KADOKA PRESS

The official newspaper of Jackson County, South Dakota

$1.00
includes tax

Volume 107
Number 24
December 26, 2013

Santa makes an early delivery

With the combined financial support of Kadoka Community Betterment Association and the Jackson County Legion, Santa was able to deliver a 58 inch TV to the residents at the Kadoka Nursing Home on Monday, December 23. e TV will be mounted
on the wall in the front room for the residents to enjoy. is TV will replace the smaller TV and will be much more enjoyable for them. Residents pictured are Joy Parker (L), Mary Ellen Herbaugh, Emma Jarl, Sheila Bowen, Santa, Ruth Klundt, Jobie
Gary, and Charity Edwards.

With giving hearts, fourth graders raise money for local ranchers

e students poured the coins they had collected in to the change counter.

Aer hearing about the local ranchers and their families who lost cattle during the Atlas Blizzard in October, the Kadoka fourth grade students approached their
teacher, Mary Graupmann, wanting to know what they could do to help. Aer a class discussion the students organized a bake sale that was held on December 7 and
also collected change in money jars. On December 16, the students and Graupmann took the money that had been raised to the bank to get an official count and learned
they had raised $506.12. e money was then distributed to local ranchers who lost cattle. Back row (L-R): Mary Graupmann, Amira Sitting Up, Terrance Terkildsen,
LaReese Spotted Elk, Farynn Knutson, Gene Christensen BankWest Kadoka Branch Manager, and Sarah VanderMay, BankWest. Front row: Rico Ashley, Dante Comes,
Rebecca Shuck, Andi Stone, Tejai Sanner and Madison Brown.

e students then ran all the bills through to be counted.

Editorial

2 - Thursday, December 26, 2013 - Kadoka Press

From the U.S. Senate | Senator John Thune

Lookin’ Around | Syd Iwan
Kindness
There are a lot of good, kind
people around here, and they apparently start out pretty young.
This week, for instance, we got a
check from the local fourth-grade
class. The accompanying letter
read:
Dear Mr. and Mrs. Iwan,
Following the big storm in October, some of the fourth graders
decided that we wanted to do a little something for some of our community members who lost a lot of
cattle. Throughout the year, we
donate to charities after we fill our
good-behavior marble jar and decided we would like to donate to
your cause. We also thought it
would be good to do a bake sale to
raise extra money so we could give
more towards your losses.
With the help of our teacher, we
organized a bake sale for the
Kadoka/Faith double header on
Saturday. Our parents and other
Kadoka educators provided the
baked goods. We raised a total of
$506.12 through our bake sale and
donations.
Please use this money for whatever your needs may be. We hope
you have a Merry Christmas and
a Happy New Year.

Sincerely,
Kadoka Fourth Grade
The letter was signed by the
teacher, Mrs. Graupmann, and
eleven students.
Isn’t that great? I assume probably another eight people got similar letters and checks. They are
probably smiling too. It’s fairly
amazing that fourth graders could
and would work hard enough to
make over five-hundred dollars
and then give it away. Bless their
hearts. They must be awfully good
kids to be that concerned about
the people in their community.
We have met with a lot of other
kind acts during the past year as
well. Many nurses and doctors
have shown us great kindness in
caring for and trying to help our
son, Chance. Sometimes that
takes quite a bit of patience due to
Chance’s autism. He tries to work
with those who are helping him,
but he has various fears and defense mechanisms that cause reactions that have to be worked
around. What is somewhat amazing is that many nurses have told
us he is one of their favorite patients. It must be that smile of his
and those big brown eyes. He, too,
is a very kind person, and people
pick up on that fairly soon.

Even hunters can be thoughtful
people. A bunch of fellows who like
to hunt on our ranch got together
and painted our car garage after it
was repaired this summer. It was
looking pretty run down this
spring and now looks great. Of
course these fellows took breaks
from their painting to hunt this
and that, but they also got the
painting done and the inside
squared away.
What’s more, we have received
various gifts from people just out
of the blue--cookies, books, and
what not. Self centered people
don’t give gifts. Generous people
do.
In this last part of the year, we
see, of course, the greatest gift of
all in our Savior coming to earth
as a baby in Bethlehem. By that
act, he provided a way for us to
spend eternity in heaven with
him. Our Lord is kindness personified.
I hope your Christmas season
has been great for you, and that
you’ll have a fine New Year filled
with good, kind people. There are
lots them around, and that includes the local fourth-graders.
Thank you very much, fourth
graders. You have warmed our
hearts.

From the U.S. Dept. of Ag | Ag Secretary Tom Vilsack
A New Farm Bill to
Carry On America’s
Record Agricultural
Trade
Over the course of 2013, we’ve
seen yet another banner year for
U.S. agricultural exports. Exports
of U.S. farm and ranch products
reached a record $140.9 billion in
2013 and supported about a million U.S. jobs. In fact, compared to
the previous five-year period from
2004-2008, U.S. agricultural exports from 2009-2013 increased by
a total of nearly $230 billion.
All told, the past five years represent the strongest five-year period in our nation’s history for
agricultural exports.
The U.S. Department of Agriculture has focused on two key factors in recent years to help make
this success possible. First, an unprecedented effort by USDA and
our Federal partners to expand
and grow markets around the
world. Second, a commitment to
make sure our farmers and ranchers have the tools to grow more,
even in the face of uncertainty.
Thanks to the Farm Bill, particularly the Foreign Market Development Program and Market
Access Program, USDA has been
able to work with hundreds of U.S.
businesses since 2009 to expand
trade. We have led more than 150

Wishing you all
safe travels and a
very Merry
Christmas!
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Bison Courier: 244-7199
Murdo Coyote: 669-2271

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U.S. agribusinesses on agricultural trade missions and helped
more than 1,000 U.S. companies
and organizations promote their
wares at trade shows around the
world.
Together, these trade promotion programs yield $35 in economic benefits for every dollar
invested. Unfortunately, without
a new Farm Bill, these programs
can’t continue.
The trade promotion programs
complement USDA efforts with
our Federal partners to expand
trade agreements and break down
unfair barriers to trade. In the
past five years, the Obama Administration has challenged more
than 750 sanitary and phytosanitary trade barriers, compared to
less than 400 such challenges in
the previous five-year period.
We’ve also helped achieve new
trade agreements with Colombia,
Panama and South Korea, along
with equivalency agreements for
organic products to Canada, the
European Union and Japan.
But the Farm Bill stands at the
heart of our trade promotion effort, and companies across the nation need a renewed commitment
to agricultural trade promotion
that only a new Farm Bill can provide.
As we have undertaken record
efforts to promote U.S. trade,

we’re also hard at work here at
home to help America’s farmers
and ranchers increase their productivity.
Since 2009, USDA has provided
a record number of farm loans –
more than 159,000 – to help farmers get started and keep growing.
Additionally, using Farm Bill programs that have since expired, we
stepped in to help hundreds of
thousands of producers facing disaster. So, in addition to the many
trade-related benefits of the Farm
Bill, USDA is awaiting passage of
this legislation to continue helping
farmers and ranchers grow the
food needed to drive exports even
higher. A new Farm Bill would
continue assistance to farm businesses through loans and loan
guarantees, while also reauthorizing disaster assistance programs
and providing retroactive help to
livestock producers who have been
hit particularly hard in the past
two years.
American agriculture has been
an economic success story in recent years – growing more despite
adversity, sending more food
around the world and creating
more jobs here at home. There is
even more success ahead, but we
need a new Farm Bill as soon as
possible to keep this record momentum going..

From the S.D. Hwy Patrol | Trooper Jason Hamar
Season’s Greetings
Season’s greetings from the
South Dakota Highway Patrol. I
certainly hope you enjoy the holidays. And, I’m pretty sure you’ll
enjoy the season a lot more if you

avoid a run-in with me. Just reminding you to be safe and find
yourself a sober driver this hoiday
season. Cops are cracking down
this holiday season.
Drunk driving. Over the Limit
Trooper Jason Hamar, SDHP

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South Dakota’s Ellsworth Air
Force Base’s 28th Bomb Wing is
home to two of the three combat
squadrons operating the B-1B
strategic bomber. Of the three aircraft that currently comprise our
bomber fleet, the B-1B has the
highest payload, the fastest maximum speed, and operates at the
lowest cost per flying hour.
As potential adversaries continue to modernize their anti-aircraft systems, our ability to
penetrate those systems must also
modernize. The next generation
bomber will ensure our ability to
operate effectively in anti-access
and area-denial environments. As

Kay Reckling
Independent Norwex Consultant

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kayreckling.norwex.biz
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Christmas
Former
President
Calvin
Coolidge was known as “Silent
Cal,’’ but the quiet statesman
spoke volumes about the meaning
of Christmas.
“Christmas,’’ Coolidge said, “is
not a time or a season but a state
of mind. To cherish peace and
goodwill, to be plenteous in mercy,
is to have the real spirit of Christmas.’’
Oh, sure, I know. Tell that to a
10-year-old girl or boy bursting
with excitement at the thought of
tearing into the brightly wrapped
presents under the tree. For children, yes, Christmas is very much
about the anticipation of gifts, the
giving and receiving of gifts and
the thrill of opening the gifts. It’s
all they can do to contain themselves.
And, let’s be honest. Just because some of us are adults
doesn’t mean we don’t feel that
same excitement, whether we’re
watching a child or grandchild
open that “special’’ gift from us or

•Grain •Feed •Salt
•Fuel •Twine

Home for Christmas
Christmas 1943 carried with it
a lot of optimism. Unemployment
numbers were falling fast due to
World War II-related employment, meaning the Great Depression
was
all
but
over.
Manufacturers had successfully
transitioned from making things
like automobiles to producing essential military materials, further
growing the U.S.’s influence over
the manufacturing industry. The
year had also been seen as a turning point in the war, largely due to
the success of U.S. military operations in Europe.
Nonetheless, the optimism that
accompanied the year was singed
with the harsh realities of
wartime America. Canned goods,
meat, cheeses, butter and cooking
oils were rationed due to shortages of certain materials. And
millions of American service mem-

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we’re seeing the anticipation in
the eyes of a child as we open a gift
from them. I hope none of us ever
grows too old to get excited about
that part of Christmas.
But as we grow older, we come
to understand deep in our hearts
that Christmas is much more than
presents. As students home from
college, for example, or soldiers on
leave from military duty, we appreciate simply being “home for
the holidays,’’ sharing the joys of
the season with family and
friends, reliving and repeating the
traditions that made our family’s
Christmases unique and memorable. There is a sense of peace
and, yes, goodwill, in those familiar traditions shared with loved
ones. That, I think, is the state of
mind to which President Coolidge
referred when he spoke of the real
spirit of Christmas.
Peace and goodwill are on my
mind this Christmas even more
than most years. In the past few
days, I’ve been honored to participate in two very different but
equally emotional ceremonies

with the South Dakota National
Guard.
On Dec. 14, I joined soldiers
and family members in Harrisburg, where members of the
Guard’s 1742nd Transportation
Company prepared to deploy for a
year-long tour in Afghanistan.
Holiday or not, they answered the
call to duty, leaving homes and
families just days before Christmas.
Last Tuesday, I shared in the
joy of a welcoming home ceremony
in Pierre for the Guard’s 152nd
Combat Sustainment Support
Battalion, back from a tour in
Afghanistan just in time for
Christmas with their loved ones.
One unit deploying, another returning, each demonstrating in
the most basic way the spirit of
giving that, more than anything
else, is Christmas. I pray for the
safe return of the 1742nd, and I
offer a prayer of thanks that the
152nd is home for the holidays.
I wish each of them and all of
you the peace and goodwill of a
Merry Christmas.

bers were deployed to serve in the
grisly war.
It is no surprise that Bing
Crosby’s “I’ll Be Home For Christmas” also debuted in 1943 and became an instant Christmas
classic. It characterized what
many families in America were
going through. There was an undeniable optimism that the war
would soon be over, but those emotions were mixed with the reality
that soldiers serving abroad would
be home for Christmas “only in
their dreams,” as Bing Crosby
sings.
Today, we are again fighting to
defend our nation and the values
we represent. Just last week, I
participated in an activation ceremony for members of the South
Dakota Army National Guard,
who will first head to Fort Hood,
Texas, for training and then to
Afghanistan.
For some of them, it is their
first deployment. Others have already served tours in Iraq. Regardless of their service record,
when our country needed their expertise in Afghanistan, they answered the call.
Now, it is our collective responsibility to come together as a community around their families – not
only during the holidays, but
throughout the deployment. We
must be there to cheer their kids
on when they win a basketball
game or nail that solo at a school
concert - just as we are when they
need a shoulder to lean on. And

we must be there again when it is
time to welcome these soldiers
home.
In the days leading up to December 25, 68 soldiers of the
152nd Combat Sustainment Support Battalion of the South
Dakota Army National Guard
completed their five-month deployment to Afghanistan and 124
soldiers with the 235th Military
Police Company completed their
nine-month
deployment
to
Afghanistan. At ceremonies in
Pierre and Rapid City, these
women and men were able to tell
their spouses, parents, families
and communities: “I’m home for
Christmas.”
To those soldiers: Welcome
home. I hope you know how grateful South Dakota is for your service and your sacrifice.
Between the last-minute gift
wrapping and your family’s traditions, I hope you join me in taking
a moment to give thanks for all
those who are home this Christmas – our troops, our college students, our families who have
scattered across the country.
As Army Gen. Sidney B. Berry
wrote to his wife on Christmas
Eve 1966 from a village in South
Vietnam: “Perhaps the best aspect
of separation is our increased appreciation and understanding of
each other.” This holiday season,
take the time to be appreciative, to
be understanding. From my family to yours, Merry Christmas.

601 Chestnut
Kadoka, SD 57543-0640

Kadoka, South Dakota

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compromise version of the bill was
my amendment that puts Congress on record in support of the
next generation Long-Range
Strike Bomber. The amendment
also highlights the importance of
upgrading our current bomber
fleet, including the B-1B Bomber
based at Ellsworth Air Force Base
in order to maintain combat effectiveness in the face of continued
advancements in the anti-access
capabilities of foreign powers.
My amendment emphasizes our
commitment to the ongoing development of the Long-Range Strike
Bomber, and I will continue working with my colleagues in the Senate to ensure the necessary
backing for the completion of this
program. Our Armed Forces must
have the next-generation capabilities that they need to defend our
country against future threats.

From the U.S. House | Representative Kristi Noem

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the Air Force continues to modernize, the Long-Range Strike
Bomber remains a must-have capability for future combat operations and an important part of a
21st century strategy to protect
our interests worldwide, both as a
deterrent and as a military asset.
Beyond greater national security concerns, the next generation
bomber program is potentially important for South Dakota. As the
current home to an important military workhorse, the B-1B,
Ellsworth would be a natural fit
for a future home to the next generation
Long-Range
Strike
Bomber.
On Thursday, December 19,
2013, the Senate passed the National Defense Authorization Act,
which is the primary vehicle for
authorizing defense spending for
Fiscal Year 2014. Included in the

Office of the Governor | Gov. Dennis Daugaard

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Publisher: Don Ravellette
Graphic Design/News Writing/Photography: Robyn Jones
Published each Thursday and Periodicals postage paid at
Kadoka, Jackson County, South Dakota 57543-0309
Official Newspaper for the City of Kadoka, the Town of Interior, the Town of Belvidere,
the Town of Cottonwood, the County of Jackson and the Kadoka School District #35-2.

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Correspondent News
Gateway News | Lola Joyce Riggins, 837-2053 (Let it ring.)
Our cook, Penny Stout, came in
on Thursday morning on that
treacherous road to cook our noon
meal.
There was a car accident on the
road south of town. So sorry for
those involved and may we include
them in our prayers.
Some traveled behind the snow
plow traveling at 20 mph to attend
the funeral of Dick Pinney at Wanblee on Thursday. Kelly and I decided not to attend due to the
weather conditions. The sidewalks
and roads in town were very icy.
The quilting ladies were busy
again this week on Wednesday afternoon. Geraldine Allen, Shirley

Josserand, Susie Bauman, Margie
Peters, Lila Whidby and Lova
Bushnell were all working on putting quilts together. The quilts are
so pretty.
May we extend our sympathy
and prayers to the families who
lost loved ones this week, Dick
Pinney, Gladys (McRae) Wagner,
Raymond Dean and George
Bartlett.
Tamera and Connie brought me
a delicious plate of goodies to my
door.
Ella Hindman came by Saturday morning and invited me to
join in the Riggins family gathering. Troy and Ella, Dan and Marla

Nelson, and Sterling and Jill Riggins, and al their families were
there. The food was delicious with
card playing and great visiting.
The gathering was held in the
community room at the apartments.
Cloretta Eisenbraun stopped by
for a quick visit. As we were walking up the hall we met Muree
Struble and Cindy O’Connell delivering goodies. They were so
good and some I’ve never tasted
before.
Happiness is someone to love,
something to do and something to
hope for.

Belvidere News | Syd Iwan, 381-2147
Greg and Dana Badure made
two trips to Rapid City last week.
The first was with their kids,
Brisa and Martin, and included
some Christmas shopping and an
overnight stay at the Ramkota.
The pool at the motel was put to
good use. The second trip was just
Greg and Dana since the kids
stayed home with Dana’s niece,
Felicia, who lives with them. That
was supposed to be only one night
but stretched to two thanks to
poor weather and bad roads. On
Sunday, the Christmas tree was
put up. Dana had a fake tree she
was planning to use, but she was
outvoted. The rest of the family
wanted to go out and cut down a
real tree to decorate so that is
what happened.
Bob Fortune spent Saturday
night in Rapid City with his
daughter, Frances, and family. He
was on his way to Lander, WY, to
spend Christmas there with his
wife, Ruth.
On Tuesday, Chuck, Eve and
Abby Fortune went to Rapid City
where they did a little shopping
and then met up with friends, the
McKeehan family, and went to a
movie, “The Hobbit.” Eve said it
was a good enough movie although
it changed some things from the
book. On Saturday, Eve and Abby
drove to Pierre to do some additional Christmas shopping.
John Addison said his mom,
Diana Sutfin, went to Florida to
spend Christmas with her mom
and sister who live there. She’ll be
gone a week of so. John said he
wouldn’t have minded going along

since it is bound to be warmer
there than here, especially on Sunday when the high was something
like ten degrees and the low close
to twenty-six below zero. John and
Samantha and boys plan to spend
Christmas with Samantha’s folks,
Gordon and Trudy Fluzsner, who
run a gas station and café at
Milesville. John said their boys,
Koye and Wyatt, are growing right
along and keeping them busy. A
full-night’s sleep is not really ever
expected right now since Wyatt is
only a month old and needs food
fairly often. The disjointed nights
have actually been the case quite
a bit for the last two and a half
years, or since Koye arrived on the
scene.
Jamie Dolezal and her son,
Travis, plus their two foster kids
went to Sunday School in Midland
on Sunday. The Christmas program was presented, and the kids
did fine and were able to remember their pieces. Christmas Day is
scheduled to be spent with Carmen and Jim Nemec and family at
Hot Springs.
Mike and Marlene Perault have
their daughter, Coleen, and family
home from Brandon through
Christmas. They came on Saturday and have kept things busy.
They have kids aged five, eight
and ten years old who helped decorate Christmas cookies with
frosting and lots of sprinkles. The
kitchen may have gotten sprinkled
as well, but that is just part of the
fun. The kids are Hannah, Raden,
and Lillian, and Lillian is buddies
with her great grandma of the

same name, Lillian Carlson. Lillian Carlson remains at the rehab
place in New Underwood where
she is gaining some weight and
getting stronger. She has been enjoying the good food there and the
care. The remainder of Mike and
Marlene’s kids are expected to arrive soon for Christmas.
Charlene Ceniceros went to
Pierre last week to do some
Christmas shopping. On another
day, Charlene’s granddaughter,
Charlene Romero, and her husband, Daryl, went to Rapid Cast to
shop. Their kids didn’t go along
but stayed home with Grandma.
On Monday, the elder Charlene, is
planning to take in the Christmas
party at the nursing home in
White River. Her aunt, Martha
Shot, lives at that home and is also
celebrating her ninetieth birthday
that day.
Mary Johnston and family have
been celebrating Christmas a bit
early this year. On Saturday
evening, they held their Christmas Eve gathering at Larry and
Jo’s. Jo’s daughter, Cora, was
there as were Larry’s daughters,
Linay and Lonna, with their families. That involved about half a
dozen kids and a lot of Christmas
wrapping paper. A Merry Christmas Dinner was then held on Sunday with the same bunch at
Larry’s. Mary also went to Lonny
and Carrie’s for more gift opening
and Christmas doings. The early
part was done because various
people want to be other places on
the actual Christmas Eve and
Day.

3

Norris News | June Ring, 462-6328
“Ah, dearest Jesus, holy Child,
Make Thee a bed, soft, undefiled,
Within my heart, that it may be
A quiet chamber kept for Thee.”
Martin Luther 1535
Edna Kary recently received
the sad news that an older sister,
Pat McDougal, died in a car accident caused by icy roads on December 9. They drove to Plains,
Montana, for the funeral. It was
on the 14th, and they returned on
the 15th, as Edna had to teach the
next day.
Cliff and Pam Allard are expecting Alberta Allard of Yankton to
come spend Christmas with them.
Maxine Allard rode along with
Dorothy Bligh to Ainsworth last
Wednesday, where Maxine kept
an eye appointment with Dr.
Evans. They came back by way of
Valentine, and Maxine visited Jim
Kruger at assisted living while
Dorothy ran some errands.
Maxine has been making her
Christmas calls to her classmates
from old school days.
Pastor Glenn Denke was in
Pierre on December 10th for the
Circuit Pastors’ conference and
Christmas meeting. Sunday the
15th, they had a voters meeting at
St. Peters Lutheran Church after
services and potluck, and then at
3:00 p.m. the children’s Christmas
program was presented.
The Hubers have been trying to
get the corn harvested. Torry Rattling Leaf came to visit and went
along with Kenda to the Long Valley Christmas progam on Wednesday. When she gets a chance,
Kenda has been busy doing
Christmas baking.
Bobbi Kelley listened to the
Tigers LNI basketball action by
live stream over the internet.
Friends also kept her informed of
the outcome of the games.
Sunday afternoon, December
15, Bruce Ring and all six children
went to Rapid City to pick up their
Christmas tree and to do some
Christmas shopping. Monday
June rode with Bruce and Jessie to
Norris for the Christmas program
and party at Head Start. Wednesday it was back over to Long Valley for the school Christmas
program and concert that evening.
Thursday it was a late start due to
the weather for Kadoka Area
schools; they had their Christmas
parties, and then it was early dismissal at 12:30 because of the
weather, which was much worse
over there than it was here.

Merry Christmas from Santa

Santa wishes Bunny Green a Merry Christmas.

Kadoka Press - Thursday, December 26, 2013 -

Santa shakes hands with Shorty Ireland. Also receiving wishes from Santa were
Derald Kulhavy, Oliver Willert, Kate DeVries, and Elaine Kemnitz.

Kadoka received six inches of
snow.
Friday Jessie and the children
were in Martin keeping appointments and running errands.
Robert and Sharon Ring went to
Winner on Tuesday for Robert to
have physical therapy for his
shoulder. Wednesday evening
Torey and Linda picked up Sharon
and Janice Ring to go to the
Christmas program at Long Valley
School. Thursday morning Sharon
took Jeremy to Murdo for a dental
appointment, and then took him
back to Kadoka for school. She
said the roads were bad from 1880
on west to Kadoka on the way
back from Murdo. Then she barely
got home and heard that they dismissed early.
Torey, Linda, Jeremy and Tyler
were in Rapid City Friday and
Saturday. Jeremy had surgery to
remove his adenoids on Friday.
Lori Schmidt and Brandi were
in Sioux Falls this past weekend,
visiting Lori’s mom and also doing
some shopping.
Susan Taft’s father, Alvin Simmons, was moved to Sioux Falls to
a hospital there on Wednesday
last week. Friday Dan Taft attended an auction, hoping to get a
good buy on a tractor, but he came
home empty handed. Saturday
Dan and Susan went to Bonesteel
to pick up some panels.
Morgan was in Rapid City with
her Knowledge Bowl team at the
tournament.
Samantha
LNI
brought her home afterward, and
will be home for Christmas.
December 13, Richard Krogman
picked up Harold Krogman and
they went in to White River for the
boys’ basketball game with Jones
County. Tuesday Richard and
Noreen went to Philip for the cattle sale, visited with friends at the
sale, and then left before the sale
was done in order to attend the
Christmas program at Big White
School, where grandson Cayne
performed in “The Great Santa
Encounter” play and musical with

his other five classmates. They
stayed overnite with Mark and
Carolyn and came home Wednesday.
They listened to the LNI basketball games over the radio.
Thursday Noreen hosted the Mellette County Cattlewomen’s meeting at her home. Donna Adrian,
Amy Lehman and June Ring
braved the cold weather and arrived at her home for the meeting
and lunch.
James and Marjorie Letellier
were among those attending the
Norris School Christmas program
last Monday afternoon, and enjoyed the fruit and sugar cookies
handed out. Tuesday they were in
Philip, where they sold some cattle
at the sale, Jim kept a dental appointment, and they visited Marjorie M. Letellier in the hospital,
where they are still working on
her dislocated shoulder. Wednesday they picked up feed in
Kadoka. Saturday they headed
north to Faith to attend the funeral of ‘Butch’ Krauss. He and
Marjorie were classmates all
twelve years of school.
Dorothy Bligh enjoyed the Norris School Christmas program
Monday afternoon, and then had
the chance to have a good visit afterward with Dorothy Richardson
and Bobbie Kelley. Dorothy
Richardson came up from Nebraska to attend the program.
Gary and Anne Heinert were in
Sioux Falls on Thursday, where
Gary had a new hip put in. They
came home Saturday, and Gary is
recuperating at home. Daughter
Erin is home for Christmas.
A bus load of youth and adults
from Brandon came to Parmelee
Sunday afternoon to The Lord’s
Warriors Church to help with caroling and the party at the youth
center afterward. After the puppet
show put on by the Utecht family
presents were distributed to all
who were there. There was hot
cider and lots and lots of cookies
available for all.

Youth

4 - Thursday, December 26, 2013 - Kadoka Press

The sounds of Christmas filled the air at music concerts

e Kadoka Elementary held their Christmas music concert on Tuesday, December 10. Back row (L-R): Allie Madsen, Mason Stilwell, Isabella Suedmeier, Ryan Shuck, Cyril Eisenbraun, Jonathon MacFeat, Maggie Whirlwind Horse, Dalton Porch, Alvia
Waldner, Jyntre Coller, Lincoln Koehn, Teggan Kukal. Middle: Garrett Hermann, Makaylan Bonenberger, Don Schofield, Isabella Williams, Ivan Littlesun, Gus Stout, Laker Bement. Front: JaiShawn Quick Bear, Halley White Feather, Hailey MacFeat,
Deanna Hagedorn, Ashlynn Carlson, Mia Dart, Cash Pumpkin Seed, Jared Nemecek, Madison Stilwell.

Damien Bettelyoun (L), Jerrett Hutchinson, Carter Kendrick, Savannah Suedmeier, Chase Lamont, Jace Grimes.

Interior School held their Christmas music concert on ursday, December 5. Dustin Plenty Bull (L), Storm Guptil, Adam
Amiotte, Augustus Wilson, Ciara Birds Head, James Livermont, Kendra Bies and Norman Livermont.

Back row (L-R): omas under Hawk, Marlon White Feather, Tyus Williams, Tagg Weller. Front: Tyrel Mansfield, Trey
Lamont, Caden Stoddard.

Back row (L-R): Dante Baker, Connor Torkelson, Andrew Grimes, Kian Stone, Katie Kruse, Chloe Brunsch, Clancy Goodman.
Front row: Breezy Amiotte, Kalee Leach, Darcella Plenty Bull.

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Sports

Kadoka Press - Thursday, December 26, 2013 -

Grapplers take fifth at Valentine
The Philip Area grapplers traveled to Valentine, Neb., last weekend where they took sixth place as
a team.
Three South Dakota teams,
Philip Area, Winner and Pierre
wrestled against 13 Nebraska
schools at the meet. The team placings were David City – 185.5,
Pierre – 170, Chadron – 124.5,
O’Neill – 120, Philip – 110.5, Winner – 106.5, Cozad – 91, Valentine – 90, Alliance – 53, Gering –
42, Gordon/Rushville – 38.5, McCook – 35, Ainsworth – 33, Ord –
28, Broken Bow – 17, Gothenburg –
13
106 lbs: Hunter Peterson 4th
record 11-5
•Tech Fall Dominic Henry (AIN) 17-2
•Maj. Dec. by Austin Senger (PIE) 1-12
•Pin Skyler Key (ORD) 0:47
•Pin Bryan Sliger (VAL) 4:36
•Dec. Bryce Larson (GOT) 7-4
•Forfeit to Daniel Goings (CHA)

113 lbs: Pedro Dennis
record 7-5

•Bye
•Pin by Joseph Ritzen (CHA) 5:23
•Pin Cristian Hulsey (ALL) 1:37
•Pin by Clinton O’Neel (ORD) 4:00
126 lbs: Jed Brown 2nd
record 9-3
•Maj. Dec. D.J. Highbear (PIE) 14-3
•Dec. Cole Witt (G/R) 5-2
•Dec. Jacob Hoffman (COZ) 8-4
•Dec. by Devin Ushio (ALL) 2-7
132 lbs: Rance Johnson 4th
record 11-4
•Pin Afton Bryant (CHA) 2:36
•Dec. Trevor Bukaske (VAL) 12-8
•Dec. by Brian Messersmith (COZ) 2-4
•Pin Cameron Briggins (WIN) 1:35
•Tech Fall by Joseph Gillham (ON) 3-19
138 lbs: Nick Donnelly
record 8-5
•Bye
•Dec. Kasey Taylor (MCC) 10-5
•Dec. by Sean Bice (WIN) 2-9
•Dec. by Damian Hort (GER) 3-4
160 lbs: Grady Carley
record 5-6
•Bye
•Maj. Dec. by Brandyn Middlesworth (WIN)
0-8
•Pin Matt Pachak (ALL) 0:19

•Pin by Wyatt Leesman (PIE) 0:22
170 lbs: Chandlier Sudbeck 1st
record 12-2
•Pin Wyatt Schutte (COZ) 1:47
•Pin Garrett Ulmer (BB) 0:56
•Pin Elijah Timblin (GER) 2:09
•Dec. David Fox (ON) 3-2
182 lbs: Reed Johnson
record 6-6
•Bye
•Dec. by Quinn Reimers (PIE) 4-8
•Pin John Sayaloune (GER) 0:44
•Pin Jason Hahlbeck (ON) 2:00
•Pin by Gage Smedra (ORD) 5:00
220 lbs: Logan Ammons 4th
record 12-3
•Bye
•Pin Broderick Hoeft (DC) 0:40
•Dec. by Alex Boryca (COZ) 0-6
•Pin Matt McBride (MCC) 4:46
•Dec. by Scott Assman (WIN) 1-4
285 lbs: Gavin DeVries 4th
record 5-5
•Bye
•Pin Michael Burival (ON) 5:00
•Pin by Dylan Bennett (PIE) 1:51
•Dec. Charles Davis (BB) 6-4
•Pin by Blaine Finney (AIN) 3:00

The wrestlers will have some
time off until the next tournament
on January 4 in Salem at the McCook Central/Montrose Invite.

Chandlier Sudbeck

Jed Brown

Gavin DeVries

Logan Ammons

eace &
rosperity

5

Church

Kadoka Press - Thursday, December 26, 2013 -

6

Lawrence Kruse_________________________________ Berdyne Parsons________________________________
Lawrence Kruse, age 97, of Scenic,
S.D., died Saturday, December 21,
2013, at his son’s home near Interior.
Lawrence Raymond Kruse was
born in Mitchell on Aug. 31, 1916,
to William and Lena Kruse. At the
age of two they moved to the Badlands to a ranch eight miles north
of Conata. At the age of nine his
father died and Lena was left to
raise her large family by herself.
In 1935, during the height of
the depression, Lawrence graduated high school in Wall then left
the ranch to find work elsewhere.
He worked at various jobs
throughout the Midwest until he
received a letter from home in
1937, asking if he would come
back to help Lena manage a property. It was here that he started
breaking horses for extra money.
Lawrence purchased a ranch
four miles west of Interior for $6
an acre from the Kansas City Life
Insurance Co. The five brothers
formed a partnership called the
K5 that was the beginning of the
ranch.
Walter
and
Kruse
Lawrence were the only two
brothers that stayed and lived in
the Badlands.
In 1942, Lawrence joined the
war effort and after much training
and work ended up being a pilot of
a B-17. He would talk about his
adventures for the rest of his life.
He truly loved flying. He came
back to the ranch after his dis-

charge in 1946.
Lawrence met Bettylue Johanna Hammer and married her
December 12, 1948. They made
their home at the ranch where
they raised nine children. In 1953,
their second-born son, Raymond,
was killed in a farm accident and
changed Lawrence's direction forever. In searching for the truth, he
accepted Jesus Christ as his personal savior.
Lawrence was involved in
Gideons, Cane Creek Grazing
Assoc., Stock Growers Assoc.,
Wall E Free Church and was a
board member at Sunshine Bible
Academy.
Survivors include seven sons,
Roger and Cheryl Kruse of Rock
Springs, Wyo., Kevin and Joanne

Kruse of Interior, David and Marianne Kruse of Interior, Sylvan
Kruse of Kadoka, Charles and
Beth Kruse of Interior, Daniel and
Heidi Kruse of Interior and Philip
and Amy Kruse of Interior; one
daughter, Lois Kruse-Zibell and
her husband, Robert, of Steamboat Springs, Colo.; 23 grandchildren;
and
eight
great-grandchildren.
Lawrence was preceded in
death by his wife, Betty, on March
22, 2011; an infant son, Raymond
Kruse; seven sisters, LaVonne
Green, Evelyn Kruse as an infant,
Alice Kruse, Minnie Geller, Anne
Goard, Hannah Kruse, and Edith
Kruse; five brothers Forrest, Clifford, William “Bill”, Walter and
Bernard Kruse.
Funeral services were held
Monday, December 23, at the Interior Community Church with
Pastor Bill Auckamp officiating.
Ushers were Reid and Marshal
Kruse. Pallbearers were Roger,
Kevin, David, Charles, Daniel,
Philip and Sylvan Kruse and
Justin Hornbaker.
Interment with military honors
was at Mt. Hope Cemetery in
Quinn.
A memorial has been established.
Arrangements were with the
Rush Funeral Home of Philip.
His online guestbook is available at www.rushfuneralhome.
com

Fellowship of God | Dr. James L. Snyder
If you like your snow,
you can keep your snow.
Please!
Memory is a very wonderful
thing, at times. It seems the older
I get the more I remember things
that never happened. I do not
know how that takes place, but I
guess it is just old age creeping up
on me. With me, old age has
ceased creeping and has started a
fast sprint to some finish line. I
just wish it would slow down just
a wee bit.
Christmas, however, is the time
to indulge ourselves in memories.
Some people can go back in time
and remember things when they
were two or three years old years
old. Me, I cannot remember what
I had for breakfast this morning. I
have a strong suspicion that those
remembering things back that far
are remembering things that really did not take place but who in
the world is going to prove them
wrong.
To me, one of the delightful
things about Christmas is getting
to see family and friends that you
have not seen all year long. I remember those old-fashioned family reunions we used to have when
all of our relatives would get together. It was at those reunions
that I remembered why I did not
see my relatives the rest of the
year. Once a year was quite
enough, thank you.
If insanity is hereditary, I am in
deep trouble. I am only thankful
my wife did not meet my relatives
prior to our wedding. Of course,
after I met her relatives I began
realizing that after all, families
are relative, and some more relative than others.
I was thinking about some
Christmases in the past and the
good times we had. I remembered
our first Christmas as a married
couple. That was probably the
cheapest Christmas we ever had.
Then I got to thinking about the
Christmases as the kids began

dropping into our family and taking up permanent residence.
When the kids arrived, it changed
Christmas forever and not just the
cost.
This week I got a couple Christmas cards from some relatives
who live up north. All of them had
pictures of snow.
Watching the weather reports
this week I knew many of them
were having snowstorms and I
chuckled to myself thinking about
it. In one Christmas card, was the
familiar title, "I'm dreaming of a
white Christmas." Then at the bottom of the card, they scribbled,
"Don't you miss all the snow this
time of the year?" Then they drew
a series of smiley faces.
I smiled and for a few moments,
one brief moment, I did miss all
that snow.
The Gracious Mistress of the
Parsonage saw me smiling and
asked, "Who sent the Christmas
cards?"
I told her who the cards were
from and added, "They think we
miss all that snow." We then
shared a hearty laugh together
and went about our own business.
I just could not get it out of my
mind. Did I miss all that snow?
What a question.
I put my thinking machine in
gear and began processing the
Christmases we celebrated up
north where there was plenty of
snow. As I begin thinking, I did
begin missing all that snow.
Then it dawned on me what
snow was all about.
At times, we forget some details
of our memories and only think of
the positive and good aspects. Do
not get me wrong. Snow looks
wonderful on a Christmas card. I
do not mind watching a TV program where plenty of snow is
falling and people are singing
Christmas carols. I rather enjoy it
in those venues.
The question is, did I miss all
that snow?
My answer goes something like

this. Yes, I do miss all that snow!
Furthermore, I plan to miss all
that snow for the rest of my life.
The basic reason I moved to
Florida when I did was that I do
not like snow. I like looking at
snow on a Christmas card but I do
not like looking at snow through
my car window.
It is not so much that I do not
like driving in snow; it is the other
idiots coming at me who do not
know how to drive in snow and do
not know how to stay in their own
lane.
I remember the last time I did
any driving in snow I ended up almost a complete nervous wreck.
People drive in snow as though
they do not know how to drive in
snow.
Yes, I do miss the snow, and the
cold and being snowed in, did I
mention the cold. I do miss all that
and I plan to miss it the rest of my
life. Period. Some things you can
live without and as far as I am
concerned this is one.
To all those who love snow and
cannot get enough of it, please
enjoy it this year for me because I
do not plan to.
Only one Bible characters
seemed to enjoy snow. God said to
Job, "Hast thou entered into the
treasures of the snow? Or hast
thou seen the treasures of the
hail?" (Job 38:22).
When God was trying to get Job
to see is that no matter what your
circumstances are, that is not the
end. Look beyond your problems
and difficulties and see the hand of
God who created all things and
then called them "good." In every
circumstance you will find some
treasure of God's amazing grace.

Berdyne Parsons, age 82, of
Philip, S.D., died Sunday, December 22, 2013, at the Hans P. Peterson Memorial Hospital in Philip.
Berdyne Joanne Alys Peterson
was born March 5, 1931, at the old
Philip hospital, the 10th of 14 children born to Jacob Roger and
Rena (Bettelyoun) Peterson. Her
name Berdyne was from her dad’s
Norwegian heritage, and she was
his cousin, Berdyne Halse’s namesake. She grew up in the Philip
area, and received her education
in Philip.
Berdyne married Frank Parsons on December 5, 1947, in
Sturgis. They lived all of their
married life at Milesville, until
moving to town in 2004.
While in Milesville, she was on
the election board, a census taker,
and a crop reporter. She served on
the Hardingrove School Board,
various church boards, and on the
Hans P. Peterson Hospital and
Nursing Home Board.
Berdyne loved to garden and
canned many jars of produce. She
especially enjoyed flower gardening. People would drive out from
town to see her flower gardens in
the shape of the suits of a deck of
cards. Keeping a beautiful yard
and home was important. She was
an avid Scrabble player and
worked a crossword puzzle every
day. She was a master bridge
player for over 50 years. Sewing
and creating new things was
something she loved to do. She
made numerous needlework pictures, pillows, and over 100 quilts
for family and friends. She refinished and upholstered furniture
making something old, new. She
was a wonderful cook and enjoyed
making a good meal. She was

challenged with rheumatoid
arthritis for nearly 40 years, a
chronic affliction she inherited
from her dad, but despite the pain
she made the most of every day
with courage and determination.
She was a ranch wife, but she
preferred to stay home and take
care of the house and children.
Her grandchildren and greatgrandchildren were the light of
her life.
Her husband, Frank, preceded
her in death on February 28,
2010. Berdyne continued to make
her home in Philip. While in
Philip, Berdyne was a member of
the Bad River Senior Citizen's
Center.
Survivors include two sons,
Roger Parsons and his wife, Terri,
of Pierre, and Doug Parsons of

Rapid City; one daughter, Brigitte
Brucklacher and her husband,
Bruce, of Philip; six grandchildren, Cody Parsons of Williamsport, Pa., Kelly Parsons of Rapid
City, Wendy (Dan) Peterson of
Minneapolis, Minn., Amy (Fred)
Gray of New Hope, Minn., Skye
Brucklacher of Kadoka, and Gavin
Brucklacher of Philip; six greatgrandchildren, Makaylah, Myah
and Miles Gray of New Hope, and
Joscelyn, Sevanna, and Jenessa
Parsons of Fairfax, Va.; two sisters, Virginia Barnes of Trenton,
Mich., and Beatrice Ramsey of
Spearfish; a daughter-in-law,
Vikki Parsons of Rapid City, and
a host of other relatives and
friends.
In addition to her husband,
Frank, Berdyne was preceded in
death by her parents; six sisters,
Vera Grable, Irene Hanson,
Marcine Pipal, Eileen Brooks,
Dorcas Cameron and Drexel Kay
Peterson as a child; and five
brothers, James, Max, Roger, Dale
and Edward Allen Peterson as an
infant.
Funeral services will be held at
2:00 p.m. Saturday, December 28,
at the United Church in Philip,
with Pastor Kathy Chesney officiating.
Interment will be at the Masonic Cemetery in Philip.
Arrangements are with the
Rush Funeral Home of Philip.
Her online guestbook is available at www.rushfuneralhome.
com

Meals for the Elderly
Monday, Dec. 30: Taco Salad w/ meat and beans, lettuce, tomatoes,
totilla chips and salsa, and strawberries and bananas.

Upcoming Area
Events

Tuesday, Dec. 31: Closed for Holiday! Happy New Year!
Wednesday, Jan. 1: Closed for Holiday! Happy 2014!

Thursday, December 26:
•Kadoka Post Office Window
Normal Hours
Friday, December 27:
•Girls and Boys Basketball at
Stanley County.
Monday, December 30:
•Jackson Kadoka Economic
Development Corp. will meet at
7:00 p.m. at the Gateway Apartments Community Room.
Tuesday, December 31:
•Kadoka Post Office Window
Normal Hours
Sunday, January 19:
•SD Humanities discussion
leader, Dorothy Liegl, 2:00 p.m.
at the Jackson County Library.
Books are in for the Dakota Readers group for the book "The Land
They Possessed."
Sunday February 22:
•The Light Readers group plan
to discuss the book Cape Light
with Jan Cerney on Feb. 22, 2014
at 2:00 or Mar 4, 2014 at 5:00.
Sign-up for these two delightful
selections at the library for some
holiday relaxation reading. Questions--call Deb Moor at Jackson
County Library @ 837-2689.

Inspiration Point
Jesus: The Son of God
Matthew 16:13-16
What difference does it make who Jesus is? Why should we take Him seriously? The way we answer these questions will deeply impact our belief
system, mold our character, and influence our lifestyle. They will also determine where we spend eternity.
Jesus identified Himself as the Son of God and stated that He and the Father are one. In other words, whoever has seen Christ has seen the Father
(John 10:30; 14:9). Conversely, those of us who long to know God must draw
near to Jesus—He alone reveals the Father.
The Son of God was sent here to give His life as a ransom for many. The
purpose was to rescue us from slavery to sin and prepare us for our heavenly
home, where we’ll spend eternity. Notice that in describing His mission,
Jesus said He “did not come to be served, but to serve” (Matt. 20:28). Those
who belong to Him are to imitate His life of service.
Jesus testified that He does exactly as the Father commands (John 14:31).
This, too, is an example for us. His life of obedience shows us how to please
God. Jesus knew why He came, and He did what was asked in order to glorify
His Father (John 17:1). There’s a plan and purpose for every one of us as
well, and we likewise glorify the Lord by our obedience.
Matthew 28:18 gives another reason to obey: since Jesus said, “All authority has been given to me in heaven and on earth,” we are to live in submission
to Him.
Do you believe Jesus’ testimony? If so, thank Him for the difference He
has made in your life. Then share with others how knowing Him has impacted you.

PEOPLE’S
MARKET
WIC, Food
Stamps & EBT
Phone: 837-2232
Monday thru Saturday
8 a.m. - 6 p.m.

Church Calendar
CONCORDIA LUTHERAN
Kadoka • 837-2390
Sunday Services: 10:00 a.m.
LUTHERAN PARISH - ELCA
OUR SAVIORS LUTHERAN • Long Valley
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
Sunday Services: 5:00 p.m.
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Kadoka • Pastor Gary McCubbin • 837-2233
Worship Services: 11:00 a.m.
Sunday School: Sr. Adults - 9:45 a.m.
Sunday School: All Ages - 9:45 a.m., • Sept. - May
Release Time: 2:15 p.m. Wednesdays. • Sept. - May
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Interior • 859-2310
Sunday Worship: 11:00 a.m.
BELVIDERE COMMUNITY CHURCH
Pastor Gary McCubbin • 344-2233
Sunday Worship: 9:30 a.m.
Coffee & Donuts: 10:30 a.m.
Sunday School: 10:45 a.m. Sept. - May
OUR LADY OF VICTORY CATHOLIC CHURCH
Father Bryan Sorensen • Kadoka • 837-2219
Mass: Sunday - 11:00 a.m.
Confession After Mass
INTERIOR COMMUNITY CHURCH
Sunday School: 9:30 a.m. • Church: 10:30 a.m.
EAGLE NEST LIFE CENTER
Gus Craven • Wanblee • 462-6002
Sunday Church: 11:00 a.m.
ST. PETER LUTHERAN CHURCH-LCMS
Midland • Rev. Glenn Denke • 462-6169, SD
(6 mi. north and 3 mi. east of 1880 Town)
Sunday Worship--10:00 a.m. MT/11:00 a.m. CT

Community
Santa visits Long Valley students

Kadoka School Christmas music concert

Back row (L-R): Cannon Speer, Kaylee Kusick, Emery Kukal, Isaac Sitting Up, Kato
Charging Hawk. Front: Laney Eisenbraun, Leia Bennett, Madisyn Nemecek, Martin Badure, Nevaeh Bull Bear Pierce, Zachary Lechette.

Following the Christmas music concert at the Long Valley School on Wednesday,
December 18, Santa dropped by to visit and bring gis. Reece Ohrtman helps his
little brother, Rollie, visit Santa.

Lily Uhlir, Chase Johnson, Kassidee Williams.

“The best way to spread Christmas cheer
is singing loud for all to hear”

2014
Hayden Chase Alone was excited to see Santa.

Peters Excavation
Home: (605) 837-2945
Cell: (605) 381-5568

Excavation work of
ALL types!
WBackhoe WTrenching
WDirectional Boring
WCobett Waters Located in
Kadoka, SD
WTire Tanks
WDozer
WVacuum
Excavation
Brent Peters

Kadoka Press - Thursday, December 26, 2013 -

7

Public Notices

8 - Thursday, December 26, 2013 - Kadoka Press

Town of Belvidere
Regular Meeting
December 9, 2013
A motion was made by Rudy Reimann to
call the meeting to order. Wayne Hindman seconded the motion. The following
people were present: Rudy Reimann,
John Rodgers, Wayne Hindman, Jo
Rodgers, Wally Wells and Frank Carlson.
OLD BUSINESS:
The minutes from the November 13,
2013 meeting were presented. With
there being no changes, Rudy Reimann
made a motion to accept the minutes.
Wayne Hindman seconded the motion.
John Rodgers gave an update from West
Central about putting in a culvert by the
substation. Dirt work will have to wait
until spring and if done correctly, no culvert will be needed. John also informed
the council that the speed limit signs will
be installed but do not know when.
NEW BUSINESS:
The Alcoholic Beverage License application for John Rodgers was presented to
the council. After discussion on some
questions that were asked, Rudy
Reimann made a motion to renew the license. Wayne Hindman seconded the
motion. The license will now be sent to
the state for their approval.
Jo informed the council that the virus protection for the computer needed updated
and asked to be reimbursed the cost that
was charged to her credit card.
The whole council voted yes to keep the
following: Official Bank – BankWest, Official Newspaper – Kadoka Press, and
the Official Attorney – Tollefson Law Office.
Discussion was held again about snow
removal. No action was taken at this
time.
Jo informed the council that not all the
bills were received for payment and that
another meeting will need to be held to
pay these bills before the end of the year.
The council will meet again on December
23, 2013 to close out the books for 2013.
BILLS APPROVED AND PAID:
Golden West,
phone & DSL . . . . . . . . . . .108.55
Jo Manke-Rodgers,
wages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .50.79
Jo Rodgers,
virus program . . . . . . . . . . . .54.94
Kadoka Press, publications . . . .47.11
SD Assoc of Code
Enforcement, dues . . . . . . . .40.00
SD Building Officials
Assoc,dues . . . . . . . . . . . . . .50.00
SD Gov Finance Officer
Assoc, dues . . . . . . . . . . . . .40.00
SD Municipal Attorneys
Assoc, dues . . . . . . . . . . . 20.00
SD Municipal Liquor
Assoc, dues . . . . . . . . . . . . .25.00
SD Human Resource
Assoc, dues . . . . . . . . . . . . .25.00
SD Municipal League,
Dues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44.60
WR/LJ, water . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42.50
With there being no further business,
Wayne Hindman made a motion to adjourn the meeting. Rudy Reimann seconded the motion. The next regular
council meeting will be January 13, 2014
at 7:00 p.m. in the city office.
John L. Rodgers, Council President
ATTEST Jo Manke-Rodgers
Finance Officer
[Published December 26, 2013, at the
total approximate cost of $33.48]

NOTICE FOR HAIL
DAMAGE REPAIR BIDS
Bids for repairing the out building roofs of
the Kadoka Area School District will be
accepted until 2:00 p.m., Thursday January 2, 2014. Bids will be opened at this
time in the office of the business manager.
Bids will be considered by the board of
education at their regular meeting to be
held Wednesday, January 8, 2014 at
3:30 pm in Long Valley. A detailed listing
of all damages to be repaired is available
at the school business office.
Bidders please bid for the following buildings to have a new metal roof.
High School North Storage Shed 563.93
surface area

Kadoka School Modular
1318.93 surface area

Storage

Sports Complex Storage Shed 539.70
surface area
Shed behind Grandstands 125.53 surface area
Denote on outside of envelope: Out
Buildings Repairs
Bidders please bid for the following building to have either a new shingled roof
and/or metal roof.
Superintendent house 1322.74 surface
area
Denote on outside of envelope: Superintendent House Roof Repairs
Each bid must be accompanied by a certificate of insurance with minimum liability
coverage of one million dollars.
Pursuant to state law, a copy of the bidder’s sales and use tax license and a
copy of the bidder’s excise tax license as
issued by the state of South Dakota must
accompany the bid. In lieu of a copy of
the license, the bidder shall submit appropriate evidence that the bidder and all
affiliates have the appropriate licenses.
The Board of Education of the Kadoka
Area School District reserves the right to
accept or reject any or all bids.
Questions regarding this project and repair specifications should be directed to:
Jamie Hermann, Superintendent at 605837-2175.
Kadoka Board of Education
Jo Beth Uhlir,
Business Manager
[Published December 19 & 26, 2011, at
the total approximate cost of $48.75]

Official Proceedings
SPECIAL MEETING
Board of Jackson
County Commissioners
December 2, 2013
The Board of Jackson County Commissioners met in special session at 1:00
p.m., Monday, December 2, 2013 in the
Commissioner's Room of the Jackson
County Courthouse. Chairman Glen
Bennett called the meeting to order with
members Larry Denke, Larry Johnston,
Jim Stilwell and Ron Twiss present.
Highway Superintendent Dwight Deaver
and Kolette Struble, Hwy. Sec. were
present. The purpose of the meeting was
to attend to matters that had arisen since
the last meeting, discuss road matters,
and negotiate a maintenance agreement
with the City of Kadoka.
All motions carried unanimously unless
otherwise noted.
The Commissioners requested that representatives of the City of Kadoka be
present to negotiate a maintenance
agreement. Patty Ulmen, City Finance
Officer, Dick Stolley, Councilmember,
and Patrick Solon, City Maintenance
were present. At 1:05 p.m., Johnston
moved, Stilwell seconded, that the board
go into executive session to discuss personnel matters and negotiate a maintenance agreement. All persons in
attendance were present during the executive session except the County Auditor. The board came out of executive
session at 1:31 p.m.
Johnston moved, Stilwell seconded, that
Jackson County continue to exchange
maintenance and services at no charge
with the City of Kadoka as has been
done in the past.
Discussion was held on various methods
of selecting roads for emergency snow
removal. It was consensus of the board
that main trunk routes (CH roads) be
done first. Each Commissioner was
given a map of the county and they
marked roads on the map showing which
roads in their districts would receive
emergency snow removal first, those
roads that would receive emergency
snow removal second, and those roads
that would receive snow removal last. A
completed map was given to the Highway Superintendent.
Dwight Deaver, Hwy. Supt. reported that
plows and wings have been mounted on
the motorgraders.
Discussion was held on use of the funds
received from sale of the 1985 Cat mo-

torgrader with a suggestion to buy at
least one used truck tractor. Discussion
was held on declaring the two Volvo truck
tractors surplus, sell them, and use the
additional funds to purchase a newer
used truck tractor. Denke moved that the
two Volvo truck tractors be declared surplus, that those pieces of equipment be
sold through Big Iron, that the funds from
the sale of those pieces of equipment
along with the funds received from the
sale of the 1985 Cat motorgrader be
used to purchased one truck tractor.
Twiss seconded the motion.
Dwight Deaver, Hwy. Supt. reported that
the transmission in the blue International
truck tractor needs to be repaired again.
At 5:15 p.m., Twiss moved, Johnston
seconded, that the board go into executive session to discuss personnel matters. Dwight Deaver, Hwy. Supt. was
present until 5:40 p.m. The board came
out of executive session at 5:53 p.m.
Stilwell moved, Twiss seconded, that
James Kramer be hired as full time
equipment operator / highway worker
with starting pay to be set at $10.75 per
hour with a $0.25 per hour pay increase
following his 90 day probationary period.
Denke moved, Johnston seconded, that
the Highway Superintendent offer a full
time general worker position to Tom Riggins with starting pay of $9.75 per hour
with a $0.25 per hour pay increase following a 90 day probationary period.
Discussion was held on volunteers from
each area of the county serving as spotters to report areas of road needing repaired or needing snow removal.
Report was made that Nemec Construction, Midland, is going to submit a quote
for installation of new windows in the
courthouse.
There being no further business to come
before the board Twiss moved, Johnston
seconded, that the meeting be adjourned.
ATTEST: BOARD OF JACKSON
COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
Vicki D. Wilson,
Jackson County Auditor
Glen A. Bennett, Chairman
[Published December 26, 2013, at the
total approximate cost of $44.52]

Official Proceedings
REGULAR MEETING
Board of Jackson
County Commissioners
December 9, 2013
The Board of Jackson County Commissioners met in regular session at 9:00
a.m., Monday, December 9, 2013 in the
Commissioner’s Room of the Jackson
County Courthouse. Chairman Glen
Bennett called the meeting to order with
members Larry Denke, Larry Johnston
and Jim Stilwell present. Ron Twiss arrived at 10:50 a.m.
All motions carried unanimously unless
otherwise noted.
Stilwell moved that minutes of the November meetings be approved. Denke
seconded the motion.
The Auditor’s account with the County
Treasurer was approved as of November
30, 2013:
Total amount of
deposits in banks . . . . . . . . . .745.30
Total amount of
actual cash . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .896.99
Total amount of
actual cash
(Reg. of Deeds) . . . . . . . . . . .250.00
Total amount of checks . . . . .10,575.48
Library Donations . . . . . . . . .15,878.49
Returned checks . . . . . . . . . . .1,639.48
Money Market
Account . . . . . . . . . . . . . .930,087.34
Time Deposits . . . . . . . . . . .117,132.00
JCFSA Passbook
savings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2,972.37
Total Funds . . . . . . . . . . .1,080,177.45
TOTAL COUNTY
FUNDS . . . . . . . . . . . . . .927,980.65
General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .564,290.24
Road & Bridge . . . . . . . . . .215,023.52
CH & BR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3,283.42
Secondary Road . . . . . . . . .109,295.55
911 Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3,825.86
Other Grants . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2,304.56
Emer. Disaster . . . . . . . . . . . .2,026.32
Abuse Center . . . . . . . . . . . .12,427.98
Building . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .-6,377.53
Library Donations . . . . . . . . .15,878.49
L. E. S. T. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1,202.03
Mod. & Preserv. . . . . . . . . . . .4,800.21
TOTAL TRUST &
AGENCY FUNDS . . . . .152,1963.80
Schools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .84,737.93
Townships . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .278.32
Towns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16,478.96
State . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25,444.02
Law Library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .678.03
Mod. & Preserv. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0.00
JCFSA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2,972.37
Other . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21,607.17
Register of Deeds November collections:
$2,519.00.
The following bills from the files of the
County Auditor were presented, examined, allowed and ordered paid:
Salary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29,523.49
BankWest, payroll tax . . . . . . .8,030.44
American Family Life
Ass’r. Co., ins. prem. . . . . . .1,031.21
Jackson Co. Flexible
Spending Acct.,
payroll ded. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .176.76
Wellmark, ins. prem. . . . . . . . .6,883.35
S. D. Retirement,
payroll ded. . . . . . . . . . . . . .4,492.64
Credit Collection Bureau,
payroll ded. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .380.54
Boston Mutual Life,
ins. prem. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .136.04
Dearborn National
Life, ins. prem. . . . . . . . . . . . .$61.20
Colonial Life, ins. prem. . . . . . . . .51.12
Wage Works, FSA fee . . . . . . . . .50.00
S. D. Game, Fish & Parks,
game license fees . . . . . . . . . . .65.00
S. D. State Treasurer,

10/13 Cash Rec. Trans. . . .18,291.99
S. D. Assoc. of Co.
Commissioners, M & P fees . . .66.00
S. D. State Treasurer,
11/13 Cash Rec. Trans. . . .26,144.02
To Whom It May Concern,
10/13 tax apport. . . . . . . .420,942.31
To Whom It May Concern,
11/13 tax apport. . . . . . . .102,088.84
U. S. Postage Service,
box rent & postage . . . . . . . . .366.00
Cindy Willert, medical reimb. . . .500.00
Ernie’s Building Center,
windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6,395.76
Dakota Inn, lodging . . . . . . . . . .420.00
Hildebrand Steel & Concrete,
concrete, install
propane tanks . . . . . . . . . . .3,723.00
Jackie Stilwell, expenses . . . . . . .53.28
Pennington Co. 911,
surcharge remittance . . . . . .1,995.40
City of Kadoka, service . . . . . . .103.66
Golden West, service . . . . . . .1,037.89
Lacreek Electric, service . . . . . . .41.71
S.D. Bureau of Info. & Tech.,
internet & e-mail . . . . . . . . . . . .58.00
Verizon Wireless, service . . . . . .208.21
Voyager Fleet System, gas . . . . .87.06
West Central Electric, service . .993.02
West Central Electric, service . .902.68
West River Electric, service . . . . .64.17
West River Lyman
Jones, service . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20.00
Glen Bennett, expenses . . . . . . .19.24
Larry Denke, expenses . . . . . . . .56.24
Larry Johnston, expenses . . . . . .35.52
Ron Twiss, expenses . . . . . . . . . .66.60
Haakon County, Adm.
Asst. salary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .479.42
Sheryl Hansen, expenses . . . . . . .8.14
Reliable Office Supplies,
supplies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .118.04
Carrie Weller, expenses . . . . . . .155.15
Best Western Ramkota,
SF, lodging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .170.25
Bradley Borge, ct. appt. atty. . .2,772.34
Century Business Leasing,
copier rent . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .180.93
Latasha Buchholz, expenses . . . .45.00
Butler Machinery, parts . . . . . . . .14.57
Ashley Carpenter, expenses . . . .36.00
Central S. D. Enhancement
District, 2014 dues . . . . . . . .6,165.50
Heidi Coller, B/A draw . . . . . . . . .50.00
D-Ware, 2014 computer
maint. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1,550.00
Dakota Business
Center, supplies . . . . . . . . . .1,061.01
Discount Fuel, gas . . . . . . . . .1,188.30
Double H Feed, posts . . . . . . . . .27.00
Fromm’s Hardware,
supplies, parts . . . . . . . . . . . . .161.66
Grimm’s Pump, meter . . . . . . . .296.79
Hometown Computer,
computer service . . . . . . . . . .128.55
Jackson Co. Conservation
Dist., ’13 approp. . . . . . . . . .1,500.00
Kadoka Care Center,
office rent . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .500.00
Kadoka Clinic, CDL test . . . . . . . .30.00
Kadoka Gas & Go., gas . . . . . . . .16.01
Kadoka Press, publication . . . . .398.15
Kemnitz Law Office,
office exp. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .397.00
Kennedy Implement,
repairs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1,537.47
Dorothy Leigl, consulting . . . . . .262.24
Microfilm Imagining
Systems, scanner rent . . . . . . .75.00
Midwest Coop, gas, fuel,
propane . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1,333.45
Miller Garbage, service . . . . . . . .61.60
Debra Moor, books, supplies . . .434.39
Nat’l. Geographic,
subscription . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39.00
Nemec Construction,
install windows
down pmt. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2,000.00
Newman Signs, signs . . . . . . . .513.06
Noteboom Glass,
windshield repair . . . . . . . . . . . .50.00
Oien Implement, parts . . . . . . . .323.49
Joseph Parr, ct. appt. atty. . . . . .616.80
Pennington Co. Sheriff,
prisoner board . . . . . . . . . . . . .340.00
People’s Market, supplies . . . . .165.24
Pheasantland Industries,
MH decals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44.15
Philip Body, install window . . . . .244.80
Philip Motor, repairs . . . . . . . . . .207.12
Reliable Office Supplies,
supplies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .321.98
Allen Reuer, B/A draw . . . . . . . .100.00
Aaron Richardson,
skid loader rent . . . . . . . . . . . .310.00
Runnings, binoculars . . . . . . . . . .49.99
Servall, rugs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .242.80
Jon Siedschlaw,
coroner fees, mileage . . . . . . .125.62
S. D. Assoc. of Assessing
Officers, 2014 dues . . . . . . . . .110.00
S. D. Assoc. of Co.
Comm., 2014 dues. . . . . . . . .924.34
S. D. Assoc. of County
Officials, 2014 dues . . . . . . . .737.17
S, D, Retailers, 2014 dues . . . . .150.00
S. D. Dept. of Health,
employee flu shots . . . . . . . . .260.00
S. D. Dept. of Health, lab fees . . .70.00
Sioux Foundry, blades . . . . . . . .325.20
Jackie Stilwell, cell
phone costs . . . . . . . . . . . . . .150.00
W W Tire, tires . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .84.00
Western Construction,
crush/stockpile gravel
(Addison) . . . . . . . . . . . . . .88,693.01
Western Construction,
crush/stockpile gravel
(Pass Creek) . . . . . . . . . . .87,313.47
Vicki Wilson, expenses . . . . . . .218.00
Winner Police Dept.,
prisoner bd. & trans. . . . . . . . .635.60
Golden West, 911 access . . . . .765.45
Kadoka Telephone,
911 access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .160.43
WOW !, 911 service line . . . . . . .56.04
Century Link, 911 access . . . . . .146.17
Stilwell moved, Denke seconded, that
the billing from Ernie’s Building Center,
supplies and materials, $673.71 be
tabled.
The Auditor presented financial information to the board.
Report was made that a check issued to
Katie Hicks in August 2013 in the amount
of $10.74 has not been cashed or returned through the bank. No action was
taken at this time.
The S. D. Developmental Center, Redfield, SD has billed Jackson County an
additional $60.00 for an accrued total of
$1,260.00 for client assessment. Jackson County responded in June 2012 that
charges should be assessed to the appropriate federal government agency as
per SDCL 27B-3-27. Stilwell moved,
Denke seconded, that the billing be denied.

Re-billings were received for mental illness costs. Stilwell moved, Denke seconded that the following mental illness
billings again be denied: Lewis & Clark
Behavioral Health Services, men. ill.
costs, $309.00; Yankton County, men. ill.
costs, $148.25; Yankton County, men. ill.
costs, $106.25.
Sheriff Clements met with the board and
reported on the Sheriff’s rifle damaged in
the 2011 accident involving the Sheriff’s
pickup. He reported he had a loaner rifle
from the state, but it has been returned
to the state. Estimated cost to purchase
a new rifle would be between $875 to
$1,000. Denke moved, Johnston seconded, that the Sheriff purchase a new
DPMS rifle.
Sheriff Clements reported that the Sheriff’s budget and jail budget will need to be
supplemented. Discussion was held on
supplementing budgets and doing contingency transfers at the yearend meeting.
Sheriff Clements reported that crime in
South Dakota is on the rise.
Sheriff Clements reported that the Winner Jail will be increasing daily prisoner
board rates in January 2015, and that no
amount of increase has been determined
at this time.
Application for a Hazardous Materials
Emergency Preparedness Planning
Grant was received from the S. D. Office
of Emergency Management. The board
took no action.
The 2013 CHN contract was presented
to the board. Jackson County is to provide $4,120.00 in funding to the S. D.
Dept. of Health for nursing services. Stilwell moved, Johnston seconded, that the
contract be approved and signed.
Carrie Weller, 4-H advisor, met with the
board. She reported on annual conference and a survey done of restructuring
which showed 4-H as the top connection
with the Extension Service. She also reported on 4-H horse shows, judging
events and other programs for young
adults.
The following renewal wine license application for the year 2014 were presented
to the board for approval:
Fresh Start Convenience Stores, Badlands Travel Stop, S2S2NE4SE4,
SE4SE4 Ex. Hwy., Section 21, T 2 S, R
22 E, Jackson County, SD
Badlands Lodge, LLC, Cedar Pass
Lodge, NW4, Section 34, T 3 S, R 18 E,
Jackson County, SD
Stilwell moved, Johnston seconded, that
the two renewal wine license applications
be approved, signed, and forwarded to
the state for final approval.
A quote was received from Nemec Construction to remove and replace windows
in the courthouse at a total of $5,916.00,
with a request for a down payment of
$2,000.00 be made if the quote is accepted. Stilwell moved, Twiss seconded,
that Nemec Construction be hired to remove and replace new windows in the
courthouse for a total of $5,916.00, and
that a $2,000.00 down payment be authorized.
Twiss moved, Stilwell seconded, that
new Christmas decorations be purchased for the courthouse.
Johnston moved, Stilwell seconded that
the board recess for lunch. The board reconvened at 1:00 p.m. with Denke, Johnston, Stilwell and Twiss present. Bennett
was absent. Vice Chairman Denke called
the meeting to order. Dwight Deaver,
Hwy. Supt., Aaron Richardson and Kolette Struble were also present.
Cattle guard permits were discussed.
Report was made of a new cattle guard
installed to replace an older one on CS
45. The new cattle guard is too narrow
for blades to cross.
Twiss reported that White River Road
and Big Foot Road may have heavier
traffic due to repair of SD 240 at Cedar
Pass. Dwight Deaver said he would
watch the two roads.
Dwight Deaver introduced new employees James Kramer and Tom Riggins.
John Gerlach, Rapid City Region,
SDDOT, met with the board. He presented an agreement between the
SDDOT and Jackson County to elevate
a section of county highway off I-90 at
Exit 127. The state will apply a gravel to
a width of 20’ on the county highway and
will extend culverts to accommodate the
road being widened to 20’. County roads
affected are CS 23A, CH 11 and CH 12
leading from I-90 Exit 127 south and east
to Cactus Flats and would be used as
detour for local traffic. Discussion was
held on adding two additional culverts in
the area where water stands and has
built up enough water to cover the road.
Adjoining landowners will not allow material to be taken from their land to elevate the road. Discussion was held on
possibly getting fill material from the National Park Service construction site at
the new Minuteman Missile Visitor’s Center. Stilwell moved, Twiss seconded, that
Jackson County enter into the agreement with the SDDOT for use and
restoration of the detour route on CS
23A, CH 11 and CH 12.
Highway project reports were presented
to the board. Stilwell moved, Twiss seconded, that the following resolution be
adopted adjusting funds within the Road
Fund.
JACKSON COUNTY,
SOUTH DAKOTA
RESOLUTION 2013 – 18
WHEREAS, revenues received for Secondary Road
and County Highway and
Bridge Reserve purposes are
deposited within the County
Road and Bridge Fund; and

WHEREAS, these classes of
revenue are not considered
Cash, but are considered Restricted Funds and are to be
used only for specific purposes; and
WHEREAS, project reports
are presented to the County
Auditor by the County Highway Department and used for
determining whether costs are
for specific purposes upon
Secondary Roads or for
County Highway and Bridge
Reserve purposes; and
WHEREAS, project reports for
current year 2013 have now
been presented to the County
Auditor; and
WHEREAS, the amount of the
County Road and Bridge Fund
shown as funds Restricted for
Secondary Road as of November 30, 2013 was
$109,295.55;
NOW THEREFORE BE IT
RESOLVED, that $109,000.00
be adjusted at this time from
Restricted Funds for Secondary Road to County Road and
Bridge Cash as per project reports presented to the County
Auditor.
Secondary Road
to County Road
and Bridge . . . . . 109,000.00
Resolution adopted this 2nd day of December, 2013.
ATTEST: BOARD OF JACKSON
COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
Vicki D. Wilson, Auditor
Glen A. Bennett, Chairman
Safety Benefits notified counties of upcoming MSHA trainings available to
county highway department personnel.
Dwight Deaver reported that the Town of
Belvidere has offered to allow the county
to park a motor grader at a location in
Belvidere at $45.00 per month and the
Town of Belvidere would pay the county
$100.00 per hour for snow removal for
the town.
Dwight Deaver reported that Wayne
Hindman has an area to park a motor
grader but there is no electricity to the
site. It would cost the county to install the
meter and pay for electrical use.
The board requested that Wayne Hindman attend the December 30, 2013
meeting to discuss allowing a blade to be
parked on his property with electrical
use. Report was made that the bus driver
for the Long Valley School has reported
the speed limit on the Long Valley Road
(CH 16) being set at 25 mph is too low,
as they have to pick up students too early
in the morning in order to get them to
school on time. Report was made that a
representative of the Badlands National
Park had questioned the lowered speed
limits on county roads.
Discussion was held on holding public informational meetings to discuss emergency snow removal routes that have
been established. The board requested
that a notice be published in the Kadoka
Press and notices be mailed and posted
throughout the county that meetings
would be held at the Kennedy Hall, Wanblee at 7:00 p.m. on December 16, 2013
and at the Kadoka Fire Hall, Kadoka at
7:00 p.m. on December 18, 2013.
Report was made that the Kadoka Shop
is infested with mice.
Discussion was held on the proposal by
the SDDOT to turn over roads under
overpasses on I-90 to the county. Twiss
moved, Stilwell seconded that a letter be
drawn up stating the county will not assume maintenance or liability for these
sections of road and that the letter be addressed to Doug Sherman, SDDOT Winner Office.
At 2:52 p.m., Twiss moved, Stilwell seconded, that the board go into executive
session to discuss personnel matters.
The board came out of executive session
at 3:03 p.m.
Debra Moor, Librarian, met with the
board. She presented a list of Library
Board members for the year 2014.
Discussion was held on the billing submitted for Dorothy Leigl. Debra Moor reported that Dorothy Leigl has been
providing consulting services to the Library. The resolution prepared by the
Jackson County Library Board and submitted to the Kadoka Area School District
was submitted to the board. Johnston
moved, Stilwell seconded that the resolution designating the libraries at Long
Valley and Interior schools be turned
over to the school district be accepted.
The Kadoka Area School District is to
send their decision on taking over the libraries at the Long Valley and Interior
schools to the county.
Report was made that the last paychecks
for the year 2013 are scheduled to be issued on January 2, 2014. Stilwell moved,
Johnston seconded the last paychecks
of the year to be issued on December 31,
2013 for budgeting purposes.
There being no further business to come
before the board, Twiss moved, Johnston
seconded, that the meeting be adjourned. The board will meet in special
session at 1:00 a.m., December 30, 2013
to complete year end business, and meet
in regular session at 9:00 a.m., Monday,
January 13, 2014.
ATTEST: BOARD OF JACKSON
COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
Vicki D. Wilson,
Jackson County Auditor
Glen A. Bennett, Chairman
[Published December 26, 2013, at the
total approximate cost of $208.60]

Classifieds
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Agriculture

10 - Thursday, December 26, 2013 - Kadoka Press

Cow lease/share arrangements

Winner Regional Extension Center

Bob Fanning, Plant Pathology Field Specialist 842-1267
The Big Picture
I recently attended one of the
“2013 Winter Road Show” workshops presented by the South
Dakota Grassland Coalition, and
as expected, learned some things.
While this wasn’t the kind of event
one would think a Plant Pathology
Extension Field Specialist would
find of interest, I attended for several reasons. I’ve always had an
interest in grazing management;
two, I am a member of the SD
Grassland Coalition; and three, I
was in the community where it
was held for a dentist appointment that morning.
Both of the featured speakers
were North Dakota cattle ranchers, and incorporated cover crops
into their grazing systems, so
there was some reference to
agronomy. Plant diseases and
fungi were also mentioned several
times, which certainly caught my
attention. Both presenters referred to how individual management decisions about always
affected other aspects of their operations, hence the title of this column, “The Big Picture”.
Gene Goven shared thoughts
about how he uses rotational grazing to improve soil health, and the
benefits of doing so. Simply deciding to implement a rotational
grazing system isn’t going to make

a cattle producer successful when
they otherwise weren’t. Rotational
grazing, no-till farming and many
other practices have been proven
to be beneficial, but they share a
common characteristic that scares
some people away from adopting
them, and can cause failure, a
higher level of management.
Everyone’s situation is unique,
and there is no cookbook way of
doing things, so it’s up to each
rancher and farmer to continually
adapt practices that will work in
their operation, ignore or modify
those that don’t or might, and
come up with some of their own.
Both Gene and Jerry Doan, the
afternoon speaker, discussed practices they use to control weed and
insect problems in their pastures
and cattle herds by how they manage grazing. Not only are these
control practices accomplished
largely or completely without
chemicals, but often the use of
chemicals negatively affects how
their techniques work. Certainly
nothing against the companies
that develop and market these
chemicals, they’re simply satisfying a need, or request, but these
producers have documented that
there are other ways to deal with
the problems.
Gene in particular, stressed the
importance of plant diversity in

According to the United States
Department of Agriculture's National Agricultural Statistics
Service, South Dakota's cow herd
totals ranked fifth nationally, up
by five percent from 2012.
With grazing and pasture resources difficult to find in some
areas of the state, cattle producers
may consider looking to other
areas of the state for grazing resources, said Jim Krantz, South
Dakota State University Extension cow/calf field specialist. Cow
lease/share arrangements may be
one way to match cows to feed resources.
For South Dakota cattle producers challenged by dwindling grazing resources, Krantz suggested
they consider cow lease/share
arrangements as an alternative to
herd liquidation.
“Cow lease/share arrangements
offer a logistical solution in some
instances for cattle producers with
surplus grazing acres or winter
feed and those who do not have
those vital resources available to
them,” he said.
Krantz said contractual agreements are unique in almost every
circumstance due to the individuality of management programs,
herd genetics, cow frame size or
long-term goals. “Fundamentally,
particularly in the case of share
agreements, discussions begin
with the identification of the contributions each party will provide
in this cow partnership,” he said.
From the owner's (lessor) viewpoint, those contributions usually
include the cows themselves along
with an accompanying health program and the bull power to service
the cows.
“The latter is sometimes listed
on the lessee side of the ledger instead, depending on the desires
and goals of both parties,” Krantz
said.
Inputs are typically listed as
contributions from the lessee and
might include feed, grazing acres,
labor, equipment and facilities.
When individual contribution values are tallied, some idea of the
percentage of inputs each will provide can then serve as a guide for
sharing the calf crop value.
Krantz said a common industry
value used extensively in recent
years is a 70 percent to 30 percent
share arrangement where the cow
owner receives 30 percent of the
calf value at a designated date. In
nearly all arrangements, the cow
owner will receive all the cull cow
proceeds.
“As these agreements are
drafted, it is important for both
parties to remember that this industry value may or may not fit
every situation,” Krantz said. This
standard usually implies that the
agreement includes a time frame
of one year that typically runs
from October to October. Should
that time frame vary, adjustments
to the percentage of calf value
shared may need to be altered as
well.
While this percentage may be
the primary driver in the share
arrangement, there are a number
of additional factors that need consideration as lessor/lease discus-

improving and maintaining soil
health and productivity. Of course
that got my attention too, as in the
production of cash crops, those of
us in agronomy also promote diversity by recommending crop rotation and the use of cover crops.
Livestock operations can take advantage of plant diversity much
more than strictly crop producers
because animals can select what
plants they wish to graze from a
variety of species in a pasture, or
a field planted to a mixture of
cover crops.
This workshop was one of many
I’ve attended that challenge attendees to think of innovative ways to
solve problems. Sometimes we all
need to be reminded there is more
than one way to skin a cat.
Calendar
1/6/2014: PAT, 1:00 pm, MST,
Sr. Citizen’s Center, Philip
1/13/2014: PAT, 1:30 pm, CST,
SDSU Extension Center, Winner
(also at the Pierre and Lemmon
SDSU Extension Centers, and the
West River Ag Center, Rapid City)
1/17/2014: PAT, 1:00 pm, MST,
Library Community Room, Martin
1/28/2014: PAT, 1:00 pm, CST,
Fire Hall, Presho
2/5/2014: PAT, 1:00 pm, CST,
Civic Center, Burke
2/10/2014: PAT, 1:00 pm, CST,
SDSU Extension Center, Winner

Cull cows, marketing,
seasonal prices and profit
Every best management practices book related to beef cattle
production calls for pregnancy
checking the herd to identify open
cows as early in the season as possible, said South Dakota State
University Extension livestock
business management field specialist, Heather Gessner.
"Open cows in the herd have a
negative impact on profit as they
are consuming expensive inputs
such as feed, animal unit month,
and labor without contributing
back to the operation. The reasons
cows do not breed back are many
and varied and something cattle
producers need to be monitoring,"
Gessner said.
Many times cows are not identified as open until late fall/early
winter as this is when cows are
typically brought in off summer
grazing areas and calves are
weaned, explained Gessner.
"A downside with this plan is
that most other cattle producers
are working on the same time
table, and thus many open cows
hit the market at the same time,
resulting in a seasonal price decline during the fall," she said.
The national average cutter cow
price ranged from $77-78 per hundredweight for the first three
quarters of 2013, with projections
for the fourth quarter at $78-80
per hundredweight and for the
first quarter of 2014 at $79-83 per
hundredweight according to the
Livestock, Dairy and Poultry Outlook – November 2013.
"This increase in price projections may be an indicator for producers to hold on to open cows
until after the first of the new
year," Gessner said.
Some reasons to consider this
option include: the potential to

ner explained that the margin is
tight and even small increases in
feed costs or decreases in the market price will reduce that profit
potential. Because there are no
price risk management tools available for cows, Gessner said completing an enterprise budget is the
best tool to analyze the profit potential.
Current feed supply inventory
must be taken into consideration.
"Feedstuff needs for the remaining cow herd should be analyzed
carefully to ensure the main herd
can be appropriately fed throughout the winter and spring. If feed
inventories are not large enough
to get through extreme cold snaps
or an extended spring feeding period from a delayed spring
turnout, selling open cows may be
a better option, unless the added
return from retaining the cows is
sufficient to make up for any feed
shortage," Gessner said.
Producers who are optimistic
about heifer retention and herd
expansion/rebuilding will want to
watch the cow market closely to
analyze the size of beef production
changes during the fourth quarter
of 2013.
"Timing cull cow marketing decisions based on the seasonal cull
cow prices and the potential for
cull cow price increases after analyzing feed rations and costs could
add profits this year," she said.

add weight to an animal that may
have come off grass in poor body
condition. Adding pounds will increase the total weight available
for sale and will also increase the
white fat on the carcass.
Current signs are pointing towards a decline in cow slaughter
numbers and the number of
heifers destined for feedlots. With
fewer cows and heifers entering
the supply chain, beef production
will be reduced. Supplies of lean
ground beef used in many processing plants will face the biggest
shortage as cow slaughter numbers decline. This shortage of supply will pressure prices to remain
at or above current levels.
Young cows that are open are
candidates to be re-exposed for fall
calves. Bred female prices have increased in the last few months.
Marketing a group of young cows
bred for fall calves may well be a
profitable venture.
"Both adding weight and increased value are ways to bring
additional profit to the operation.
However, added weight and days
on feed are not free. If you have a
relatively inexpensive feed resource available, such as corn
stalk grazing, low test weight
corn, or low cost forages, there
may be opportunity for increased
profits," she said.
While there is added profit potential for feeding cull cows, Gess-

&

if we put it on
the radio.
~~~

SEEING
is
BELIEVING
~~~

Ravellette
Publications, Inc.

Kadoka
837-2259
Philip
859-2516

cluded in the cow share agreement. That typically involves the
services of a licensed veterinarian
with the expense normally assigned to the cow owner.
Expectations for herd health,
cows and calves, should be outlined in the agreement as well.
Unique marketing programs
sometimes have limitations on
vaccines or treatment protocols
making it essential to list them so
they can be complied with. In addition, both party's veterinarians
should be consulted for input, especially if the new environment is
significantly different than the
present one.
Creep feeding calves for some is
a standard practice, while other
cattle producers prefer to forEgo
that management scheme. That
decision should also be a part of
the agreement. If it is utilized,
creep expenses are normally
shared in the same percentage as
calf value is.
Next to agreeing on sharing of
calf value, how that share is to be
divided may deserve some serious
consideration. When all the calves
are sold at public auction, the
process is simple mathematics.
Where calves are designated for
owner/operator possession, the
process is something to be discussed thoroughly as the agreement is being prepared.
Cow lease/share arrangements
may be a win-win scenario for cattle producers with cows and limited feed resources, said Krantz,
especially grazing acres, and cattle producers who have the resources to meet those very needs.
“However, only after establishing a business mindset and doing
some personal homework are cow
share agreements truly destined
to be "win-win" for all involved,"

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sions continue including.
All agreements should be in
writing. While many business
arrangements have been done on
a handshake to the benefit of both
parties, there are numerous examples of verbal agreements that
have failed because the parties
couldn't agree on exactly what had
been agreed to. Having things in
writing goes a long way to eliminate those problems.
Timelines should also include a
date when the owner needs to
take responsibility for his share of
the calves.
Cows should be guaranteed
pregnant when they arrive (if October start date). On multi-year
share agreements, is there a "minimum number" of cows guaranteed by the owner? (How are
replacements handled?) Cows
should be pregnancy-tested each
fall to document non-bred individuals and eliminate winter feed
costs involved with wintering
them.
If calves are to be backgrounded
or heifers developed, a separate
agreement needs to be made
where the owner of the calves
pays for the feed costs and
yardage expenses. Combining this
enterprise with the cow lease
makes determining an equitable
split of the calf crop much more
difficult.
Herd body condition score
should be assigned to cows when
care for them is transferred, so
both parties are aware of the expectations for cow condition if the
agreement is terminated at some
point later. Use of a third party to
assist both parties in that process
is recommended.
Procedures utilized by insurance companies to verify cow
death loss can be adopted and in-

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