You are on page 1of 2

Grading Policy Matt Rasmussen EPSY 485 The course for this grading policy would be an upper­level physics class, not necessarily AP, but similarly paced.

 The first semester would covering classical mechanics; Newtons laws of motion and kinematics, work and energy, and little bit of rotation would be the major components of that semester. The second semester would focus on Electricity, Magnetism, electromagnetism, some physics of circuits, and some simple quantum mechanics and light phenomena. Each one of these sections would have at least one lab associated with it, as well as a summative assessment. For grading such a class, I would emphasize both summative assessments like exams and practical lab work as the primary means of demonstrating student knowledge. While I plan on offering students plenty of practice for developing knowledge, what really matters to me in the class is how they apply that knowledge in particular situations. My main expectations of students will be to complete in class assignments, as they will be the students best opportunity to practice the concepts of the class and become familiar with them. When working on examples and problems in class is the time to be making mistakes and asking questions, in order to be better prepared for assessments. The purpose of this policy would be to encourage students to work together to build their knowledge, but they are largely assessed on what they know individually. Broadly speaking, there are three things that students will be doing in the classroom; practice work and labs to build and apply knowledge at their own pace, and then assessments to demonstrate that knowledge. The practice work would count for a grade, but more as a completion grade rather than a correctness; it’s not as important to me that it’s correct as it is for the students to use it as a gauge of how well they’re understanding the material of the class, and what aspects they could stand to improve. As the parts of the class where students really get to apply what they’ve learned, lab work and summative exams will be a large part of students’ grades. I would weigh them equally, as they are both very important parts of the class, and neither is a better demonstrator of student knowledge than the other. As weighted percentages, practice work would make up 20% of a students grade, and then labs and exams would each make 40% For gathering feedback for students and my own improvement, bellringer questions serve as as a way for students to demonstrate knowledge without being as high stakes as the summative exam situation.

Attendance, tardiness, oral participation, attitude, etc. would not be explicitly a grade given to students, but it would be reflective in the grade they receive for practice work, as that’s

the situation where those factors will come into play most often. On some level I don’t want to make a portion of students’ grades to be “showing up”, but if they are in class and practicing the skills and concepts that are necessary for the class, I think that their grade should reflect that.