix@gmail.com.
Notre Dame de Namur
University’s ‘Noël.’ 7:30 p.m. Taube
Center, 1500 Ralston Ave., Belmont.
$25 for students, $15 for students
and seniors. For more information
call 508-3713.
‘RiffTrax Live: Santa Claus
Conquers the Martians.’ 8 p.m.
Select cinemas. Prices vary. For more
information contact a participating
theater.
‘November’ by David Mamet. 8
p.m. Dragon Theatre, 2120
Broadway, Redwood City. A hilarious-
ly biting commentary on the state of
the union, a politically incorrect
president in the death throes of his
failing re-election campaign and
some Thanksgiving turkey pardons
for sale. Contains adult language.
Tickets range from $15 to $30 and
can be purchased at www.drag-
onproductions.net. Runs Nov. 22
through Dec. 15. Thursdays through
Saturdays at 8 p.m., Sundays at 2
p.m.
FRIDAY, DEC. 6
The Goodness of Produce and
Your Health. 7:30 a.m. to 8:30 a.m.
Crystal Springs Golf Course
(Wedgewood Room), 6650 Golf
Course Drive, Burlingame. Pete
Carcione, author of The New Green
Grocer cookbook and president of
Carcione’s Fresh Produce, will speak.
$15 includes breakfast. For more
information call 515-5891.
Free First Fridays. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
San Mateo County History Museum,
2200 Broadway, Redwood City.
Admission is free the entire day and
two programs are planned for public
view without any fees. For more
information go to www.histo-
rysmc.org.
Christmas luncheon. South San
Francisco Elks Lodge, 920 Stonegate
Drive, South San Francisco. This
luncheon is hosted by the South San
Francisco AARP chapter. Choice of
tri-tip or chicken. Non-members $26,
and this price may include member-
ship if desired. For more information
call Karen Gibson at (415) 467-7205.
For reservations call David Souza at
991-4111.
Friends of the Millbrae Library Big
Book and Media Sale. 2 p.m. to 5
p.m. Millbrae Library, 1 Library Ave.,
Millbrae. Twice yearly sale to benefit
the Millbrae Library. $5 admission or
Friends membership. For more infor-
mation call 697-7607.
Two New Exhibits Opening at
Pacific Art League. 5:30 p.m. to 8
p.m. 227 Forest Ave., Palo Alto. The
Pacific Art League of Palo Alto will
host two new exhibitions from Dec.
6 to Dec. 26. ‘Art Under $200,’ exhib-
ited in the Main Gallery, will feature
67 works by 37 different artists. Free
admission. For more information call
321-3891.
Night of Lights. 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.
Downtown Half Moon Bay, Main
Street. Bring the family for a tree
lighting ceremony in Mac Dutra
Park, a Parade of Lights down Main
Street, carolers and musical enter-
tainment and activities for the kids.
Free. For more information call 726-
8380.
King Building Lighting. 6:30 p.m. to
7:30 p.m. King Community Center,
725 Monte Diablo Ave., San Mateo.
Free. For more information call 522-
7470.
‘Arsenic and Old Lace.’ 7 p.m.
Capuchino High School, 1501
Magnolia Ave., San Bruno. Student
production of the comedy play
‘Arsenic and Old Lace’ in Capuchnio’s
new state-of-the-art theater. Tickets
are $15 for general admission and
$10 for students. For more informa-
tion call 558-2799.
Hillsdale High School Presents ‘In
The Heights.’ 7 p.m. Hillsdale High
School Theatre, 3115 Del Monte St.,
San Mateo. $17 for adults and $12 for
students and seniors. Tickets can be
purchased at
hhs.schoolloop.com/drama. For
more information email hillsdaledra-
matix@gmail.com.
‘A Christmas Carol: The Musical’
and fundraiser gala. 7 p.m. 1500
Ralston Ave., Belmont. Notre Dame
de Namur University presents this
performance for the 28th year. $50
for adults and $25 for children ages
3 to 12. For more information visit
www.christmascarolthegift.org.
Notre Dame de Namur
University’s ‘Noël.’ 7:30 p.m. Taube
Center, 1500 Ralston Ave., Belmont.
$25 for students, $15 for
students/seniors. For more informa-
tion call 508-3713.
‘MAME.’ 8 p.m. Hillbarn Theatre,
1285 E. Hillsdale Blvd., Foster City.
One of Broadway’s greatest musi-
cals. For more information contact
hillbarn@gmail.com.
‘November’ by David Mamet. 8
p.m. Dragon Theatre, 2120
Broadway, Redwood City. A hilarious-
ly biting commentary on the state of
the union, a politically incorrect
president in the death throes of his
failing re-election campaign and
some Thanksgiving turkey pardons
for sale. Contains adult language.
Tickets range from $15 to $30 and
can be purchased at www.drag-
onproductions.net. Runs Nov. 22
through Dec. 15. Thursdays through
Saturdays at 8 p.m., Sundays at 2
p.m.
Return of the Foster City tree.
During the month of December, you
will be able to enjoy the beautiful
lights from the tree floating in Foster
City’s Lagoon. For more information
call 286-3380.
SATURDAY, DEC. 7
Java With Sen. Jerry Hill. 8:30 a.m.
to 9:30 a.m. Caffe Roma, 143 S. El
Camino Real, Millbrae. Free. For more
information call 212-3313.
Fear of Flying Clinic Workshop. 9
a.m. to 4 p.m. San Francisco
International Airport. Pre registra-
tion is required. For more informa-
tion call 341-1595.
Friends of the Millbrae Library Big
Book and Media Sale. 9 a.m. to 4
p.m. Millbrae Library, 1 Library Ave.,
Millbrae. Huge variety of books and
media for all ages and in a variety of
languages. Free admission. For more
information call 697-7607.
Brunch with Santa. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
King Community Center, 725 Monte
Diablo Ave., San Mateo. $9. For more
information call 522-7270.
Special Holiday Free Program. 10
a.m. to 4 p.m. San Mateo County
History Museum, 2200 Broadway,
Redwood City. The day will feature
children’s craft activities such as
making old fashion Christmas tree
ornaments. Free. For more informa-
tion call 299-0104.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
Sundheim starting in 1998, having
taken the job to support her family
after the assassination of her father
and attempted assassination of her
brother, Sundheim said.
She was overqualified but desperate
to care for her family, he said.
She was also pursuing a Ph.D. in
geophysics at Stanford University.
Because of her financial circumstances,
Sundheim provided his services on a
volunteer basis.
In spring 1012, however,
Rasolovoahangy netted millions of
dollars in cash and stock in a business
agreement with an Australian company
to develop hundreds of millions of bar-
rels of oil in Madagascar. She is the
founding president of Petromad
Limited and is reportedly the first
native Madagascan to win a bid to
search for oil in the country.
According to the suit, the windfall
prompted her to run for president but
Sundheim told her she had been out of
the country so much for so long she
would not have the political base to
win even if she overcame other legal
issues of getting on the ballot.
“It was a close question as to whether
she would qualify,” Sundheim said.
Rasolovoahangy reportedly said she
could not wait until the next election.
“If they want to go ahead, my role is
to support them throughout,”
Sundheim said of his advisory posi-
tion.
Despite worries about his own phys-
ical safety, Sundheim agreed to serve
as her senior advisor at the rate of
$10,000 in August 2012 and thereafter
for $20,000 per month which would be
deferred until the campaign raised
money. If the campaign did not raise
the money, Rasolovoahangy would
reportedly pay it from her personal
account.
Among Sundheim’s services was
the hiring of Matthew Down, senior
strategist for former president
George Bush’s 2000 and 2004 elec-
tions and a television analyst. Dowd
was to be paid $35,000 per month
but has still not received the funds,
according to the suit.
The initial goal was securing the
presidency but the longer-term plan
was making a difference in the lives of
people, Sundheim said.
In April 2013, she continued spend-
ing more than $100,000 per month on
the campaign using her own funds
while not paying those who worked
for her, the suit stated.
The suit claims Rasolovoahangy
was obligated to pay her debt at the
time she was declared ineligible or the
Oct. 25 election, whichever came first.
She keeps promising she will pay
the money owed and giving repeated
assurances, Sundheim said.
Sundheim said the situation is par-
ticularly painful because they had an
established relationship prior to the
business arrangement and he had pre-
viously helped her when she was in
need.
“I never would have thought I’d be
talking to a paper about her not paying
me,” he said.
The breach of contract suit seeks the
money owed, interest and legal costs.
A case management conference is
scheduled for March.
Continued from page 1
LAWSUIT
hand to yarn bomb in some holiday
cheer.
“I think people will view this as
something very unique. It kind of dif-
ferentiates us with décor from other
cities and points out some of the vital-
ity of the downtown area,” said John
Schrup, president of United American
Bank.
Collaborating with the city and pub-
lic on installation projects highlights
the San Mateo art scene and raises
awareness about the talent that resides
within the city, Watt said.
“It’s unbelievable how many people
are getting involved … it enhances the
neighborhood and people feel a sense
of community from it,” Watt said.
Becky Sankauskas is a San Mateo res-
ident who’s kept up with Watt’s creative
installations over the past year. She
passed by yesterday and was thrilled to
watch them yarn bombing and for the
chance to speak with the artist.
“You’re making our day. I love watch-
ing the process,” Sankauskas told
Watt. “The whole city is getting a
cheer-up.”
The public appreciates these com-
missioned installations that unexpect-
edly pop up around downtown. Plus,
with the rise in public approval, the
city is investing more in the artistic
community and deterring against graf-
fiti, Watt said.
“What’s so cool about it is it’s so old
school, it’s urban graffiti … but it’s not
a couple of clowns with a spray can,
it’s well thought out and it helps with
the beautification of the city, ”
Sankauskas said.
The DSMA is pushing forward with
sprucing up the streets Saturday from 9
a.m. to noon with a group of volun-
teers from College of San Mateo join-
ing for a service project to clean win-
dows, pick up litter and gussy up the
streets for the holiday season, Jessica
Evans, executive director of the DSMA,
wrote in an email.
Word of Watt’s unique projects and
their ability to connect to the commu-
nity led the Monterey Bay Aquarium to
reach out, Watt said. It’s considering
commissioning her to yarn bomb squid
trees in San Francisco to advertise for a
summer exhibit, Watt said.
“It’s something people really
respond to, they like to interact with
it,” Watt said. “Not everybody gets to
say that about their art. It’s been really
rewarding.”
For more information about Lorna
Watt visit knitsforlife.com. For more
information about DSMA vi si t
dsma.org.
Continued from page 1
YARN
Since 2011, the board is required by
state law to issue its top 500 list each
quarter along with an interactive map
displaying the location and amounts
owned by the delinquent accounts. The
board must also provide the informa-
tion to state agencies issuing taxpay-
ers’ occupational, professional and
driver’s licenses and exclude delin-
quent taxpayers from contracting with
the state.
The 2013 fourth quarter delinquen-
cies, including the two San Mateo
County accounts, total $501.7 million
in taxes and the newly added owe a
combined $30.9 million.
Of these, $95.8 million are jointly
owned liabilities which mean individu-
als associated with a corporation, part-
nership or company might be person-
ally responsible for the past-due taxes.
While the two new county business-
es’ debt may seem hefty, they are
nowhere near the state’s largest recent-
ly added debtor. The Ontario-based
company Fiesta Motors owes more
than $4.8 million in taxes, according
to the board’s list.
Already on the top 500 list is
Stephen D. Field, Inc. which does
business as General Appliance &
Kitchens Burlingame. The Burlingame
company owes $630,093.33 dating
back from April 25, 2008. Stephen
Squires, doing business as Squires Slot
Machines in San Mateo, owes
$435,830.02 dating from Aug. 19,
2004.
Since the program began, the Board
of Equalization has recouped $9.93
million from 117 taxpayers of which
97 are paying in installments and 20
have fully paid off their debt.
The full list of www.boe.ca.gov/cgi-
bin/deliq.cgi.
michelle@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 102
Continued from page 1
TAXES
COMICS/GAMES
12-4-13
TUESDAY’S PUZZLE SOLVED
PREVIOUS
SUDOKU
ANSWERS
Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 • La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifieds
Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifieds
Boggle Puzzle Everyday in DateBook


Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.
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ACROSS
1 Google rival
6 Gathered flowers
12 Speaks slowly
14 Beethoven’s Third
15 Move laboriously
16 Chili beans
17 NASA counterpart
18 West Coast hrs.
19 Burning
21 Sunbeam
23 Jackie’s tycoon
26 Not just my
27 Air pump meas.
28 Evildoer
30 — -Magnon man
31 Always, to Whitman
32 Well-timed (2 wds.)
33 Faint trace
35 Rollover subj.
37 Lubricate
38 Ryan or Tatum
39 Sushi fish
40 Country addr.
41 Mdse.
42 Pound sound
43 Music albums
44 Kipling novel
46 Ms. Thurman
48 Goddess of wisdom
51 Time of the mammals
55 Fabric sample
56 Advanced
57 Toto’s home
58 Calf-roping event
DOWN
1 Fabric meas.
2 Bow shape
3 Sarcastic retort
4 Young screecher
5 Bullfight bravos
6 Full of energy
7 Eye part
8 Hold
9 Frontier’s — Carson
10 Kind of system
11 They prosecute perps
13 Meager
19 Tempting
20 Wrinkle-free
22 More open
24 Write down
25 Arctic people
26 Numerical prefix
27 Rind
28 Paddock youngster
29 Edit out
34 Rubber rings
36 Make a pit stop
42 Far East nannies
43 Chocolate bean
45 Cuzco founder
47 Where heather grows
48 Question
49 Dundee duo
50 Leia’s love
52 Cease
53 Born as
54 Tokyo, to shoguns
DILBERT® CROSSWORD PUZZLE
CRANKY GIRL®
PEARLS BEFORE SWINE®
GET FUZZY®
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2013
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) — Your ability to
find solutions will put you in demand. Don’t ignore
personal problems because you are too busy helping
others. Finding a balance between business and
domestic responsibilities is necessary.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) — Work diligently
on important deals that must be completed before
the end of the year. Make sure you have done your
research before committing to something that could
change your future.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) — Network, share
your ideas and win points with people who have
something to offer. Your articulate and trendy way of
presenting and promoting will lead to victory.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) — Partnerships
and money matters will experience pressure. A
resourceful and quick response will save the day.
Re-establish a connection with someone from your
past who can be of help now.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) — Don’t get frustrated.
Keep your emotions tucked away, do your job and get
on to more enjoyable activities. A change in the way
you think will help you handle pressure better.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) — People from your
past will come to mind. Make plans to reconnect
before year’s end. Partnerships are highlighted,
and your personal and business relationships
appear to be optimistic.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) — Do your best to help
those in need. Favorable changes will develop
in your personal and professional relationships.
Listen carefully and share equally. Balance is the
key to your success.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) — Don’t rush.
Observe first, and you’ll discover what will satisfy
your needs. Someone you love may become
unpredictable. Take the time to plan something
special that will help calm the waters.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) — Socialize with friends or
colleagues. Be prepared to change plans at the last
minute. Your ability to adapt will be appreciated. Don’t
feel pressured to overspend or to pay for others.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) — Impress those you work
with and for. Your ideas and efforts will be well-
received. Problems at home will develop if honesty is
in question. Don’t give in to emotional blackmail.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) — Your ability to see
both sides of an issue will help keep the peace.
Domestic changes may not sit well with you at first,
but in time you will benefit.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) — You will be able to
handle fine details at work and at home. Socializing
and putting extra thought, time and effort into a
personal relationship is favored.
COPYRIGHT 2013 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
24 Wednesday • Dec. 4, 2013
THE DAILY JOURNAL
25 Wednesday • Dec. 4, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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CAREGIVERS
2 years experience
required.
Immediate placement
on all assignments.
Call (650)777-9000
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
110 Employment
JOB TITLE: ACCOUNTING MANAGER
Job Location: San Mateo, CA
Requirements: Master's in Accounting,
Finance, Bus.Adm or equiv. + 2 yrs. exp.
reqd. (or Bachelor's + 5 yrs exp.). CPA
also reqd. Exp. w/ S-1, ERP,
AP/AR/FA/GL & MS Excel reqd.
Mail Resume: RingCentral, Inc.
Attn: HR Dept.
1400 Fashion Island Blvd, 7th Floor
San Mateo, CA 94404
110 Employment
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
RETAIL JEWELRY SALES +
SALES MGR- (jewelry exp req)
Benefits-Bonus-No Nights!
650-367-6500 FX 367-6400
jobs@jewelryexchange.com
TAXI DRIVER
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY
Clean DMV and background. $2000
Guaranteed a Month. Call (650)703-8654
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258398
The following person is doing business
as: Silly Monkey Mobile Coffee Cart, 39
13th Ave, SAN MATEO, CA 94402 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Michelle Pizzo and Christopher Pizzo,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by a married couple. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN.
/s/ Michelle Pizzo /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/06/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/13/13, 11/20/13, 11/27/13, 12/04/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258515
The following person is doing business
as: Conscious Kitty, 605 Fox Court East,
REDWOOD CITY, CA 94061 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Shari
Klein, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN.
/s/ ShariClair Klein /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/14/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/20/13, 11/27/13, 12/04/13, 12/11/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258549
The following person is doing business
as: SDG Architects, 603 Jefferson Ave,
REDWOOD CITY, CA 94063 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Steven
Simpson, 2805 San Ardo Way, Belmont,
CA 94002. The business is conducted
by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on1996.
/s/ Steven Simpson /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/18/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/20/13, 11/27/13, 12/04/13, 12/11/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258541
The following person is doing business
as:ANA Smog Test Station, 75 El Cami-
no Real, REDWOOD CITY, CA 94062 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Huong Tran, 1558 Orangewood Drive,
San Jose, CA 95121. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 11/13/2013.
/s/ Huong Tran /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/15/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/20/13, 11/27/13, 12/04/13, 12/11/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258511
The following person is doing business
as: New City Church, 2701 Crestmoor
Dr., SAN BRUNO, CA 94066 is hereby
registered by the following owner: New
City Community, Incorporated. The busi-
ness is conducted by a Corporation. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Lee Miller /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/14/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/20/13, 11/27/13, 12/04/13, 12/11/13).
26 Wednesday • Dec. 4, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
The San Mateo Daily Journal,
a locally owned, award-winning daily newspaper on the
Peninsula has an opening for a Account Executive.
The position is responsible for developing new business
opportunities and maintaining those customers within the
San Mateo County and Santa Clara County area.
The candidate will develop new business through a
combination of cold calling, outdoor canvassing, net-
working and any other technique necessary to achieve
his or her goals.
º The candidate will effectivel], professionall] and
accurately represent the Daily Journal’s wide range of
products and services which include print advertising,
inserts, internet advertising, social media advertising,
graphic design services, event marketing, and more.
º The candidate will manage their clients in a heavil]
customer-focused manner, understanding that real
account management begins after the sale has been
closed.
º A strong work ethic and desire to succeed responsiol]
also required.
Work for the best local paper in the Bay Area.
To apply, send a resume and follow up to
ads @ smdailyjournal.com
Immediate
Opening
for an
Account
Executive
Job Requirements:
º 8ell print, digital and other mar-
keting solutions
º B2B sales experience is preferred
º hewspaper and other media
sales experience desired but not
required
º work well with others
º Excellent communication, pre-
sentation, organizational skills are
required
º A strong work ethic and desire to
succeed responsibly also required.
Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
LEGAL NOTICES
Fictitious Business Name Statements, Trustee
Sale Notice, Alcohol Beverage License, Name
Change, Probate, Notice of Adoption, Divorce
Summons, Notice of Public Sales, and More.
Published in the Daily Journal for San Mateo County.
Fax your request to: 650-344-5290
Email them to: ads@smdailyjournal.com
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258601
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Fortune Star Chinese Cuisine,
2214-2216 S. El Camino Real, SAN MA-
TEO, CA 94403 is hereby registered by
the following owner: A & J Fortune Co-
moany Inc, same address.. The business
is conducted by a Corporation. The reg-
istrants commenced to transact business
under the FBN.
/s/ Jing Hong Huang, Pres. /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/20/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/27/13, 12/04/13, 12/11/13, 12/18/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258652
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Ju Ke Limo, 2018 Trousdale Dr
#10, BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Shir-
bazar Erdem, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on.
/s/ Shirbazar Erdem /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/26/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/27/13, 12/04/13, 12/11/13, 12/18/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258596
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Isha’s Limo Service, 1944 Gar-
den Dr #201, BURLINGAME, CA 94010
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Ishsuren Battsooj, same address.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on.
/s/ Ishsuren Battsooj /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/20/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/27/13, 12/04/13, 12/11/13, 12/18/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258315
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Sunshine Home Care & Com-
panion Services, 3345 Fleetwood
Drive,San Bruno, CA 94006 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Faye
Bret, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN.
/s/ Faye Bret/
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/30/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/27/13, 12/04/13, 12/11/13, 12/18/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258370
The following person is doing business
as: Sunny Side Up,1636 Claremont
Drive, SAN BRUNO, CA 94066 is here-
by registered by the following owner: Bit-
na Hu, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN .
/s/ Bitna Hu /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/05/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/04/13, 12/11/13, 12/18/13, 12/25/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258635
The following person is doing business
as: Due Italian Style, 1287 Fernside St,
REDWOOD CITY, CA 94061 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Mirit
Callioni, same address. The business is
conducted by a Corporation/LLC The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN 01/01/2012.
/s/ Mirit Callioni /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/22/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/04/13, 12/11/13, 12/18/13, 12/25/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258363
The following person is doing business
as: Remi Jewel Decor, 401 Cherry Ave,
SAN BRUNO, CA 94066 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Reema
Narayan-Parssad, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN 10/15/2013.
/s/ Reema Narayan-Prasad /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/22/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/04/13, 12/11/13, 12/18/13, 12/25/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258688
The following person is doing business
as: S & A Mobility Transporation, 410
Eucalyptus, SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO,
CA 94080 is hereby registered by the
following owner: Scott Santos, same ad-
dress. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced
to transact business under the FBN.
/s/ Scott Santos /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/27/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/04/13, 12/11/13, 12/18/13, 12/25/13).
NOTICE OF DEATH OF
MILUSKA ANNA KOSIK
To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors,
contingent creditors, and persons who
may otherwise be interested in the will
or estate, or both of MILUSKA ANNA
KOSIK, who was a resident of San
Mateo County, State of California, and
died on October 27, 2013, in the City
of Brisbane, County of San Mateo,
State of California.
IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a
contingent creditor of the deceased,
you must file your claim within four
months from the date of first publica-
tion with the DERMER LAW FIRM,
15720 Winchester Boulevard, Suite
200, Los Gatos, California 95030
(408) 395-5111.
Joseph D. Dermer, Esq.
DERMER LAW FIRM
15720 Winchester
Boule-
vard, Suite 200
Los Gatos, CA 95030
Tel (408) 395-5111
Fax (408) 354-2797
(Published in the San Mateo Daily
Journal, 12/4/13, 12/11/13, 12/18/13,)
204 Parking Spaces
WOOD BOOKCASE unit - good condi-
tion $65.00 (650)504-6058
210 Lost & Found
IO 3732
LOST AFRICAN GRAY PARROT -
(415)377-0859 REWARD!
LOST DOG-SMALL TERRIER-$5000
REWARD Norfolk Terrier missing from
Woodside Rd near High Rd on Dec 13.
Violet is 11mths, 7lbs, tan, female, no
collar, microchipped. Please help bring
her home! (650)568-9642
LOST GOLD Cross at Carlmont Shop-
ping Cente, by Lunardi’s market
(Reward) (415)559-7291
LOST ON Sunday 03/10/13, a Bin of
Documents on Catalpa Ave., in
San Mateo. REWARD, (650)450-3107
LOST SET OF CAR KEYS near Millbrae
Post Office on June 18, 2013, at 3:00
p.m. Reward! Call (650)692-4100
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
210 Lost & Found
REWARD!! LOST DOG - 15LB All White
Dog, needs meds, in the area of Oaknoll
RWC on 3/23/13, (650)400-1175
294 Baby Stuff
BABY CAR SEAT AND CARRIER $20
(650)458-8280
HIGH CHAIR by Evenflo. Clean, sturdy,
barely used. $20 SOLD
296 Appliances
AMANA HTM outdoor furnace heat ex-
changer,new motor, pump, electronics.
Model ERGW0012. 80,000 BTU $50.
(650)342-7933
COIN-OP GAS DRYER - $100.,
(650)948-4895
ELECTRIC DRYER (Kenmore) asking
$95, good condition! (650)579-7924
GAS STOVE (Magic Chef) asking $95,
good condition! (650)579-7924
LEAN MEAN Fat Grilling Machine by
George Foreman. $15 (650)832-1392
LG WASHER/ DRYER in one. Excellent
condition, new hoses, ultracapacity,
7 cycle, fron load, $600, (650)290-0954
MAYTAG WALL oven, 24”x24”x24”, ex-
cellent condition, $50 obo, (650)345-
5502
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
ROTISSERIE GE, IN-door or out door,
Holds large turkey 24” wide, Like new,
$80, OBO (650)344-8549
SANYO MINI REFRIGERATOR- $40.,
(415)346-6038
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SMALL REFRIGERATOR great for of-
fice or studio apartment . Good condition
$40.00 (650)504-6058
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
297 Bicycles
GIRLS SCHWINN Bike 24” 5 speed in
very good condition $75 (650)591-3313
298 Collectibles
101 MINT Postage Stamps from Eu-
rope, Africa, Latin America. Pre 1941,
All different . $6.00, (650)787-8600
1920'S AQUA Glass Beaded Flapper
Purse (drawstring bag) & Faux Pearl
Flapper Collar. $50. 650-762-6048
1940 VINTAGE telephone bench maple
antiques collectibles $75 (650)755-9833
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
2 RARE Volumes of Lewis & Clark Expe-
dition publish 1903 Excellent condition,
$60 Both, OBO, (650)345-5502
2 VINTAGE Light Bulbs circa 1905. Edi-
son Mazda Lamps. Both still working -
$50 (650)-762-6048
84 USED European (34), U.S. (50) Post-
age Stamps. Most pre-World War II. All
different, all detached from envelopes.
$4.00 all, 650-787-8600
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23”, $50. OBO,
(650)754-3597
BOX OF 2000 Sports Cards, 1997-2004
years, $20 (650)592-2648
298 Collectibles
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
JAPANESE MOTIF end table, $99
(650)520-9366
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MARK HAMILL autographed Star Wars
Luke figure, unopened rarity. 1995 pack-
age. $45 San Carlos, (650)518-6614.
MEMORABILIA CARD COLLECTION,
large collection, Marilyn Monroe, James
Dean, John Wayne and hundreds more.
$3,300/obo.. Over 50% off
(650)319-5334.
MICHAEL JORDAN POSTER - 1994,
World Cup, $10., (650)365-3987
SCHILLER HIPPIE poster, linen, Sparta
graphics 1968. Mint condition. $600.00.
(650)701-0276
SCHILLER HIPPIE poster, linen, Sparta
graphics 1968. Mint condition. $600.00.
(650)701-0276
STAR WARS 9/1996 Tusken Raider ac-
tion figure, in original unopened package.
$4.00, Steve, SC, (650)518-6614
TATTOO ARTIST - Norman Rockwell
figurine, limited addition, $90.,
(650)766-3024
TEA POTS - (6) collectables, good con-
dition, $10. each, (650)571-5899
TRIPOD - Professional Quality used in
1930’s Hollywood, $99, obo
(650)363-0360
UNIQUE, FRAMED to display, original
Nevada slot machine glass plate. One of
a kind. $50. 650-762-6048
300 Toys
‘66 CHEVELLE TOY CAR, Blue collecti-
ble. $12. (415)337-1690
LEGO - unopened, Monster truck trans-
porter, figures, 299 pieces, ages 5-12.
$27.00 (650)578-9208
MAHJONG SET 166 tiles in case good
condition $35.00 call 650-570-602
PINK BARBIE 57 Chevy Convertible
28" long (sells on E-Bay for $250) in box
$99 (650)591-9769
RADIO CONTROL car; Jeep with off
road with equipment $99 OBO
(650)851-0878
STAR WARS R2-D2 action figure. Un-
opened, original 1995 package. $7.
Steve, San Carlos, (650)518-6614.
STAR WARS, Battle Droid figures, four
variations. Unopened 1999 packages.
$45 OBO. Steve, (650)518-6614.
TONKA EXCAVATOR, two arms move,
articulated,only $22 (650)595-3933
TOY - Barney interactive activity, musical
learning, talking, great for the car, $16.
obo, (650)349-6059
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14” x 21”, carved top, $45.,
(650)341-7890
ANTIQUE CRYSTAL/ARCADE Coffee
Grinder. $80. 650-596-0513
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE OLD Copper Wash Tub, 30 x
12 x 13 with handles, $65 (650)591-3313
ANTIQUE WASHING MACHINE - some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
BREADBOX, METAL with shelf and cut-
ting board, $30 (650)365-3987
MAHOGANY ANTIQUE Secretary desk,
72” x 40” , 3 drawers, Display case, bev-
elled glass, $500. (650)766-3024
OLD VINTAGE Wooden “Sea Captains
Tool Chest” 35 x 16 x 16, $65 (650)591-
3313
STERLING SILVER loving cup 10" circa
with walnut base 1912 $65
(650)520-3425
303 Electronics
2 RECTILINEAR speakers $99 good
condition. (650)368-5538
2 RECTILINEAR speakers $99 good
condition. (650)368-5538
27” SONY TRINITRON TV - great condi-
tion, rarely used, includes remote, not flat
screen, $65., (650)357-7484
27” SONY TRINITRON TV - great condi-
tion, rarely used, includes remote, not flat
screen, $65., (650)357-7484
46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
AUTO TOP hoist still in box
$99.00 or best offer (650)493-9993
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
BLACKBERRY PHONE good condition
$99.00 or best offer (650)493-9993
DVD PLAYER, $25. Call (650)558-0206
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
HP PRINTER, mint condition, Photo
Smart, print, view photos, documents,
great for cards, $25.00 SOLD
IPHONE GOOD condition $99.00 or best
offer (650)493-9993
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
NIKON FG SLR body w 3 Vivitar zoom
lenses 28-70mm. 28-219 & 85-205, Ex-
cell Xond $ 99 (650)654-9252
PHILLIPS ENERGY STAR 20” color TV
with remote. Good condition, $20
(650)888-0129
303 Electronics
PIONEER STEREO Receiver 1 SX 626
excellent condition $99 (650)368-5538
SAMSUNG 27" TV Less than 6 months
old, with remote. Moving must sell
$100.00 (650) 995-0012
SAMSUNG, FLAT screenTV, 32” like
new! With Memorex DVD player, $185
(650)274-4337
SET OF 3 wireless phones all for $50
(650)342-8436
SET OF 3 wireless phones all for $50
(650)342-8436
SLIDE PROJECTOR Air Equipped Su-
per 66 A and screen $30 for all
(650)345-3840
SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with re-
mote good condition $99 (650)345-1111
304 Furniture
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
2 TWIN Mattresses - Like New - $35
each , OBO (650)515-2605
ALASKAN SCENE painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
ANODYZED BRONZE ETEGERE Tall
banker’s rack. Beautiful style; for plants
flowers sculptures $70 (415)585-3622
BBQ GRILL, Ducane, propane $90
(650)591-4927
BRASS DAYBED - Beautiful, $99.,
(650)365-0202
CHAIRS 2 Blue Good Condition $50
OBO (650)345-5644
CHANDELIER, ELEGANT, $75.
(650)348-6955
CHINA CABINET, 53” x “78” wooden
with glass. Good shape. $120 obo.
(650)438-0517
CHINESE LACQUERED cabinet, 2
shelves and doors. Beautiful. 23 width 30
height 11 depth $75 (650)591-4927
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DINNING ROOM table with chairs excel-
lent condition like new. $99.00 (650)504-
6058
DISPLAY CABINET 72”x 21” x39 1/2”
High Top Display, 2 shelves in rear $99
(650)591-3313
DRESSER - 6 drawer 61" wide, 31" high,
& 18" deep $50 SOLD
DRESSERlarge, $55. Call
(650)558-0206
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
END TABLE, medium large, with marble
top. and drawer. $60 or best offer,
(650)681-7061
END TABLES 2 Cabinet drum style ex-
cellent condition $90 OBO (650)345-
5644
EZ CHAIR, large, $15. Call (650)558-
0206
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258081
The following person is doing business
as: Victory Honda of San Bruno Pre
Owned Center, 345 El Camino Real,
SAN BRUNO, CA 94066 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Cappo
Management XXVI Inc., 345 El CAmino
Real, San Bruno, CA 94066. The busi-
ness is conducted by a Corporation. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN.
/s/ Michael Cappo, CFO/
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/15/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/13/13, 11/20/13, 11/27/13, 12/04/13).
FLAT TOP DESK, $35.. Call (650)558-
0206
I-JOY MASSAGE chair, exc condition
$95 (650)591-4927
KING SIZE Brass bed frame. $200 OBO
(650)368-6674
KITCHEN CABINETS - 3 metal base
kitchen cabinets with drawers and wood
doors, $99., (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL SINK $25 (650)766-4858
27 Wednesday • Dec. 4, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
304 Furniture
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
MATCHING RECLINER, SOFA & LOVE
SEAT - Light multi-colored fabric, $95.
for all, (650)286-1357
MIRRORS, large, $25. Call
(650)558-0206
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
NATURAL WOOD table 8' by 4' $99
(650)515-2605
OAK ENTERTAINMENT Cabinet/lighted,
mirrored,glass Curio Top. 72" high x 21"
deep x 35" wide. $95.00 (650)637-0930
OFFICE LAMP, small. Black & white
pen and paper holder. Brand new, in
box. $10 (650)867-2720
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PATIO TABLE with 4 chairs, glass top,
good condition 41” in diameter $95
(650)591-4927
PORTABLE JEWELRY display case
wood, see through lid $45. 25 x 20 x 4 in-
ches. (650)592-2648.
QUEEN SIZE Hide a Bed, Like new
$275, (650)245-5118
QUEEN SIZE Hide a Bed, Like new
$275, (650)245-5118
RECLINER CHAIR very comfortable
coast $600.00 sacrifice $80.00
(650)504-6058
RECLINING CHAIR, almost new, Beige
$100 SOLD
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
ROCKING CHAIR Great condition,
1970’s style, dark brown, wooden,
suede cushion, photo availble, $99.,
(650)716-3337
ROCKING CHAIR w/wood carving, arm-
rest, rollers, swivels $99, (650)592-2648
ROUND DINING table, by Ethan Allen,
sturdy good cond. $95 SOLD
SEWING TABLE, folding, $20. Call
(650)558-0206
SHELVING UNIT from IKEA interior
metal, glass nice condition $50/obo.
(650)589-8348
SOFA 7-1/2' $25 (650)322-2814
SOFA EXCELLENT CONDITION. 8FT
NEUTRAL COLOR $99 OBO (650)345-
5644
SOFA PASTEL color excellent
condition $99 (650)701-1892
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
STORAGE TABLE light brown lots of
storage good cond. $45. (650)867-2720
TEA / UTILITY CART, $15. (650)573-
7035, (650)504-6057
TEACART - Wooden, $60. obo,
(650)766-9998
TOWER BOOK Shelf, white 72” tall x 13”
wide, $20 (650)591-3313
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
TV STAND brown. $40.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
TV STAND, with shelves, holds large TV,
very good condition. $90. (650)573-7035,
(650)504-6057.
TWINE BED including frame good con-
dition $45.00 (650)504-6058
304 Furniture
WALL CLOCK - 31 day windup, 26 “
long, $99 (650)592-2648
WHITE 5 Drawer dresser.Excellent con-
dition. Moving. Must sell $90.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
WICKER DRESSER, white, 3 drawers,
exc condition 31 width 32 height 21.5
depth $35 (650)591-4927
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE” decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Three avail-
able, Call (650)345-5502
BRADFORD COLLECTOR Plates THAI
(Asian) - $35 (650)348-6955
CANDLEHOLDER - Gold, angel on it,
tall, purchased from Brueners, originally
$100., selling for $30.,(650)867-2720
CANNING POTS, two 21 quart with lids,
$5 each. (650)322-2814
COFFEE MAKER, Makes 4 cups $12,
(650)368-3037
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
GAS STOVE - Roper, Oven w 4 Burners,
good condition $95 (650)515-2605
HOUSE HEATER Excellent condition.
Works great. Must sell. $30.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
KIRBY VACUUM cleaner good condition
with extras $90 OBO (650)345-5502
MANGLE-SIMPLEX FLOOR model,
Working, $20 (650)344-6565
MONOPOLY GAME - rules, plastic real
estate, metal counters, all cards and pa-
per money $10 (650)574-3229
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
PUSH LAWN MOWER - very good
condition $25., (650)580-3316
PUSH LAWN MOWER - very good
condition $25., (650)580-3316
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
VACUMN EXCELLENT condition. Works
great.Moving. Must sell. $35.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
VINTAGE VICTORIAN cotton lawn
dress, - $65. (650)348-6955
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
LADIES GLOVES - gold lame' elbow
length gloves, size 7.5, $15. new,
(650)868-0436
PRO DIVER Invicta Watch. Brand new in
box, $60. (650)290-0689
WATCHES - Quicksilver (2), brand new
in box, $40 for both, SOLD!
308 Tools
12-VOLT, 2-TON Capacity Scissor Jack
w/ Impact Wrench, New in Box, Never
Used. $85.00 (650) 270-6637 after 5pm
BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269
CEMENT/ CONCRETE hand mixing box
Like New, metal $25 (650)368-0748
CRACO 395 SP-PRO, electronic paint
sprayer.Commercial grade. Used only
once. $600/obo. (650)784-3427
CRACO 395 SP-PRO, electronic paint
sprayer.Commercial grade. Used only
once. $600/obo. (650)784-3427
PUSH LAWN mower $25 (650)851-0878
308 Tools
CRAFTMAN JIG Saw 3.9 amp. with vari-
able speeds $65 (650)359-9269
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN 9" Radial Arm Saw with 6"
dado set. No stand. $55 (650)341-6402
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
LOG CHAIN (HEAVY DUTY) 14' $75
(650)948-0912
NEW 18VOLT Drill/Driver w/ light,
warranty, only $29.99 (650)595-3933
ROLLING STEEL Ladder10 steps, Like
New. $475 obo, (650)333-4400
TOOL BOX full of tools. Moving must
sell. $100.00 (650) 995-0012
309 Office Equipment
CANON COPIER, $55. Call
(650)558-0206
DESK - 7 drawer wood desk, 5X2X2.5'
$25., (650)726-9658
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20., (650)871-7200
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20.00 (650)871-7200
16 BOOKS on Histoy if WWII Excllent
condition $95 all obo, (650)345-5502
2 FLOWER pots with Gardenia's both for
$20 (650)369-9762
4 IN 1 STERO UNIT. CD player broken.
$20., (650)834-4926
70 BAMBOO POLES - 6 to 12ft. long
$40. for all can deliver, (415)346-6038
Alkaline GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM - ,
PH Balance water, anti-oxident proper-
ties, new, $100., (650)619-9203.
ALUMINUM WINDOWS - (10)double
pane, different sizes, $10. each,
(415)819-3835
ANTIQUE CAMEL BACK TRUNK -wood
lining. (great toy box) $99.,
(650)580-3316
ANTIQUE CAMEL BACK TRUNK -wood
lining. (great toy box) $99.,
(650)580-3316
ANTIQUE KILIM RUNNER woven zig
zag design 7' by 6" by 4' $99.,
(650)580-3316
ANTIQUE LANTERN Olde Brooklyn lan-
terns, battery operated, safe, new in box,
$100, (650)726-1037
ARTIFICIAL FICUS TREE 6 ft. life like,
full branches. in basket $55. (650)269-
3712
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
BALANCING SANTA, Mint condition,
Santa rocks back/forth, 20 in high, sturdy
metal, snowman, chimney, $12.00
(650)578-9208
BLACK LEATHER Organizer, Unop-
ened, Any Year, Cell Holder, Wallet, Cal-
ender., In Box $12 (650)578-9208
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
BODY BY JAKE AB Scissor Exercise
Machine w/instructions. $50.00
(650)637-0930
BODY BY JAKE AB Scissor Exercise
Machine w/instructions. $50.00
(650)637-0930
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BUFFET CENTERPIECE: Lalique style
crystal bowl. For entre, fruit, or dessert
$20 (415)585-3622
CHEESESET 6 small and 1 large plate
Italian design never used Ceramica Cas-
tellania $25. (650)644-9027
COPPERLIKE CENTERPIECE, unused
oval, 18 inches high, x 22 x 17,$10.00
(650)578-9208
DOWN PILLOW; Fully Stuffed, sterilized,
allergy-free ticking. Mint Condition $25
(650)375-8044
DRAIN CLEANER Snake 6' long,
new/unused only $5 (650)595-3933
DVD'S TV programs 24 4 seasons $20
ea. (650)952-3466
ELECTRIC IMPACT wrench sockets
case warranty $39.95 (650)595-3933
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good
condition $50., (650)878-9542
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
310 Misc. For Sale
EXOTIC EROTIC Ball SF & Mardi gras 2
dvd's $25 ea. (415)971-7555
EXTENDED BATH BENCH - never
used, $45. obo, (650)832-1392
FOLDING MAHJHONG table with medal
chrome plated frame $40 SOLD!
FRONT LOADER, bucket & arm move,
articulated $12.50 (650)595-3933
FULL SIZE quilted Flowerly print green &
print $25 (650)871-7200
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GOURMET SET for cooking on your ta-
ble. European style. $15 (650)644-9027
GRANDFATHER CLOCK with bevel
glass in front and sides (650)355-2996
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10),
(650)364-7777
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
HUMAN HAIR Wigs, (4) Black hair, $90
all (650)624-9880
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
JAPANESE SAKE Set, unused, boxes,
Geisha design on carafe and 2 sake
cups, $7.00 (650)578-9208
JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
K9 ADVANTIX - for dogs 21-55 lbs.,
repels and kills fleas and ticks, $60.,
(650)343-4461
KENNESAW ORIGINAL salute cannon
$30. (650)726-1037
LAMPSHADE - Shantung, bell shaped,
off white, 9” tall, 11” diameter, great con-
dition, $7., (650)347-5104
LANDSCAPE PICTURES (3) hand
painted 25" long 21" wide, wooden
frame, $60 for all 3, (650)201-9166
LANDSCAPE PICTURES (3) hand
painted 25" long 21" wide, wooden
frame, $60 for all 3, (650)201-9166
LAWN CHAIRS (4) White, plastic, $8.
each, (415)346-6038
LITTLE PLAYMATE by IGLOO-10"x10",
cooler includes 2 icepaks, 1 cooler pack
$20 (650)574-3229
MANUAL LAWN mower ( by Scott Turf )
never used $65 (650)756-7878
MARTEX BATH TOWELS(3) 26"x49",
watermelon color $15 (650)574-3229
MARTEX HAND TOWEL(5) 15"x28", wa-
termelon color $10 (650)574-3229
MEDICINE CABINET - 18” X 24”, almost
new, mirror, $20., (650)515-2605
MEN’S LEATHER travel bags (2), used
$25 each.(650)322-2814
MERITAGE PICNIC Time Wine and
Cheese Tote - new black $45
(650)644-9027
MIRROR 41" by 29" Hardrock maple
frame $90 OBO (650)593-8880
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
OUTDOOR GREENHOUSE. Handmade.
33" wide x 20 inches deep. 64.5 " high.
$70.00 (650)871-7200
OVAL MIRROR $10 (650)766-4858
PET CARRIER Excellent Condition Very
Clean Size small "Petaire" Brand
$50.00 (650)871-7200
PRINCESS PLANT 6' tall in bloom pot-
ted $15 (415)346-6038
QUEENSIZE BEDSPREAD w/2 Pillow
Shams (print) $30.00 (650)341-1861
RED DEVIL VACUUM CLEANER - $25.,
(650)593-0893
REVERSIBLE KING BEDSPREAD bur-
gundy; for the new extra deep beds. New
$60 (415)585-3622
RICHARD NORTH Patterson 5 Hard-
back Books @$3.00 each (650)341-1861
ROGERS' BRAND stainless steel steak
knife: $15 (415)585-3622
SCREWDRIVERS, SET of 6 sealed
pack, warranty only $5 (650)595-3933
SET OF 11 Thomas registers 1976 mint
condition $25 (415)346-6038
SF GREETING CARDS -(300 with enve-
lopes) factory sealed, $10 (650)365-3987
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48” x 69”
$70 (650)692-3260
SINGER SEWING machine 1952 cabinet
style with black/gold motor. $35.
(650)574-4439
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
310 Misc. For Sale
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
TRAVIS MCGEE (Wikipedia) best mys-
teries 18 classic paperbacks for $25.
Steve (650) 518-6614
TWIN BEDDING: 2 White Spreads,
Dust-Ruffles, Shams. Pink Blanket,
Fit/flat sheets, pillows ALL $60 (650)375-
8044
TWIN SIZE quilt Nautica, New. Yellow,
White, Black Trim “San Marino" pattern
$40 Firm (650)871-7200.
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VINTAGE WHITE Punch Bowl/Serving
Bowl Set with 10 cups plus one extra
$40. (650)873-8167
VINYL SHOWER CURTAIN
black/gold/white floral on aqua $10
(650)574-3229
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WEST AFRICAN hand carved tribal
masks - $25 (650)348-6955
WHEEL CHAIR asking $75 OBO
(650)834-2583
WOMEN'S LADY Cougar gold iron set
set - $25. (650)348-6955
311 Musical Instruments
FENDER BASSMAN 25 watt Bass am-
plifier. $50. 650-367-8146
GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO -
Appraised @$5450., want $3500 obo,
(650)343-4461
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
K MANDOLIN - A Style, 1940’2 with
Case, $50 firm SOLD!
LAGUNA ELECTRIC 6 string LE 122
Guitar with soft case and strap
$75.(650)367-8146
OLD USED Tube Amplifer, working con-
dition $25 SOLD!
SHERMAN CLAY Player Piano, with 104
player rolls, $1000, (650)579-1259
UKULELE STILL in box unused, no
brand $35 SOLD!
312 Pets & Animals
BAMBOO BIRD Cage - very intricate de-
sign - 21"x15"x16". $50 (650)341-6402
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
AUTHENTIC PERUVIAN VICUNA PON-
CHO: 56” square. Red, black trim, knot-
ted fringe hem. $99 (650)375-8044
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
HOODED ALL-WEATHER JACKET:
reversible. Outer: weatherproof tan color.
Iner: Navy plush, elastic cuffs. $10
(650)375-8044
316 Clothes
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES DONEGAL design 100% wool
cap from Wicklow, Ireland, $20. Call
(650)341-8342
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES FUR Jacket (fake) size 12 good
condition $30 (650)692-3260
LADIES WINTER coat 3/4 length, rust
color, with fur collar, $30 obo
(650)515-2605
LADIES WOOL BLAZER: Classic, size
12, brass buttons. Sag Harbor. Excellent
condition. $15.00 (650)375-8044
LARRY LEVINE Women's Hooded down
jacket. Medium. Scarlet. Good as new.
Asking $40 OBO (650)888-0129
LEATHER JACKET Classic Biker Style.
Zippered Pockets. Sturdy. Excellent Con-
dition. Mens, XL Black Leather $50.00
(650)357-7484
LEATHER JACKET, brown bomber, with
pockets.Sz XL, $88. (415)337-1690
LEATHER JACKETS (5) - used but not
abused. Like New, $100 each.
(650)670-2888
MENS JEANS (11) Brand names various
sizes 32,33,34 waist 30,32 length $100.
for all (650)347-5104
MENS WRANGLER jeans waist 31
length 36 five pairs $20 each plus bonus
Leonard (650)504-3621
MINK CAPE, beautiful with satin lining,
light color $75 obo (650)591-4927
NIKE PULLOVER mens heavy jacket
Navy Blue & Red, Reg. price $200 sell-
ing for $59 (650)692-3260
PROM PARTY Dress, Long sleeveless
size 6, magenta, with shawl like new $40
obo (650)349-6059
VELVET DRAPE, 100% cotton, new
beautiful burgundy 82"X52" W/6"hems:
$45 (415)585-3622
WHITE LACE 1880’s reproduction dress
- size 6, $100., (650)873-8167
WINTER COAT, ladies european style
nubek leather, tan colored, green lapel &
hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10 labeled Du-
plex and is priced at $15 (650)574-4439
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10. Elie Tahari
new, never worn $25 (650)574-4439
317 Building Materials
(1) 2" FAUX WOOD WINDOW BLIND,
with 50" and 71" height, still in box, $50
obo (650)345-5502
30 FLUORESCENT Lamps 48" (brand
new in box) $75 for all (650)369-9762
70 SPREADER cleats, 1” x 8” for 8”
foundations. $25. SOLD
BATHROOM VANITY, antique, with top
and sink: - $65. (650)348-6955
BRAND NEW Millgard window + frame -
$85. (650)348-6955
ELECTRICAL MATERIAL - Connectors,
couplings, switches, rain tight flex, and
more.Call. $30.00 for all SOLD
ONE BOX of new #1 heavy CEDAR
SHAKE shingles $14.00. SOLD!
PVC - 1”, 100 feet, 20 ft. lengths, $25.,
(650)851-0878
318 Sports Equipment
2 BASKETBALLS Spalding NBA, Hardly
used, $30 all (650)341-5347
2 SOCCER balls hardly used, $30 all
San Mateo, (650)341-5347
FISHERS MENS skis $35 (650)322-2814
28 Wednesday • Dec. 4, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 Caesar’s love
5 Signal to an on-
call doctor
9 Omits
14 Chowhound’s
request
15 Sharif who played
Zhivago
16 World Court site,
with “The”
17 Shepard in space
18 Plate ump’s
purview
20 Brand for
heartburn
22 Providence-to-
Boston dir.
23 Scraps for Rover
24 Unit of work
25 Soda for dieters
28 French season
30 Thin pancake
31 Violinist’s gift
34 Move very slowly
36 Suffers from
37 In recent times
39 Mechanic, at
times
41 “That works!”
42 4-Down collector
43 Boy king
44 Made a hue turn?
45 Suffix for records
46 Oater group bent
on justice
48 Nile biter
49 Blush wine, for
short
51 Short market
lines?
54 Piedmont wine
region
57 Erie Canal mule
58 __ Pipeline, Oahu
surfing attraction
60 “She’s Not There”
rock group
63 “Ripostes” poet
Pound
64 Overnight refuge
65 Theater part
66 Choir part
67 Blow some dough
68 __ collar
69 Stonewall’s
soldiers
DOWN
1 Shock
2 Large grinder
3 Citrus shavings
4 Payment to 42-
Across
5 “Thick and Rich”
chocolate syrup
6 Rescue pro
7 Ones on the
payroll
8 Freddie __ Jr. of
“Scooby-Doo”
films
9 Ship reference
10 Musical buzzer
11 Composer
Stravinsky
12 Fourth-down play
13 Dates
19 Property border
warning
21 The Red Sox’ Jon
Lester, e.g.
26 1980s Chrysler
product
27 Altered mtge.
29 Social cupfuls
31 This crossword,
literally for some,
phonetically for
all
32 “Please don’t
yell __”
33 Oboe, e.g.
34 Eye rudely
35 They’re found in
lodes
36 Reason for a
medal
38 Classic Fords
40 Last year’s frosh
41 1956 Mideast
dispute area
43 J. Alfred Prufrock
creator
47 Straw-strewn
shelter
48 Santa __ winds
49 Shrivel
50 “A Doll’s House”
playwright
52 Medicare section
53 Informal byes
54 Dollar dispensers,
for short
55 Hit a Target?
56 Head of Paris?
59 Close by
61 Getting on in years
62 Big one on the
set, perhaps
By Ed Sessa
(c)2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
12/04/13
12/04/13
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
318 Sports Equipment
AB LOUNGE exercise machine cost
$100. sell for $25. Call 650-570-6023
BOWLING BALLS. Selling 2 - 16 lb.
balls for $25.00 each. (650)341-1861
BUCKET OF 260 golf balls, $25.
(650)339-3195
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18” di-
meter, “Halex” brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
DL1000 BOAT Winch Rope & More,
$50., (650)726-9658
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
GOTT 10-GAL beverage cooler$20.
(650)345-3840
KIDS 20" mongoose mountain bike 6
speeds front wheel shock good condition
asking $65 (650)574-7743
LADIES BOWLING SET- 8 lb. ball, 7 1/2
sized shoes, case, $45., (650)766-3024
LADIES STEP thruRoadmaster 10
speed bike w. shop-basket Good
Condition. $55 OBO call: (650) 342-8510
LOOKING TO PURCHASE A TOTAL
GYM Price Negotible. Please call
(650)283-6997
MENS ROLLER Blades size 101/2 never
used $25 (650)520-3425
POWER PLUS Exercise Machine $99
(650)368-3037
REI 2 man tent $40 (650)552-9436
STATIONERY BIKE, $20. SOLD
318 Sports Equipment
SALMON FISHING weights 21/2 pound
canon balls $25 (650)756-7878
Say Goodbye To The 'Stick In
Style & Gear Up For a Super
Season!
49er Swag at Lowest Prices
Niner Empire
957C Industrial Rd. San Carlos
T-F 10-6; Sa 10 -4
ninerempire.com
(415)370-7725
SCHWINN 26" man's bike with balloon
tires $75 like new (650)355-2996
SMALL TRAMPOLINE $5.00 call 650-
570-6023
STATIONARY BIKE, Volt, Clean, $15
(650)344-6565
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
VINTAGE ENGLISH ladies ice skates -
up to size 7-8, $40., (650)873-8167
WET SUIT - medium size, $95., call for
info (650)851-0878
WO 16 lb. Bowling Balls @ $25.00 each.
(650)341-1861
322 Garage Sales
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
335 Garden Equipment
CRAFTSMAN 5.5 HP gas lawn mower
with rear bag $55., (650)355-2996
GAS ENGINE String Trimmer - Homelite
- 25cc engine. Excellent Cond.$70
(650)654-9252
LAWNMOWER - American made, man-
ual/push, excellent condition, $50.,
(650)342-8436
REMINGTON ELECTRIC lawn mower,
$40. (650)355-2996
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
CLASSICAL YASHICA camera
in leather case $25. (650)644-9027
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
VIVITAR ZOOM lens-28mm70mm. Filter
and lens cap. Original owner. $50. Cash
(650)654-9252
VIVITAR ZOOM lens. 28mm-210mm. Fil-
ter and lens cap. Original owner. $99.
Cash. (650)654-9252 SOLD
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $99
(415)971-7555
345 Medical Equipment
2 WALKABOUT ROLLATORS 4
Wheeled Rollators, hand brakes, seats
back rest, folds for storage, transport.
$50 each (650)365-5530
ELECTRIC HOSPITAL Bed, variable
pressure mattress $900, (650)348-0718
ELECTRIC HOSPITAL Bed, variable
pressure mattress $900, (650)348-0718
INVERSION TABLE relieves pressure
on back. Cost $100.00 sell for $25.
(650)570-6023
MEDICAL EQUIPMENT - Brand new
port-a-potty, never used, $40., Walker,
$30., (650)832-1392
PATIENT LIFT with heavy duty sling,
$450 (650)348-0718
PATIENT LIFT with heavy duty sling,
$450 (650)348-0718
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
380 Real Estate Services
HOMES & PROPERTIES
The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
weekly Real Estate Section.
Look for it
every Friday and Weekend
to find information on fine homes
and properties throughout
the local area.
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom, New carpets,
new granite counters, dishwasher, balco-
ny, covered carports, storage, pool, no
pets. (650)595-0805
REDWOOD CITY 1 bedroom apartment
$1350. month, $1000 deposit, close to
Downtown RWC, Absolutely no animals.
Call (650)361-1200
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49.-59.daily + tax
$294.-$322. weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator & A/C
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
FLEETWOOD ‘93 $ 3,500/offer. Good
Condition (650)481-5296
MERCEDES ‘06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
625 Classic Cars
FORD ‘63 THUNDERBIRD Hardtop, 390
engine, Leather Interior. Will consider
$6,900 OBO (650)364-1374
630 Trucks & SUV’s
FORD ‘98 EXPLORER 6 cylinder, 167K
miles, excellent condition, good tires,
good brakes, very dependable! $2,400 or
best offer. Moving, must sell! Call
(650)274-4337
GMV ‘03 .ENVOY, SLT , 4x4, excellent
condition. Leather everything. 106K
miles. White. $7,800 (650)342-6342
635 Vans
‘67 INTERNATIONAL Step Van 1500,
Typical UPS type size. $2500, OBO,
(650)364-1374
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
MOTORCYCLE GLOVES - Excellent
condition, black leather, $35. obo,
(650)223-7187
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAGS with
brackets and other parts, $35.,
(650)670-2888
670 Auto Service
GRAND OPENING!
Sincere Affordable Motors
All makes and models
Over 20 years experience
1940 Leslie St, San Mateo
(650)722-8007
samautoservices@gmail.com
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
CAR TOWchain 9' $35 (650)948-0912
HONDA SPARE tire 13" $25
(415)999-4947
HONDA WHEELS with tires. Good
tread/ 14 in. 3 for $99 (415)999-4947
MECHANIC'S CREEPER vintage, Com-
et model SP, all wood, pillow, four swivel
wheels, great shape. $40.00
(650)591-0063
MECHANIC'S CREEPER vintage, Com-
et model SP, all wood, pillow, four swivel
wheels, great shape. $40.00
(650)591-0063
670 Auto Parts
NEW BATTERY and alternator for a ‘96
Buick Century never used Both for $80
(650)576-6600
NEW, IN box, Ford Mustang aluminum
water pump & gasket, $60.00. Call
(415)370-3950
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, 1
gray marine diesel manual $40
(650)583-5208
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, 1
gray marine diesel manual $40
(650)583-5208
SHOP MANUALS for GM Suv's
Year 2002 all for $40 (650)948-0912
TIRE CHAIN cables $23. (650)766-4858
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
35 Years Experience
2001 Middlefield Road
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
29 Wednesday • Dec. 4, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ADVERTISE
YOUR SERVICE
in the
HOME & GARDEN SECTION
Offer your services to 76,500 readers a day, from
Palo Alto to South San Francisco
and all points between!
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
Carpentry
D n’ J REMODELING
Finish Carpentry
• Windows • Doors •
• Cabinets • Casing •
• Crown Moulding •
• Baseboards •
• Mantels • Chair Rails •
(650)291-2121
Cabinetry
Cleaning
ANGELICA’S HOUSE
CLEANING & ERRAND
SERVICES
• House Cleaning • Move In/Out
Cleaning • Janitorial Services
• Handyman Services
• General Errands • Event Help
$15 off when mention this ad
(650)918-0354
myerrandservicesca@gmail.com
Concrete
Construction
WARREN BUILDER
Contractor & Electrician
Kitchen, Bathroom, Additions
Design & Drafting Lowest Rate
Lic#964001, Ins. & BBB member
Warren Young
(650)465-8787
Construction
DEVOE
CONSTRUCTION
Kitchen & Bath
Remodeling
Belmont, CA
(650) 318-3993
O’SULLIVAN
CONSTRUCTION
(650)589-0372
New Construction, Remodeling,
Kitchen/Bathrooms,
Decks/ Fences
Licensed and Insured
Lic. #589596
Doors
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
Gardening
GENERAL
LANDSCAPE
MAINTENANCE
Commercial & Residential
Gardening
New lawn &
sprinkler installation,
Trouble shooting and repair
Work done by the hour
or contract
Free estimates
Licensed
(650)444-5887, Call/Text
glmco@aol.com
Flooring
SHOP
AT HOME
WE WILL
BRING THE
SAMPLES
TO YOU.
Call for a
FREE in-home
estimate
FLAMINGO’S FLOORING
CARPET
VINYL
LAMINATE
TILE
HARDWOOD
650-655-6600
SLATER FLOORS
. Restore old floors to new
. Dustless Sanding
. Install new custom & refinished
hardwood floors
Licensed. Bonded. Insured
www.slaterfloors.com
(650) 593-3700
Showroom by appointment
Gutters
GUTTER
CLEANING
O.K.’S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutters
Down Spouts
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Roof & Gutter Repairs
Friendly Service
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
(650)556-9780
RAIN GUTTERS
• Gutters and downspouts,
• Rain gutter repair,
• Rain gutter protection (screen),
• Handyman Services
Free Estimates
(650)669-6771
(650)302-7791
Lic.# 910421
Handy Help
AAA HANDYMAN
& MORE
Repairs • Maintenance • Painting
Carpentry • Plumbing • Electrical
Contractor Lic. 468963 Since 1976
Bonded and Insured
All Work Guaranteed
(650) 995-4385
DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
Kitchen/Bathroom Remodeling,
Tile Installation,
Door & Window Installation
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
Handy Help
FLORES HANDYMAN
Serving you is a privilege.
Painting-Interior & Exterior• Roof
Repair • Base Boards New Fence •
Hardwood Floors • Plumbing • Tile •
Mirrors • Chain Link Fence • Windows
Bus Lic# 41942
Call today for free estimate.
(650)274-6133
SENIOR HANDYMAN
“Specializing in Any Size Projects”
•Painting • Electrical
•Carpentry •Dry Rot
40 Yrs. Experience
Retired Licensed Contractor
(650)201-6854
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
•Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
•Refinish
•High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
CHAINEY HAULING
Junk & Debris Clean Up
Furniture / Appliance / Disposal
Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo
Starting at $40& Up
www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
Hauling
by Greenstarr
Chris’s Hauling
Licensed Bonded and Insured
Since 1985 License # 752250
www.yardboss.net
º Yard c|ean up - att|c,
basement
º Junk meta| remova|
|nc|ud|ng cars, trucks and
motorcyc|es
º 0emo||t|on
º 0oncrete remova|
º Fxcavat|on
º Sw|mm|ng poo| remova|
&
Tom 650.355.3500
Chris 415.999.1223
Landscaping
Moving
Bay Area
Relocation Services
Specializing in:
Homes, Apts., Storages
Professional, friendly, careful.
Peninsula’s Personal Mover
Commercial/Residential
Fully Lic. & Bonded CAL -T190632
Call (650) 630-0424
Painting
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Quality Work, Reasonable
Rates, Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
MK PAINTING
Interior and Exterior,
Residental and commercial
Insured and bonded,
Free Estimates
Peter McKenna
(650)630-1835
Lic# 974682
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
Painting
NICK MEJIA PAINTING
A+ Member BBB • Since 1975
Large & Small Jobs
Residential & Commercial
Classic Brushwork, Matching, Stain-
ing, Varnishing, Cabinet Finishing
Wall Effects, Murals, More!
(415)971-8763
Lic. #479564
Plumbing
Remodeling
HARVEST KITCHEN
& MOSAIC
Cabinets * Vanities * Tile
Flooring * Mosaics
Sinks * Faucets
Fast turnaround * Expert service
920 Center St., San Carlos
(650)620-9639
www.harvestkm.com
Tree Service
Hillside Tree
Service
LOCALLY OWNED
Family Owned Since 2000
• Trimming Pruning
• Shaping
• Large Removal
• Stump Grinding
Free
Estimates
Mention
The Daily Journal
to get 10% off
for new customers
Call Luis (650) 704-9635
30 Wednesday • Dec. 4, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tree Service
by Greenstarr
º 0omp|ete |andscape
ma|ntenance and remova|
º Fu|| tree care |nc|ud|ng
hazard eva|uat|on,
tr|mm|ng, shap|ng,
remova| and stump
gr|nd|ng
º 8eta|n|ng wa||s
º 0rnamenta| concrete
º Sw|mm|ng poo| remova|
Tom 650. 355. 3500
Licensed Bonded and Insured
www.yardboss.net
Since 1985 License # 752250
Tile
CUBIAS TILE
• Entryways • Kitchens
• Decks • Bathrooms
• Tile Repair • Floors
• Grout Repair • Fireplaces
Call Mario Cubias for Free Estimates
(650)784-3079
Lic.# 955492
Window Washing
EXTERIOR
CLEANING
SERVICES
- window washing
- gutter cleaning
- pressure washing
- wood restoration
- solar panel cleaning
(650)216-9922
services@careful-clean.com
Bonded - Insured
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
Attorneys
• BANKRUPTCY •
Huge credit card debit?
Job loss? Foreclosure?
Medical bills?
YOU HAVE OPTIONS
Call for a free consultation
(650-363-2600
This law firm is a debt relife agency
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Food
GET HAPPY!
Happy Hour 4-6• M-F
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
GRAND OPENING
BASHAMICHI
Steak & Seafood
1390 El Camino Real
Millbrae
www.bashamichirestaurant.com
JACK’S
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
NEW ENGLAND
LOBSTER CO.
Market & Eatery
Now Open in Burlingame
824 Cowan Road
newenglandlobster.net
LIve Lobster ,Lobster Tail,
Lobster meat & Dungeness Crab
PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA
Because Flavor Still Matters
365 B Street
San Mateo
www.sfpanchovillia.com
VEGETARIAN
BAMBOO GARDEN
Lunch & Dinner
Only Vegetarian Chinese
Restaurant in Millbrae!
309 Broadway, Millbrae
(650)697-6768
Financial
RELATIONSHIP BANKING
Partnership. Service. Trust.
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
Half Moon Bay, Redwood City,
unitedamericanbank.com
San Mateo
(650)579-1500
Furniture
DURALINER ROCKING CHAIR, Maple
Finish, Cream Cushion w matching otto-
man $70 (650)583-4943.
WESTERN FURNITURE
Grand Opening Sale
Everything Marked Down !
601 El Camino Real
San Bruno, CA
Mon. - Sat. 10AM -7PM
Sunday Noon -6PM
We don't meet our competition,
we beat it !
Guns
PENINSULA GUNS
(650) 588-8886
Handguns.Shotguns.Rifles
Tactical and
Hunting Accessories
Buy.Sell.Trade
360 El Camino Real, San Bruno
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
DENTAL
IMPLANTS
Save $500 on
Implant Abutment &
Crown Package.
Call Millbrae Dental
for details
650-583-5880
EYE EXAMINATIONS
579-7774
1159 Broadway
Burlingame
Dr. Andrew Soss
OD, FAAO
www.Dr-AndrewSoss.net
NCP COLLEGE OF NURSING
& CAREER COLLEGE
Train to become a Licensed
Vocational Nurse in 12 months or a
Certified Nursing Assistant in as little
as 8 weeks.
Call (800) 339-5145 for more
information or visit
ncpcollegeofnursing.edu and
ncpcareercollege.com
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
STUBBORN FAT has met its match.
FREEZE Your Fat Away with
COOLSCULPTING
Bruce Maltz, M.D.
Carie Chui, M.D.
Allura Skin & Laser Center, Inc.
280 Baldwin Ave., San Mateo
(650) 344-1121
AlluraSkin.com
Insurance
AANTHEM BLUE
CROSS
www.ericbarrettinsurance.com
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
AFFORDABLE
HEALTH INSURANCE
Personal & Professional Service
JOHN LANGRIDGE
(650) 854-8963
Bay Area Health Insurance Marketing
CA License 0C60215
a Diamond Certified Company
HEALTH INSURANCE
All major carriers
Collins Insurance
Serving the Peninsula
since 1981
Ron Collins
650-701-9700
Lic. #0611437
www.collinscoversyou.com
Insurance
PARENTI & ASSOCIATES
Competitive prices and best service to
meet your insurance needs
* All personal insurance policies
* All commercial insurance policies
* Employee benefit packages
650.596.5900
www.parentiinsurance.com
1091 Industrial Rd #270, San Carlos
Lic: #OG 17832
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
est. 1979
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues, Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
ASIAN MASSAGE
$45 per Hour
Present ad for special price
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
ENJOY THE BEST
ASIAN MASSAGE
$40 for 1/2 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
RELAX
REJUVENATE
RECHARGE
in our luxury bath house
Water Lounge Day Spa
2500 S. El Camino
San Mateo
(650)389-7090
Massage Therapy
851 Cherry Ave. #29, San Bruno
in Bayhill Shopping Center
Open 7 Days 10:30am- 10:30pm
650. 737. 0788
Foot Massage $19.99/hr
Free Sauna (with this Ad)
Body Massage $39.99/hr
Hot StoneMassage $49.99/hr
GRAND OPENING
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes • Multi-family •
Mixed-Use • Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Real Estate Services
VIP can help you with all of your
real estate needs:
SALES * LEASING * MANAGEMENT
Consultation and advice are free
Where every client is a VIP
864 Laurel St #200 San Carlos
650-595-4565
www.vilmont.com
DRE LIC# 1254368
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living
Care located in
Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
&
Burlingame Villa
- Short Term Stays
- Dementia & Alzheimers
Care
- Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
Seniors
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
NAZARETH VISTA
Best Kept Secret in Town !
Independent Living, Assisted Living
and Skilled Nursing Care.
Daily Tours/Complimentary Lunch
650.591.2008
900 Sixth Avenue
Belmont, CA 94002
crd@belmontvista.com
www.nazarethhealthcare.com
Travel
FIGONE TRAVEL GROUP
(650) 595-7750
www.cruisemarketplace.com
Cruises • Land & Family vacations
Personalized & Experienced
Travel Service
Family Owned & Operated
Since 1939
CST#100209-10
WORLD 31
Wednesday • Dec. 4, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Hyung-Jin Kim and Foster Klug
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SEOUL, South Korea — An 85-year-old
U.S. veteran being held in North Korea spent
his war years there in one of the Army’s first
special forces unit, helping a clandestine
group of Korean partisans who were fighting
and spying well behind enemy lines.
Now South Koreans who served with
Merrill Newman, who is beginning his
sixth week in detention, say their unit was
perhaps the most hated and feared by the
North and his association with them may be
the reason he’s being held.
“Why did he go to North Korea?” asked
Park Boo Seo, a former member of unit
known in Korea as Kuwol, which is still
loathed in Pyongyang and glorified in Seoul
for the damage it inflicted on the North dur-
ing the war. “The North Koreans still gnash
their teeth at the Kuwol unit.”
Some of those guerrillas, interviewed this
week by the Associated Press, remember
Newman as a handsome, thin American lieu-
tenant who got them rice, clothes and
weapons during the later stages of the 1950-
53 war, but largely left the fighting to them.
Newman was scheduled to visit South
Korea to meet former Kuwol fighters follow-
ing his North Korea trip. Park said about 30
elderly former guerrillas, some carrying
bouquets of flowers, waited in vain for sev-
eral hours for him at Incheon International
Airport, west of Seoul, on Oct. 27 before
news of his detention was released.
Newman appeared over the weekend on
North Korean state TV apologizing for
alleged wartime crimes in what was widely
seen as a coerced statement.
Park and several other former guerrillas
said they recognized Newman from his past
visits to Seoul in 2003 and 2010 — when
they ate raw fish and drank soju, Korean
liquor — and from the TV footage, which
was also broadcast in South Korea.
U.S. veteran detained in North
Korea oversaw guerrilla group
REUTERS
The White House urged North Korea to release Merrill Newman, an 85-year-old U.S. veteran
of the Korean War who has been held in North Korean custody since last month.
32 Wednesday • Dec. 4, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The Stimulus
The Response
The Norman Silverman
Bridal Collection

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