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1.Author: Arielle Cox 2.Title: Fractions Warm-Up 3. Standards: N.ME.04.20 Understand fractions as parts of a set of objects. N.MR.04.

23 Understand the relationships among halves, fourths, and eighths and among thirds, sixths, and twelfths. 4.Rationale: Many times things are broken down into portions of a whole. Students need to not only understand that we have a portion, but how much that portion is worth. 5.Prerequisite Skills: My students must already know the definition of a fraction and know what the difference between a fraction and a whole is. They must also understand what a portion of a whole is; this makes a fraction. Students need to know that there are more to fractions that cutting objects in half, such as fourths, eighths, and so on. 6.Anticipatory Set: In fourth grade and at home what do you remember hearing about fractions? Can someone give me some cases where we might be able to use fractions in our life? Finally can anyone tell me why this concept of fractions might be so important? 7.The Lesson Plan Goal and Objective and Purpose: Goal: Grades 35 Expectations: In grades 35 all students should-

develop understanding of fractions as parts of unit wholes, as parts of a collection, as locations on number lines, and as divisions of whole numbers; Objectives: 1. Students will work with fractions and understand they are a certain portion out of a whole. 2. Student will be able to show the relationship between halves, fourths, and eighths and thirds, sixths, and twelfths 8.Instructional Input: Today we will break different objects down into different portions and represent those portions using fractions. Then we will compare a few of those fractions. Before we start, I want to remind you that the number on the bottom of the fraction is called the denominator and it tells us how many pieces our whole is cut into and the number on the top is known as the numerator and tells us how many of those pieces we want to take. To start we will look at 1/2, 1/4, and 1/8. Then we will look at 1/3, 1/6, and 1/12. 9.Modeling: To begin I would write 1/2, 1/4, and 1/8 on the overhead. I would draw a picture and divide it up into 2 sections and color in one side to show them that if I take a whole and divide it into 2 equal sections, I know I have 2 equal parts. If I shade in one half to represent the section I want to take out of that, I can show them that is 1 out of the 2 parts or we would call it 1/2. I would do the same thing with 1/4 and 1/8. But before I move on to the other example I would show them once I break something down into a half, if I want to break those 2 halves into 2 equal parts I will now have a new portion. That will give me fourths instead of halves. It would be the same thing if I wanted to break each of my 4 equal parts in half again, it would double the pieces I had and give me eighths. For 1/3, 1/6 and 1/12 I would do exactly the same thing. 10.Checking for Understanding: I would give each student a sheet of paper and ask them to write down the fraction 1/2, 2/3, 3/4, and 1/5 on their paper. I would then ask the student to draw me a picture and represent these fractions for me. I would tell them to try

and make the portions as equal as possible. Once they start working I would walk around and make sure all the students are doing this correctly. Once they are done, we would move onto our activity for the day. 11.Guided Practice: For this assignment I would need many computers so I would need to rent out the schools computer lab for the day. When we got to the computer lab I would have the students go to the following link: http://www.sheppardsoftware.com/mathgames/fractions/memory_fractions1.htm The game they will play is called Matching Fractions. When they have completed the game it will give them a screen that has a percentage of how many they got correct. I will have them turn this paper in so I know how well they are doing. Also, as they work I will walk around and visually check how they are doing. http://www.math-play.com/math-fractions-games.html Here is another website that I will have them use in the computer lab to help them with fractions. This website has all different types of fun ways to learn fractions. 12.Closure: With this pretty much being a review assignment I would hope they all kept up pretty well. I would bring the students back to the room and ask the students how they did and if there were any fractions that confused them? 13.Independent Practice: For homework I would want the students to play this game at home again just to make sure all the students understand what a portion out of a whole is and what fraction it would be called. Instead of printing it off they have the option to send the results to an email. I would give them my school email address and have them send the results there. 14.Technology: As earlier, I stated that I would use an overhead and computers. I would have to rent out the computer lab so that each student has access to their own. If my classroom had a SMARTboard, I could use the SMARTboard notebook software. This software has all types of shapes that I could use to represent portions with.

Using a SMARTboard can help make the lesson more hands on. The students can come up to the SMARTboard during my lesson to help practice before they are on their own. The students will get extra practice using the computers by getting on the internet, while also getting more educated on how to use a SMARTboard.

Websites Used: http://www.sheppardsoftware.com/mathgames/fractions/memory_fractions1.htm (this website will be a useful way for my students to get more practice on fractions) http://www.math-play.com/math-fractions-games.html (here is another website that I will have the students use to play fractions games that are best suited for their age group to help they get even more practice) 15.Materials/Resources: Overhead, pencil, paper, and computers. SMARTboard (if provided in my classroom). 16.Time Frame: 45 minutes to an hour 17.Activities/Procedure: Step 1: To begin I would write 1/2, 1/4, and 1/8 on the overhead (or SMARTboard). Step 2: I would then draw a picture and divide it up into 2 sections and color in one side to show them that if I take a whole and divide it into 2 equal sections, I have 2 equal parts. Step 3: The shaded parts represents 1 out of the 2 parts and I would show them that this equals 1/2. Step 4: Now I would show them that once I break something down into a half, if I want to break those two halves into 2 equal parts, I will now have a new portion. That will give me fourths instead of halves.

Step 5: I would then draw a picture and divide it up into 4 sections and color in one of the sections to show them that if I divide a whole into 4 parts, I have four equal parts. Step 6: The shaded part represents 1 out of the 4 parts and I would show them that this equals 1/4. If I wanted to break each of my 4 equal parts in half again, it would double the pieces I had and give me eighths. Step 7: I would then draw a picture and divide it up into 8 sections and color in one of the sections to show them that if I divide a whole into 8 parts, I have eight equal parts. Step 8: The shaded part represents 1 out of the 8 parts and I would show them that this equals 1/8. Step 9: I would then show them that for 1/3, 1/6 and 1/12 it works exactly the same way. Step 10: Next I would ask the students questions and make sure that they understand what I mean by what fractions are. Step 11: Now it is time for me to bring the students into the computer lab where I can have them get to the math fraction game website. Step 12: My students will now have time to practice the fractions, which will help them be prepared for their test on fractions for the following day. Step 13: Lastly, I will assign the students to go on both math fraction games websites and practice for their test. 18.Performance Assessment: I will know if my instruction was successful if the students do well on the lesson test the following day. All of my goals and objectives were met for the lesson plan. The students gained a better understanding of fractions and that they are a certain portion of a whole. By testing my students the following day, I will know if each student achieved the desired capabilities that were defined in the objectives or not. At the end of class, I will have already walked around the computer lab and see how well the students did on the fractions website by seeing the percentage of questions they answered correctly. Here is a rubric I would use to assess them for the class.

19.Follow-Up/Extension Activity: This lesson was a review on the fractions of 1/2 1/4 1/8 1/3 1/6 and 1/12. After this lesson, I feel like the students have a better understanding of fractions so my follow-up assignment for the following day will be a test on fractions. 20.Reflections on your lesson plan: I feel as though my lesson plan has many great qualities and will help the students gain an understanding of what fractions are and how the portions relate to a whole. This is a short lesson plan and does not take up a large amount of

time, but I believe that elementary school students have short attention spans so the time frame fits the age group perfectly. Since this is my first ever lesson plan, there are a few points in my lesson plan that I feel could be week, but overall I think the lesson fits the standards well that I stated above. 21.References: Math Fraction Games. Retrieved March 18, 2012, from http://www.mathplay.com/math-fractions-games.html. Sheppard Software. More Fraction Games. In Matching Fractions. Retrieved March 17, 2012, from http://www.sheppardsoftware.com/ mathgames/fractions/memory_fractions1.htm. Printable K-12 Rubrics. Get Worksheets. Retrieved March 18, 2012, from http://www.getworksheets.com/samples/rubrics/index.html