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Aramayo Lesson Plan Title: The Pieces Make up The Whole Grade: 11 Time: 3 days Teacher: Monica Aramayo

Year: 2013 __________________________________________________________________________________________ Learners Characteristics: According to the Stages of Artistic Development by Dr. Viktor Lowenfeld freshmen in High School are in the Decision Stage- (13-16 years old) Children at this stage will decide to continue drawing or view it as an activity without merit. Because of the level of self-criticism inherent at this stage, many children, (now young adults) view drawing as a skill that do they do not possess. Others, however, decide to continue working on their drawing skills and continue to develop. I think that it is important to encourage students to continue drawing despite their level of skill. Any skill level can be attained with practice. This stage of artistic development is perhaps the most critical to the development of an artist. Students w. Learning Disabilities Characteristics: Hearing Impaired: Hearing loss or deafness does not affect a persons intellectual capacity or ability to learn. However, children who are hard of hearing or deaf generally require some form of special education services ADD and/or ADHD may be inattentive, hyperactive and impulsive. Autism: have a lifelong developmental disability that affects their verbal communication, nonverbal communication and social interaction. Behavioral, Emotional and Social: Can be aggressive and anti-social. May stem from a wide range of issues, gangs, drug use, homelessness, familial abuse, medication and health problems. Emotional challenges can make them feel sad, depressed and have low self esteem. Students with Social challenges have difficulty interacting with others, making and keeping friends and dealing with the everyday demands of social activities. Ell and ESl: English Language Learners are students who speak their native language and are not proficient in English. They have difficulty understanding what is required of them in classroom settings where English is the dominant language. They also have difficulty using English to communicate with their teachers and most of their classmates. English as Second language students who are proficient in their native language tend to develop English language skills more rapidly than those students who have difficulty communicating in their native language. __________________________________________________________________________________________ Theme Concept: A culture in Peru called Nazca around 100 BCE to 800CE much younger than the Incas, created what we call today the Nazca Lines. The lines are shallow trench designs made in the ground of the desert with a depth of 4 inches. More than 70 designs such as birds, fish, llamas, jaguar, monkeys, spiders, fish, sharks, orcas, lizards, trees and flowers and others with a length up to 890 feet long. Since the images are so long and in a flat surface, it is believed that the Nazca people created these images for their Gods, because unless they had aircrafts they couldnt have appreciated the work done. Most likely, they used some form of graph system like a grid to enlarge small drawings. One of the oldest civilizations on earth used a grid and those were the Acient Egyptian artists who used chalk grid lines to enlarge small drawings and to ensure accurate proportions. Renaissance artists, like Abrecht Durer used grids. _________________________________________________________________________________________ The Pieces Make up the Whole 1

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Non-Art Discipline Concept: Math Do you remember when you didnt know how to multiply? You used a multiplication table to figure out how much was 9x8 you would point to the 9 either on the vertically or horizontally and then to the 8. Your finger would stop at the box where both met and that was 54. If your family wants to tile the floor in your house, how do you think they can figure out how many tiles are needed in your room?

CONCEPTS IN ART DISCIPLINES

Art Production (Art Making): A. Element or Principle of Design: A line is a fundamental mark or stroke used in drawing in which the length is longer than the width. Two connected points form a line and every line has a length, width, and direction if it is straight B. Technique/Process The students will use the line as an element of design to create drawings that convey specific meanings. Following they will cut their images and create a collaborative collage. __________________________________________________________________________________________ Aesthetics: Students are provided with reproductions of Chuck Close. Are hyper realistic art works good art? Why? Why not? When do you like it bestWhen Close painted as if the painting was a photograph or when he used funky colors to reinterpret pixels? Why? Should everyone appreciate this style of art? Why not? __________________________________________________________________________________________ Art Criticism: A. Description What do you see? What colors do you see? How are the shapes? B. Formal Analysis what is the difference between Lucas I and Lucas II? How was the color applied in the very left corner square below? C. Interpretation: What do you think that the artist made such big portraits? D. Judgment Do you like how the painting looks like? Do you like the style? Would you ever give a painting like this as a present? Would you hang it in your wall? Yes? No? why ? __________________________________________________________________________________________

The Pieces Make up the Whole

Aramayo Art History: Working from a gridded photograph, he builds his images by applying one careful stroke after another in multicolors or grayscale. He works methodically, starting his loose but regular grid from the left hand corner of the canvas.[11] His works are generally larger than life and highly focused Lucas (19861987), oil & pencil on canvas Lucas II, 1987. Oil on canvas, 36 x 30". Big Self-Portrait, 1967-1968. Acrylic on canvas, 107-1/2" x 83-1/2" (273 cm x 212.1 cm). Phil, 1969. Acrylic on canvas, 108 x 84". Leslie/Watercolor, 1972-1973. Watercolor on paper on canvas, 72-1/2 x 57" (184.2 x 144.8 cm). Mark, 1979. Acrylic on canvas, 9' x 7' (29.6 x 23 m). Fanny/Fingerpainting, 1985. Oil on canvas, 102" x 84" (259.1 cm x 213.4 cm).

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

Art Disciplines: Students will learn that it is possible to reproduce and or enlarge an image if we rely on the use of a grid. The students will understand that small parts make the big picture. The students will learn that they have to walk away from the painting in order to see what is happening. The students will put in practice their visual literacy skills when talking to their classmates in the process of the painting.

Adaptations/Modifications for Students w. Learning Disabilities: Will be modified according to the students disability. Since the work is a group work and needs precision there will be adaptations necessary for everybody to work to their potential. For example if the student is not able to stay within the lines, they can paint big areas that would not disrupt the aesthetics aimed for. Adaptations for the students with hearing impairment as well as the students of ESL and ELL would be more written words in PowerPoints, additionally I would make sure we have eye contact, that my mouth is not covered by my hair, hands, so that they can read my lips. That my body gestures could mimic some of my words.

Non-Art Discipline: The student will be focused only on unit squares also called cells. The student will create measurements to make a grid. Each line will be straight and the result will be structured and precise.

The Pieces Make up the Whole

Aramayo Adaptations/Modifications for Students w. Learning Disabilities: Adaptations will be according to the learning disability of the student, some others may apply. If the measuring is too overwhelming a graphed paper could be hand in to the student, additionally an already graphed image with a simple design and few squares. For students with hearing impairments as well as ELL and ESL students PowerPoint slides will have written words, the use of body gestures and eye contact would be more prominent. ADD and/or ADHD may need aid organizing tasks, activities and materials. Students with autism may opt to use different materials since they might exhibit unusual responses to sensory experiences. Students with behavioral, emotional and social issues will be sited in a group or by themselves depending on behavior shown as they entered in the classroom. __________________________________________________________________________________________ Democratic Skills: Teamwork Not getting hard feelings if there are errors. Listen with respect the opinions of others. Talk with respect your opinions as well.

Adaptations/Modifications for Students w. Learning Disabilities: The lesson plan will be modified according to the learning disability of the student. ADD and/or ADHD may need aid organizing tasks, activities and materials. Students with autism may opt to use different materials since they might exhibit unusual responses to sensory experiences. Students with behavioral, emotional and social issues will be sited in a group or by themselves depending on behavior shown as they entered in the classroom.

Sequence of Classroom Activities: Introduction with slides of the Nazca lines, questions and explanations of what they are, and how it is believed that they were made, slides of Egyptian art. Powerpoint presentation showing most of Chuck close work, plus a youtube video of him talking about why he prefers using grid Materials & Equipment: Paper House paint Buckets Acrylics Graphite Water Brushes Chalk Ladders Pencils Chalk box Rulers Rags

Different materials may be modified for the optimum use of students with disabilities The Pieces Make up the Whole 4

Aramayo Resources (books, magazines, articles, websites): http://www.wikihow.com/Scale-Drawings-Using-the-Grid-Method http://www.biography.com/people/chuck-close-9251491 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_e-p5M0vhZI Chuck close explains why he follows a grid __________________________________________________________________________________________ List of Art Works: Lucas (19861987), oil & pencil on canvas Lucas II, 1987. Oil on canvas, 36 x 30". Big Self-Portrait, 1967-1968. Acrylic on canvas, 107-1/2" x 83-1/2" (273 cm x 212.1 cm). Phil, 1969. Acrylic on canvas, 108 x 84". Leslie/Watercolor, 1972-1973. Watercolor on paper on canvas, 72-1/2 x 57" (184.2 x 144.8 cm). Mark, 1979. Acrylic on canvas, 9' x 7' (29.6 x 23 m). Fanny/Fingerpainting, 1985. Oil on canvas, 102" x 84" (259.1 cm x 213.4 cm). Self-Portrait, 1997. Oil on canvas, 102 x 84" (259.1 x 213.4

Supporting Materials (vocabulary list, artists biographies, historical information, student self-assessments, rubric): Powerpoint with pictures of Nazca lines and Egyptian art Reproduction cut in pieces labeled with cell unit names to be used as a puzzle. The pieces make up the Whole by Aramayo Reference of chuck close Lucas I and close up. Student self Assesment

NARRATIVE OF CLASSROOM PROCEDURES

Introduction/Discussion/Questions Introduction: Powerpoint slides on Nazca lines, Egyptian art and Albrecht Durer. How do you think that the people from Nazca made the designs on the desert? How do you think the Egyptians made this drawings? When you draw something big you always need to step aside to see what is happening with the image, what about the Egyptians when they made such big drawings in small corridors? Do you believe the grid is an efficient tool overall? Why?

Stimulation Activity: Before the students hear the introduction provide each students a reproduction cut off into several different squares labeled in the back with grid cell names, A7, C4, E9 and ask them to bring their pieces to the front of the class and figure out how to put their piece together, either they will not see a correlation or they may intuitively get how to solve the problem in a more efficient way. The Pieces Make up the Whole 5

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I Want You To If I make a tiny drawing and I want to make it exactly the same but 10 times bigger tell me all of the ways in which you think this is possible Who can tell me what a grid is? Have you ever used a multiplication table? How does it work? Tell me how did you figure out how to make up the puzzle, More Questions, Statements, Positive Verbal Reinforcements, Suggestions and Clarification of Tasks Have you ever worked with a grid before? Is it possible to make any drawing you want with the grid? Do you think that human beings used grid throughout history? __________________________________________________________________________________________ Concluding the Lesson (Discussion, Questions, Sharing of Productions, Recapping): Why do you think that Chuck Close liked to use the grid? Throughout the process did you get confused with your cells? If yes, Why do you think this happened? Would you like to make use of a grid again?

Lesson Extensions/Connections: Students start making a connection between art and math. Students learn how to work as a team. Students have fun while learning. __________________________________________________________________________________________ NJCCS: A. One Visual Arts Standard and Indicator 1.1.12.D.1Common themes exist in artwork from a variety of cultures across time and are communicated through metaphor, symbolism, and allegory. (Distinguish innovative applications of the elements of art and principles of design in visual artworks from diverse cultural perspectives and identify specific cross-cultural themes.) B. One Non-Art Discipline Standard and Indicator Mathematics CCSS.Math.Content.HSN-Q.A.1 Use units as a way to understand problems and to guide the solution of multi-step problems; choose and interpret units consistently in formulas; choose and interpret the scale and the origin in graphs and data displays.

The Pieces Make up the Whole

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TEACHERS EVALUATION
Lesson Plan: The standard addressed for Art says that a common theme exist in artwork from a variety of cultures across time and are communicated through symbolism, and allegory. In this case cultures such as Nazca and the Egyptians applied graphs such as the grid n order to enlarge their images (symbolism) that were part of their culture. In the standard for math it says use units as a way to understand problems and to guide the solution of multistep problems; choose and interpret units consistently in formulas; choose and interpret the scale and the origin in graphs and data displays. The students are interpreting the scale in a graph by using simple labels for their unit squares in order to solve a work enlarged minimum approximately 200 times. The activities in the lesson are age appropriate. There are parts that may have required more time for adequate understanding, but they were understood as we where going along with the assignment. All of the parts of the lesson engaged and maintained students interests, at times some of them got bored, it was very hot too, some felt that it couldnt be done, that it was too much work. The lesson conceptually links art with math integrating it both implicit and explicit, without the use of a grid we couldnt have had the same results by eye balling a design in a 20 x 9 feet wall. The learning activities were presented in the best sequence for maximizing student understanding and participation. Teaching of Lesson: The lesson did allow enough wait time. I motivated my students by making them play with the puzzle. We had an extended class discussion where everybody had an input. I asked enough open ended questions as well as answering them. I spoke clearly and loudly enough for students to hear me. I made eye contact with the students I was exited about the lesson because we were going to make history by leaving our mark with a mural that the students design and we were able to materialize. I checked for students understanding throughout my demonstration.

Student Outcomes majority of the student as well as English language learners: Aesthetics: the students had a strong sense of design. Art History: The students learned who Chuck Close is. Art Criticism: the students were walked through the stages of art criticism: describing, formal analysis, Interpreting, and judgment. Art Making: The students were assigned to a couple of squares at a time with graphite, when they finished they were assigned to fill in any empty spot free of students. Once sketched the students were assigned to one area with one color, until most of the sections that needed that color where done they moved to a different color. The outcome was impressive; it will stay for years to come at the veterans post in Rochelle Park. Non-art Concept: The students learned that by using math we were able to sketch a huge work of art. Additionally they learn how to persevere and do one thing at a time. The Pieces Make up the Whole 7

Aramayo Democratic Skills: The students learn to listen to each other with respect, sophomores, juniors and seniors worked together, communicated with respect and bonded as friends.

The Pieces Make up the Whole