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Building The 1920 Briggs & Stratton Cycle Car

Copyright 2004, 2005 Everett Moore

Everett Moore P.O. Box 1705 Cottonwood, AZ 86326 1

Foreword
The original Cycle Car that inspired this reproduction had the famous “Motor Wheel” as its power source. This simple unit had only three controls. The throttle was controlled from a small quadrant placed on the steering wheel, and the entire wheel assembly was raised off the ground by means of a lever to the right of the driver. The brake was foot-operated and, merely, consisted of a board rubbing on both rear wheels. Crude to say the least! It probably served the purpose, however, I decided to be a little bit more professional with the braking arrangement on this replica. Designing and building a “Motor Wheel,” I felt, would be beyond the intent of a simple car to be built without welding or lathe work. The engine is mounted on the chassis, which extends to the rear about 10” more than the original. Through a Comet torque converter, it drives a jack shaft that, in turn, drives the right rear wheel. I was tempted to use a differential in place of the jack shaft, but made myself keep to the simplest approach. Besides, I had no experience with driving a small car with only one rear wheel. It had been done many times by “sidewalk” car builders and was even used in a little, production car — the King Midget. I still wanted to have brakes on both rear wheels and worked out, with the use of aircraft pulleys and control cable, an equalizing system, whereby the same braking force was applied to both rear wheels. I used 4” drums with an external band. One thing I learned was, while sufficient for parade driving, I got minimal braking. The 4” drums on a 26” wheel was at a disadvantage. At the speeds traveled, there’s sufficient stopping power, but, don’t worry about dragging a flat spot on your tires! My final design used a foot throttle and hand brake, both being the simplest approach to the task at hand. I had to constantly remind myself of the criteria I was 2 designing to meet. I wanted a simple car with which an entry level builder would have no problem. The original Cycle Car was built on six 3 1/2” slats apparently of 1” thick oak or hickory. To keep construction in the affordable class, I chose to build the chassis from a piece of 2 x 8 foot 3/4” plywood. Dummy slats were created by gluing six 3-1/2” strips of 1/4” plywood to the top with equal distant spacing of approximately 5/8”. This added a bit of strength and created the slat look on the top surface. There’s no reason why, if you have access to 1” thick oak or hickory, you couldn’t use real slats like the original. Most of the controls exit from top to bottom through areas in the “spaces.” The only exception is the brake equalizing assembly, which attaches in a slot area. You would have to redesign a bit here. To achieve the necessary “stiffness” in the chassis, I had to add a 2x4 support to the bottom side, left and right. For those of you who would like to have a real “motor wheel” power source, this running gear, with the chassis shortened a bit in the rear, would still make a good platform to attach your “wheel.” I held off completing this set of plans until the car had been driven in its intended purpose, a parade. This was accomplished on the 4th of December ‘04. Here’s the results: The steering is “gokart” quick with the 12” dia. steering wheel. Once the driver is accustomed to it, no problem. All in all, the only thing I discovered that I felt needed a revision was the flexibility of the wooden chassis, coupled with the tremendous torque of the power train, allowed the chain to jump a tooth or two under extreme acceleration. The required reeducating the throttle foot. Once the driver was use to this, no problem. However, I have added, in the drawings, addition supports to stiffen up the area of the engine/power train.

Introduction
“Nothing is particularly hard if you divide it into small jobs.” — Henry Ford “Before everything else, getting ready is the secret of success.” — Henry Ford

"Tattoo the above quotes on your brain" as Ernest used to say. Better yet, paint them as signs to hang in your shop where you can look at them every time the going gets rough. It was with this incentive that the manual you're holding was done. With its nearly 200 different parts not even a simple cycle car is necessarily easy. However, if approached one part at a time, the job becomes much easier. Sometimes when you buy a set of plans for a project such as this, all you get is a copy of a magazine article or everything crowded onto a few sheets of paper. In this manual you will find a complete drawing of each part — nothing is left for you — no guess work! A lot of parts are simply a piece of bar stock, angle or tubing cut to length with one or more holes drilled in it. This is not to imply that you can't go off the beaten trail and modify or redesign to your own desires. To do so is encouraged. The idea that this horseless carriage could be approached as a class project crossed our mind. Since it utilizes several machine shop operations, each student could be assigned a few parts to do according to their ability and skills. When completed, let the auto body 3

shop do the painting. Then drive in the homecoming parade! The Industrial Arts Dept wins, hands down! The same could apply to friends or neighbors who join together to build each a car with different ones making all of certain parts. A few tools I consider a necessity (either owning or having access to) and they are: a cut-off saw, a drill press, a hand grinder, an accurate square (combination & large carpenter's square), a bottle of layout blue and the means of accurately-scribing layout lines on the stock. Always center punch all holes before drilling. When I began designing for this set of plans, I followed the criteria of not using a lathe or welder. I wanted to produce a simple car that even a person with minimum workshop skills and equipment could build one. Before you start making scrap iron, study this manual and drawings. Obtain catalogs from suppliers and if you have access to the internet, look at and bookmark the suppliers we have referenced. Plan where you are going to work on your car. Although desirable, a large shop isn't necessary. Henry Ford utilized a coal shed for

his first horseless carriage, the Quadricycle. And, while Henry said “plan ahead,” he even had to knock out the existing door and add a larger one just to get his car outside! Visit your local steel supplier. Depending on your location, you may have access to a well-stocked supplier. If you live in a rural area, look for a welding shop that might have some scrap or be willing to order for you. — What Tools Will You Need? — Tools, while making any job easier, cannot replace skill in the hands using them. The list of tools that follows are what I consider sufficient to build the “Red Bug.” 1. A good floor-standing drill press. Includes a drill press vice and drill bit set. 2. A quality table saw. 3. A good metal chop saw. 4. An electric hand drill (3/8) 5. A bellhangers drill bit (1/4) 6. A set of Forstner drills. 7. A hand jig saw. 8. A drum sander (either individual or attachment for drill press. 9. A hand, belt sander is very useful. 10. A bench grinder or hand grinder for smoothing metal parts. 11. A good tap and die set (both NC & NF) 12. A box of Band Aids!

— Start with the wooden parts — It is only a suggestion that you start with the wooden parts. The chassis is not unlike the foundation when building a house. Since most other components rely on it for alignment, care must be exercised when laying out the various locations on the chassis. Set the frame on a couple of saw horses. Every time you enter your shop you will see it and it will trigger your mind to the idea that, "By golly I'm really building a car - from scratch - by myself". "I wonder when the next parade in town is." Also, since the chassis is basically a 2 x 8 ft piece of 3/4 plywood, it makes an excellent place to sit down and make other small parts. Seeing you car take shape is a thrill you'll never forget. On the original Briggs & Stratton Cycle Car, the chassis was constructed from six 3 1/2” wide boards of (I would guess) 1” thick oak or hickory. If you have such available, go ahead and substitute for the plywood I used. I used a 2 x 8 sheet of 3/4 plywood and added “phony” slats by gluing 3 1/2 wide strips of 1/4 plywood to the top surface. I found this arrangement to be a bit “flexible” with a payload of 450 lbs. Therefore, a support, made from a 2x4, was added to each on the underside. _______________

The Original 1920 Briggs and Stratton Cycle Car 4

The Finished Cycle Car — “The Red Bug”

5

The Making and Assembly Processes
Let’s Make Sawdust First I would recommend that all the wooden parts be sawed out at the same time. This will reduce the large sheets of plywood into, smaller, more manageable pieces. In some of the next pages you will find rough, cutout dimensions. Rip all similar width pieces at the same saw setting. Start with the widest and proceed to the smaller ones. You might consider finishing the seat, cushion bases and seat support first and set them aside for final painting. You will note how the axles are made by gluing pieces of 3/4 inch plywood together to get the desired thickness. The front axle is straight forward gluing together of 3 identical pieces. Whether you cut the profile of the front axle in the individual pieces or after gluing, is up to you. Note how the rear axle has a dado (1 x 1) to hold the 1” square axle tube at assembly. You can come close to this dado by sawing the filler pieces as shown. However, because of the varying thickness of purchased plywood, you will most likely have to “fine tune” the dado for a good fit to the steel tube. This fit should be close enough to allow epoxying the tube at final assembly. The tube must be flush to top surface of axle after assembly. The bearing support blocks are, also, made by gluing three pieces of 3/4 inch plywood together. It might be wise to glue the blocks as one unit, slightly oversize and then sawing them individually after gluing. The foot rest is, likewise, made by gluing together two pieces of 3/4 inch plywood. The fun piece is the steering shaft support which, because of its shape, I call the “dog bone.” Like the front axle, you might want to saw the 2 individual pieces before gluing together. A good drum sander is very useful in the finishing of this part. Save the drilling until after the gluing is done. 6 While I didn’t specify any corner rounding, I personally used a hand router and a 1/4” round over bit to make a lot of edges “look pretty.” I, also, spared a lot of little detail on the wood parts because I find most people with any degree of a home workshop will usually have sufficient woodworking skills to suffice. I recommend that any finished wood part be left without paint at this time. You should completely finish, assemble and test drive your car and only then disassemble and paint. _______________

A city version of the Cycle Car was made later, using electric power for use in large estates as personal transportation. It was call the “Red Bug.” We named ours Red Bug, likewise.

4

1 4

31 3/4

31 3/4

31 3/4

3

1 2

front axle rear axle seat support botton foot rest

front axle rear axle

front axle rear axle seat support front

2

1 2

3 3 15 4 1 5 4

foot rest

38
seat support front seat support side

22 3
seat support side

1 2

3

3 4

24

22

1 2

15

3 4

15

3 4

40

1 4 48

7
24
CHASSIS

96

NOTES: 1. Quantity required per car: 1 2. Use dimensions given - Do not scale drawing. 3. Material: 3/4 Plywood - full 4 x 8 sheet. 4. Saw cut has been allowed for.

Copyright 2004 Everett Moore
PART DESCRIPTION

PLYWOOD CUTTING SHEET - 1
SCALE PART NUMBER

See Notes

007

3

1 ( X6 ) 2

floor slat x 6 floor slat x 6 floor slat x 6 floor slat x 6

2

1 2

floor slat x 6 floor slat x 6

8

NOTES: 1. Quantity required per car: 1 2. Use dimensions given - Do not scale drawing. 3. Material: 1/4 Plywood - full sheet

Copyright 2004 Everett Moore
PART DESCRIPTION

PLYWOOD CUTTING SHEET - 2
SCALE PART NUMBER

See Notes

008

48.00 44.00

Back 16.00 17.00 17.00

8.00

Side

Side 48.00

1.75

Seat Back Strip

9
17.00 Bottom 40.00

NOTES: 1. Quantity required per car: 1 2. Use dimensions given - Do not scale drawing. 3. Material: 3/4 Plywood

Copyright 2004 Everett Moore
PART DESCRIPTION

PLYWOOD CUTTING SHEET - 3, SEAT
SCALE PART NUMBER

See Notes

009

96 Hole Pattern "E" 6 Hole Pattern "D" 2 1 10 2 1 1 2 x 5 * 10 16 2 * x * 1 2 16 x 4 x x x 1 4 Center Line of Chassis 2 x 3 1 16 1 4 5 8 6

10 (ref) Hole Pattern "C"

3 8

3 16

x

10

5 * 16

x 4R 8 1 15 2 20 27 1 31 2 Center Line Front Axle 48 1 2 72 3 Center on groove Hole Pattern "B" 20 4 1 4 Center Line Rear Axle 1 7 7 8

x

18 R

Hole Pattern "A"

010

3

5 8

1

1 R 2

14

Dims marked with ( * ) apply to both front and rear axle mounting holes.

NOTES: 1. Quantity required per car: 1 2. Use dimensions given - Do not scale drawing. 3. Material: 3/4” Plywood — Imitation Slats = 1/4” Plywood. 4. All hole dia’s to be 3/8” except those marked “x” which are 1/4”. 5. Some hole dia’s are called out on hole patterns. 6. See text for more drilling instructions. 7. Break all corners and sharp edges. 8. Finish: Choice of builder.

Copyright 2004 Everett Moore
PART DESCRIPTION

CHASSIS — TOP VIEW
SCALE PART NUMBER

See Notes

010

D
1 1 2

1 DIA - 2 Holes 4

3 DIA (ref) 3 places 8

Cut relief to clear 1/4" flat washer Cut thru 1/4" imitation slat - 2 places

2 (ref)

B
3 R 8

1 1 2

3 DIA - 2 Holes 8

1

3 4

3 R 8

1

3 8

E
3 1 2

7

011
3 DIA - 4 Holes 8 3 3 R 8 1 1 2 6

A
1 (ref) 2 places
3 R 8

3 DIA - 2 Holes 8

1

3 8
1 1 2

3

1

3 8

3

1 2

C

Copyright 2004 - Everett Moore

PART DESCRIPTION

HOLE PATTERN LAYOUTS
Use dimensions given - Do not scale drawing.

CHASSIS - TOP VIEW SHEET 2
SCALE PART NUMBER

See Notes

011

3 3 PIECES OF 3/4 PLYWOOD GLUED TOGETHER APPROX. 2 1/4 INCHES

3 DIA 8 2 HOLES 1 7 8 1 4 6

4

012

NOTES: 1. Quantity required per car: 2 2. Use dimensions given - Do not scale drawing. 3. Material: 3/4 Plywood. 4. Break all corners and sharp edges. 5. Finish: Choice of builder.

Copyright 2004 Everett Moore
PART DESCRIPTION

BEARING MOUNTING BLOCK
SCALE PART NUMBER

See Notes

012

36

1 1 2

1R

3 DIA - 2 Holes 8 3 3R 1 2

7

3 4

1
3R

013

1

1 2

1
6 20

1 2

6

NOTES: 1. Quantity required per car: 1 2. Use dimensions given - Do not scale drawing. 3. Material: 3/4 Plywood. Glue 2 pieces together. 4. Break all corners and sharp edges. 5. Finish: Choice of builder.

Copyright 2004 Everett Moore
PART DESCRIPTION

FOOT REST
SCALE PART NUMBER

See Notes

013

10 7 8 2 1 4

5 16 2

10 1 16 2 1 16

5 16 2

1 4

7 8

1

1 8

3 DIA - 8 holes 8 3 2 - 4 plcs 4 31 3 4

2

1 (ref) 4 2 1 2 1 4

014

4 13 both ends 16

3

13 13 both ends 16

Center Line of Chassis 1" Dia. C'bore to depth shown - Typical 4 Places

NOTES: 1. Quantity required per car: 1 2. Use dimensions given - Do not scale drawing. 3. Material: 3/4 Plywood (3 pieces glued together) 4. Break all corners and sharp edges. 5. Finish: Choice of builder.

Copyright 2004 Everett Moore
PART DESCRIPTION

FRONT AXLE SUB - ASSEMBLY
SCALE PART NUMBER

See Notes

014

10

5 16 2 1 16 2 1 16

10

5 16

1 DIA - 12 holes 4 2 1 2 2 1 2

3 4 34 1 1 2 7 8

1

1 - Typical 6 places 4

3 4

3

1 2

Sq tube & plywood surfaces to be flush this entire surface

1

1 2

015

1

1 4

3 DIA - 4 holes 8 31 3 4

Center line

1

1 4 1 9 (ref - both ends) 16

NOTES: 1. Quantity required per car: 1 2. Use dimensions given - Do not scale drawing. 3. Material: 3/4 plywood (3 pieces), 1/4” plywood (1 piece) Cut to dims shown. 1” square x .120 wall steel tubing - 34.750 long 4. Glue plywood pieces together as shown. When dry, epoxy steel tube in to dimensions shown. Tube and plywood to be flush at top. 5. Plywood thickness can vary. Therefore it may be necessary to touch up the 1” dado on the table saw to make a snug but loose fit between steel and wooden axle. 6. Break all corners and sharp edges. 7. Finish: Choice of builder.

Copyright 2004 Everett Moore
PART DESCRIPTION

REAR AXLE ASSEMBLY
SCALE PART NUMBER

See Notes

015

5

1 14

14

1

1 2

1R

1 2R

2

5 8 DIA 4 Holes 1 1 4

16
11 2

2

1

3

3 DIA 8 4 Places

3 4 Typical both ends

NOTES: 1. Quantity required per car: 1 2. Use dimensions given - Do not scale drawing. 3. Material: 2 pieces of 3/4 plywood glued together. 4. Round over corners as shown. 5. Finish: Choice of builder.

Copyright 2004 Everett Moore
PART DESCRIPTION

STEERING SHAFT SUPPORT
SCALE PART NUMBER

See Notes

016

6 1 5 4 22

1 2

20 3 4

15
17

3 DIA - 2 Holes 8

7

7 8

3 4 1 2

3 4

2 24

2 (REF)

NOTES: 1. Quantity required per car: 1 2. Use dimensions given - Do not scale drawing. 3. Material: 3/4” Plywood. 4. Glue & screw together. 5. Finish: Choice of builder.

Copyright 2004 Everett Moore
PART DESCRIPTION

SEAT SUPPORT ASSEMBLY
SCALE PART NUMBER

See Notes

017

44 4R 15
o

16

5 16

3 15 4

15 4R 80° 16

40 3 1 2

8

1

1 4

18

2 17 1R Front corner top view Typical two places

NOTES:
1. 2. 3. 4. Use dimensions shown. Do not scale drawing. Material: 3/4 in. plywood. Referring to this drawing and drawing XXX, cut two slots to accept corner brackets. Fit parts - glue - reinforce with screws and corner brackets.

Copyright 2004 Everett Moore
PART DESCRIPTION

SEAT ASSEMBLY
SCALE PART NUMBER

See Notes

018

Cut slot thru seat back to accept corner bracket both sides

4 in corner reinforcing bracket fasten to rear of seat, extend thru slot fasten to outside of arm rest. ( 2 places )

19

Rear view of seat

Detail of seat back reinforcement
NOTES:
1. Cut two slots as shown. Use router preferably. However, multiple holes can be drilled and connected with jig saw. Slot should only be wide enough to accept the bracket. Prototype used 1/4 in. 2. Drill 1/4 dia holes thru seat back & arm rests and secure brackets with 1/4 - 20 bolts, fender washers and nuts. Place nuts on outside.

Copyright 2004 Everett Moore
PART DESCRIPTION

SEAT - REAR DETAIL
SCALE PART NUMBER

See Notes

019

1

1 DIA - C'Bore - 5/16 Deep

1 8R 11

10

1 8 3 8

12 1 1 4 69 5 8
20

3 16 3 1 2

NOTES: 1. Quantity required per car: 1 2. Use dimensions given - Do not scale drawing. 3. Material: Make from 2 x 4 (1 1/2 x 3 1/2) 4. With 1/4” Dia router bit, cut key way as shown. 5. Mounting holes to be drilled at assembly. 6. Finish: Choice of builder.

Copyright 2004 Everett Moore
PART DESCRIPTION

UNDER CHASSIS SUPPORT - LH
SCALE PART NUMBER

See Notes

020

1

1 DIA - C'Bore - 5/16 Deep

1

1 R 8 11

10

1 8 3 8

12
21

69

5 8

3 16

NOTES: 1. Quantity required per car: 1 2. Use dimensions given - Do not scale drawing. 3. Material: Make from 2 x 4 (1 1/2 x 3 1/2) 4. With 1/4” Dia router bit, cut key way as shown. 5. Mounting holes to be drilled at assembly. 6. Finish: Choice of builder.

Copyright 2004 Everett Moore
PART DESCRIPTION

UNDER CHASSIS SUPPORT - RH
SCALE PART NUMBER

See Notes

021

The Making of Metal Parts
— Now Let’s Make Some Iron Filings — If you haven’t already, you might want to cut the 1” square tube to required length and finish the rear axle per drawing No. 015. Be sure to align your chop saw so as to cut as near to 90 degrees as possible. I never trust the marks provided and prefer to use a square to do this. I recommend cutting all bar stock and angle parts to the required length at one time. Next, remove any burrs and sharp edges with a hand file. To layout the hole locations, you should have a small bottle of layout blue. You need only apply it to the approximate area where the holes will be. Accurately locate the holes with a good square and scale. Scribe lines with a scriber and center punch before drilling holes. When all holes are drilled, using either a bench grinder or hand grinder, form the radius’ called out on the drawings. These are not critical and in some cases are more for appearance than anything else. One of the more difficult parts will be the two hub mounting flanges, Drawing No. 034. Layout and scribe the hole locations with your square and compass or use the cardboard tool described in Drawing No. 035. Using the appropriate tap drill, drill and then tap holes per drawing. If you have never used a tap before, do two things — 1) Use a cutting fluid to lubricate the tap while cut ting (I use WD-40) 2) Every couple or three turns of the tap, stop and backup a turn to break the chip and free the tap again. Don’t force the tap, back up, and go again. Nothing will make a grown man cry quicker than breaking a tap flush with the work, usually on the last hole of a nearly completed part! Make an effort to start the tap perpendicular to the the part. After completing drilling and tapping, all that’s left to do is cutting the center hole. In 22 sticking with my criteria established at the beginning, I did this without using a lathe. Of course, if you have a lathe, by all means use it! I used a 1-5/8” dia. metal cutting hole saw, cutting half way on one side and turning the part over and finishing from the other side. Since the hole could be a bit smaller, if you have a 1-9/16” dia saw or want to use a fly cutter, use it. The only tapped holes remaining are on the chain tightener anchor blocks and the tubular nuts (use in the steering shaft support AKA “Dog Bone.”) All the techniques of tapping used on the previous parts, apply here, also. While into tread cutting, you might as well cut the threads on three parts made from round CRS. From your tap and die set chose the appropriate die and die stock (the handle that holds the die) and, after cutting the rods to length, cut the threads per drawings No. 038 and 039. The remaining metal work entails modifying a purchased part, such as cross drilling and pressing in a roll-pin, drill and tapping or, in one case, cutting threads with a die. One part, the brake activator guide, Part No. 041 requires drilling and tapping plus pressing in two bearings. Other modifications are self-explanatory as per the drawing. Now is a good time to examine all your parts by comparing them to the drawing. Remove any burrs found, de-grease and set aside for the initial assembly process. Only after making sure that parts fit and function as intended, should they be degreased, primed and painted with the finish of your choice. _______________

5

5 8 4.125 2.250 11 16

1

1 R 2 1 1 2

23

.375 DIA (2) .625 DIA

.750

NOTES: 1. Quantity required per car: 4 2. Use dimensions given - Do not scale drawing. 3. Material: 1/4 X 1-1/2 Steel Bar Stock. 4. Break all corners and sharp edges. 5. Finish: Choice of builder.

Copyright 2004 Everett Moore
PART DESCRIPTION

FRONT SPINDLE MOUNTING BRACKET
SCALE PART NUMBER

See Notes

023

25 1 9 DIA 32 1 2

24

Note: Used only if excessive flexing of the plywood chassis in the area of engine mount and jack shaft is experienced. Install by raising engine (PP 215) and engine mounting plate (PP 250) and sliding the two supports between wood chassis and mounting plate. Place as far apart as possible while in contact with engine mounting bolts. Secure supports at front with 1/4” hardware. This may increase the length of #35 roller chain required between torque converter and jack-shaft. Copyright 2004 Everett Moore
PART DESCRIPTION

NOTES: 1. Quantity required per car: 2 2. Use dimensions given - Do not scale drawing. 3. Material: 1” x 1” x .120 wall Square tube. 4. Break all corners and sharp edges. 5. Finish: Choice of builder.

DRIVE TRAIN SUPPORT
SCALE PART NUMBER

See Notes

024

4.250

1

7 8

5 16

2 (ref) 1.375 1 .250 DIA - 2 Holes .375 DIA - 2 Holes 7 5 16
25

NOTES: 1. Quantity required per car: 2 2. Use dimensions given - Do not scale drawing. 3. Material: 3/16 X 2” Bar Stock. 4. Break all corners and sharp edges. 5. Finish: Choice of builder.

Copyright 2004 Everett Moore
PART DESCRIPTION

CHAIN TIGHTENER BASE PLATE
SCALE PART NUMBER

See Notes

025

3 8

1

1 4

9 DIA 32 1 1 2 3 DIA 8 1 2 1 Plate B - Qty = 2 Plate A - Qty = 4

2

26

5 15 16 3 1 8

NOTES: 1. Quantity required per car: See notation on drawing. 2. Use dimensions given - Do not scale drawing. 3. Material: 1/8 x 1 Bar stock. 4. Break all corners and sharp edges. 5. Finish: Choice of builder.

Copyright 2004 Everett Moore
PART DESCRIPTION

WASHER PLATES A&B
SCALE PART NUMBER

See Notes

026

19

1 2 .312 DIA 3

.250 DIA 16 (ref) 5

1 R 2 Both ends

27
10°

NOTES: 1. Quantity required per car: 1 2. Use dimensions given - Do not scale drawing. 3. Material: 1/4 X 1 Bar Stock. 4. Drill & bend as indicated. 5. Break all corners and sharp edges. 6. Finish: Choice of builder.

Copyright 2004 Everett Moore
PART DESCRIPTION

BRAKE LEVER
SCALE PART NUMBER

See Notes

027

7 1 1 2 4.00

3 4 .250 DIA 2 Holes

1

1 2

28

NOTES: 1. Quantity required per car: 1 2. Use dimensions given - Do not scale drawing. 3. Material: 1/8 X 1- 1/2 steel bar stock. 4. Break all corners and sharp edges. 5. Finish: Choice of builder.

Copyright 2004 Everett Moore
PART DESCRIPTION

CENTER BRAKE PULLEY MTG. BKT.
SCALE PART NUMBER

See Notes

028

.250 DIA 13 12° 1 1 2 4.50 6.00

3 4 1 1 2 1

1

1 2

1 R 8

.375 DIA 2 Holes

29

Twisting bend to be within this area

A= B=

LH as shown (Qty 1) RH to be mirrow image (Qty 1)

NOTES: 1. Quantity required per car: 1 Left Hand & 1 Right Hand. 2. Use dimensions given - Do not scale drawing. 3. Material: 1/8 X 1- 1/2 Steel Bar Stock 4. Twist bend as shown to allow brake cable to go under chassis board. 4. Break all corners and sharp edges. 5. Finish: Choice of builder.

Copyright 2004 Everett Moore
PART DESCRIPTION

OUTBOARD BRAKE PULLEY MTG. BKT.
SCALE PART NUMBER

See Notes

029

3 4

1 2 2

.250 DIA 2 HOLES 1 R 2

3 (ref) 16

1

1 2

2 1

2 4 1 2 3
30

.312 DIA

2

1

.375 DIA - 2 Holes 1 R 8

NOTES: 1. Quantity required per car: 2 2. Use dimensions given - Do not scale drawing. 3. Material: 3/16 X 2 X 2 Angle. 4. Break all corners and sharp edges. 5. Finish: Choice of builder.

Copyright 2004 Everett Moore
PART DESCRIPTION

BRAKE LEVER MOUNTING BRACKET
SCALE PART NUMBER

See Notes

030

1 R 4

1 R 2

7 8

5 .375 DIA 3 HOLES

3 4

5

31

1

1 2

1 2

1 2

2

NOTES: 1. Quantity required per car: 1 2. Use dimensions given - Do not scale drawing. 3. Material: 3/16 X 2 X 2 Angle. 4. Break all corners and sharp edges. 5. Finish: Choice of builder.

Copyright 2005 Everett Moore
PART DESCRIPTION

BRAKE ANCHOR MOUNTING BKT - LH
SCALE PART NUMBER

See Notes

031

1 R 4

7 8 1 R 2

5 .375 DIA 3 HOLES

3 4 5

32

1

1 2

1 2

1 2

2

NOTES: 1. Quantity required per car: 1 2. Use dimensions given - Do not scale drawing. 3. Material: 3/16 X 2 X 2 angle 4. Break all corners and sharp edges. 5. Finish: Choice of builder.

Copyright 2005 Everett Moore
PART DESCRIPTION

BRAKE ANCHOR MOUNTING BKT - RH
SCALE PART NUMBER

See Notes

032

1R 2

.312 DIA

4 3

.375 DIA 2 Holes

2
33

2 3

1 2

1 2

1 R 4

NOTES: 1. Quantity required per car: 1 2. Use dimensions given - Do not scale drawing. 3. Material: 3/16 - 2 x 3 Angle or make from larger angle. 4. Break all corners and sharp edges. 5. Finish: Choice of builder.

Copyright 2004 Everett Moore
PART DESCRIPTION

THROTTLE MOUNTING BRACKET
SCALE PART NUMBER

See Notes

033

2.812 DIA

2.000 DIA

5/16 x 24 UNF 4 holes

1/4 x 28 UNF 4 holes

34

Make from 3 1/2" Dia. Aluminum disc McMaster-Carr No. 9035K17 - PP 248

1-5/8 DIA 3-1/2 DIA (ref)

.50 (REF)

NOTES: 1. Quantity required per car: 2 2. Use dimensions given - Do not scale drawing. 3. Material: See drawing callout. 4. Break all corners and sharp edges. 5. Finish: Choice of builder.

Copyright 2004 Everett Moore
PART DESCRIPTION

HUB MOUNTING FLANGE - ALTERNATIVE
SCALE PART NUMBER

See Notes

034

3

1 DIA 2 2 13 DIA 16 1 13 R 32

2 DIA 1R

35

11 * 1 DIA 32 Location of pin holes Typical 8 places

NOTES: 1. Quantity required per car: 1 2. Use dimensions given - Do not scale drawing. 3. Material: Cardboard such as on back of writing tablets, poster board, etc. 4. Cut stack of small disks to be snug fit in wheel bearing hole. (approx 1.375). 5. Glue stack of small disks concentrically on large disk. This stack must be sufficient to firmly locate tool in wheel hub. 6. Make small pin hole at intersection of all 8 hole locations.

Copyright 2004 Everett Moore
PART DESCRIPTION

CARDBOARD TOOL WHEEL/FLANGE DRILL
SCALE PART NUMBER

See Notes

035

1/4 - 28 UNF - 3 Holes

1.375

5 16 5 8 1 5 16

2

36

5 8

NOTES: 1. Quantity required per car: 2 2. Use dimensions given - Do not scale drawing. 3. Material: 5/8” Sq. Bar Stock or Key Stock. 4. Break all corners and sharp edges. 5. Finish: Choice of builder.

Copyright 2004 Everett Moore
PART DESCRIPTION

CHAIN TIGHTENER ANCHOR BLOCK
SCALE PART NUMBER

See Notes

036

5/16 - 24 UNF 5 DIA 8

3 4 1 1 2

37

NOTES: 1. Quantity required per car: 4 2. Use dimensions given - Do not scale drawing. 3. Material: 5/8 Dia CRS 4. Break all corners and sharp edges. 5. Finish: Choice of builder.

Copyright 2004 Everett Moore
PART DESCRIPTION

TUBULAR NUT
SCALE PART NUMBER

See Notes

037

8.00 1 12 1

1/4 - 28 UNF - Both ends - Min. full thread as shown

38

NOTES: 1. Quantity required per car: 1 2. Use dimensions given - Do not scale drawing. 3. Material: .250 Dia. Cold Rolled Steel (CRS). 4. Break all corners and sharp edges. 5. Finish: Choice of builder.

Copyright 2004 Everett Moore
PART DESCRIPTION

BRAKE ACTIVATOR SHAFT
SCALE PART NUMBER

See Notes

038

Tie Rod "A" = 7 in. Long Tie Rod "B" = 23 3/8 long

3/8 - 24 UNF - Min 1-1/2" full thd - both ends Make from 3/8 dia CRS
39

3/8 - 24 Nut (4 req"d) 3/8 - 24 Ball end - No. PP 203 (4 req'd)

NOTES: 1. Quantity required per car: 1 “A” & 1 “B” 2. Use dimensions given - Do not scale drawing. 3. Material: Per drawing callout. 4. Break all corners and sharp edges. 5. Finish: Choice of builder. 6. Assemble each Tie Rod with lock nut and ball end on each end. Screw on far enough to keep together as a unit. Do not tighten until final assembly.

Copyright 2004 Everett Moore
PART DESCRIPTION

TIE RODS - A & B
SCALE PART NUMBER

See Notes

039

1" (ref) .125 dia - Press in 1/8" x 1" Roll Pin until flush opposite side. Center hole in bolt head

40

5 (ref)

NOTES: 1. Quantity required per car: 2 2. Use dimensions given - Do not scale drawing. 3. Material: Make from 3/8 x 5” UNC bolt. 4. Break all corners and sharp edges. 5. Finish: Choice of builder.

Copyright 2004 Everett Moore
PART DESCRIPTION

PILLOW BLOCK FRONT BOLT
SCALE PART NUMBER

See Notes

040

PP 243 (2)

1 (ref) 4

.375 DIA - thru both ends

1 (ref) 1 DIA 4 See notes

1 2 1/4 - 28 UNF - 2 holes

1

1 (ref) 4

PP 242

41
3 4 1 1 2 5 8 3" (ref)

NOTES: 1. Quantity required per car: 1 2. Use dimensions given - Do not scale drawing. 3. Material: Per drawing callout. The builder has lattitude to utilize what ever is on hand to build this guide. 4. Break all corners and sharp edges. 5. Press bearings in flush with flange (both ends). The .250 hole thru bearings must be aligned and free for movement of activator shaft. This may require running drill through holes after assembly. 6. Finish: Choice of builder.

Copyright 2004 Everett Moore
PART DESCRIPTION

BRAKE ACTIVATOR GUIDE
SCALE PART NUMBER

See Notes

041

3 (ref) 1 2 Min full thd 1

42

.250 DIA

1/4 -28 UNF

Make from No. 6065K131 Rod End Blank (McMaster- Carr) 244 PP

NOTES: 1. Quantity required per car: 1 2. Use dimensions given - Do not scale drawing. 3. Material: Make from PP 244 - No. 6065K131 (McMaster - Carr) 4. Break all corners and sharp edges. 5. Finish: Choice of builder.

Copyright 2004 Everett Moore
PART DESCRIPTION

BRAKE ACTIVATOR LINK
SCALE PART NUMBER

See Notes

042

1 in. before threads 1 1/8 x 3/4 Roll pin

1 2 2 1 4

43

NOTES: 1. Quantity required per car: 2 2. Use dimensions given - Do not scale drawing. 3. Material: Make from 3/8 x 24 UNF bolt. 4. Cross drill .125 dia as shown. 5. Break all corners and sharp edges. 6. Press roll pin thru bolt flush with opposite side. 7. Finish: Choice of builder.

Copyright 2004 Everett Moore
PART DESCRIPTION

BRAKE BAND ANCHOR BOLT
SCALE PART NUMBER

See Notes

043

1

1/8 x 3/4 Roll pin .125 Dia.

3 (ref) 8

1 2

.375 DIA - CRS

44

NOTES: 1. Quantity required per car: 2 2. Use dimensions given - Do not scale drawing. 3. Material: .375 dia. Cold rolled steel (CRS) or make from Cable Pins, Part. No. 13663 (Northern Tool) 4. Break all corners and sharp edges. 5. Press roll pin thru until flush with with opposite side. 6. Finish: Choice of builder.

Copyright 2004 Everett Moore
PART DESCRIPTION

BRAKE BAND ANCHOR PIN
SCALE PART NUMBER

See Notes

044

17/64 Dia. 4 holes, evenly spaced on 2.000 dia BC

45

Rear Wheel (Purchased Part No. 206) Only hub is shown for clarity.

NOTES: 1. Quantity required per car: 2 2. Material: Per callout on drawing. 3. Carefully remove bearing from one side. 4. Use dimensions given - Do not scale drawing. 5. Remove burrs after drilling. 6. Finish: Paint metal exposed by drilling. Color: Choice of builder.

Copyright 2004 Everett Moore
PART DESCRIPTION

REAR HUB MODIFICATION
SCALE PART NUMBER

See Notes

045

PP 245

Straighten shank 7 32 1 4
46

3 DIA 32

Cut tang off as shown 1.75 (ref) Remove & discard threaded pin

5/16 Dia (ref)

NOTES: 1. Quantity required per car: 1 2. Use dimensions given - Do not scale drawing. 3. Material: Make from Azusa Part No. AZ1806 PP 245 4. Break all corners and sharp edges. 5. Finish: It’s Zink plated - only touch up raw metal from alteration - any color.

Copyright 2004 Everett Moore
PART DESCRIPTION

THROTTLE PEDAL MODIFICATION
SCALE PART NUMBER

See Notes

046

Make from PP 239

Bend tab up as shown
47

NOTES: 1. Quantity required per car: 4 2. Use dimensions given - Do not scale drawing. 3. Material: Make from purchased part. 4. Bend tab as shown. This allows sufficient contact with wood to hold in place. 5. Finish: None - already plated.

Copyright 2004 Everett Moore
PART DESCRIPTION

THROTTLE CONDUIT CLAMP MODIFICATION
SCALE PART NUMBER

See Notes

047

1 2

15

SHAFT "A" (1 Req'd)
Make from PP 233

48

24 (REF)

SHAFT "B" (1 Req'd)

PP 232

NOTES: 1. Quantity required per car: 1 each. 2. Use dimensions given - Do not scale drawing. 3. Material: Make from purchased parts per drawing callout. 4. Break all corners and sharp edges. 5. Finish: Choice of builder.

Copyright 2004 Everett Moore
PART DESCRIPTION

STEERING SHAFT A&B
SCALE PART NUMBER

See Notes

048

The Sub-Assembly Process
You will find that there are some parts that can best be assembled as a sub-assembly and then, be attached to the final assembly as a unit. A perfect example of this is the brake activator assembly as shown on drawing No. 050. This unit is adjusted after final assembly, to allow proper function of braking mechanism. You will note how the brake cable is threaded through the pulley of this subassembly. This simple mechanism provides equal application of braking force to both rear wheel drums. The next sub-assembly will be the two chain tighteners per drawing No. 057. The assembly is straight forward with the use of 1/4-28 UNF hardware per call out on drawing. An all-thread bolt is made by the jamming of 2 hex nuts on one end. The next two sub-assemblies are a bit more difficult. Referring to drawing No. 052, you will see how the adapter, Part No. 034 is attached to a rear wheel. While we only power the right wheel, both wheels have brake drums and require both rear wheels to have this adapter attached. Originally, we fastened the adapter and wheel with 1/4-28 socket-head cap screws and split lockwasher. However, after several miles of parade driving, this loosened up on the driven wheel. Therefore, we now recommend that in addition to the lockwasher, the threads be coated with LocTite (Red), making a semipermanent assembly. The inner bearing of the wheel had to be removed for the drilling of the four holes as shown in drawing No. 045. The bearing is not replaced until after the mounting flange has been attached. Doing the above described assembly requires working in very tight quarters. A long, ball end allen wrench is used to insert and turn the Allen Head screws from the opening in the opposite bearing. After applying LocTite, tighten all four screws as tight as you can get them just short of breaking the ball end off your wrench. Hopefully, this is the last time you have to do this. With the two rear wheels thus done, you might as well proceed to finishing up the rear wheels by attaching the sprockets and brake drums per drawing No. 053. Having an unused sprocket on the left rear wheel serves a purpose. At first we had a large 1/8 thick disc between the left wheel and the brake drum to assure the brake band remaining in correct position. Actually, we learned that making this disc without a lathe was difficult and, if done by a machine shop, would cost more that an extra sprocket. Also, if you wanted to add a differential in place of the jack shaft, the driven sprocket is there waiting for you. Meanwhile, it serves the purpose of keeping the brake band in place. It, also, serves as a conversation piece. When someone, while looking your car over, asks what that sprocket is for, tell them it is the sending or trigger wheel for your anti-skid braking system! The front axle can either be sub-assembled separately or after it is attached to the chassis board. I prefer the latter. In either case it is depicted on drawing No. 054. The jack shaft can, likewise, be loosely assembled as a sub-assembly. See drawing No. 061 for reference. _______________

49

PP214 (ref) 1/4- 28 Hex nut (3)

Spring optional 041 PP 214 (3) PP 240 (3) PP 241 (3) PP 235 (1)

042

038 PP 214 (ref)

Note: It may be necessary to file clevis in this area for free turning of pulley

50

NOTES: 1. Quantity required per car: 1 2. Use dimensions given - Do not scale drawing. 3. Material: Per drawing callout 4. Finish: Choice of builder. 5. A compression spring can be added to area indicated to aid returning of brake to off position. (Optional) 5. Final adjust of this assembly is done at final assembly.

Copyright 2004 Everett Moore
PART DESCRIPTION

BRAKE ACTIVATOR ASSEMBLY
SCALE PART NUMBER

See Notes

050

025

1/4 - 28 Hex Nut

1/4 - 28 All Thread Rod - 2 3/4" Lg. Make head by jamming 2 hex nuts with J B Weld in threads.

51

036

1/4 - 28 x 3/4" C'screw & L'washer (2)

NOTES: 1. Quantity required per car: 2 2. Use dimensions given - Do not scale drawing. 3. Material: Per drawing call outs. 4. Break all corners and sharp edges. 5. Finish: Previously finished.

Copyright 2004 Everett Moore
PART DESCRIPTION

CHAIN TIGHTENER SUB-ASSEMBLY
SCALE PART NUMBER

See Notes

051

1/4 X 28 - 5/8 Long Socket Hd Capscrew (4 req'd) 1/4 Lock Washer (4 req'd) - Apply LocTite (Red) to threads.

52
Part No. 034 Part No. 045 Only hub is shown for clarity.

NOTES: 1. Quantity required per car: 2 2. Material: Per drawing callout. 3. Apply LocTite (Red) to threads. 4. Re-install bearing removed when modifying hub. Use new bearing if original was damaged. 5. Finish: Finished prior to assembly.

Copyright 2004 Everett Moore
PART DESCRIPTION

REAR WHEEL - FLANGE SUB-ASSEMBLY
SCALE PART NUMBER

See Notes

052

5/16 x 24 UNF - 7/8 Long Socket Head C'Screw 5/16 Lock Washer 4 each req'd

Sprocket - PP No. 218 Northern # 1363 (54 tooth - 41 pitch)

53

Brake Drum - PP No. 223 Northern # 1366

Wheel Sub-Assembly Part No. 052

Copyright 2004 Everett Moore NOTES: 1. Quantity required per car: 2 2. Material: Per callout on drawing. 3. Finish: Parts are pre-finished at assembly
PART DESCRIPTION

REAR WHEEL ASS’Y SPROCKET & DRUM
SCALE PART NUMBER

See Notes

053

023 (4)

014

PP 202 PP 228 (2)

PP 201 PP 228 (2)

54
Adjust spacing between brackets, if needed, by placing large, fender washers between lower brackets and wood.

NOTES: 1. Quantity required per car: 1 2. Use dimensions given - Do not scale drawing. 3. Material: Per drawing callout. 4. Break all corners and sharp edges. 5. Finish: Parts to be finished before assembly. 6. Add 3/8 fender washers to lower spindle brackets as necessary to obtain proper fit of spindle.

Copyright 2004 Everett Moore
PART DESCRIPTION

FRONT AXLE ASSEMBLY
SCALE PART NUMBER

See Notes

054

The Assembly Process
— Lets Build a Car — I recommend that, before painting anything, you completely assemble your car and test drive it. Don’t use lock nuts this time — merely use regular hex nuts and lock washers. Trailer it to some area where you can safely drive it around a bit. If you have a problem, now is the time to find out. Once you’re satisfied, completely disassemble, clean all the metal parts with Acetone or other good de-greaser and paint the color of your choice. My car was finished with gloss black on the metal parts and bright red on the wood. On the final assembly, use nylon lock nuts every where possible. Where not possible, use LocTite (blue). There’s a lot of unfelt vibration that can loosen hardware and ruin the entire parade for you. I have not specified the exact lengths and sizes of most hardware as it should be self evident. When attaching parts to wood, the wood tends to crush under the load of tight ening the bolts. Hence, the generous use of large, fender washers is advised. Build all the sub-assemblies first. Follow the instructions on the specific drawing. Now, with the chassis board upside down on saw horses, assemble the front and rear axles, and proceed with the attachment of all parts noted on Drawing No. 058. From the pictures to the right you see an amazing amount of parts and hardware utilized in this “simple” car! You will use quite a bit of the hardware while working on the underside. However, be prepared to “box it up” when it becomes necessary to turn it over and assemble on the top side. Attach both front and rear axles at this time. Referring to drawing No. 058 and photos on page 56, attach as many of the parts shown on the next page as possible. Noting the direction of the bolts you made with the 55

The upside down chassis board makes an excellent place to pile parts and hardware until you need to assemble from the top side!

Photo No 1 - Throttle cable routing under brake equalizer assemble. Note how the cable is held in place with 3 clamps, Part No. 047.

Photo No. 4 - This shot shows the brake equalizer and how the brake cable is threaded to reach the outer puller and finally to brake band.

Photo No. 2 - Throttle cable makes its exit to top side through hole drilled at an angle that will prevent any restriction to throttle wire movement. Held in place with clamp, Part No. 047.

Photo No. 5 - Detail of how throttle wire terminates at engine. A modified “Z” bend matches the existing hole in throttle arm while Clamp, part No. PP 239 attaches to existing threaded engine hole with 10-32 x 1/2 socket head cap screw. An additional spring added to assist return to idle.

Photo 3 - Attachment of throttle wire to foot pedal with “Z” bend in end of wire. Note the cable being held with another clamp No. 047. An extension spring has been added to assist throttle returning to idle. 56

Photo No. 6 - Throttle cable emerges from just behind seat support.

roll-pin protruding from the head, install through proper hole in both outboard brake pulley mtg. brackets, Part Nos.029A and 029B. Leave bolt loose at this time. With the roll-pins pointing forward, the two chassis supports, Part Nos.020 and 021 can be positioned in place. The Foot rest, part No. 013 can be installed from the opposite side and loosely bolted in place. Continue to refer to assembly drawing No. 058, which shows the proper location of most parts under your car. While the tie rod assemblies are shown on this drawing, it is best to wait until the steering shaft, part No.048A has been installed before attaching the tie rods. When you are satisfied that the bottom mounted parts have been installed as far as possible, turn the chassis over, revealing the top side (with slats). You can now mount the seat support. Note: while not called out on drawing, I placed four large diameter rubber washers under the seat support (about 2” in from the four corners. When the mounting bolts are tightened, the rubber washers are captivated. Since the chassis flexes under changing terrain, this allows some “float” between the two parts. Make sure the seat support does not interfere with the throttle cable. Check to insure free movement of the throttle wire. Before mounting the jack shaft assembly, it is best to semi-assemble it before hand. Leave all setscrews loose. Refer to Dwg.062. You should have a bolt protruding up on both sides of the chassis. Drop both bearing support blocks, part Nos 012 over these holes. Next install the chain tension adjusters, part No.051 over the protruding bolt. Refer to drawing Nos 062 & 063 for detail and orientation of the adjusters. You can now carefully lower the jack shaft assembly onto the support blocks as shown on assembly drawings No.059 and No.062. Install the second bolt up through the chassis support, chassis, bearing block, chain adjuster and through the elongated hole in the pillow block. Use as many heavy, flat 57

washers under the nuts securing the pillow blocks, as possible. Referring to drawing No.062, locate the large sprocket that connects to the engine, in the center of the clearance slot cut for it. Do not tighten any sets screws yet. Before continuing with the jack shaft, it is necessary to mount the rear wheels. However, this is even a better time to mount the brake band anchor bolts (with the rollpin). See the brake band installation drawing No.064 for details. To install engine, refer to drawing No. 059 and 060. On the prototype the engine was bolted directly to the chassis board with an engine mounting plate, No. PP 250 separating the engine from the wood. Actual tests indicated that addition stiffness was needed. Therefore, engine supports, drawings No. XXX and XXX were added. They are installed between the wood chassis board and the engine mounting plate. You will note, by observing the picture on page 5, how a 1/4” pipe nipple and elbow was used to extend the engine’s oil drain plug rear and downward, to enable easy oil changes.

039A 054

023 046 PP 238 PP 239 047 050 020 028 PP 235 (2)

029A PP 235

040 Roll pin pointing forward 026A 015

58
010 021 040 Roll pin pointing forward 029B PP 235 039B 026A PP 236 026B (2)

NOTES: 1. Quantity required per car: 1 2. Parts locate per previously drilled holes. 3. Material: Per drawing callout. 4. Assemble per intructions in text.

Copyright 2004 Everett Moore
PART DESCRIPTION

CHASSIS ASSEMBLY BOTTOM VIEW
SCALE PART NUMBER

See Notes

058

013

027 (See Notes)

065

030 (2) 017 215

59
216 Attach brake actuator ass'y (below) with 1/4-28 x 1" capscrews & fender washers. Bolt head must not interfer with seat support (017). Secure with LocTite (Blue)

NOTES: 1. Quantity required per car: 1 2. Parts locate per previously drilled holes. 3. Material: Per drawing callout. 4. Assemble per intructions in text. 5. Slip bicycle handlebar grip onto brake lever to improve grip.

Copyright 2004 Everett Moore
PART DESCRIPTION

CHASSIS ASSEMBLY TOP VIEW
SCALE PART NUMBER

See Notes

059

Mtg. flange included with 048B 048B PP 212 (2) PP 229 (2) PP 226 PP 227 018 068 Direction of throttle cable 016 037 (4) 067 See notes

PP 204 (2) PP 234 048A

60
1 (ref) 4 For detail see drawing 061

NOTES: 1. Dis-assemble pillow blocks No. PP 204 and re-assemble with oil cup out side instead of top hole. This will allow extreme movement of bearing necessary to match angle of steering shaft. 2. Position the steering shaft to clear front axle by 1/4” and secure in place with Collars PP 212 and Bearings PP 229. 3. Attach seat to support with 2-1/2” removable pin hinges (2)

Copyright 2004 Everett Moore
PART DESCRIPTION

CHASSIS ASSEMBLY SIDE VIEW
SCALE PART NUMBER

See Notes

060

1/4 PP 210 (typical) PP XXX (typical)
XXX (typical) PP 211 (typical) Apply LocTite (Blue) 2 places (Blue) 2 places
61

NOTES: 1. Assemble as shown. 2. End of steering shaft to be 1/4” from front axle. 2. Use shim washers as shown to premit maximum tie rod travel. 3. Secure nuts with LocTite (blue)

Copyright 2004 Everett Moore
PART DESCRIPTION

TIE ROD - STEERING SHAFT ASS’Y DETAILS
SCALE PART NUMBER

See Notes

061

30

012

PP 225 (Cut to dimension shown)

012 PP 205 (2)

PP 219 PP 213 PP 213

PP 213

PP 213 PP 220

62

051 (2)

PP 217

NOTES: 1. Quantity required per car: 1 2. Use dimensions given - Do not scale drawing. 3. Material: Per drawing call out. 4. Break all corners and sharp edges. 5. Finish: n/a

Copyright 2004 Everett Moore
PART DESCRIPTION

JACKSHAFT ASSEMBLY
SCALE PART NUMBER

See Notes

062

PP 205 PP 225 (ref) Grease fitting to rear 3/8 Lock Nut & double flat washers

63
057 (ref) 012 (ref) Front of car

Copyright 2004 Everett Moore NOTES: 1. Quantity required per car: Typical 2 places. 2. Balance of Jack shaft assembly shown on drawing No. 062. 3. Material: Per drawing callout.
PART DESCRIPTION

CHAIN TIGHTENER INSTALLATION
SCALE PART NUMBER

See Notes

063

PP 224 (2)

044

64

043 031 (Left ) 032 (Right )
NOTES: 1. Quantity required per car: 2 (left and right) 2. Loosely assemble anchor bolt (043) at this stage. Final adjustment are made to it and brake cable after rear wheels are mounted. 3. Secure brake cable with standard clamp from hardware store. 4. Roll-pins of parts 043 and 044 are positioned approximately as shown. Copyright 2005 Everett Moore
PART DESCRIPTION

BRAKE BAND INSTALLATION
SCALE PART NUMBER

See Notes

064

Attach entire assembly to axle with 5/32 cotter pin

PP 246 - 1/32 shim washer (as needed) See notes about axle length

Wheel PP 206

PP 247 - 1/8 shim washer (as needed) Suggest using 2 at first.

65 NOTES:

Make from 1/2 in pipe cap Drill out to 3/4 dia. - cross drill 5/32 dia.

1. Use dimensions shown. Do not scale drawing. 2. Axle = 3/4 dia CRS cut oversize (48”) - Push axle thru axle tube on frame - Install shim washers and 1 wheel as show above - Install 1 hub cap, cross drill, install cotter pin - Install shim washers and 2nd wheel - Allowing extra length for hub cap, cut off - Install hub cap - cross drill - Install 2nd cotter pin. 3. Add or remove 1/32 shim washers to allow wheels to turn freely without excesssive end play.

Copyright 2004 Everett Moore
PART DESCRIPTION

AXLE - HUBCAP DETAILS
SCALE PART NUMBER

See Notes

065

024 (2)

66

Copyright 2004 Everett Moore NOTES: 1. Quantity per car: 2 (If required) 2. Material: Per drawing call out.
PART DESCRIPTION

DRIVE TRAIN SUPPORT INSTALLATION DWG.
SCALE PART NUMBER

See Notes

066

1 35 2
71 4

21

5/16 dia C'bore 1" dia 1/16 deep Press 1/4 - 20 "T" nut flush Typical 4 places 11

14

67

Section A - A

4:1

A

A 1 1 2

NOTES: 1. Quantity required per car: 1 2. Use dimensions given - Do not scale drawing. 3. Material: 1/2 inch plywood - 1/4 - 20 x 5/16 “T” nuts (4) - PP 249 4. Break all corners and sharp edges. 5. Finish: None. 6. Suggest using 2 in. of foam covered with appropriate upholstery material stretched tight and stapled in back. Be sure and not cover up the mounting holes. Alternate: Take to an upholstery shop and let them cover it.

Copyright 2004 Everett Moore
PART DESCRIPTION

SEAT CUSHION BASE
SCALE PART NUMBER

See Notes

067

5 5/16 dia C'bore 3/4" dia 1/16 deep Press 1/4 - 20 "T" nut flush Typical 3 places

1 2 16

32

4R

A

A

7

1 2

Section A - A

4:1 43 1R

3

3 4

68

NOTES: 1. Quantity required per car: 1 2. Use dimensions given - Do not scale drawing. 3. Material: 1/2 inch plywood - 1/4 - 20 x 5/16 “T” nuts (3) - PP 249 4. Break all corners and sharp edges. 5. Finish: None. 6. Suggest using 2 in. of foam covered with appropriate upholstery material stretched tight and stapled in back. Be sure and not cover up the mounting holes. Alternate: Take to an upholstery shop and let them cover it.

Copyright 2004 Everett Moore
PART DESCRIPTION

SEAT BACK CUSHION BASE
SCALE PART NUMBER

See Notes

068

Vendor Code =

FB

Foley-Belsaw P.O. Box 419593 Kansas City, Mo 64141 1-800-821-3452 W. W. Grainger, Inc. Website: www.grainger.com McMaster-Carr Website: www.mcmaster.com Manufacturer’s Supply P.O. Box 167 Dorchester, WI 54425 1-800-826-8563 Website: www.mfgsupply.com Northern Tool & Equipment 1-800-556-7885 Website: www.NorthernTool.com Small Engine Warehouse 765-768-6725 Website: www.smallenginewarehouse.com Go-Kart Galaxy 1-903-340-1965 Website: www.gokartgalaxy.com Aircraft Spruce & Specialty Co. 1-877-477-7823 Website: http://www.aircraftspruce.com

Vendor Code = Vendor Code = Vendor Code =

G * McC ** MS

Vendor Code =

NT

Vendor Code =

SEW

Vendor Code =

GKG

Vendor Code =

AS

*

W. W. Grainger has outlets in most larger cities. You need to contact the one closest to you. Look in a phone book for a larger city near you.

** McMaster-Carr has several locations. They have such a user friendly website that the easiest way to order from them is on the internet. Always check our website: www.smallcarplans.com for links to the latest in suppliers.

69

PP No. 201 202 203 204 205 206 207 208 209 210 211 212 213 214 215 216 217 218 219 220 221 222 223 224 225 226 227 228

Qty 1 1 4 2 2 4

Description Spindle, RH Spindle, LH Ball Joint, 3/8 - 24 Pillow Block, 5/8” Bronze Pillow Block, 1” Ball Bearing Pneumatic Spoked Wheel, 26” Removed

Vendor Code MS MS MS G NT NT

Catalog No. AZ2518 AZ2519 10-2214 2X529 1805 145123

10 10 10 10 2 4 4 1 1 1 2 1 1 10 ft. 10 ft. 2 2 1 1 1 4

Shim Washer, 5/8 X 1 OD X .031 Shim Washer, 5/8 X 1 OD X .125 Shim Washer, 3/8 ID X 5/8 OD X .062 Shim Washer, 3/8 ID X 5/8 OD X .125 Collar, 5/8 ID Collar, 1” ID Clevis, 1/4 - 28 Engine, B&S - 5.5 hp Intek Torque Converter Ass’y Sprocket, #35 - 60 Tooth Sprocket, #41 - 54 Tooth Sprocket Hub Sprocket, #41 - 15 Tooth - 1” Bore #35 Roller Chain #41 Roller Chain 4” Brake Drum 4” Brake Band w/pin Steel shaft with Keyway 1” OD x 36” 12” Steering Wheel Steering Wheel Cap Assembly King Pin Bushing (nylon) 70

McC McC McC McC MS MS MS SEW NT NT NT NT McC NT NT MS MS McC MS GKG MS

3088A433 3088A513 3088A466 3088A511 AZ8554 AZ8565 AZ8354 126312 1377 1361 1363 138291 6280K534 136410 136510 4-485 4-486 1497K102 4-9396 1877 AZ8215

229 230 231 232 233 234 235 236 237 238 239 240 241 242 243 244 245 246 247 248 249 250

2 2 2 1 1 1 5 15 ft 100 ft 1

Bronze Bushing - 5/8 ID - 3/4 OD x 1 Lg McC Connect Link - #41 Chain Connect Link - #35 Chain McC McC

6391K243 6261K192 6261K191 AZ1868-24 AZ1867-22 1320-0016 A-124 05-04000 5960245 5960247 EGR5979510 AZ8355 AZ8419 AZ8171 6338K413 6065K131 AZ1806 3088A434 3088A514 9035K17 90975A025 AZ8190

24” Steering Shaft w/o pitman arms welded MS 22” Steering Shaft w/ pitman arms welded 5/8 x 5/8 Coupling Control Cable Pulley Control Cable - 3/32 x 7x19 Throttle Wire Throttle Wire Conduit MS SC AS AS FB FB FB MS MS MS McC McC MS McC McC McC McC MS

Pk of 10 Throttle Wire Conduit Clamp 3 3 1 2 1 1 10 10 2 7 1 Clevis Pin Cotter Pin Spindle Bracket Bronze Bearing - 1/4 ID - 3/8 OD Flanged Rod End Blank Throttle Pedal Shim Washer, 3/4 ID x 1 1/8 OD x 1/32 Shim Washer, 3/4 ID x 1 1/8 OD x 1/8 Aluminum Disc, 3 1/2 OD x 1/2 thick Tee Nut, 1/4 - 20 x 5/16 High Engine Mounting Plate

71

Building The 1920 Briggs & Stratton Cycle Car