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Welcome Back 8/24/09

Welcome Back 8/24/09

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Published by DailyCamera.com
The second edition of the Colorado Daily's six issue Welcome Back series. Published Monday, August 24, 2009.
The second edition of the Colorado Daily's six issue Welcome Back series. Published Monday, August 24, 2009.

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WELCOME BACK!

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ColoradoDaiLY.com
NEWS➙CALENDAR➙CHEAP➙EATS➙ENTERTAINMENT➙SPORTS➙TIMEWASTERS
Monday
FREE
Covering CU and Boulder since 1892 Do something.
WHERE TO RUN, CAMP, CLIMB AND
HIKE IN AND AROUND BOULDER
THE GREAT
OUTDOORS
INSIDE
SKI PASSES
COMPARING
MULTI-MOUNTAIN
LIFT TICKETS
PARKOUR
CHECK IT OUT
BIKE TRAILS
BOULDER’S
BEST
TWO-WHEEL
TRACKS
OFFBEAT
SPORTS
ON CAMPUS
AND
IN TOWN
WB2 Colorado Daily Welcome Back Monday, August 24, 2009
OUTDOOR
RECREATION INDEX
Rock gyms: .............. 3
Bolder Boulder:....... 6
Pro runners:............. 8
CU Club Sports: ..... 11
Trail dogs: .............. 14
Ski passes:............. 17
Ski rentals:............. 21
Ski sales:................ 24
Hiking trails:.......... 26
Trail running: .......... 29
Colorado 14ers:...... 31
Rock climbing:........ 34
Trail biking: ............ 37
Road cycling:......... 39
Non-trad sports: .... 42
Camping: ................ 47
Waterways: ............ 52
Ski resorts: ............ 54
Backcountry:.......... 58
Unicyclist: ............. 60
Skate parks:.......... 62
ROCK WORK
Rock gyms
George Squibb gets ready to turn the roof at the indoor climbing wall at the Boulder Rock Club. File photo Zak Wood
Boulder’s indoor climbing spots
Sport climbers have
a lot of indoor
options in this city
By Philip Armour
For the Colorado Daily
C
lustered within a
carabiner’s throw of each
other, Boulder’s four rock
climbing gyms offer something
for everyone, from bouldering and
lead climbs to mountain guiding
services and yoga classes.
Climbing gyms are excellent
for training hard for the natural
rock, yet have spawned their own
form of climbing and competitive
indoor circuits.
Boulder Rock Club
Where: 2829 Mapleton Ave.
Cost: Day pass, $17 ($12
students); monthly unlimited, $65
($52 students); four-month
unlimited, $175 for CU Alpine
Club members
Info: www.totalclimbing.com,
303-442-2804
The deal: The
12,000-square-foot Boulder Rock
Club, is the most ropes-driven and
traditional of the local climbing
gyms. There is a modest
bouldering area, but most climbs
are for roped teams.
There’s also a kid’s area and a
learning area, plus a free-weight
workout room and a yoga room.
The Colorado Mountain School
has offices in the building and
offers a full guide service for
outdoor climbing, ice climbing,
and skiing mountaineering.
The Spot Bouldering Gym
Where: 3240 Prairie Ave.
Cost: Day pass, $15; unlimited
monthly pass, $65 ($58.50 for
students)
Info: www.thespotgym.com,
303-379-8806
The deal: The
10,000-square-foot Spot
Bouldering Gym is mainly for
bouldering. There are some walls,
but ropes are generally not used
here, except for the kids’
programs and teaching belay
techniques.
The freestanding, man-made
boulders of steel and concrete are
why people come here.
As a result, the atmosphere
tends to be social, because
climbers are not partnered up,
SEE CLIMBING , PAGE 4
Monday, August 24, 2009 Colorado Daily Welcome Back WB3
ROCK WORK
Danielle Hoffman works a problem at The Spot Bouldering Gym. File photo Zak Wood
CLIMBING CLIMBING CLIMBING from 3
and the music selection is often
dancey hip-hop and techno.
Movement Climbing
and Fitness
Where: 2845 Valmont Road
Cost: Day pass, $16 ($12
students); monthly pass, $75 ($65
students)
Info:
www.movementboulder.com,
303-443-1505
The deal: Movement Climbing
and Fitness is a new
22,000-square-foot complex
geared for competition and overall
workouts.
It’s home to the city’s tallest
roped climbing wall, at 40 feet,
which makes it the only local
climbing gym qualified to host
International Federation of Sport
Climbing competitions.
There will be a total of 225
routes on 17,500 square feet of
climbing surface area, plus yoga
and spinning studios, and a
complete line of Technogym
cardio and weight equipment.
Colorado Athletic
Training School
Where: 2400 30th St.
Cost: Drop-in, $5; monthly
unlimited, $30
Info: www.catsgym.com,
303-939-9699
The deal: Colorado Athletic
Training School is primarily a
10,000-square-foot gymnastics
gym, but also has a small and
extremely difficult bouldering
area, much of it over-hanging and
with 10 times the number of holds
per panel than any other gym.
Serious climbers come here to
train.
Owner Rob Candelaria opened
the facility in 1988 and was one of
the first climbing walls in the
nation.
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WB4 Colorado Daily Welcome Back Monday, August 24, 2009
Monday, August 24, 2009 Colorado Daily Welcome Back WB5
OPEN LATE
RUN HARD
Get ready
Tommy Rokita works hard to climb the last hill to Folsom Field during
the 2009 Bolder Boulder. File photo Paul Aiken
We buy gently
used brand
name clothing
and accessories
for teens and
young adults.
AT PLATO’S
CLOSET
®
We pay on the spot for all items accepted. •
No waiting time for items to sell.
Clothing must be in good condition •
and in current style. It must be freshly
laundered and folded neatly in boxes,
or in shopping bags. No hangers, please.
We make selling the items you no longer •
need or use convenient, efficient and
fun! (No appointments are necessary.)
The amount we pay is based on •
condition, brand, style and demand.
We reserve the right to refuse items
based on condition, current inventory
levels, or past experience.
Sell
your
cool stuff
today!
www.platosclosetboulder.com
2510 Arapahoe Ave • 303.444.2274
SW corner of 28th and Arapahoe,
just down from Safeway next to Petco
Change your clothes… Change your style!
Shaping up
for the next
Bolder Boulder
Plan 12 weeks to
gear up for
Boulder’s biggest
street party
By Elizabeth Miller
For the Colorado Daily
E
very Memorial Day for the
last 30 years, the streets of
Boulder have crowded with
participants in what has become
the second-largest race in the
country and the largest Memorial
Day celebration outside of
Washington, D.C.
This past May, nearly 55,000
people gathered for the Bolder
Boulder, which is as much a
street party as a road race.
But before they charged away
from the starting line and toward
the finish at Folsom Field, these
runners, joggers and walkers
likely took some steps to prepare
themselves for the 10K race.
Ewen North, head coach and
training director for the Bolder
Boulder, already is leading Bold
Running group training programs
for potential race participants. On
a Saturday morning in August, he
coached almost 50 runners before
they set out for two-hour runs.
SEE RACE , PAGE 7
Bolder Boulder
The next Bolder Boulder
10K race starts at 7 a.m.
May 31, 2010, at 30th
Street near Iris Avenue.
Registration already is
underway at
www.bolderboulder.com
Training tips
A few tips for training for
the next Bolder Boulder:
— Take eight to 12
weeks to train
— Start with mixed
walking and running for
20-30 minutes
— Begin with a 10
minute walking warm-up
— Add five minutes in
time or 10 percent in
distance per week of
training.
— Run in the right shoes,
and don’t put more than
400 miles on any one pair
of shoes
— Visit a physical to get
a fitness check before
beginning a program if you
have any questions or
concerns about your fitness
get interactive
WB6 Colorado Daily Welcome Back Monday, August 24, 2009
RUN HARD
Party
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Rentals
959 Walnut
303-443-2850
COSTUMES
COSTUMES
Runners nearing the finish line at the 2009 Bolder Boulder. File photo Paul Aiken
“Distance running or any
endurance support is really about
building up an aerobic base,” he
said. “Often to really improve it
takes up to several years.”For
novice runners just interested in
getting in shape to run the 6.2
miles of the Bolder Boulder, eight
to 12 weeks of training should
suffice.“Find your level of fitness
and build from there,” he said.
That can mean starting with 20
or 30 minutes of walking with
intermittent running. Then,
gradually increase the amount of
time spent running and the time
for the entire workout to the time
necessary to cover the race
distance.
Three weeks before the race,
the runner should reach the
mileage of the race and run the
race distance in one workout a
week.
“Everyone can do a lot more
than they think they’re capable
of,” he said. “It’s just being patient
and gradually developing the
fitness.”
Cross training by biking, hiking
or even playing ultimate Frisbee
can increase fitness and help
avoid injury by training muscles to
support those used in running
through low-impact activities.
Finding a group of people to
run with, whether through a
training session organized by the
Bolder Boulder or just by
grouping up with friends or
family, can add fun and a better
chance of success to a training
program. And, North said, it also
matches the training program to
the atmosphere of the Bolder
Boulder.“It’s not just a race. It’s a
community event. It’s a street
party. It’s a celebration of
Memorial Day,” North said. “Just
come and do it and you’ll be
blown away by what a great
experience it is.”
This year, 38 performers lined
the race route, which starts on
30th Street at Iris Avenue and
winds through streets downtown,
including Pearl, Folsom, 19th and
Walnut streets, among others.
Repeat race participants look for
the regulars on the route,
including Elvis, the Blues
Brothers and belly dancers.
“It’s such a community thing,”
said Jessie Hild, a Boulder
resident who has run the Bolder
Boulder three times. “You really
feel like a true Boulderite once
you’ve run the race.”
Willis Corcoran, of Longmont,
started running a year and a half
ago and trains with the Bold
Running sessions. Her advice to
new runners: “Just listen to your
body and start out slow.”
The first wave of the 32nd
annual Bolder Boulder will start at
7 a.m. May 31, 2010. Registration
is already open at
www.bolderboulder.com.
RACE RACE RACE from 6
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Monday, August 24, 2009 Colorado Daily Welcome Back WB7
MON DAY ALL DAY AN D NI GHT
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WEDN ESDAY ALL DAY AN D NI GHT
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303.938.0330
www.boulderjapango.com
The pros
Altitude, terrain
and community
By Elizabeth Miller
For the Colorado Daily
J
eff Boele describes Boulder as
a place where “you can wear
your short-shorts.”
Boele moved to Boulder in 2005
because he knew Boulder’s athletic
community would make it easier
and be more accepting of his desire
to pursue a dream of becoming a
professional runner.
“You can come here and not feel
out of place as a runner,” he said.
“Here you can stand at the bus
stop or go to the grocery store
right after a run and you’ll blend
right in.”
Southern Illinois, where Boele
grew up, doesn’t provide the same
athlete-camouflaging community.
Nor does it offer the diverse
terrain, the number of runners
willing to share a workout and the
training-friendly weather that
added to Boulder’s appeal.
Boele now works as a sales
associate and manager of the
team sales division for the
Boulder Running Company,
which was founded by
professional runners, while
continuing to chase his dream.
He’s not alone in choosing
Boulder for his training ground.
For decades, professional runners
have visited to Boulder to train,
and a lot of them have stayed to
become residents.
“They found it wasn’t only a
great place to train, but it’s a great
place to live,” said Brendan Reilly,
president of Boulder Wave.
Founded in 1993, the coaching
and athlete representation
company gets between 150 to 175
athletes coming to Boulder to
train every year.
With 30 medals awarded for the
women’s marathon in the last 10
Olympics and world
championships, the Boulder Wave
has won nine of them. Wave
athletes include Naoko Takahasi,
who won a gold medal in the 2000
Olympics and set a world record
for the marathon in 2001; Lydia
Simon, who won silver at the 2000
Olympics; and Constantina Dita,
who won gold in the 2008
Olympics for the marathon.
Many of these athletes come
not just for what Boulder gives —
its support, its trails on everything
from asphalt to dirt roads — but
also for what being here takes
away: oxygen.
“The main thing you’re after
here is to increase your red blood
cell count,” Reilly said.
Red blood cells are responsible
for carrying oxygen through the
blood stream, so, he said, “you’re
basically trying to improve your
oxygen delivery system as an
athlete.”
More efficient oxygen use can
give athletes an edge at
competitions, many of which are
at sea level.
“You’re a little more tired and a
little more challenged each run,”
said Justin Young, a Wave runner
who lives in Superior and
attended the world
championships in Berlin in
August. “That’s the strength that
you gain when you get to the
competition at sea level.”
Young moved to Boulder seven
years ago to train and live near
the mountains.
“It’s just an inspiring
atmosphere,” he said. “You get to
get a variety of places to train,
whereas in Indianapolis and
Michigan there aren’t as many
options of trails and the
community isn’t as supportive of
distance runners.”
Having other runners around,
whether he’s running the Boulder
Creek Path or in Chautauqua
Park, also helps him feel a little
more motivated.
Sara Vaughn, a middle-distance
runner with the Wave, said the
local trails and the supportive
community kept her and her
husband, Brent Vaughn, in
Boulder after both graduated
from the University of Colorado in
2008.
“We love how, when it snows,
they plow the creek path before
they’ve even plowed the roads,”
she said.
Many of Vaughn’s pro-runner
friends have moved to Oregon,
where companies like Nike offer
support to athletes.
Boulder also competes with
Albuquerque, N.M.; Mammoth
Lakes, Calif.; St. Moritz,
Switzerland; and Kunming, China,
for high-altitude training centers.
“We just think this is the best
place and the community support
here means a lot to us,” Vaughn
said.
Distance runners, Reilly said,
“are not just accepted here.
They’re celebrated.”
Former University of Colorado runners Brent and Sara Vaughn have
remained in Boulder to train. File photo Sammy Dallal
WB8 Colorado Daily Welcome Back Monday, August 24, 2009
TRAINING GROUNDS
Monday, August 24, 2009 Colorado Daily Welcome Back WB9
WB10 Colorado Daily Welcome Back Monday, August 24, 2009
CLUB STYLE
B AR e
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4:30pm-6:00pm
Closed Sunday
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M-F: 11am-2:30pm
M-TH: 4:30pm-9:30pm
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2785 Iris Ave. Boulder, CO 80304
NW corner 28th and Iris | 303.443.5100
www. ar ugul ar i s t or ant e. com
Club Sports
really happy hour
cocktails on the cheap
Mike Blea, president of the University of Colorado’s club freestyle ski
team, practices aerial maneuvers on a trampoline in his backyard
earlier this year. File photo Zak Wood
Teaming up
to train
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CU’s clubs offer
ways to explore and
improve at outdoor
sports
By Elizabeth Miller
For the Colorado Daily
C
lub Sports at the
University of Colorado
offer students a chance to
get active and be involved,
meeting new people and taking
advantage of a team support
system.
Structured practices, access to
equipment and coaching can
train novices and experts alike
on the sports of their choice.
At the peak of its season, CU’s
Club Sports draw approximately
1,400 student participants. The
34 clubs cover activities that the
major campus teams miss —
everything from soccer to fly
fishing.
According to Patty McConnell,
coordinator for collegiate sport
clubs, with the number of sports
offered and the variety of skill
levels accepted, Club Sports
“find a niche for everybody.”
Many of the clubs are
structured so members become
as competitive as they choose.
“There’s a component in
skiing that’s necessary to
improve, and that’s desire,” said
Palmer Hoyt, head coach for the
freestyle ski club. “The incentive
for people to train is the level of
desire they have to improve.”
The freestyle ski club provides
members coaching on improving
both as freestyle skiers and as
skiers on the whole mountain.
More advanced members form a
competitive team and may ski at
10 or 15 competitions, while
general club members compete
in about five competitions.
“For the most part everybody
trains together,” Hoyt said. “We
SEE TRAIN, PAGE 12
More info
Learn more about the
University of Colorado’s
Club Sports program at
www.colorado.edu/
rec-center/clubsports
Monday, August 24, 2009 Colorado Daily Welcome Back WB11
CLUB STYLE
Matt Gawronski works the quarter-pipe at a past University of Colorado club snowboard competition at
Eldora Ski Resort. File photo Jon Hatch
TRAIN TRAIN TRAIN from 12
try as much as possible to
function as a whole team unit.”
That includes four days a
week of strength training and
two or three days of training on
trampolines or diving boards.
Coaches also offer practice
sessions at Keystone four days a
week.
For the last two years, the
competitive team has won the
Collegiate National Freestyle
Skiing competitions.
Club Sports, on average, bring
in two or three national
championships per year,
according to McConnell. In
addition to the freestyle ski club,
the novice women’s rowing and
swim club won national
championships in 2009.
“We talk about promoting the
university in a very positive light
through athletics, and we do that
very well,” McConnell said.
The university provides
equipment for use during many
club sports with a deposit. It may
also help reduce costs by
providing space for meetings,
vans for transportation and
visibility for incoming students
who might have an interest in
the sport but not know how to
pursue it without support.
“A lot of people come in
thinking, ‘There’s no way I could
finish that,’ and they learn that
with training, and by learning
how to eat and sleep right, they
can,” said Jesse Prather,
president of the triathlon club.
“It’s great to see peoples’
confidence grow as they’re
learning how to do things they
never thought they could.”
To be eligible for
membership, students must be
enrolled full time and be in good
standing. Clubs also have unique
requirements for membership
dues, equipment, lessons and
contributing volunteer hours or
hours at fundraising events.
McConnell said attending a
club’s organizational meeting at
the beginning of the semester is
essential to getting those details
in order, as well as making
attending possible tryouts.
Popular clubs:
CYCLING
Fall meeting: 6:30-8 p.m.
Tuesday, Hellems 252
Members include 75 road
bikers and 45 mountain bikers, as
well as track and cyclo-cross
members. The club organizes
between two and five rides per
week. Members can compete in
10 or more events per semester.
EQUESTRIAN
Fall meeting: 7-8 p.m.
Thursday, Recreation Center
Conference Room 1-2.
The equestrian club’s 30
members practice English-style
riding at Fall River Farm in Fort
Lupton, and Western in Parker.
They compete in nine regional
shows per style.
FLY FISHING
Fall meeting: 5-6 p.m. Sept. 3,
Recreation Center Conference
Room 1-2.
The 20 members of the fly
fishing club meet at Boulder
Creek or in member’s homes
once a weak to learn fly tying and
fly casting. Club members take
trips to rivers and lakes in the
SEE TRAIN, PAGE 13
with the Turtle Island Quartet & Pacquito D’Rivera
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WB12 Colorado Daily Welcome Back Monday, August 24, 2009
CLUB STYLE
The University of
Colorado’s cycling
club hosts a short-
track mountain bike
race in 2008.
File photo Marty
Caivano
TRAIN TRAIN TRAIN from 12
region.
FREESTYLE SKI
Fall meeting: 6-7 p.m. Sept. 10,
Recreation Center Conference
Room 1-2.
Fifty members of the freestyle
skiing club practice mornings and
evenings during the week in
addition to training at Keystone
between two and four days a
week. Members compete in six
Rocky Mountain Division
competitions, six local slope
style/half pipe/rail jam
competitions, two big mountain
competitions, USCSA National
Collegiate Freestyle Skiing
Circuit, and Nationals, for
qualifiers.
KAYAK
Fall meeting: 7-8 p.m. Sept. 3,
Recreation Center Conference
Room 1-2.
For the 30 to 50 members of
the kayak club, the Rec Center
Clare Small Pool is opened
Wednesday and Friday evenings
for practice sessions. Members
can compete in freestyle/rodeo
boater-x and slalom competitions.
SNOWBOARDING
Fall meeting: 7-8 p.m. Sept. 10,
Recreation Center Conference
Room 3-4.
Optional off-season training
including trampoline and skate
practice and weightlifting are
available for the 100 members of
the snowboarding club. Official
club practices begins in late fall,
and sessions are Monday through
Fridays at 8:30 a.m. Members can
compete in multiple regional
events.
TRIATHALON
Fall meeting: 7-8 p.m. Sept. 1,
Benson Earth Sciences 180
The 120 members of the
triathlon club can choose from
different workouts any day of the
seek. They compete in the
Collegiate Nationals and Regional
competitions, as well as other
competitions selected by
individuals.
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Monday, August 24, 2009 Colorado Daily Welcome Back WB13
FOUR LEGS
Excursions
Taking the dog for a hike
Boulder’s outdoor
spaces offer plenty
to choose for pet-
friendly activities
By Elizabeth Miller
For the Colorado Daily
P
icking an activity to do with
a dog depends as much on
personal choice and fitness
as picking an activity for people,
according to Ania Savage, author
of “Best Hikes with Dogs
Colorado.”
“I’d never recommend a couch
potato with an overweight dog
climbing a 14er,” Savage said.
“Match your fitness level and the
fitness level of your pet to the
difficulty level of the hike.
“If you can match them well,
you’re going to have a really,
really good time.”
In Boulder, that means starting
with the Mesa Trail in Eldorado
Canyon, which offers a variety of
terrain but also a variety of exit
points if the hike needs to be
shortened.
Then, Savage said, move up to
the Royal Arch trail in
Chautauqua, then the Green
Mountain loop from the Gregory
Trailhead near Chautauqua, and,
finally, South Boulder Peak and
Bear Mountain in Eldorado
Canyon.
“Make sure that you pace
yourself and your dog to your
abilities, and start easy,” Savage
said.
She recommended checking
the trailheads for current
information on leash laws for
specific trails. Most of the trails in
Chautauqua and Eldorado Canyon
allow dogs on leash or within
voice-and-sight control. If a dog
has been trained to come back
immediately when called, to not
chase wildlife and not be
aggressive, it can be off leash in
open spaces and mountain parks
after receiving a voice-and-sight
tag.
Rachael Thompson, who
adopted her dog a year ago when
she moved to Boulder, said she
enjoys hiking the Mesa Trail with
her dog.
“Boulder is just so friendly for
dogs that it’s a lot of fun to have
one,” she said. “And hiking with a
dog is so much more fun than
hiking by yourself.”
SEE DOGS, PAGE 16
Lauren Ferber, center, and Ben Weible take Sammy the dog out for a
hike at Mount Sanitas. File photo Sammy Dallal
WB14 Colorado Daily Welcome Back Monday, August 24, 2009
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FOUR LEGS
DOGS DOGS DOGS from 14
Savage also suggested
spending some time at area dog
parks, where training and
socialization can be practiced.
Boulder city ordinances —
including the laws requiring
owners to pick up after their pets
and prohibiting aggressive
animals — still apply at city dog
parks. And leash laws still apply
on the way to and from the off-
leash areas.
“In general, they’re fairly
common sense approaches,” said
Matt Claussen, urban resource
manager for the city’s Parks and
Recreation Department. In
addition to following ordinances,
Claussen urged owners to be
courteous to one another.
“It’s always good to check in
with other people and say ‘Is it OK
if our dogs play?’ ” he said. “It’s
really, really important that people
respect why other people are
using the dog park.”
Popularity of dog parks has
encouraged the city to turn two
temporary dog parks at Valmont
City Park and at the East Boulder
Community Center as permanent
off-leash areas.
“They’re very, very popular for
a lot of communities these days
because a lot of communities have
leash laws,” said Claussen.
They’ve become play areas,
though, according to Claussen,
the original intent for dog parks
was to be training areas for voice-
and-sight control.
Reynolds Ranch and the west
lake at Twin Lakes offer off-leash
areas for dogs.
Owners interested in using the
voice-and-sight program must
view a video and have a tag issued
for their dog to wear. The video is
on the Open Space and Mountain
Parks Web site: www.osmp.org.
Daisy Mae shakes off water at owner Kim Haroche’s feet after
retrieving a disc from the dog pond at East Boulder Recreation Center.
File photo Jon Hatch
Off-leash Boulder
Valmont Dog Park, 5275 Valmont Road, on north side of
Valmont. Fenced area for large and small dogs, about 3 acres in
large area, about .25 acres in small area. A water spigot is
seasonally available.
Foothills Community Dog Park, Eighth Street, west of Broadway
between Locust Avenue and Lee Hill Road. Two acres with
separate areas for large and small dogs. Open dawn to dusk..
East Boulder Dog Park, 5660 Sioux Drive, near East Boulder
Community Center. Fenced area for large and small dogs and
limited water access to a small lake. Large dog area is 2.5
acres, and small dog is .25 acres.
Howard Heuston Dog Park, on 34th Street, south of Iris
Avenue, east of 30th Street. Non-fenced area of about 1.23
acres where voice and sight control must be in use.
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WB16 Colorado Daily Welcome Back Monday, August 24, 2009
Off-leash guidelines
— Excrement removal is required as a city ordinance
— Aggressive dogs are prohibited
— Dogs must be vaccinated and display a license
— Owners need to be attentive to their dogs
— Owners should avoid bringing more than three dogs to the
park at a time
— Avoid bringing children, puppies or dogs in heat.
SKI PASSES
Lift tickets
Bring on the ski deals
Some student deals
or discounted
prices continue
through the fall
By Elizabeth Miller
For the Colorado Daily
A
s lift prices at the ticket
window creep up toward
$100, multi-mountain passes
may begin to look more
appealing, even for skiers and
riders who don’t plan to hit the
slopes every weekend from
November to April.
“If you’re going to ski more
than four or five days, it’s still a
bargain to get a pass,” said Mary
Woolwine, director of marketing
for Winter Park Resort.
“The key benefit is the value,”
Liz Biebl, a spokesperson for Vail
Mountain, wrote in an e-mail. “For
guests who regularly ski or
snowboard in Summit County, or
both Summit and Eagle counties,
the passes offer a fantastic value
with equally outstanding benefits
versus the cost of a single-day lift
ticket.”
Multi-mountain ski passes
basically break down to cover
either the Vail resorts —
including Vail, Beaver Creek,
Keystone, Breckenridge and
Arapahoe Basin — or the
Intrawest resorts, which are
Winter Park/Mary Jane, Copper
and Steamboat.
Prices for passes fluctuate
through the year. The prices
advertised now are expected to
increase around Labor Day.
SEE TICKETS, PAGE 19
Andy Henkes blasts down Dragon’s Teeth in China Bowl at Vail. Associated Press file photo
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Monday, August 24, 2009 Colorado Daily Welcome Back WB17
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WB18 Colorado Daily Welcome Back Monday, August 24, 2009
SKI PASSES
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Cathy Wiedemer makes waist deep tracks at the Steamboat Ski Area.
Associated Press file photo
TICKETS TICKETS TICKETS from 17
“You can buy a pass all the
time, but January prices are a little
high,” Woolwine said.
Passes include benefits such as
e-mail updates on weather
conditions, events at ski areas and
gear deals, as well as
subscriptions to Ski or Skiing
magazine and even the option to
use your pass like a debit card at
resort stores and restaurants.
Most include the option to
purchase discounted tickets
available for friends and family.
Renewals are available online
already, but many passes must be
purchased for first-time pass
buyers at in-store locations, many
of which have not yet been
announced.
Vail Resorts
All passes come with six days of
discounted tickets for friends and
family of passholders to use.
Pricing on those tickets has not
been released.
Epic Pass: One of the more
expensive and more flexible
options out there, this pass
provides unlimited, unrestricted
access to Vail, Beaver Creek,
Breckenridge, Keystone and
Arapahoe Basin, as well as
Heavenly near Lake Tahoe in
California. That’s 16,000 acres to
ski or ride any day of the season.
Priced for fall sales at $599, and
available for purchase online at
www.epicpass.com.
Colorado Pass: A more
modestly priced but still epicly
capable pass, the Colorado Pass
offers unlimited and unrestricted
access to Keystone, Breckenridge
and Arapahoe Basin, plus 10 days
at Vail and Beaver Creek.
Blackout days for Vail and Beaver
Creek fall around the
Thanksgiving, Christmas, New
Year’s and Valentine’s holidays.
Priced currently at $439 for
SEE TICKETS, PAGE 20
Monday, August 24, 2009 Colorado Daily Welcome Back WB19
SKI PASSES
TICKETS TICKETS TICKETS from 19
adults and $329 for teenagers
aged 18 or under. Available to
renew online at
www.coloradopass.com.
Summit Pass: The smaller-
scale version of the Colorado
Pass, the Summit Pass gives
unlimited access to Keystone,
Breckenridge and Arapahoe Basin
for $399, or $309 for those 18 and
under.
Available to renew at
www.snow.com/passsales.
Intrawest Resorts
All Rocky Mountain Passes
come with 10 $55 tickets for
friends and family to use with a
passholder at Copper or Winter
Park.
Rocky Mountain Super Pass:
For $399, this pass provides
unlimited skiing at Winter Park/
Mary Jane and Copper. The pass
is on sale now online at
www.skicolorado.com.
Through Dec. 1, college
students, faculty and staff are
eligible to open a new checking
account at Wells Fargo and
receive two Super Passes for the
cost of one.
More information is available at
www.collegeskideal.com.
Rocky Mountain Super Pass
Plus: The Super Pass Plus allows
for unlimited skiing at Winter
Park/Mary Jane and Copper, as
well as six unrestricted days and
free Friday afternoons at
Steamboat for $439.
Full-time college students with
an ID and class schedule can
purchase the Super Pass Plus for
$329. Passes are sold at Copper
Mountain, Winter Park or the
Christy Sports at Denver West in
Lakewood.
Rocky Mountain Ultimate
Pass: For unlimited access to
Winter Park/Mary Jane, Copper
and Steamboat, this pass is the
way to go. It’s currently priced at
$919 and is only for sale at the
Christy Sports at Denver West.
Renewals for both passes are
available online now.
A skier does a little showing off in front of the lift at Breckenridge Ski Resort. File photo Mark Leffingwell
Cultural Events Board...
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November 16 - Meet & Greet
November 30 - New Member Interviews
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Interested in advertising your event?
The Colorado Daily reaches 70% of CU Students daily!
Contact Nate Manning at (720) 232-1277 or manning@coloradodaily.com
WB20 Colorado Daily Welcome Back Monday, August 24, 2009
SKI RENTALS
ENVISION BOULDER HAS MOVED
Come visit our new Pearl Street location!
Bring in your Buff One Card for a student discount
Call & Schedule your next eye exam, contact lens fitting or Lasik Consultation.
We validate parking in city garages.
303.939.3021 1011 PEARL STREET ENVISIONBOULDER.COM
Try it out
Conor Morrison, an employee at Boulder Ski Deals, pulls out a pair of
rental skis for a customer. File photo Stephanie Davis
Gearing up
on a budget
Local options allow
for sampling
outdoor sports
By Elizabeth Miller
For the Colorado Daily
O
utdoor sports can be
expensive. Really
expensive.
So for new Colorado residents
just hoping to get a taste for the
great outdoors available in
Boulder’s backyard, dropping a
few hundred dollars on a tent or a
set of skis can be scary enough to
make sitting on the couch look
like the best way to blow a
Saturday afternoon.
Local companies and the
University of Colorado’s Outdoor
Program rent gear at affordable
rates, and usually pass it on with a
little good advice.
The Outdoor Program
equipment office, located on the
upper floor of the CU Recreation
Center, rents tents, sleeping bags,
sleeping pads, snowshoes,
trekking poles and climbing
shoes. For $20, a student can
check out a sleeping bag for the
weekend to make sleeping in the
woods or crashing on the floor of
a friend’s condo at a ski area more
comfortable.
Weeklong rentals also are
available for double the price of a
weekend rental.
They take advance reservations
online, which Annaliese Seidel,
assistant coordinator for the
Outdoor Program, recommended
for busy times, including Labor
Day weekend, fall break and
spring break.
“The Outdoor Program is here
to provide good outdoor services,”
she said. “We lead trips but we
also want to provide people who
have their own trips planned with
quality gear.”
Outdoors Program staff talks to
students to make sure the gear
they check out matches their
needs. Staff can also provide
information or resources for
planning, including driving
directions and permits.
Equipment available to
checkout does not include any
technical mountaineering gear.
“We’d rather take you on the
trip and teach you the gear than
just check out the gear and hope
for the best,” Seidel said.
Trips offered vary from rock
climbing to fly fishing.
The Boulder REI store also
rents camp stoves, tents,
backpacks, sleeping bags/pads,
and snowshoes. Mountaineering
gear, paddling gear, and Nordic
skis can be rented from the
Denver flagship store.
SEE GEAR, PAGE 22
Monday, August 24, 2009 Colorado Daily Welcome Back WB21
SKI RENTALS
You can rent ski gear at REI, too. File photo Paul Aiken
GEAR GEAR GEAR from 21
For skis and snowboards, rental
shops offer prices from $14.99 for
a basic ski package at Sports
Authority to $26 for the
performance shape ski package at
Maison de Ski. Snowboard rentals
often fall just above $20, at $25 at
the Crystal Ski Shop and $21 at
Maison de Ski.
With the new season comes
new gear, even at rental
companies.
“We are massively upgrading
the inventory for this year just to
have good stuff,” said Dennis
Wied, co-owner of Maison de Ski.
That will include 150 Solomon
skis, 50 Rossignol skis, 50
snowboards and new boots for all
skis and boards.
Rates for rentals at ski resorts
may run a little higher, at over $40
for demo ski packages at some ski
areas, but basic packages list
rates similar to those at rental
shops in town.
According to Tapio Niskanen,
national sales manager for
rentskis.com, a network of rental
shops at the resorts allows them
to move skis and snowboards
around based on the conditions at
the areas.
“We can keep very specific
equipment in each location to
match whatever needs you would
have up on that terrain,” he said.
That can mean making more
powder skis available to rent
where the powder is, and more
mogul skis where the moguls are.
Though student discounts are
not available, Niskanen
encouraged students who may be
coming to the mountains with a
campus group or a group of
friends to contact the rental
company to make a group
reservation and secure a group
rate for rentals.
Online reservations can also
provide some discounts.
Advanced reservations receive
between 10 and 20 percent off on
rentskis.com and 25 percent off
on skirentals.com.
“Obviously we’re trying to get
people to make reservations
ahead of time,” Niskanen said. “It
helps us manage our equipment
flow.”
He said that as airlines have
continued to add fees for extra
and over-sized baggage, ski and
snowboard rental companies are
seeing an increase in business
because fees have made it less
expensive to rent skis or a
snowboard than to check them for
flights.
Ski and snowboard rentals are
available for the day, the week or
the season.
Popular rental outlets include:
Boulder Ski Deals
2525 Arapahoe Ave.
303-938-8799
www.boulderskideals.com
Breeze
999 County Road #308
(off exit 234 on I-70 at Dumont)
303-567-2087
www.skirentals.com
Christy Sports
2000 30th St. Boulder
888-413-6966
www.christysports.com
Crystal Ski Rental
3216 Arapahoe Ave., #H, Boulder
303-449-7669
www.crystalskishop.com
Maison de Ski Rental
2804 Colorado Ave.
303-567-2044
www.maisondeski.com
REI
1789 28th St.
303-583-9970
www.rei.com/stores/44
Sports Authority
3320 N. 28th St., Boulder
303-449-9021
www.sportsauthority.com
University of Colorado
Recreation Center
303-492-6080
www.colorado.edu/rec-center
303.402.9475 • 1980 8th St. (8th & Pearl)
www.myspace.com/westendsalonboulder


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WB22 Colorado Daily Welcome Back Monday, August 24, 2009
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Monday, August 24, 2009 Colorado Daily Welcome Back WB23
SKI SALES
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Yes, these people are actually camped out for Sports Authority’s Sniagrab sale in Denver a couple years
ago. Rocky Mountain News
Browsing ski
and board deals
Local stores offer later, longer sales for ski, snowboard gear
By Elizabeth Miller
For the Colorado Daily
B
ig stores have big sales, but
some of Boulder’s smaller
merchandisers are offering
some big deals this fall, too.
The big sales — Sniagrab at
Sports Authority and Ski Rex at
Boulder Ski Deals — will offer up
to 75 percent off last year’s line of
clothing and gear. Both sales start
Labor Day weekend.
Every ski, every snowboard,
every boot, every binding and all
winter apparel will be marked
between 40 and 75 percent off the
original price for last year’s
merchandise at Ski Rex, according
to a Boulder Ski Deals
spokesperson.
Some current season products
may go on sale, too, but that
SEE DEALS, PAGE 25
WB24 Colorado Daily Welcome Back Monday, August 24, 2009
SKI SALES
information will not be released
until the sale starts.
The Sniagrab sale is
comparable.
REI also will have a big fall sale
Oct. 9-18 that, according to
Courtney Coe, a public relations
associate for the store, will have
markdowns on ski and snowboard
gear. Those details are also not yet
released.
To avoid the battles in big lines
and crowds — in years past, the
line Sniagrab has started days in
advance of the sale with buyers
camping out near the store — and
the possibility of untrained or, at
best, overworked employees,
some of the smaller, local stores in
Boulder are offering deals worth
checking out.
Those sales may run later in the
season, or continue longer toward
opening days at the ski areas.
Narily MacDonald, marketing
coordinator for Outdoor Divas,
said she’s seeing “a lot of bright,
fresh colors in the next season,
and a lot of smaller brands coming
out with some fun fresh patterns
which are quite cool and trendy.”
Outdoor Divas has its 2009
inventory on sale, and the 2010
Burton boards and K2 skis already
are marked down.
“If people are shopping around,
we have a lot to choose from and
we will match any price out there,”
she said.
Side benefits for shopping at
Outdoor Divas, which stocks
women-specific clothing and gear,
include custom boot-fitting and a
free pedicure with the purchase of
a new pair of ski boots — so riders
and skiers can, as MacDonald
said, “show off your toes before it
snows.”
For those willing to purchase
used, or barely used, gear, the
Boulder Sports Recycler and
Alpine Sports Ski and Kayak offer
a chance to pick up gear for
affordable prices.
“Our store motto is ‘friends
don’t let friends pay retail,’ ” said
Jamie Bledsoe, general manager of
the Recycler. “Everything’s on sale
every day.”
The Recycler pricing scale is
based on wholesale. They start
stocking ski and snowboard
equipment at the end of
September.
Alpine Sports is planning a ski
swap and sale for early October
that will include closeout sales of
2009 gear as well as the
opportunity for selling or
purchasing used gear.
“Everyone else does their big
blowout tent sales and we’re trying
to be a more community-oriented
ski swap,” said Patrick Wallace,
the owner of Alpine Sports. “It’s
basically a parking lot event. We’ll
set up tables and anyone can bring
by any kind of gear that they want
to swap.”
This swap will be the second for
Alpine Sports this year, following a
kayak swap in the spring.
“We just figured, with the
economy the way it is, a lot of
people don’t have the money to
spend n new gear,” Wallace said.
“It’s a way to encourage people to
continue the sport without
spending a ton of money.”
Sales representatives for
equipment companies will also
bring in samples to sell, though
which representatives will attend
has not yet been determined.
Wallace said he expects more
details to be available on the
company’s Web site toward the
middle of September.
Alpine Sports Ski & Kayak
2510 47th St., Unit A1
303-325-3231
www.alpine-sports.com
Boulder Ski Deals
2525 Arapahoe Ave., #E10
303-938-8799
www.boulderskideals.com
Boulder Sports Recycler
4949 N. Broadway #113
303-786-9940
www.bouldersportsreycler.com
Outdoor Divas
1133 Pearl St.
303-449-3482
www.outdoordivas.com
REI
1789 28th St.
303-583-9970
www.rei.com/stores/44
Sports Authority
53320 N. 28th St.
303-449-9021
www.sportsauthority.com
DEALS DEALS DEALS from 24
Monday, August 24, 2009 Colorado Daily Welcome Back WB25
HIKING
Happy feet
Five great local hikes
Boulder County’s a
gold mine of trails
By Philip Armour
For the Colorado Daily
A
ccording to the city of
Boulder, the city’s Open
Spaces and Mountain Parks
receive 5.3 million visits each year
— about as many as Yellowstone
National Park.
Boulder’s natural wonders and
sporty populace are indivisible, so
join the fray to sniff sweet
wildflowers, spot poodle-
snatching mountain lions and ogle
dramatic rock formations.
The 19th-century miners who
flocked here for gold (and never
found any) would be surprised
that the very wilderness that
repelled and challenged them is
Boulder’s gold mine today.
1
Sugarloaf
Mountain
The hike up
SEE HIKES, PAGE 28
More info
Boulder’s Open Space and
Mountain Parks
(www.bouldercolorado.gov)
and Colorado State Parks
(www.parks.state.co.us)
have great local trail
information, as does
www.protrails.com for Front
Range hikes.
Justin Roth, right, and Kristin Marine, of Boulder, hike Betasso Preserve located off of Sugarloaf Road. For
Colorado Daily Zak Wood
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WB26 Colorado Daily Welcome Back Monday, August 24, 2009
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Monday, August 24, 2009 Colorado Daily Welcome Back WB27
HIKING
303-492-8855
www.cuvictimassistance.com
Assault * Bias MotivatedIncidents * Crime * Death
* Harassment * Intimate Partner Violence * Serious
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To make a confidential report online go to
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I was forced to have sex.
Was it a sexual assault? Rape?
Bad sex? Being groped?
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Free confidential information and support are
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HIKES HIKES HIKES from 26
Sugarloaf Mountain is one of
the quickest and best ways to
get a view above Boulder
County.
Take Colo. 119 (Boulder
Canyon) and turn right one mile
past the tunnel onto Sugarloaf
Road.
At 4.8 miles up the hill, turn
right on Sugarloaf Mountain
Road and drive one mile to the
trailhead.
2
Royal
Arch
Just 3.5 miles from
Chautauqua Trailhead, the
Royal Arch is a Utah-like arch
formation.
Hidden in the Flatirons, this
20-foot rock arch beautifully
frames the Boulder valley to the
southeast and the massive
Flatirons to the north.
Arrive at Chautauqua early to
get a good parking spot. The lot
is small and fills up early. Other
parking is available on Baseline
Road, south of the entrance to
the park.)
3
Betasso
Perserve
The three-mile loop
at Betasso Preserve is a great
place to bring a lunch, as
numerous picnic tables and
memorial benches adorn the
773-acre backcountry area.
Take Colo. 119 (Boulder
Canyon) west from Boulder for
six miles, then turn right onto
Sugarloaf Road for 0.9 miles.
Turn right again at Betasso
Road to the trailhead.
FYI: Bikes are allowed, but
not on Wednesdays and
Saturdays.
4
Rattlesnake
Gulch
Rattlesnake Gulch
Trail in Eldorado Canyon State
Park is a 3.6-mile loop that
wends past the burned ruins of
the historic Crags hotel, built in
1908.
This mellow hike has
spectacular canyon views to the
west and plains views to the
east.
5
Green Mountain
Start at the Gregory
Canyon Trailhead off
Baseline Road and get onto the
Ranger Trail, which leads you
up 5.45 miles to the summit of
Green Mountain.
The short but challenging
hike rewards visitors with
exceptional views to the west of
Boulder County’s back range,
the Indian Peaks Wilderness,
Continental Divide, and Rocky
Mountain National Park.
Area man Ryan Van Duzer under the Royal Arch. File photo
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WB28 Colorado Daily Welcome Back Monday, August 24, 2009
TRAIL RUNNING
David Rosenthal, of
Boulder, gives his dog
Rama a few minutes
to cool off at the
trailhead of Mount
Sanitas after a
morning run.
File photo Stephanie
Davis
Go fast
Five top area
running trails
High-altitude
endurance training
will get you into the
shape of your life
By Philip Armour
For the Colorado Daily
Y
ou don’t need us to discover
the popular Boulder Canyon
Trail from Eben G. Fine
Park or the Mesa trail, with its
multitude of variations.
Just follow the runners.
Perhaps more than biking (or
yoga), running is the signature
Boulder sport.
And besides these popular
areas, the mountains are riddled
with trails.
1
C Loop
The 6.76-mile C
Loop from the
Chautauqua Amphitheater
circles National Center for
Atmospheric Research on parts
of Mesa Trail.
Skirting the Flatirons is what
makes this run special.
2
Marshall Mesa
Loop
The nine-mile
Marshall Mesa Loop off Hwy
170 near Eldorado via the
Community Ditch and Doudy
Draw is rolling and fast.
Get into a steady rhythm
here.
SEE TRAILS, PAGE 30
More info
USA Track and Field’s Web
site, www.usatf.org, has a
feature called America’s
Running Routes that list
484 runs in the Boulder
area from half-mile to
75-plus-mile routes.
Monday, August 24, 2009 Colorado Daily Welcome Back WB29
TRAIL RUNNING
TRAILS TRAILS TRAILS from 29
3
BoBolink Trail
The BoBolink
trailhead at Baseline
Road and Cherryvale Avenue is
a 6.59-mile out and back run
through flat Boulder Open
Space land.
It’s flat, pastoral and
meditative.
4
Mount Sanitas
At the top of
Mapleton Avenue by
the entrance to Sunshine
Canyon, the Sanitas Valley trail
climbs 1,200 feet over 1.75
miles to the top of Mount
Sanitas, so the legs can get
wobbly on the steady uphill
climb.
But the views of Boulder from
the summit cannot be beat.
5
Wonderland Lake
Get onto the
Wonderland Lake
trailhead on north Broadway
and circle Wonderland Lake,
then head north on the trials to
Foothills trailhead, for a five-
mile out and back.
Running near water is always
a treat.
Erin Eckles of Boulder runs around Wonderland Lake on a cool fall day. File photo Cliff Grassmick
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WB30 Colorado Daily Welcome Back Monday, August 24, 2009
MOUNTAINS
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Jennifer Roach reaches the summit of Colorado’s highest 14er, the
14,433-foot Mount Elbert near Leadville. Associated Press file photo
High as the sky
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Five (or six)
summitable
14ers
Not all of
Colorado’s
14,000-foot peaks
are difficult to
climb
By Philip Armour
For the Colorado Daily
G
et off the Hill and into some
real hills.
Colorado has 54
mountains in excess of 14,000 feet
in elevation, not to mention the
756 peaks and promontories of
13,000 feet or higher.
Summitting all 54 14ers can be
a lifetime goal, a summer suffer-
fest or, in the case of Chris
Davenport, a one-winter ski
mountaineering marathon.
For most hikers, though,
summitting one every summer or
two is enough.
Gary Roache’s and Lou
Dawson’s guide books — both
named (surprise!) “Colorado’s
Fourteeners” —are the go-to
resources for the casual hiker,
offering experienced and
insightful route-finding and safety
tips.
1
Mount
Elbert
Despite being the
highest point in Colorado,
Mount Elbert (14,433 feet) is a
pretty straightforward hike up a
long ridge.
As the tallest 14er, it scores
big bragging rights, plus the
Colorado Avalanche carried the
Stanley Cup up there after
winning the trophy in 2001.
2
Mount
Evans
Mount Evans
(14,264 feet) is unique
because you can drive — or
bike — to the top, which makes
SEE 14ERS, PAGE 33
More info
Colorado Fourteeners
Initiative has extremely
detailed trail descriptions,
photos, GPS coordinates
and topo map suggestions
at 14ers.org
Monday, August 24, 2009 Colorado Daily Welcome Back WB31
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WB32 Colorado Daily Welcome Back Monday, August 24, 2009
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14ERS 14ERS 14ERS from 31
the come-one-come-all party
atmosphere at the summit
totally different from the
wilderness peaks.
You can hike it, of course —
but why bother?
3
Pike’s
Peak
Pikes Peak (14,110
feet) is another chair-assisted
summit opportunity, as a cog
railroad is available to hoist you
to the summit.
The Pikes Peak Marathon
(www.pikespeakmarathon.org)
each August, however, starts in
Colorado Springs and gains
7,815 feet over 26.2 miles to
the top.
Ouch.
4
Grays
and Torreys
Grays (14,270 feet)
and Torreys (14,267 feet) are
great because they’re so close
— just off Interstate 70 near
Georgetown — and you can
easily nail both summits on the
same hike.
5
Long’s
Peak
Longs Peak
(14,255 feet) may not be easy,
per se, but this Front Range
behemoth casts its shadow far
onto the plains and captures
the imagination of anyone who
drives through Estes Park.
Plus, the wide summit
plateau is so unusually large
that you can comfortably play
Frisbee or football up there.
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Monday, August 24, 2009 Colorado Daily Welcome Back WB33
CLIMBING
Stone free
Five excellent climbs
As its name
suggests, Boulder’s
knee-deep in rock
climbing
By Philip Armour
For the Colorado Daily
T
he iconic Flatirons have been
attracting rock climbers
since the 19th century, to say
nothing of the Native Americans
who made the Boulder Valley
their home for thousands of years
and hunted game throughout the
crags and gullies of the Front
Range.
Bouldering here took off in the
1950s and ’60s, with trad and
sport climbing expanding quickly
(along with the fights over where
and where not to place bolts).
It’s a unique pleasure of living
here to spot climbers high on the
Flatirons or to see them dangling
above the road in Boulder
Canyon.
1
Bastille Crack
Eldorado Canyon,
the next canyon south
SEE EXCELLENT, PAGE 35
More info
For more route descriptions
of local climbs, visit
www.rockclimbing.com and
www.summitpost.org.
David Bardes, left, and Seth Zaharias begin their assault on the Bastille Crack in Eldorado Canyon. File photo
Marty Caivano
WB34 Colorado Daily Welcome Back Monday, August 24, 2009
CLIMBING
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Hope Bentley makes her way up the First Flatiron. File photo
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of Boulder Canyon, is a semi-
secluded climber’s haven with
more than 600 routes lacing
the angular sandstone walls
and is home to the Bastille
Crack (5.7 trad).
Some people say that this
five-pitch route is one of the
best 5.7s in the country —
long, consistent, dramatic.
The crack, polished dark by
the scuffs of thousands of
climbing shoes, can make a
slippery lead, but the climb’s
position on the shady north
face of the Bastille makes it an
alluring summer choice.
2
North Face
Center
Boulder Canyon has
a lot of accessible climbs very
close to town.
North Face Center (5.7 trad)
is the obvious line up the clean
center of Cob Rock, a granite
buttress located on the south
side Boulder Canyon, about
seven miles from town.
To get to the route — and
back again — climbers have to
hike up their pants to wade the
frigid snowmelt in Boulder Creek
or hook into the ropes that
permanently hang across the
water for a Tyrolean traverse.
3
Direct East Face
The Flatirons, a
short approach from
Chautauqua, feature expansive
views of the plains.
The Direct East Face on the
First Flatiron (5.6 trad) is the
longest slab route you can find
in the Flatirons, so you get a lot
of exposure rush, without
having to commit to a harder
route.
The wandering line is sparse
on good gear placements and
requires mainly friction moves.
4
Pear Buttress
Splayed across the
northern boundary of
the Estes Park Valley, Lumpy
Ridge is made of about a dozen
major granite domes and spires
(and hundreds of smaller
formations).
Pear Buttress (5.6-5.8+,
depending on exact route, trad)
on the Book formation requires
a variety of moves up the
500-foot face on a fantastically
clean alpine granite.
The Lumpy Ridge formations
poke above 8,000 feet, so get
here early to avoid the brutal
summer thunderstorms.
5
South Face
Rock Mountain
National Park
features the eight-pitch South
Face (5.8 trad) on the Petit
Grepon, which is included in
Steve Roper and Allen Steck’s
“Fifty Classic Climbs in North
America” — which can make it
crowded on summer weekends.
The summit is a graceful
finger and one of the more
memorable features in the
park.
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Monday, August 24, 2009 Colorado Daily Welcome Back WB35
Everything you really
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WB36 Colorado Daily Welcome Back Monday, August 24, 2009
TRAIL BIKING
Fat tire
Five trails to spin your wheels on
Does anyone in
Boulder not own a
mountain bike?
By Philip Armour
For the Colorado Daily
H
ave you ever seen a more
bike-centric town outside of
China or the Netherlands?
Boulder’s bike community is
omnipresent, from the morning
commuters to speedy road
cyclists to lollygaging cruisers,
but the mud-splattered
mountainbikers are perhaps the
most at home.
The vast network of mountain
trails long have been a magnet to
the fat-tire set, and despite being
banned from favorite spots in
town (such as the Mesa trail) for
safety reasons due to foot traffic
and dogs, mountain bikers have
plenty of singletrack to choose
from — plus more bicycle shops
than you can shake a spoke at.
1
Heil Valley
Ranch
The 4,923-acre Heil
Valley Ranch
(www.bouldercounty.org) off
Left Hand Canyon Road
northwest of Boulder has about
15 miles of trails.
SEE BIKING, PAGE 38
More info
Boulder Mountain Bike
Alliance has great list of
local rides at www.bma-
mtb.org
Mark Bauman, left, and Jeff Farmelo head up Wapiti Trail on Heil Valley Ranch Open Space. File photo
Marty Caivano
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Monday, August 24, 2009 Colorado Daily Welcome Back WB37
TRAIL BIKING
Stephanie Cantor ascends the Walker Ranch loop at Walker Ranch Open Space. File photo Carmel Zucker
BIKING BIKING BIKING from 37
The Lichen Trail, is closed to
bikes, but the 2.5-mile Wapiti
Trail, the 2.6-mile Ponderosa
Loop Trail, the 3.0-mile Wild
Turkey Trail and the 5.2-mile
Picture Rock Trail are all open
for spinning the black circle.
2
Hall
Ranch
The red sandstone
of 3,206-acre Hall Ranch
(www.bouldercounty.org) near
Lyons was quarried to build
many on the University of
Colorado’s buildings and has
12 miles total of mountain
biking trails.
There are countless
combinations of the various
loops, including Super Hall,
which involved biking (not
driving) out there from town.
3
Walker
Ranch
The steep canyons
and pristine South Boulder
Creek that bisect Walker Ranch
make it a special place.
Off Flagstaff Road only 7.5
miles from Boulder, Walker
Ranch sees heavy mountain
bike and hiker traffic, but for
good reason.
Standing amongst yucca
cactus and looking at the snow-
capped peaks of the
Continental Divide is unique.
Riding up from town and
completing the Ranch’s
8.2-mile loop is called the
Super Walker.
4
West
Magnolia
The West Magnolia
Trails at about 8,000 feet near
Nederland are where mountain
bikers head in the dead of
summer.
An average of 10 to 15
degrees cooler than Boulder,
the network of Magnolia Trails
off the Peak to Peak Highway at
Magnolia Road near the
Sundance Cafe offer respite
(and great singletrack) from the
baking plains.
5
Spring Brook
Trail
The 5.2-mile Spring
Brook Trail Loop
(www.protrails.com) on the west
side of Highway 93 at the base
of Elodrado Canyon off Eldorado
Springs Drive is a mellow rolling
singletrack that connects to the
larger Marshall Mesa Trail
System.
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WB38 Colorado Daily Welcome Back Monday, August 24, 2009
ROAD BIKING
Tour de Colorado
Five first-rate road rides
Dodge the cars
(and other cyclists)
and become the
ultimate road
warrior
By Philip Armour
For the Colorado Daily
W
ant to breathe like Lance
Armstrong in the
mountains? Ride the
mountains.
There are myriad route
variations for huffing and puffing
through the Front Range and
nearly as many pelotons to join.
Bouldercyclingclub.com is a
good place to start. And the
gearheads at Pro Peloton
(www.propeloton.com) are a great
hub for local beta.
1
Fruit Loop
The ride from
Boulder to Lyons to
St. Vrain Canyon is a
35-to-40-mile trek also known
as the Fruit Loop.
Head north on U.S. 36 to
SEE RIDES, PAGE 41
More info
For more road rides and
local maps, visit
www.trails.com
Cyclists cruise down Nelson Road on a variation of the Hygiene Loop. For the Colorado Daily Zak Wood
Monday, August 24, 2009 Colorado Daily Welcome Back WB39
WB40 Colorado Daily Welcome Back Monday, August 24, 2009
ROAD BIKING
A cyclist cruises past Nelson Road on U.S. 36. For the Colorado Daily Zak Wood
RIDES RIDES RIDES from 39
Lyons and turn left up
Allenspark and St. Vrain Canyon
on Old St. Vrain Road. A nice
mix of flats and climbs and
dubbed the Fruit Loop for the
areas apple orchards.
2
Hygiene Loop
They Hygiene Loop
is a 30-mile ride from
Boulder to U.S. 36 north, to
Nelson Road to Hygiene Road.
Just head north on 36, turn
right on Nelson past Left Hand
Canyon, Hygiene to 75th, to the
Diagonal, to Jay Road.
Fast and flat.
3
Peak to Peak
This 50-to-60-mile
ride runs from
Boulder to Ward to the Peak to
Peak Highway to Nederland to
Boulder.
Head north on U.S. 36, turn
left up Left Hand Canyon, left to
Ward, left on the Peak to Peak,
then left in Nederland.
Flat at first, this ride is about
long climbs and fast descents.
4
Red Zinger Loop
The 30-mile Morgul-
Bismark Route runs
from South Boulder Road to
South McCaslin Boulevard.
Head east on South Boulder
Road and turn right on South
McCaslin, cross U.S. 36, and
get onto 120th Avenue.
Rolling hills and the famous
loop for the Red Zinger Classic
road races in the 1970s and
’80s.
5
El Dorado
Canyon
This 20-mile ride
winds south on the bike paths
and turns right into El Dorado
Canyon. Head up as far as you
choose, then turn around.
Short and sweet.
Monday, August 24, 2009 Colorado Daily Welcome Back WB41
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All makes
& models
University of Colorado student Matt Perry does some crazy Parkour moves on campus. File photo Kasia
Broussalian
Five great alternative
passtimes to try out
Yes, somersaulting, Frisbees, and balancing are sports, too
By Philip Armour
For the Colorado Daily
N
ot everyone is into all (or
any) of the classic outdoor
sports Boulder has on offer.
But this town has plenty of fun,
creative outlets for you, too.
Most city parks allow balance
junkies to set up slacklines
between trees, and the nine-hole
disc golf course by the South
Boulder Recreation Center plays
as good as any.
You won’t find a town with
more longboarders skating
around, either, and the cruiser
bike culture is practically a
religion.
These offbeat alternatives to
adrenaline sports will have you
SEE ALTERNATIVE, PAGE 43
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WB42 Colorado Daily Welcome Back Monday, August 24, 2009
ALT.SPORTS
seeing Boulder’s streets and
parks with fresh eyes.
1
Parkour
Parkour
practitioners — and
“freerunners,” their less-
structured cousins — call their
sport “the art of moving
effectively through the
environment using only the
human body to overcome
obstacles.”
Seeing these guys tumble
over local park benches is like
on walking in on a Cirque du
Soliel convention — strange
and exhilarating.
Contact Apex Movement
(www.apexmovement.com) for
local classes and
ColoradoParkour.com for
information on the local scene.
2
Slacklining
Originated by rock
climbers who’d string
up climbing webbing in camp to
practice balance skills,
slacklining has progressed into
the parks of Boulder (often
Chautauqua and Eben G. Fine
parks), where people of every
size and shape can be seen
goofing off on the lines.
Local slackline producer
Gibbon (GibbonSlacklines.com)
had two pro teams
crisscrossing the U.S. this
summer performing and
promoting the sport.
3
Disc golf
Disc golf combines
everything you love
about Frisbees and drinking
games (hitting stuff for points)
and calls it “golf.”
SEE ALTERNATIVE, PAGE 45
ALTERNATIVE ALTERNATIVE ALTERNATIVE from 42
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Monday, August 24, 2009 Colorado Daily Welcome Back WB43
WB44 Colorado Daily Welcome Back Monday, August 24, 2009
ALT.SPORTS
ALTERNATIVE ALTERNATIVE ALTERNATIVE from 43
Mellow yet mildly active, as
you have to walk the course
(and chase your errant tosses),
disc golf is the sport of semi-
athletic slackers.
Find your tribe at Harlow
Platts Park near the South
Boulder Recreation Center.
4
Longboarding
Longboarding is to
skateboarding what
lying down is to walking, except
you get the benefit of actually
moving.
This low-impact sport has
gone surprisingly high-tech, with
board and truck technology
progressing to accommodate
high speeds and aggressive
carving.
Falling on cement is never
fun, yet today’s boards seem to
swallow up uneven pavement.
Check out Denver’s
Neversummer skateboards for
their impressive quiver of
longboards for every riding
style.
Popular local roads (besides
the bike paths) are Overlook
Drive in Lafayette and the road
to the National Center for
Atmospheric Research.
5
Cruiser ride
What do you do
when a group of giddy
cyclists passes you dresses in
wacky costumes, with their
bikes wrapped in Christmas
lights, and pulling trailers with
speakers blasting dance
music?
You join!
Summer’s Happy Thursday
cruiser rides are a guerilla
tradition 15 years running and
a fun way to enjoy Boulder and
create some happy mayhem on
the streets. For more
information, visit
HappyThursday.org.
Jeremy Louis, of Boulder, shows off his slacklining skills at Chautauqua Park. File photo Stephanie Davis
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Monday, August 24, 2009 Colorado Daily Welcome Back WB45
WB46 Colorado Daily Welcome Back Monday, August 24, 2009
CAMPING
Pitch a tent
Five scenic Boulder-
area camping spots
Tent camping, car
camping,
backpacking — the
mountains of
Boulder have it all
By Philip Armour
For the Colorado Daily
W
ith Patagonia, REI,
Boulder Army Store,
Dicks Sporting Goods,
Neptune Mountaineering, the
North Face, Outdoor Divas,
MontBell, Boulder Sports
Recycler and McGuckin
Hardware, this town offers the
best money can buy in camping
supplies.
Luckily, most of the camping
itself is free — and plentiful.
Rocky Mountain National Park
is only a 30-minute drive to the
north in Estes Park, and Boulder
edges the largest mountain range
in North America.
A good portion of the
2,000-plus-mile-long Rocky
Mountains pass through
Colorado, which has 15 national
parks, historic monuments,
historic sites, historic trails and
SEE TENTS, PAGE 51
Campground host Larry Good carries ashes away from a site at the Camp Dick campground in the
Roosevelt National Forest near Ward. File photo Carmel Zucker
Monday, August 24, 2009 Colorado Daily Welcome Back WB47
University of Colorado at Boulder
Register now for Fall-term
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Boulder. Independent Learning
term-based online courses
provide a rich interaction
with your instructor and other
students, while giving you the
flexibility of online learning.
Communication
COMM 3310 Principles and Practices
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COMM 3320 Persuasion in Society
COMM 3610 Communication, Technology, and Society
English
ENGL 1191 Introduction to Creative Writing
ENGL 1500 Masterpieces of British Literature
ENGL 1600 Masterpieces of American Literature
ENGL 2000 Literary Analysis
ENGL 2010 Introduction to Literary Theory
ENGL 2717 Native American Literature
ENGL 3000 Shakespeare for Non-Majors
ENGL 3060 Modern and Contemporary Literature
ENGL 3665 American Literature After 1860
ENGL 4245 American Novel 2
History
HIST 1010 Western Civilization 1:
From Antiquity to the 16th Century
HIST 1020 Western Civilization 2:
16th Century to the Present
HIST 2123 The History of England, 1660 to Present
Philosophy
PHIL 1000 Introduction to Philosophy
PHIL 1400 Philosophy and the Sciences
PHIL 2200 Major Social Theories
PHIL 2390 Philosophy and Psychology
PHIL 3180 Critical Thinking: Contemporary Topics
Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences
SLHS 4918 Introduction to Clinical Practice
SLHS 5032 Competencies & Strategies for the SLPA
SLHS 5930 SLPA Internship
Writing and Rhetoric
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WRTG 3007 Writing and the Visual Arts
WRTG 3020 Topics in Writing
American Culture
Environmental Writing
Sports in American Culture
Spirituality in Literature and Art
Food and Culture
Gender and Sexuality
Biomedical Ethics
Moral Arguments in Fiction:
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WRTG 3030 Writing on Science and Society
WRTG 3035 Technical Communication and Design
WRTG 3040 Writing on Business and Society
WRTG 3090 Open Topics in Writing:
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ENVD 4365 Special Topics: Technology and
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ENVS 1000 Introduction to Environmental Studies
JOUR 4301 Media Ethics and Professional Practice
JOUR 5301 Media Ethics and Professional Practice
MATH 1071 Finite Mathematics for Social
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PSCI 1101 The American Political System
PSCI 3163 American Foreign Policy
SOCY 1021 United States Race and
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SOCY 2044 Crime and Society
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WB48 Colorado Daily Welcome Back Monday, August 24, 2009
University of Colorado at Boulder
Business Core
BCOR 2000 Accounting and Financial Analysis
BCOR 2300 Adding Value with Management
Contemporary Societies
ECON 2010 Principles of Microeconomics
PSCI 1101 The American Political System
SOCY 1001 Introduction to Sociology
SOCY 4024 Juvenile Delinquency
Critical Thinking
ARTH 3109 Art in Contemporary Society
PHIL 3180 Critical Thinking: Contemporary Topics
PSCI 4701 Symbolic Politics
Cultural and Gender Diversity
COMM 1600 Intercultural Communication
ENGL 1800 American Ethnic Literatures
SOCY 1016 Sex, Gender, and Society 1
WMST 2000 Introduction to Feminist Studies
WMST 2200 Women, Literature, and the Arts
Foreign Language
SPAN 1010 Beginning Spanish 1
SPAN 1020 Beginning Spanish 2
SPAN 2110 Second-Year Spanish 1
Historical Context
CLAS 1051 The World of the Ancient Greeks
HIST 1020 Western Civilization 2:
16th Century to the Present
RLST 3000 Christian Traditions
Ideals and Values
PHIL 1000 Introduction to Philosophy
PHIL 1600 Philosophy and Religion
PHIL 3140 Environmental Ethics
PSCI 2004 Survey of Western Political Thought
RLST 2500 Religions in the United States
SOCY 1004 Deviance in U.S. Society
SOCY 2031 Social Problems
Literature and the Arts
ARTH 1400 History of World Art 2
ENGL 1600 Masterpieces of American Literature
ENGL 3000 Shakespeare for Nonmajors
ENGL 3060 Modern and Contemporary Literature
MUEL 1832 Appreciation of Music
THTR 1009 Introduction to Theatre
Natural Science
ANTH 2010 Introduction to Physical Anthropology 1
ANTH 3010 The Human Animal
ATOC 1050 Weather and the Atmosphere
ATOC 1060 Our Changing Environment:
El Niño, Ozone, and Climate
EBIO 1210 General Biology 1
GEOG 1001 Environmental Systems 1 –
Climate and Vegetation
GEOG 1011 Environmental Systems 2 –
Landscapes and Water
IPHY 3420 Nutrition, Health, and Performance
MCDB 1041 Fundamentals of Human Genetics
PSYC 2012 Biological Psychology 1
Quantitative Reasoning & Math Skills
MATH 1011 Fundamentals and Techniques
of College Algebra
MATH 1012 Quantitative Reasoning and
Mathematical Skills
MATH 1300 Analytic Geometry and Calculus 1
United States Context
HIST 1025 History of the United States since 1865
HIST 2117 History of Colorado
HIST 2215 The Era of the American Revolution
HIST 2866 American History and Film
PSCI 1101 The American Political System
RLST 2500 Religions in the United States
SOCY 1021 United States Race and Ethnic Relations
Written Communication
WRTG 3020 Topics in Writing – From Essay to Blog:
Exploring Non Fiction
WRTG 3020 Topics in Writing – What’s a Worldview?
Other Courses
ARTS 1010 Introduction to Studio Art
COMM 1300 Public Speaking
ENGL 1191 Introduction to Creative Writing
ETHN 3502 Historical and Contemporary Issues
of Black Women
FILM 2105 Introduction to the Screenplay
FILM 3010 Film Topics: Contemporary
Documentaries
FILM 3563 Producing the Film
GEOG 1982 World Regional Geography
GEOG 1992 Human Geographies
GEOG 3251 Mountain Geography
JOUR 1001 Contemporary Mass Media
JOUR 4453 Advertising and Society
MGMT 3030 Critical Leadership Skills
PSYC 1001 General Psychology
PSYC 2145 Introductory Cognitive Psychology
SOCY 1006 The Social Construction of Sexuality
SOCY 3042 Topics in Population and Health:
Death and Dying
WMST 3505 Historical and Contemporary Issues
of Black Women
Offered as part of the Colorado Statewide Extended Campus.
The University of Colorado is an equal opportunity/nondiscrimination institution.
For more information, visit conted.colorado.edu/becreditcd, or call 303.492.5148.
Evening Courses Still Available
Please note that Continuing Education tuition is charged separate from and in addition
to all other CU course tuition. Registration is underway and courses are filling quickly.
Monday, August 24, 2009 Colorado Daily Welcome Back WB49
University of Colorado at Boulder
Business Core
BCOR 2000 Accounting and Financial Analysis
BCOR 2300 Adding Value with Management
Contemporary Societies
ECON 2010 Principles of Microeconomics
PSCI 1101 The American Political System
SOCY 1001 Introduction to Sociology
SOCY 4024 Juvenile Delinquency
Critical Thinking
ARTH 3109 Art in Contemporary Society
PHIL 3180 Critical Thinking: Contemporary Topics
PSCI 4701 Symbolic Politics
Cultural and Gender Diversity
COMM 1600 Intercultural Communication
ENGL 1800 American Ethnic Literatures
SOCY 1016 Sex, Gender, and Society 1
WMST 2000 Introduction to Feminist Studies
WMST 2200 Women, Literature, and the Arts
Foreign Language
SPAN 1010 Beginning Spanish 1
SPAN 1020 Beginning Spanish 2
SPAN 2110 Second-Year Spanish 1
Historical Context
CLAS 1051 The World of the Ancient Greeks
HIST 1020 Western Civilization 2:
16th Century to the Present
RLST 3000 Christian Traditions
Ideals and Values
PHIL 1000 Introduction to Philosophy
PHIL 1600 Philosophy and Religion
PHIL 3140 Environmental Ethics
PSCI 2004 Survey of Western Political Thought
RLST 2500 Religions in the United States
SOCY 1004 Deviance in U.S. Society
SOCY 2031 Social Problems
Literature and the Arts
ARTH 1400 History of World Art 2
ENGL 1600 Masterpieces of American Literature
ENGL 3000 Shakespeare for Nonmajors
ENGL 3060 Modern and Contemporary Literature
MUEL 1832 Appreciation of Music
THTR 1009 Introduction to Theatre
Natural Science
ANTH 2010 Introduction to Physical Anthropology 1
ANTH 3010 The Human Animal
ATOC 1050 Weather and the Atmosphere
ATOC 1060 Our Changing Environment:
El Niño, Ozone, and Climate
EBIO 1210 General Biology 1
GEOG 1001 Environmental Systems 1 –
Climate and Vegetation
GEOG 1011 Environmental Systems 2 –
Landscapes and Water
IPHY 3420 Nutrition, Health, and Performance
MCDB 1041 Fundamentals of Human Genetics
PSYC 2012 Biological Psychology 1
Quantitative Reasoning & Math Skills
MATH 1011 Fundamentals and Techniques
of College Algebra
MATH 1012 Quantitative Reasoning and
Mathematical Skills
MATH 1300 Analytic Geometry and Calculus 1
United States Context
HIST 1025 History of the United States since 1865
HIST 2117 History of Colorado
HIST 2215 The Era of the American Revolution
HIST 2866 American History and Film
PSCI 1101 The American Political System
RLST 2500 Religions in the United States
SOCY 1021 United States Race and Ethnic Relations
Written Communication
WRTG 3020 Topics in Writing – From Essay to Blog:
Exploring Non Fiction
WRTG 3020 Topics in Writing – What’s a Worldview?
Other Courses
ARTS 1010 Introduction to Studio Art
COMM 1300 Public Speaking
ENGL 1191 Introduction to Creative Writing
ETHN 3502 Historical and Contemporary Issues
of Black Women
FILM 2105 Introduction to the Screenplay
FILM 3010 Film Topics: Contemporary
Documentaries
FILM 3563 Producing the Film
GEOG 1982 World Regional Geography
GEOG 1992 Human Geographies
GEOG 3251 Mountain Geography
JOUR 1001 Contemporary Mass Media
JOUR 4453 Advertising and Society
MGMT 3030 Critical Leadership Skills
PSYC 1001 General Psychology
PSYC 2145 Introductory Cognitive Psychology
SOCY 1006 The Social Construction of Sexuality
SOCY 3042 Topics in Population and Health:
Death and Dying
WMST 3505 Historical and Contemporary Issues
of Black Women
Offered as part of the Colorado Statewide Extended Campus.
The University of Colorado is an equal opportunity/nondiscrimination institution.
For more information, visit conted.colorado.edu/becreditcd, or call 303.492.5148.
Evening Courses Still Available
Please note that Continuing Education tuition is charged separate from and in addition
to all other CU course tuition. Registration is underway and courses are filling quickly.
WB50 Colorado Daily Welcome Back Monday, August 24, 2009
CAMPING
recreation areas and 43 state
parks.
1
Camp Dick
Camp Dick
(www.fs.fed.us) is
located in Peaceful Valley off
Peak to Peak Highway, north of
Ward. It’s close to Boulder, and
has a large campground with
lots of backpacking and day
hike opportunities.
2
Pawnee
Campground
The Pawnee
Campground (www.fs.fed.us) is
located in the Brainard Lake/
Long Lake area, also off the
Peak to Peak Highway. Again,
it’s close to Boulder and large
campground, with lots of open
water.
3
Lost Lake
Lost Lake
(www.hikercentral.co
m) can be found off the Peak to
Peak Highway/Fourth of July
Road. Getting there involves a
short hike, so it’s likely to be
more private than Brainard or
Camp Dick.
Plus, the hiking and summit
opportunities are many.
4
Crater Lake
Crater Lake
(www.protrails.com) is
west of the Continental Divide,
up the Cascade Creek Trail,
east of Monarch Lake. This very
remote and extremely beautiful
area has views of a striking
rock spire called Lone Eagle
Peak.
As a bonus, this spire (5.6 or
5.7) can be climbed with gear.
5
Eleven Mile
Canyon
Eleven Mile Canyon
(parks.state.co.us/parks/
elevenmile) is west of Woodland
Park. It sports extremely easy
access to a number of different
types of recreation, including
fishing, hiking, trad and sport
climbing, and bouldering.
TENTS TENTS TENTS from 47
Robb Dullien doles out hot dogs to his family, wife Vivian, left;
Caroline, center; and Julia while they huddle around their camp stove
at Pawnee Campground near Brainard Lake. File photo Marty Caivano
rock out
club notes
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Monday, August 24, 2009 Colorado Daily Welcome Back WB51
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Brady James enjoys some sweet tubing action on Boulder Creek this
summer. File photo Mark Leffingwell
Five key
waterways
There’s no ocean,
but plenty of water
around here
By Philip Armour
For the Colorado Daily
F
or such a small creek, the
Boulder Creek sees an
impressive amount of
enthusiasts, from tubers and
kayakers and canoeists to
flyfishermen in waders and
children in water wings.
Go further afield, though, and
the state’s many rivers and
reservoirs will almost make you
forget the ocean (almost).
The Dillon Yacht Club in Frisco
(www.dillonyachtclub.com) even
hosts a series of sailing races on
the Dillon Reservoir at 9,017 feet.
1
Boulder Creek
Tubing on Boulder
Creek is a
summertime ritual. When you
see gigantic, inflated
innertubes affixed with bike
locks to a lampposts in front of
Boulder bars, you know it’s
summer.
SEE WATERWAYS, PAGE 53
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WB52 Colorado Daily Welcome Back Monday, August 24, 2009
WATER
get buffed
WATERWAYS WATERWAYS WATERWAYS from 52
2
South Boulder
Creek
South Boulder
Creek is less than 12 miles
from downtown Boulder and can
have six different bugs hatching
at once.
The low floes of fall (75-125
cubic feet per second) are
perfect for dry fly fishing, with
the section below Walker Ranch
(park by the Pika Trailhead) the
most crowd-free.
3
Clear Creek
Canyon
Kayaking through
Clear Creek Canyon is for
advanced boaters only, but the
creek flattens out in Golden,
where the all-women Outdoor
Divas (www.outdoordivas.com)
leads beginner trips.
4
Colorado River
The burgeoning
sport of river surfing
— using surfboards to ride
standing river waves — has
taken hold in Glenwood
Springs, where a series of man-
made rapids swell up in spring,
when the Colorado River surges
to 10,000 to 20,000 cubic feet
per second.
5
Arkansas River
The Arkansas River
sees lots of rafting
traffic (and is well served by
many rafting companies,
including
ArkansasRiverTours.com,
thanks to its Class I-IV+ rapids
and proximity to charming
mountain towns such as Buena
Vista and Salida.
Surfing the Colorado River near Glenwood Springs. File photo Peter
McBride
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Monday, August 24, 2009 Colorado Daily Welcome Back WB53
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2009 ORGANIZATIONAL MEETINGS
www.colorado.edu/rec-center/programs/club-sports
CLUB DATE TIME FACILITY
Coach/Officers August 24 6-7:30pm RCCR 1-4
Baseball August 26 8-9pm RCCR 1-2
Crew August 25&26 7-8pm RCCR 1-2
Cycling August 25 6:30-8pm HELLEMS 252
Dance August 27 7-8pm RCCR 3-4
Equestrian August 27 7-8pm RCCR 1-2
Fencing September 2 7-8pm RCCR 3-4
Field Hockey August 26 6-7pm RCCR 3-4
Fly Fishing September 3 5-6pm RCCR 1-2
Freestyle Ski September 10 6-7pm RCCR 3-4
Men’s Hockey August 27 5-6pm RCCR 1-2
Women’s Hockey August 27 5-6pm RCCR 3-4
Kayak September 3 7-8pm RCCR 3-4
Men’s Lacrosse August 25 7-8pm RCCR 3-4
Women’s Lacrosse August 26 7-8pm RCCR 3-4
Racquetball August 27 8-9pm RCCR 1-2
Roller Hockey August 27 6-7pm RCCR 3-4
Men’s Rugby August 25 8-9pm RCCR 1-2
Women’s Rugby August 25 8-9pm RCCR 3-4
Snowboarding September 10 7-8pm RCCR 3-4
Men’s Soccer August 25 5-6pm RCCR 3-4
Women’s Soccer August 25 6-7pm RCCR 3-4
Softball August 27 6-7pm RCCR 1-2
Swimming & Diving August 26 5-6pm RCCR 3-4
Synchronized Skating September 3 6-7pm RCCR 3-4
Tae Kwon Do September 3 6-7pm RCCR 1-2
Tennis August 26 6-7pm RCCR 1-2
Triathlon Sept. 1 7-8pm BENSONSCIENCES 180
Men’s Ultimate August 25 5-6pm RCCR 1-2
Women’s Ultimate August 26 5-6pm RCCR 1-2
Men’s Volleyball September 1 7-8pm RCCR 1-2
Women’s Volleyball September 1 7-8pm RCCR 3-4
Water Polo August 26 8-9pm RCCR 3-4
Wrestling September 2 7-8pm RCCR 1-2
For more information, please call 303.492.5274 or stop by the
Student Recreation Center, Collegiate Sports Clubs Office Room 126.
Note: RCCR = Recreation Center conference Rooms (2nd Floor)
Jesse Zarat catches some air while snowboarding at Eldora Mountain
Resort. File photo Mark Leffingwell
Five ripping
resorts
Colorado skiers
take their powder
seriously
By Philip Armour
For the Colorado Daily
W
ith about 25 downhill ski
resorts in the state,
Colorado is the unrivaled
ski capital of North America.
It snows 300 to 500 inches a
year in the high country, and even
though Boulder itself may not be
a ski town, a (relatively) quick
drive gets you deep into big
mountains.
For those looking to hit the
slopes, here are some options:
1
Eldora
The closest chair
lifts to Boulder are a mere 20
miles up Boulder Canyon just
past Nederland at Eldora
SEE RESORTS, PAGE 56
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Monday, August 24, 2009 Colorado Daily Welcome Back WB55
SKIING
RESORTS RESORTS RESORTS from 54
Mountain Resort
(www.eldora.com).
Not famous for steeps —
and infamous for wind —
Eldora is a locals-only hill.
(Friends don’t let friends dive
Interstate 70, as the slogan
goes.)
There is some good tree
skiing to be found in the Bryan
and Salto glades, but most
people seem to gravitate here
because it’s close and great for
the kids.
The excellent Nordic Center
also has many miles of classic
and skating trails.
2
Loveland
The next closest
bet is Loveland Ski
Area (www.skiloveland.com), a
45-mile drive to the
Eisenhower/Lincoln tunnels.
The skiing here is more wide
open than Eldora and the lifts
newer and faster. Lifts 1, 4 and
8 access the best terrain.
There’s also some challenging
hike-to terrain.
At the summit of the Front
Range, Loveland can also get
extremely windy.
3
Arapahoe Basin
Arapahoe Basin Ski
and Snowboard Area
SEE RESORTS, PAGE 57
A boarder rips it up at Loveland Ski Area. File photo Mark Leffingwell
10290 RidgeGate Cir.,
Lone Tree, CO 80124
4545 E. 9th Ave.,
Ste. 420, Denver, CO 80220
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Louisville, CO 80027
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Young mothers and college
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Many couples cannot build their families without
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You can help by becoming an egg donor.
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WB56 Colorado Daily Welcome Back Monday, August 24, 2009
SKIING
Guy telemarks down the Montezuma Bowl at Arapahoe Basin. File photo
RESORTS RESORTS RESORTS from 55
(www.arapahoebasin.com), a
50ish-mile drive from Boulder,
has a legendary springtime
party scene at “The Beach”
parking lot, but no one would
be there if the skiing didn’t
deliver.
The highest-elevation ski
resort in the state, Arapahoe
opens earlier, keeps its snow
longer, and stays open later
than most resorts.
They also greatly increased
the skiing acreage with the
recent opening of Montezuma
Bowl.
4
Winter Park
Winter Park Resort
(www.skiwinterpark.c
om) and its sister hill, Mary
Jane, are a 75-mile drive from
Boulder. These areas are
known for bump skiing and
greater acreage than Eldora,
Loveland and A-Basin.
The neighboring town of
Fraser is an authentic, funky
little mountain town with a
sense of place (like
100-year-old buildings and
actual history) that many
Colorado ski resorts lack.
Mary Jane, in fact, was
named after a local
19th-century madam.
5
Vail
If you make the
effort and drive
through the Eisenhower/Lincoln
tunnels, you can stop at
Breckenridge, Keystone, or
Copper — but (no offense) you
might as well go all the way to
Vail Resort (vail.snow.com),
about a 100-mile drive from
Boulder.
Or to neighboring Beaver
Creek Resort
(www.beavercreek.com), for
that matter, which is less
crowded.
The Summit County resorts
tend to hold their snow better
and accumulate more than the
windswept Front Range resorts.
On the Web
For more information about
Colorado’s generous
heaping of ski resorts, visit
www.coloradoski.com
rock out
club notes
Monday, August 24, 2009 Colorado Daily Welcome Back WB57
BACKCOUNTRY
Work for it
Five ski spots worth hiking to
Snow doesn’t only
fall at Colorado’s
ski resorts
By Philip Armour
For the Colorado Daily
S
ki lifts are great, but lift
tickets are expensive and
resort slopes crowded.
With training in avalanche
evaluation, rescue and first aid, a
strong skier/snowboarder with the
proper safety equipment (beacon,
shovel, probe) and experienced
partners can access millions of
square acres of backcountry skiing
in Colorado — from gnarly ski
mountaineering feats in on the
14ers to mellow kick and glides
through the forest.
The Rocky Mountains offer
“incredible skiing beyond the
resort ropes,” according to Pete
Swensen, director US Ski
Mountaineering Association
(www.ussma.org). “Getting there
just takes some extra work.”
1
Berthoud Pass
A ski area operated
sporadically from
1937 to 2001 off
11,307-foot Berthoud Pass on
U.S. 40 on the way to Winter
Park. The lifts have since been
removed, but the fantastic
skiing remains.
Friends of Berthoud Pass
(www.berthoudpass.org)
organizes avalanche clinics and
groups skis.
2
Dry Gulch
The Dry Gulch Trail
parking lot just east
of the Eisenhower/
Lincoln tunnels near Loveland
Ski Resort offers quick access
to steep skiing, like the
13,294-foot Citadel (a.k.a.
Snoopy) or 13,195-foot Hagar
Mountain.
3
Indian Peaks
The Indian Peaks
just west of Boulder
are a classic spring
skiing destination.
Take the Brainard Lake Road
near Ward to access trails for
12,979-foot Mount Toll. Before
the gate opens around
Memorial Day, ride bikes into
the trailhead.
The 4th of July trailhead in
Eldora offers access to
13,400-foot South Arapaho
Peak.
4
Bear Lake
In Rocky Mountain
National Park, head
for the Bear Lake Trailhead,
where the skiing is steeper
than off Trail Ridge Road, the
park’s unplowed through road.
5
Torreys Peak
Along with its
neighbor Grays Peak,
14,267-foot Torreys Peak sits
right on the Continental Divide.
Access from the Stevens Gulch
Trailhead.
Jake Williams floats through the powder as he rides through a glade on the northeast side of Berthoud Pass. Rocky Mountain News file photo
On the Web
The Boulder Outdoor Club
offers avalanche clinics and
snow reports at
www.boc123.com, and
www.summitpost.org has
trail information.
Boarders head into the backcountry from the Bear Lake Trailhead. File
photo Carmel Zucker
WB58 Colorado Daily Welcome Back Monday, August 24, 2009
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Monday, August 24, 2009 Colorado Daily Welcome Back WB59
EXTREME
Getting there
One-wheeled commute
Derek Brouwer’s
12-mile commute
to Boulder — on a
unicycle
By Philip Armour
For the Colorado Daily
D
erek Brouwer has heard
every heckle in the book.
“Where are your juggling
balls?” is common and so is “Look,
a clown.” But most often he gets:
“You lost your other wheel.” He
usually quips back: “I don’t need
my training wheel any more!” but
the mood on the road was lighter
on Wednesday.
“There’s a different crowd out
there today,” says Brouwer, who
rides his unicycle 12 miles from
Erie to Boulder about once a week.
“Actually friendly.”
We’re at the Bike to Work Day
breakfast station at Whole Foods
on Pearl Street earlier this
summer, and Brouwer needs to
recharge before heading out again.
A 43-year-old systems architect for
a local software company, he’s
been unicycling for the last hour
and a half and is sweating
profusely.
“I need a massage,” he declares
and gets into line for the free
massage booth.
Back on the road, Brouwer and
I ride back streets to his office. I
follow him on my cruiser and
watch as he steers with a dainty
hip twist (No handlebars,
remember?) and flaps his arms for
balance.
Brouwer has been unicycling
for three years and got into it
because of his 17-year-old son,
who is “stunningly good,”
according to his proud papa.
Mary Rios, the founder of the
62-member Boulder Unicyclist
Club (www.boulderuni.com),
speaks fondly of Brouwer, who is a
member.
“He gets out there quite a bit,”
she says in a phone interview
about seeing him at Hall Ranch in
Lyons or Walker Ranch west of
Boulder.
During the school year, Rios
hosts a unicycle clinic every Friday
afternoon at the South Boulder
Recreation Center.
“I love the sport, because I suck
at it,” Brouwer laughs. “I get to
constantly enjoy getting better at
it.” It’s also a great workout, he
says, and claims to have “abs that
can bounce bullets,” if you peel
away the fat.
His wife doesn’t like to hear it,
but women come up to him all the
time wanting to talk about the
unicycle or try it out. “I’m not into
that or anything,” he says “But it’s
pretty cool.”
The wheel on his commuter
unicycle — a chrome Coker — is a
massive 36 inches in diameter. He
owns seven unicycles. On this one,
his head is a good eight feet off the
ground, but the added wheel
diameter allows him to cover more
ground per pedal stroke.
His unicycle has typical
commuter gadgets, like a light on
the seat post and cycle computer,
plus untypical gadgets, like an
inflatable Kris Holm seat with a
handle. For safety gear, he wears a
helmet and unicycling Kris Holm
gloves with wrist support. The
pedals are wide, flat downhill
mountain bike pedals.
Derek Brouwer commutes to work on his unicycle earlier this summer
as part of Bike to Work day. File photo Marty Caivano
WB60 Colorado Daily Welcome Back Monday, August 24, 2009
Monday, August 24, 2009 Colorado Daily Welcome Back WB61
SKATING
Rip it up
Skate Colorado
By Philip Armour
For the Colorado Daily
T
here are 23 skateboard parks
along the Front Range,
according Coskate.com,
which has directions to each
location and helpful descriptions.
Skateboarding has other
popular disciplines, such as
longboarding and slalom, but the
acrobatic moves associated with
“street” and “vert” riding seem to
draw the most riders.
Because these types of riding
require obstacles to perform the
specific moves, municipalities
have chipped in to construct skate
parks to keep riders from
destroying public property.
Besides the list below, other
highly rated parks in the area
include Northside Park in Fort
Collins, the Colorado Springs
skateboard park and Parker Park
in Parker, southwest of Aurora.
All these parks are free and
outdoors, but if it’s dumping snow
and you absolutely must skate,
Woodward Skateparks in
Lakewood
(www.woodwardskateparks.net)
does have an indoor facility.
Most open dawn till dusk,
weather permitting.
Skate parks
Boulder Skate Park
Scott Carpenter Park, 30th Street
and Arapahoe Avenue
303-441-3427
www.boulderparks-rec.org
Sandstone Ranch Skateboard
Park
3001 E. Highway 119, Longmont
Nathan Lazarus Skatepark
145 East St., Nederland
www.nathanlazarusskatepark.com
Brighton Skate Complex
1101 Judicial Center Parkway,
Brighton
Denver Skatepark
2205 19th St., Denver
www.denverskatepark.com
Pioneer Skatepark
5902 Holly St., Commerce City
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WB62 Colorado Daily Welcome Back Monday, August 24, 2009
Monday, August 24, 2009 Colorado Daily Welcome Back WB63
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WB64 Colorado Daily Welcome Back Monday, August 24, 2009

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