Connie Makris Lesson Plan Analysis September 27, 2013

http://education.nationalgeographic.com/education/activity/measuring-weather-withtools/?ar_a=1 I chose my lesson from NatGeo called “How do You Measure Weather?” It seems to be mostly a vocabulary lesson without much science going on. According Sullenger’s article science isn’t happening unless learners are questioning the work of scientists and actually knowing that what they are doing is science. There does not seem to be any evidence of “doing science” in the lesson- just talking about “science terms”. Although learning the definitions of the words in this lesson is important, students need the opportunity to apply what they have learned. 1. Content: This lesson is about weather instruments. The objective states that students will be able to determine which instruments would be helpful on other planets. The actual lesson however does not really support this objective. The majority of the lesson is learning the definitions to the weather instruments. At the end of the lesson the class goes back to whole group to discuss two very broad questions about which instruments would be helpful on other planets. According to Weinburgh’s article about the three legs of science, content seems to be the longest leg. The Sunshine State Standard that would be addressed in this lesson is SC.5.E.7.3: Recognize how air temperature, barometric pressure, humidity, wind speed and direction, and precipitation determine the weather in a particular place and time. 2. Science Process: The science process identified in this lesson is communication. There are many opportunities for students to communicate in this lesson however they are mostly communicating about the vocabulary words.

Connie Makris Lesson Plan Analysis September 27, 2013

There is time for discussion about which weather instrument to use on another planet but that is only at the end of the lesson. There really isn’t any form of inquiry going on in this lesson. 3. Nature of Science: I am honestly not sure which aspect of science is being portrayed in this lesson. This lesson might be a stepping stone to the aspect “The World is Understandable”. Students are learning about the different tools that are used to learn about the weather in different planets. Lesson Modification: In class one of the things most of us said that led to effective science teaching was hands on learning. To me, this means actually applying what I know or have learned to investigate questions and ideas. I feel that this lesson is severely lacking authentic hands on learning. To learn about the weather instruments, I would have a weather station set up that has most if not all the instruments being taught. I would have students go around the weather station (like a gallery walk) and write down the names of the instruments and their purpose. This would be my hook. I would not expect them to know them all but I would use this as a formative assessment and to get kids excited. Then I would facilitate a short discussion about each instrument and have students write the names and purpose of the instruments in a foldable so they could keep them straight and reference back to it. I would then have a Long Term Investigation in which students would be meteorologists. They would have to go out every day and collect the weather data and chart it on graphs. This will help them really

Connie Makris Lesson Plan Analysis September 27, 2013

get to know the instruments, how they work, and what kind of data each collects. I might even show a short video of meteorologists on the news to see if they could identify which weather instrument the meteorologist used to find out certain data he is reporting. I would have groups according to the level of inquiry I would be assigning. There would be a group using the structured inquiry process, a group using the guided inquiry process, and a group using the open inquiry process to differentiate instruction (Banchi and Bell). In the more open inquiry I would have the group come up with their own question and work on going through the process skills on their own. As students get comfortable with the weather instruments, I would tap into students’ prior knowledge about planets. I would pick two or three planets to focus on. My questions would be geared more towards what the planets’ weather is like. I would then assign a planet to each table group. Each table group would have to use what they know about their planet and the weather instruments to figure out which instruments would be the best ones to collect weather information for that planet. Students would write their science instrument picks and their rationale in their science journals and prepare to share with the rest of the class. During sharing, the class would discuss the groups’ decisions and rationales using accountable talk. This modified lesson would address all the science process skills in the form of the long term investigation. Students would also be actually communicating and problem solving during planets’ activity. It would also Include th e Nature of Science aspect “The World is Understandable”, to learn about weather patterns. Another aspect

Connie Makris Lesson Plan Analysis September 27, 2013

is “Science is a Complex Social Activity” because they would be watching a video of a meteorologist giving his report and identifying what weather instruments he would have had to use to gather the data he reported about.