WATER SOFTENING 

 
HARDNESS  
 
 Defined as the sum of all polyvalent cations (i.e., major: calcium and 
magnesium,  and  minor:  iron,  manganese,  strontium  and 
aluminium), however they are not present in significant quantities 
in natural water. 
 
 Water  hardness  is  largely  the  result  of  geological  formation  of  the 
water source. The common units of expression are mg/L as CaCO3 or 
meq/L.  
 
 Many  people  object  to  water  containing  hardness  more  than  150 
mg/L as CaCO3. A common water treatment goal is to provide water 
with hardness in the range of 75 to 120 mg/L as CaCO3.  
 
 Hardness  of  200‐500  mg/L  as  CaCO3  is  considered  excessive  for  a 
water  supply  and  results  in  high  soap  consumption  as  well  as 
objection scale in heating vessels and pipes. 
 
 
 The classification of water hardness is as follow:  
 
0 –75   
=  soft,  
 
75‐ 150  
=  moderately hard,  
 
150‐300 
=  hard, 
 
 > 300  
=  very hard, all unit as mg/L as Ca CO3. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
IR.AHMAD JUSOH/UMT/2009
w0men_iser

 
 The  natural  process  by  which  water  becomes  hard  is  shown 
schematically  in  Figure  1.  As  rainwater  enter  the  topsoil,  the 
respiration  of  microorganisms  increases  the  CO2  content  of  the 
water.  
 
 The  CO2  reacts  with  the  water  to  form  H2CO3.  Limestone,  which  is 
made up of solid CaCO3 and MgCO3, reacts with the carbonic acid to 
form  bicarbonates  of  Calcium  and  Magnesium  [Ca(HCO3)2  and 
Mg(HCO3)2] respectively. 
 
 While  CaCO3  and  MgCO3  are  both  insoluble  in  water,  the 
bicarbonates are quite soluble.  
 
 Gypsum CaSO4 and MgSO4 may also go into solution to contribute to 
the hardness.  
 
 Since Calcium and magnesium predominate, it is often convenient in 
performing  softening  calculations  to  define  the  total  hardness  (TH) 
of a water as the sum of elements 
 
 
 

 

TH = Ca 2+  +  Mg 2+ 
Where the concentration of each elements in units of mg/L as 
CaCO3 or meq/L. 

 
 Total hardness is often broken down into two components: 
 
1. That associated with the HCO3‐ anion (called carbonate hardness 
(CH), and  
 
2. That  associated  with  other  anions  (called  non‐carbonate 
hardness (NCH). Total hardness may also be defined as 
 

             TH = CH + NCH 
 
 
IR.AHMAD JUSOH/UMT/2009
w0men_iser

 
 Carbonate  hardness  is  defined  as  the  amount  of  hardness  equal  to 
the total hardness or the total alkalinity, which ever is less.  
 
 Carbonate  hardness  is  often  called  temporary  hardness  because 
heating the water removes it.  
 
 When  pH  is  less  than  8.3,  HCO3–  is  the  dominant  form  of  alkalinity, 
and the alkalinity is taken to be equal to the concentration of  HCO3– 
 
 Non‐carbonate  hardness  is  defined  as  the  total  hardness  in  excess 
of the alkalinity.  
 
 If  the  alkalinity  is  equal  to  or  greater  than  the  total  hardness,  then 
there is no non‐carbonate hardness.  
 
 Non‐carbonate hardness is called permanent hardness because it is 
not removed when water is heated. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
IR.AHMAD JUSOH/UMT/2009
w0men_iser

Bar  charts  of  water  composition  are  often  useful  in  understanding  the 
process  of  softening.  The  bar  is  constructed  with  cation  (i.e.,  Ca,  Mg,  Na 
and K) in the upper bar and anions (i.e., HCO3, SO4 and Cl ) in the lower bar. 
 
            
 
 
Rain 
 
 
 







 
 
 
Topsoil 
 
Bacterial Action ‐‐‐> CO2 
 
 
‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐ 
 
 
Subsoil 
 
 
 
 





 
 
 
 
 
CO2 + H2O ‐‐‐>   H2CO3 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
                      v____v_____v_____v_____v____v____v 
 
 
 
Limestone 
 
 
 
 
 
CaCO3 (s) + H2CO3  Ca (HCO3)2 
 

Example: Given the following analysis of a ground water, constructed a bar 
chart of the constituents, expressed as mg/L of Ca CO3 or meq/L. 
________________________________________________________________________
mg/L as Ca CO3
meq/L
Ion
mg/L as ion EW Ca CO3 /EW ion

Ca2+      103  
Mg2+       5.5  
Na+       16   
HCO3‐      255 
SO4‐2        49   
Cl‐       37   
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

IR.AHMAD JUSOH/UMT/2009
w0men_iser

2.50 
4.12 
2.18 
0.82 
1.04 
1.41 

 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

 
   
   
  
    
    

258 
  23 
  35 
209 
  51 
  52 

 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

5.15 
0.45 
0.70 
4.18 
1.02 
1.03 

Solution: 
 
0.0
Ca2+
HCO3–
0.0

4.18

5.15 5.60
Mg2+ Na+
SO42 –
5.20

6.30
Cl –
6.23

The concentration of the ions has been converted to CaCO3  equivalent and 
the results are plotted in above figure. 
 
The  total  cat  ions    316  mg/L  as  CaCO3,  of  which  281  mg/L  as  CaCO3  is 
hardness, the  total  anions  312  mg/L  (i.e.  less  than  316  mg/L  due  to  other 
ions  which  were  not  analyzed.)  of  which  the  carbonate  hardness  is  209 
mg/L as CaCO3. Therefore the non carbonate hardness should be 72 mg/L 
as CaCO3 (NCH=TH – CH or 281 – 209 = 72). 
 
 
The relationship between the total hardness, carbonate hardness and non‐
carbonate hardness are illustrated in Figure 3.14. In Figure 3.14a, the total 
hardness  is  250  mg/L  as  CaCO3,  the  carbonate  hardness  equal  to  the 
alkalinity  (HCO3‐  =  200mg/L  as  CaCO3),  and  the  non‐carbonate  hardness 
equal  to  the  difference  between  the  total  harness  and  the  carbonate 
hardness (NCH = TH – CH = 250 – 200 = 50 mg/L as CaCO3). 
 
 
In  Figure  3.14b,  the  total  harness  is  again  250  mg/L  as  CaCO3.  However, 
since the alkalinity (HCO3‐) is greater than the total hardness, and since the 
carbonate  hardness  cannot  be  greater  than  the  total  hardness,  the 
carbonate  hardness  is  equal  to  the  total  hardness  that  is  250  mg/L  as 
CaCO3.  Therefore  there  is  no  non‐carbonate  hardness.  Note  that  in  both 
cases it may be assumed that the pH is less than 8.3 because HCO3‐ is the 
only form of alkalinity present. 
 
 
 
 
 
IR.AHMAD JUSOH/UMT/2009
w0men_iser

Table Equilibrium of solid and dissolved species of common ions 
 
Mineral 
Formula
Solubility 
mg/L CaCO3 
Calcium bicarbonate 
Ca (HCO3)2
     1,620 
Calcium Carbonate 
CaCO3
          15 
 336,000 
Calcium Chloride
CaCl2
     1,290 
Calcium sulfate 
CaSO4
     2,390 
Calcium hydroxide 
Ca (OH)2
   37,100 
Magnesium 
Mg (HCO3)2
bicarbonate 
        101 
Magnesium Carbonate  MgCO3
 362,000 
Magnesium Chloride 
MgCl2
         17
Magnesium hydroxide  Mg (OH)2
 170,000 
Magnesium sulfate 
MgSO4
   38,700 
Sodium bicarbonate 
NaHCO3
   61,400 
Sodium Carbonate 
Na2CO3
Sodium Chloride
Na Cl
 225,000 
Sodium hydroxide 
Na OH
 370,000 
Sodium sulfate 
Na2SO4
   33,600 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
IR.AHMAD JUSOH/UMT/2009
w0men_iser

Example:  
Water has an alkalinity of 200mg/L as CaCO3. The Ca 2+ concentration is 160 
mg/L as the ion, and the Mg 2+concentration is 40 mg/L as the ion. The pH is 
8.1. Find the total, carbonate, and non carbonate hardness. 
 
Solution:  
The MW of Ca and Mg are 40 and 24 respectively, with both have a valency 
of 2 and thus the EW of Ca and Mg are 20 and 12 mg/meq respectively. EW 
for CaCO3 is 50 mg/meq. 
 
TH=160 mg/L (50mg/meq)   +  40 mg/L (50mg/meq)  =  567 mg/L as CaCO3 
 
              (20mg/meq)                       (12mg/meq) 
 
 
In  this  case,  the  alkalinity  is  less  than  the  total  hardness;  the  carbonate 
hardness (CH) is equal to 200 mg/L as CaCO3. The non‐carbonate hardness 
(NCH) is equal to the difference 
 
 
NCH = TH – CH 
                    = 567 – 200 = 367 mg/L as CaCO3 
 
Note that we can add or subtract concentration of Ca 2+or Mg 2+ if there are 
in equivalent unit, for example, moles/L, mg/L or mill equivalents/L.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
IR.AHMAD JUSOH/UMT/2009
w0men_iser

LIME – SODA SOFTENING 
 
 The lime‐soda water softening process uses lime, Ca (OH)2 and soda 
ash, Na2CO3, to precipitate hardness from solution.  
 
 
 Carbon  dioxide  and  carbonate  hardness  (calcium  and  Magnesium 
bicarbonate) are complexed by lime.  
 
 
 Non‐carbonate hardness (Calcium and magnesium sulfates, chlorides 
and nitrates) requires addition of soda ash for precipitation. 
 
 
 In order to precipitate CaCO3, the pH of the water must be raised to 
about  10.3.  To  precipitate  magnesium,  the  pH  must  be  raised  to 
about 11.0  
 
 
 Mg is more expensive to remove, so we leave as much Mg  2+ in the 
water as possible.  
 
 
 Similarly, there is more expensive to remove non‐carbonate hardness 
because  we  must  add  another  chemical  (soda  ash).  Therefore,  we 
leave as much non‐carbonate hardness in the water as possible. 
 
 
 The common source of hydroxyl ion is calcium hydroxide [Ca(OH)2]. It 
is  cheaper  to  use  quicklime  (CaO),  commonly  called  lime,  than 
hydrated lime [Ca (OH)2].  
 
 The quicklime is converted to hydrated lime in the water treatment 
plant by mixing CaO and water to produce a slurry of [Ca (OH)2]. The 
conversion process is called slaking. 
 
 
IR.AHMAD JUSOH/UMT/2009
w0men_iser

 
i.

CHEMICAL REACTIONS IN THE LIME‐SODA PROCESS ARE: 

 
1. In order to raise the pH, we must first neutralize any free acids that 
may  be  presented  in  the  water.  CO2  is  the  principal  acid  present  in 
unpolluted, naturally occurring water. 
    
 
 Noted that no hardness is removed in this step. 
 
 
 
 
 

 

CO2 + Ca (OH)2  = CaCO3 v  +   H2O 

2. Precipitation of carbonate hardness due to calcium 
     
 In order to precipitate CaCO3 we have to raise the pH to about 
10.3.  To achieve this we must convert all of the bicarbonate to 
carbonate. 
 
 

 
 

Ca (HCO3)2  +  Ca(OH)2  = 2CaCO3 v + 2H2O 

 
 
3. Precipitation of carbonate hardness due to magnesium 
     
 In order to remove carbonate hardness due to magnesium, we 
must  add more lime to increase the pH to about 11.  
 

 
 The reaction may be considered to occur in two stages 

 

 
 
 

Mg(HCO3)2  + Ca(OH)2 = CaCO3 v  +  MgCO3  +  H2O 

      
 Note  that  the  hardness  of  the  water  did  not  change  because 
MgCO3 is soluble.  
 
IR.AHMAD JUSOH/UMT/2009
w0men_iser

 With  the  addition  of  more  lime  the  hardness  due  to 
magnesium is removed. 
 
 
 
 
 

 

MgCO3  +  Ca(OH)2  = Mg(OH)2 v  +  CaCO3 v 

4. Removal of non‐carbonate hardness due to calcium 
      
 If we need to remove non‐carbonate hardness due to calcium, 
no further increase in pH is required.  
 
 We must provide additional carbonate in the form of soda ash 
(Na2CO3). 
 
 
Ca2+(SO4,Cl and NO3) + Na2CO3 = CaCO3v + 2Na+(SO4,Cl and NO3)  
  
 
5. Removal of non‐carbonate hardness due to Magnesium 
     
 If  we  need  to  remove  non‐carbonate  hardness  due  to 
Magnesium, we will have to add both lime and soda ash. 
 
   
 
 MgSO4 [Cl, (NO3)] + Ca (OH)2 = Mg(OH)2 v + CaSO4 [Cl, (NO3)] 
  
      
 Note  that  although  the  magnesium  is  removed,  there  is  no 
change in hardness because calcium is still in the solution.  
 
 To remove the calcium we must add soda 
 
 
 
CaSO4 [Cl, (NO3)] + Na2 CO3 = CaCO3v  +  Na2SO4 [Cl, (NO3)] 
   
 Note  that  is  the  same  as  the  one  to  remove  non‐carbonate 
hardness due to calcium. 
 
 
IR.AHMAD JUSOH/UMT/2009
w0men_iser

ii.

PROCESS LIMITATION (EXCESS LIME APPROACH) 

 
Lime  soda  softening  cannot  produce  a  water  at  completely  free  of 
hardness because of the solubility (little) of CaCO3 and Mg(OH)2. Thus 
the minimum calcium hardness can be achieved is about 30 mg/L as 
CaCO3, and the magnesium hardness is about 10 mg/L as CaCO3. we 
normally  tolerate  a  final  total  hardness  on  the  order  of  75  to  120 
mg/L  as  CaCO3,  but  the  magnesium  content  should  not  exceed  40 
mg/L  as  CaCO3  (  because  a  greater  hardness  of  magnesium  forms 
scales on heat exchange elements). 
  
Notes:  
 
a) For Mg removal less than 20 mg/L as CaCO3, the basic excess lime 
(20 mg/L as CaCO3) is sufficient. 
 
b) For Mg removal of 20 to 40 mg/L as CaCO3, we must add excess 
lime equal to the Mg to be removed (e.g. 25.8 mg/L of Mg 2+, thus 
the excess lime should be 25.8 mg/L). 
 
 
c) For Mg removal of more than 40 mg/L as CaCO3, we need to add 
excess lime of 40 mg/L as CaCO3). 
 
In order to achieve reasonable removal of hardness in a reasonable 
time  period,  an  excess  of  Ca(OH)2  beyond  the  stoichiometric  limit 
usually  implemented.  Based  on  empirical  experience,  a  minimum 
excess of 20 mg/L of Ca (OH)2 expressed as CaCO3 must be provided. 
  
There  are  several  advantages  of  lime  softening  in  water  treatment: 
the total dissolved solids are dramatically reduced, hardness is taken 
out  of  solution,  and  the  lime  added  also  removed.  Lime  also 
precipitates  soluble  iron  (i.e.,  Fe  2+)    and  manganese  often  found  in 
ground  water.  In  processing  surface  waters,  excess  lime  treatment 
provides disinfection and aids in coagulation for removal of turbidity.  
 
 
IR.AHMAD JUSOH/UMT/2009
w0men_iser

Example: Excess Lime 
 
Water  defined  by  the  following  analysis  is  to  be  softened  by  excess 
lime treatment. Assume that the practical limit of hardness removal 
for CaCO3 is 30 mg/L, and that of Mg(OH)2 is 10 mg/L as CaCO3  .  
 
Parameter (cations) 
CO2                          = 8.8 mg/L
Ca 2+                         = 40.0 mg/L
Mg 2+                        = 14.7 mg/L
Na+                          = 13.7 mg/L

Parameter (anions)
Alk(HCO3–)= 135 mg/L as CaCO3 
SO42 –        = 29.0 mg/L 
Cl –            = 17.8 mg/L 

 
a) Sketch a meq/L bar graph, and list the hypothetical combinations 
of chemicals compound in solution. 
b) Determine the calcium, magnesium and total hardness as CaCO3. 
Carbonate and non‐carbonate hardness. 
              
c) Calculate  the  chemicals  softening  required,  expressing  lime 
dosage as CaO and soda ash as Na2CO3. 
d) Draw  a  bar  graph  for  the  softened  water  before  and  after 
carbonation. Assume that half the alkalinity in the softened water 
is the bicarbonate form. 
 
Solution: 
 
Component 
Concentration
Equivalent
Meq/L 
mg/L 
Weight 
CO2                               8.8 mg/L
22.0
0.40 
2+
Ca                                 40.0 mg/L
20.0
2.00 
2+
Mg                                14.7 mg/L
12.2
1.21 
+
Na                                13.7 mg/L
23.0
0.60 
Total cations 
3.81 

Alk(HCO3 ) 
135.0 mg/L
50.0
2.70 
2 –
SO4          
29.0 mg/L
48.0
0.60 

Cl               
17.8 mg/L
35.0
0.51 
Total anions 
3.81 
 
IR.AHMAD JUSOH/UMT/2009
w0men_iser

 
0.4 0.0
CO2
0.4

2.0
2+

Ca
HCO3–

0.0

3.21 3.81
Mg
Na+
SO42 –
Cl –
2.7
3.3 3.81
2+

 
a) From the  meq/L  bar graph the hypotheticals combination are Ca 
(HCO3)2  2.0  meq/L,  Mg  (HCO3)2  0.70,  Mg  SO4  0.51,  Na2SO4  0.09, 
and NaCl, 0.51  meq/L.       
   
b) Calcium hardness 2.0 x 50 = 100 mg/L as  CaCO3   and magnesium 
hardness  =  1.21  x  50  =  60.5  mg/L  as  CaCO3  or  Total  hardness  = 
160.5 mg/L as  CaCO3.  Carbonate hardness 2.7 x 50 = 135.0 mg/L. 
Non‐carbonate hardness = 0.51 x 50 = 25.5 mg/L. 
 
 
c) Chemical  required:  The  required  lime  dosage  equals  the  amount 
needed for the softening reactions 1.25 meq/L (35 mg/L) CaO of 
excess lime to participate the magnesium. 
 
Dosage of lime   
= 4.31 x 28 + 35 = 156 mg/L CaO. 
Dosage of soda ash   = 0.51 x 53 = 27 mg/L Na2CO3. 
 
Component 
CO2 
Ca (HCO3)2 
Mg (HCO3)2 
Mg SO4 
 Total required

Meq/L
0.4 
2.0 
0.7 
0.51 

Lime Ca O meq/L
0.4
2.0
2 x 0.7 = 1.4
0.51
4.31

Soda ash meq/L 
0
0
0
0.51 
0.51 

 
d) The hypothetical  bar graph after excess lime treatment  is shown 
below: The dashed box to the left of zero is the excess lime (1.25 
meq/L CaO) added to increase the pH high enough to precipitate 
the Mg (OH)2. The practical limit of 0.6 meq/L Ca  2+  (30 mg/L as 
CaCO3 and 0.2 meq/L Mg 2+ (10 mg/L as CaCO3). 
 
 
IR.AHMAD JUSOH/UMT/2009
w0men_iser

Recarbonation  converts  the  excess  lime  to  calcium  carbonate 
precipitate.  Further  carbon‐dioxide  addition  converts  CO32–  to 
HCO3–,  and  finish  water  with  a  total  hardness  of  40  mg/L.  The 
amount CO2  required  is  (1.25  +  0.2  +  0.4)  meq/L  x  22  mg/meq  = 
40.7 mg/L of CO2. 
 
 
1.25

0.0

0.6

2+

Ca

Ca
OH –

OH

2+

0.8
Mg

CO32–

0.0 0.2

0.0

1.91

2+

0.6
0.8
2+
Mg
Na+
Ca
HCO3–
CO32–
SO42 –
0.0
0.4
0.8
1.4

Na
SO42 –

0.8

IR.AHMAD JUSOH/UMT/2009
w0men_iser

Cl –
1.4

1.91

2+

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

+

Cl –
1.91

1.91

SELECTIVE CALCIUM REMOVAL 
 
Waters with a magnesium hardness of less than 40 mg/L as CaCO3 can be 
soften by removing only a portion of the calcium hardness. The processing 
can  be  a  single‐stage  system  of  mixing,  sedimentation,  recarbonation  and 
filtration.  Enough  lime  is  added  to  the  raw  water  to  precipitate  calcium 
hardness  without  providing  any  excess  for  magnesium  removal.  Soda  ash 
may be required depending on the non‐carbonate hardness. Recarbonation 
is usually practised to reduce scaling of the filter sand and produce a stable 
effluent. (see example problem 10.5 and 10.4 pp 433‐437). 
 
Example: Selective Calcium Removal 
 
Consider selective calcium carbonate removal softening of a raw water with 
a bar graph as shown below: Calculate the lime dosage as CaO, and sketch 
the soften water bar graph after recarbonation and filtration.  
 
Solution  
 
The  only  hypothetical  combination  involving  calcium  is  2.0  meq/L  of  Ca 
(HCO3)2  ;  therefore,  no  soda  ash  is  needed  and  the  lime  required  is  2.0 
meq/L which equal to 28 mg/meq x 2 meq/L = 56 mg/L of CaO.  The soften 
water bar graph has 0.6 meq/L of calcium hardness (the practical limit of 30 
mg/L)  and  the  total  alkalinity  is  0.8  meq/L,  which  is  0.6  meq/L  from  the 
practical limit and 0.2 meq/L associated with magnesium in the raw water 
bar graph. The degree of recarbonation determines the relative amount of 
carbonate and bicarbonate anions. The  other ions in the soften water  are 
the same as in the raw water.  
 
0.0
2.0
2.6
2.9
2+
2+
Ca
Mg
Na+
HCO3–
SO42 –
Cl –
0.0
2.2
2.7 2.9
0.0

0.6
2+

Ca
CO32– HCO3–
0.0

2+

Mg
SO42 –
0.8

IR.AHMAD JUSOH/UMT/2009
w0men_iser

1.2 1.5
Na+
Cl –
1.3 1.5

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful