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Ms. Denisse Garfio Food Processing (Where does your food really come from?) Grade: 4 STANDARDS CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.4.

1 Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text. Students will be required to use specific data, details and examples from the research information they collect in their informative summaries during the evaluate portion of the lesson. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.4.7 Interpret information presented visually, orally, or quantitatively (e.g., in charts, graphs, diagrams, time lines, animations, or interactive elements on Web pages) and explain how the information contributes to an understanding of the text in which it appears. Students will be required to research recipes as well as where the ingredients on the recipes derive from. They will have to interpret different elements (charts, graphs, diagrams, etc.) in the web pages they come across. Students will be required to create a number line based on information they compile from data gathered in their research. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.4.9 Integrate information from two texts on the same topic in order to write or speak about the subject knowledgeably Students will be required to search on more than one website and combine information gathered from different sources to use in their assignment. LESSON SUMMARY/OVERVIEW Provide an overview/synopsis of the lesson and the topics that it will cover. This lesson is an extension of the work done on the previous day. The previous day should have introduced the students to the complexity of the food system. They should have gone over the different ingredients in a popular food and worked in groups to research the individual ingredients of each component (i.e. ketchup, mustard, buns, etc. for a hot dog) in order to fully grasp how interrelated and complex a simple food really is. Students will now be asked to come up with their own food (that has between 5-7 different ingredients) and work in groups to research the complexity of the food system associated with that particular food. Students will be researching recipes, and where certain ingredients come from on laptops in pairs. They will work together to create a food system diagram for each ingredient and attach it to the list of ingredients they found for their food choice during their research. After they finish their food systems, they will rank them on a number line on another sheet of paper with the least processed foods on the left and the most processed foods on the right. After reporting on an ingredient that surprised them to the class, they will work together once more to come up with ideas on how to reduce the overall processing of the ingredients and by result, the food they chose as well. Students will also be required to individually write an informative paper explaining what food they chose, the ingredients required to make it, what information they focused on during their ingredient food system research, what ingredients were the most processed and whether or not it surprised them. OBJECTIVES Students will be able to identify healthier alternatives to reduce the processing of foods. Students will be able to research a desired food that has between 5-7 different ingredients. Students will be able to create plans of action that identify different way s they can reduce the amount of food processing in the foods they have chosen. Students will be able to rank foods based on the degree of which they are processed.

Students will be able to summarize information they find and represent it in different manners using diagrams, number lines and informative essays. ASSESSMENT/EVALUATION Students will individually write an informative paper describing what they knew about their food before the lesson, what information they focused on, what ingredients were the most processed and whether or not it surprised them. As a two-person group, students will come up with a plan on how to reduce the excessive processing in the food system associated with the food they chose. PREREQUISITE KNOWLEDGE Students should know proper procedures for handling technological equipment. This should have been introduced on the first day of school. Knowledge will be accessed by reviewing proper rules for handling laptops before laptops are even brought out. They will be required to work with laptops in a responsible manner. Students will need to have basic research skills. This should have already been targeted and worked on throughout the year. Knowledge will be accessed by highlighting what it is that students are looking for specifically and writing it on the board so students are always aware of what it is they are looking for. The food system diagram done as a class the previous day will also help guide the kind of research they will be focusing on themselves. They will be required to look up, find, and analyze a proper recipe. They will be required to research where certain ingredients come from and how they are processed. Students will need to know how to create a food system diagram. This should have been taught the previous day when the whole class created a single food system diagram on a popular food. Knowledge will be accessed by reminding students of activity they participated in the previous day and pulling up the diagram you created as a class for them to use as an example. They will be required to create a food system diagram for each ingredient in the food they choose. MATERIALS One laptop for every pair of students Paper and pencils (enough for each student) Food: cake, pizza, cookies, vegetable salad, potato salad (or pictures on Powerpoint, but real food is more effective) Optional: Markers Colored Pencils Construction Paper VOCABULARY/KEY WORDS Food system: a collaborative network that integrates sustainable food production, processing, distribution, consumption and waste management in order to enhance the environmental, economic and social health of a particular place. Process: to perform a series of mechanical or chemical operations on (something) in order to change or preserve it. Reduce: to make something smaller or less in amount, degree or size.

TEACHING PROCEDURES

Engage: Have different foods (or Powerpoint pictures) in front of the classroom (a slice of cake on a plate, an individual size sealed package of popular cookies, a slice of pizza, a vegetable salad with cheese and ranch in it, and a bowl with potato salad). Ask the students, based on what we learned about the food system yesterday, wh ich of these foods do you think is the MOST processed? Prompt them by stating, I want you to think about the individual ingredients of each and where those ingredients came from. Then have them share with one another, Go ahead and tell your face partner which of these foods you think is the most processed and why, go ahead and give me a thumbs up when youre done. Ask two or three students to share their thoughts, have them stand up and use full sentences when they are speaking. Inform the students of what they will be learning, Today we are going to continue our journey of nutrition exploration but this time you all get to choose to analyze your favorite foods! Go over objectives; have them repeat objectives after you. Review vocabulary; go over one word at a time and have them define the word to their partners before you go over the definitions as a class. Explore: Divide students into groups of two (determined by the teacher). Assign each group a laptop. Laptops should only be used on desks; the proper procedures for handling equipment are a prerequisite for this lesson. Ask the students to choose a food as a group that they both like. Requirements are that they agree on the food and it has between 5-7 different ingredients. Students can use the Internet to search for recipes if they are unsure of how many ingredients a certain food has. Students are given 10 minutes to do recipe research and are given a teacher-chosen recipe if they cannot find something. Students then create food system diagrams for each ingredient in their food. Each diagram should take up half a page. Students must use pictures and captions to represent each stage of the diagram (teacher can decide whether to let the students get creative with colored pencils, markers and construction paper if time allows). Food diagrams should be compiled and attached to a sheet that contains the name of the chosen food and a list of the ingredients that are required to make the food. Explain: Students will rank the ingredients on a number line based on how processed they are, with the least processed foods on the left and the most processed foods on the right. Students will provide a paragraph blurb for each rank (food system) explaining why it ranks where it does, what the ranking means about the food and whether or not they expected it to be as processed as it turned out to be. Once all groups are finished, each group will share one ingredient that most surprised them in regard to how much or how little it was processed and where it ranks on their number line. Elaborate: Students will work in their groups to come up with at least 10 different ways the food processing could be reduced for their food, providing specific examples from their food system diagrams. This separate sheet of paper will also be attached to their food system diagrams and ranking list.

Evaluate:

Students will individually write at least a three-paragraph informative text summarizing their findings. The first paragraph should focus on what they knew about the food they chose before the lesson and list the different ingredients required to make it. The second paragraph can focus on what information they focused on when they were creating their food system diagrams. The third paragraph can focus on what ingredients were the most and least processed and whether it surprised them or not. RESOURCES This lesson is an extension from a lesson given in the Fall 2013 sustainability course (SCN 494) taught by Dr. Koster at Arizona State University. Personal communication resources cannot be cited but the following is a reference of the lesson plan the professors lesson plan was based on. Frisk, E. (2012). Untangling the Food System. Sustainability Science for Sustainable Schools. Retrieved from http://sustainableschools.asu.edu/docs/sustainableschools/toolkit/One-Day-Lessons/food-system-lessonplan.pdf WAYS OF THINKING CONNECTION Strategic thinking means being able to develop a strategy or plan in order to achieve a particular vision. The particular vision students are aiming to achieve in this lesson is reducing the production involved in the creation of certain foods. Students are working in pairs to brainstorm ideas on the actions that can be taken in order to produce healthier, less processed foods. Strategic thinking also frames every decision by how it contributes to achieve that desired vision. Throughout the lesson, students are asked to explain their reasoning and defend their logic; this strategy helps them to later analyze the individual effects each step in their food system has on the food, this in turn helps them narrow down the bad steps so they can focus on changing those specifically when brainstorming ways to reduce how much the foods they choose are processed.