P. 1
12-26-13 Edition

12-26-13 Edition

|Views: 90|Likes:
12-26-13 Edition
12-26-13 Edition

More info:

Published by: San Mateo Daily Journal on Dec 26, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
See more
See less

12/27/2013

www.smdailyjournal.

com
Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
Thursday • Dec. 26, 2013 • Vol XIII, Edition 112
Gold,
Jewelry,
Diamonds
Sliver & Coins
WE BUY
HIGHER POSTAGE
NATION PAGE 5
AP ATHLETE
OF THE YEAR
SPORTS PAGE 11
MALES MAKE
HOLLY FRUIT
SUBURBAN LIVING PAGE 19
FIRST-CLASS STAMPS TO COST 49 CENTS AS OF JAN.26
By Scott Mayerowitz
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEWYORK — Santa’s sleigh didn’t make it in time for
Christmas for some this year due to shipping problems at
UPS and FedEx.
The delays were blamed on poor weather earlier this week
in parts of the country as well as overloaded systems. The
holiday shopping period this year was shorter than usual,
more buying was done online and Americans’ tendency to
wait until the last possible second to shop probably didn’t
help either.
Neither company said how many packages were delayed
but noted it was a small share of overall holiday shipments.
While the bulk of consumers’ holiday spending remains at
physical stores, shopping online is increasingly popular
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The county’s net property assessment roll
is up $8.8 billion over last year and the
6.01 percent spike is the highest dollar
amount and the fourth-largest dollar
increase in its history.
The $156 billion total of the fiscal year
2013-14 combined roll is part of the coun-
ty’s recently released fis-
cal snapshot which con-
cluded that, while eco-
nomic and financial indi-
cators are improving,
there remains challenges
due to factors like state
criminal justice realign-
ment, long-term proper-
ty tax reductions and
implementing the Affordable Care Act.
The Affordable Care Act’s impact on the
county directly is expected to be fairly neu-
tral but brings with it phased-in reduction in
payments to hospitals with disproportional
shares of uninsured and Medicaid patients
like the county-operated San Mateo Medical
Center. The county anticipates losing
approximately $4 million in fiscal year
2013-14 and up to $17 million the next fis-
cal year because of large drops in state
health realignment funds, according to
Controller Bob Adler.
In the popular annual financial report — a
shortened and summarized version of the
comprehensive annual financial report
released in October for fiscal year ending
June 30, 2013 — Adler notes that fiscal year
2013-14 also marks the beginning of the
County releases snapshot of 2013 finances
Report show that economic and financial indicators are improvingbut challenges remain
Bob Adler
UPS,FedEx
snags delay
many gifts
Shipping problems blamed on
weather, overloaded systems
BAY CITY NEWS SERVICE
The fourth consecutive “Winter Spare the Air” alert has
been issued for Thursday.
The Bay Area Air Quality Management District’s
announcement Wednesday means that wood, logs or other
solid fuels cannot be burned in fireplaces, fire pits or any
other wood burning device indoors or outdoors for 24 hours.
The only exception is for households that depend on
wood burning as a heat source.
The dry, mild weather this week has contributed to the
buildup of pollutants that make the air unhealthy to breathe,
Fourth consecutive ‘Winter Spare
the Air’ alert issued for Thursday
TOM JUNG/DAILY JOURNAL
Above: King Herod and
his court greet visitors to
Bethlehem A.D. 2013 on
Monday. The three-day
event was held in
Redwood City and
depicted Bethlehem as it
would have appeared
2000 years ago. The
recreation of the city
included Roman tax
collectors, shops, a potter,
a carpenter and live
domestic animals of the
period. Left: Aldwin Del
Rosario and sons Beaver
and Victor get to know
Charlie the camel. The
Del Rosario family
portrayed residents of
Bethlehem.
BETHLEHEM IN REDWOOD CITY
See AIR, Page 20
See DELAY, Page 8
See REPORT, Page 20
Surfers dressed as
Santa Claus gather in Florida
COCOA BEACH, Fla. — More than
210 surfers dressed as Santa Claus,
elves and snowmen were surfing the
Christmas Eve waves off central
Florida’s Atlantic coast.
Florida Today reports that when
Cocoa Beach Mayor Dave Netterstrom
took in the view from the sand
Tuesday, he declared the fourth-annual
gathering “the largest surfing Santa
event on the planet.”
Organizer George Trosset says he
may move the holiday event to down-
town Cocoa Beach next year to accom-
modate growing crowds. He started the
tradition in 2009 with a few family
members after seeing a television
commercial featuring people surfing in
Santa Claus attire.
More friends joined them the fol-
lowing year, and in 2012, nearly 160
surfers participated. Trosset says the
event “has gone from being a little
family party to being a community
event.”
Las Vegas cab driver
finds $300K in back seat
LAS VEGAS — Las Vegas cab driver
Gerardo Gamboa thought someone left
a bag of chocolates in the back seat of
his vehicle, but the stash turned out to
be $300,000 in cold hard cash.
Now, Gamboa is winning honors for
honesty after turning in the money he
found Monday. The money was
returned to an unidentified poker play-
er. Yellow Checker Star Transportation
named Gamboa its driver of the year
and rewarded him with $1,000 and a
dinner for two at a restaurant.
A message left Wednesday for
Gamboa at the cab company wasn’t
immediately returned.
Gamboa told the Las Vegas Review-
Journal he had another passenger by
the time he began wondering what
kind of chocolates were in the brown
paper bag. He peeked inside at a traffic
light.
“I told my passenger, ‘You are my
witness on this,”’ the 13-year taxi
driver told the Las Vegas Sun, “and
then I immediately called my dispatch-
er. ”
Gamboa took the six bundles of
$100 bills to the company’s main
office, where Las Vegas police and
casino officials linked it to the poker
player.
Gamboa said the man gave him a $5
tip after a trip from the Cosmopolitan
resort to the Palms Place tower, and
Gamboa then drove to the Bellagio
resort, where a doorman helping a pas-
senger into the car noticed the bag.
It took several hours to verify the
identity of the owner and return the
cash. He took Gamboa’s information,
but didn’t immediately leave a reward.
“If he doesn’t give me anything,
that’s OK,” Gamboa told the Sun. “I’m
not waiting for any kind of return. I
just wanted to do the right thing, and I
appreciate what the company did for
me.”
Man charged
with stealing cuffs in escape
COMMODORE, Pa. — A western
Pennsylvania man is jailed on charges
he stole a pair of handcuffs he was
wearing when he allegedly escaped
from a state police cruiser.
Troopers say 29-year-old Douglas
Lydic, of Commodore, was handcuffed
but not yet charged while they
searched a scene in his hometown for
drugs Sunday night.
Police have yet to charge him in that
case but say he climbed out a cruiser
window while cuffed and wound up at
his girlfriend’s home miles away.
Court records don’t list an attorney
for Lydic, who also faces a charge of
escape at a preliminary hearing sched-
uled for Jan. 2.
He’s been in the Indiana County Jail
since he was re-arrested Monday morn-
ing at his girlfriend’s home. She’s
being held on charges of hindering his
apprehension by police.
FOR THE RECORD 2 Thursday • Dec. 26, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
800 S. Claremont St., Suite 210, San Mateo, CA 94402
Publisher: Jerry Lee Editor in Chief: Jon Mays
jerry@smdailyjournal.com jon@smdailyjournal.com
smdailyjournal.com scribd.com/smdailyjournal
twitter.com/smdailyjournal facebook.com/smdailyjournal
Phone:. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (650) 344-5200 Fax: (650) 344-5290
To Advertise: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ads@smdailyjournal.com
Events: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . calendar@smdailyjournal.com
News: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . news@smdailyjournal.com
Delivery: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . distribution@smdailyjournal.com
Career: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . info@smdailyjournal.com
As a public service, the Daily Journal prints obituaries of approximately 200 words or less with a photo one time on the date of the family’s choosing.To submit obituaries, email
information along with a jpeg photo to news@smdailyjournal.com.Free obituaries are edited for style, clarity, length and grammar. If you would like to have an obituary printed
more than once, longer than 250 words or without editing, please submit an inquiry to our advertising department at ads@smdailyjournal.com.
TV host John
Walsh is 68.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1776
The British suffered a major defeat in
the Battle of Trenton during the
Revolutionary War.
“Christmas has come and gone,and I — to speak
selfishly — am glad of it.The season always gives me
the blues in spite of myself,though I manage to get a
good deal of pleasure from thinking of the multitudes
of happy kids in various parts of the world.”
— Edwin Arlington Robinson,American poet (1869-1935)
Actor Caroll
Spinney is 80.
Rock musician Lars
Ulrich is 50.
Birthdays
REUTERS
Members of the Berliner Seehunde (Berlin Seals) ice swimmers club take a dip in Lake Orankesee during their traditional
Christmas swimming event in Berlin, Germany.
Thursday: Sunny. Highs in the mid
60s. East winds 10 to 20
mph...Becoming northeast 5 to 10 mph
in the afternoon.
Thursday night: Mostly clear. Lows
in the upper 40s. East winds 5 to 10
mph.
Friday: Sunny. Highs in the lower 60s. Northeast
winds 5 to 10 mph.
Friday night: Mostly cloudy. Lows in the upper 40s.
Northeast winds around 5 mph.
Saturday: Partly cloudy. Highs in the mid 60s.
Saturday night through Tuesday night: Mostly clear.
Lows in the mid 40s. Highs in the upper 50s to mid
60s.
Local Weather Forecast
I n 1799, former President George Washington was eulo-
gized by Col. Henry Lee as “first in war, first in peace and
first in the hearts of his countrymen.”
I n 1862, 38 Santee Sioux Indians were hanged in Mankato,
Minn., for their roles in an uprising that had claimed the
lives of hundreds of white settlers. The Civil War Battle of
Chickasaw Bayou, resulting in a Confederate victory, began
in Mississippi.
I n 1908, Jack Johnson became the first African-American
boxer to win the world heavyweight championship as he
defeated Canadian Tommy Burns in Sydney, Australia.
I n 1933, Nissan Motor Co. was founded in Yokohama,
Japan, as the Automobile Manufacturing Co.
I n 1943, the German battleship Scharnhorst was sunk by
British naval forces during the Battle of the North Cape off
Norway; only 36 of its crew of more than 1,900 survived.
I n 1944, during the World War II Battle of the Bulge, the
embattled U.S. 101st Airborne Division in Bastogne,
Belgium, was relieved by units of the 4th Armored Division.
I n 1966, Kwanzaa was first celebrated.
In 1972, the 33rd president of the United States, Harry S.
Truman, died in Kansas City, Mo., at age 88.
I n 1973, the demon-possession horror film “The Exorcist”
was released.
I n 1996, 6-year-old beauty queen JonBenet Ramsey was
found beaten and strangled in the basement of her family’s
home in Boulder, Colo. (To date, the slaying remains
unsolved.)
I n 2004, some 230,000 people, mostly in southern Asia,
were killed by a tsunami triggered by the world’s most pow-
erful earthquake in 40 years beneath the Indian Ocean.
In other news ...
(Answers tomorrow)
PRIMP MACAW SWAYED LONELY
Yesterday’s
Jumbles:
Answer: After he invented the Franklin stove, Ben was
able to give people a — WARM WELCOME
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
ZAMAE
PANOR
LURSUF
TIRUYP
©2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
All Rights Reserved.
J
u
m
b
le

p
u
z
z
le

m
a
g
a
z
in
e
s

a
v
a
ila
b
le

a
t

p
e
n
n
y
d
e
llp
u
z
z
le
s
.
c
o
m
/
ju
m
b
le
m
a
g
s
Print your answer here:
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are Whirl Win, No.
1, in first place;Money Bags, No. 11, in second
place; and Gold Rush, No. 1, in third place. The
race time was clocked at 1:44.47.
3 4 9
23 34 53 58 73 2
Mega number
Dec. 24 Mega Millions
36 51 45 25 40 8
Powerball
Dec. 21 Powerball
22 23 01 16 07
Fantasy Five Dec. 25
Daily three midday
9 7 5 5
Daily Four
2 6 0
Daily three evening
2 32 43 46 47 7
Mega number
Dec. 21 Super Lotto Plus
Actor Donald Moffat is 83. Rhythm-and-blues singer Abdul
“Duke” Fakir (The Four Tops) is 78. Record producer Phil
Spector is 74. Country musician Bob Carpenter (The Nitty
Gritty Dirt Band) is 67. Baseball Hall of Fame catcher Carlton
Fisk is 66. Retired MLB All-Star Chris Chambliss is 65.
Baseball Hall of Famer Ozzie Smith is 59. Former Sen. Evan
Bayh, D-Ind., is 58. Humorist David Sedaris is 57. Rock musi-
cian James Kottak (The Scorpions) is 51. Country musician
Brian Westrum (Sons of the Desert) is 51. Actress Nadia Dajani
is 48. Rock musician J is 46. Country singer Audrey Wiggins
is 46. Rock musician Peter Klett (Candlebox) is 44.
3
Thursday • Dec. 26, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
601 El Camino Real, San Bruno
Hours: Mon.- Sat. 10am to 7pm
Sun. Noon to 6pm
Phone: 650.588.0388
Last
Chance!
Year End Close Out
in Progress
STOREWIDE
SAVINGS!
We Don’t Meet
Our Competition,
We Create It
WESTERN FURNITURE
& MATTRESS
WESTERN FURNITURE
& MATTRESS
BURLINGAME
Harassment. A woman said someone was
leaving nasty messages for her on the 200
block of Myrtle Road before 2:30 p.m.
Monday, Dec. 9.
Fraud. A man reported that his computer
was hacked on the 1100 block of
Capuchino Avenue before 1:36 p.m.
Monday, Dec. 9.
Sol i ci t or. Amerchant said a man attempt-
ed to sell her designer purses but when offi-
cers contacted the man he said he was trying
to buy them on the 1200 block of
Broadway before 11:43 a.m. Monday, Dec.
9.
Burglary . A person reported that their
condo was burglarized on the 1500 block of
Floribunda Avenue before 11:06 a.m.
Monday, Dec. 9.
Theft. An employee of a business reported
stolen cash from the cash drawer on the
1100 block of Howard Avenue before 8:23
a.m. Monday, Dec. 9.
Disturbance. A person complained about
a delivery truck that was idling its engine
and emitting fumes on the 1200 block of
Burlingame Avenue before 6:07 p.m.
Sunday, Dec. 8.
Ani mal cal l . Someone reported their
neighbor’s dog had been barking continu-
ously for two days on the 1300 block of
Laguna Avenue before 6:19 p.m. Sunday,
Dec. 8.
REDWOOD CITY
Petty theft. A purse was stolen from an
unlocked vehicle at the intersection of
Bradford and Winslow streets before 1:40
p.m. Thursday, Dec. 12.
Burglary. A person interrupted three sus-
pects in the middle of burglarizing a house
on Carleton Court before 12:48 p.m.
Thursday, Dec. 12.
Drug acti vi ty. Astudent was arrested for
bringing marijuana to school before 12:31
p.m. Thursday, Dec. 12.
Pet t y t hef t . Ametal power box was stolen
on Broadway before 10 a.m. Thursday, Dec.
12.
Burglary . A vehicle’s window was
smashed and the interior was damaged on
Elwood Street before 9:53 a.m. Thursday,
Dec. 12.
HALF MOON BAY
Pol i ce report. A report was made about
two out of state fraudulent charges made to a
resident’s credit card on the 300 block of
Granelli Street Friday, Dec. 5.
Fal se i denti ficat i on. Someone made an
illegal turn and when stopped he gave false
information and ran away before being
caught by police on the 500 block of Kelly
Street before 6:05 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 4.
Vandal i sm. Someone punctured all four
tires of a parked car on the 400 block of
Magnolia Street before midnight
Wednesday, Dec. 3.
Recovered st ol en vehi cl e. A stolen
vehicle was recovered on the 100 block of
Higgins Canyon at an unknown time on
Sunday, Dec. 1.
Publ i c i nt oxi cat i on. An intoxicated
man who could not pay his cab fare was
taken into custody and released after he
sobered up before 3:11 a.m. Sunday, Dec. 1.
Police reports
Help!
Shoes were found hanging on an electri-
cal wire on Miller Avenue in South San
Francisco before 5:23 a.m. Saturday,
Dec. 7.
By Paul Elias
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
OAKLAND — The family of a 13-year-old
Northern California girl declared brain dead
after suffering complications following a
tonsillectomy was trying to give the girl
as normal of a Christmas as possible, with
a tree and presents in her hospital room,
her uncle said.
The family of Jahi McMath will wait
until Thursday to discuss a possible appeal
of a judge’s decision allowing a hospital to
remove her from life support, said Omari
Sealey, the girl’s uncle.
They planned to spend Christmas Day at
Children’s Hospital Oakland and had set up
a Christmas tree in Jahi’s room with pres-
ents for her and her siblings. The family
normally gathers at Jahi’s grandmother’s
house, where they share food and play
dominos and cards, Sealey said.
“We’re going to discuss our opportuni-
ties tomorrow. Today we are going to keep
as regular as possible,” Sealey said.
“We still got five days for a miracle. We
are still hopeful.”
Alameda County Superior Court Judge
Evelio Grillo ruled on Tuesday that the hos-
pital could remove Jahi from the ventilator
keeping her body functioning, but gave the
family until 5 p.m. on Dec. 30 to file an
appeal. Until then, she will stay on life
support.
The family has not decided if it will keep
fighting.
Jahi’s family has said it believes Jahi is
still alive, and that the hospital should not
remove her from the ventilator without its
permission. The teen suffered cardiac arrest
after bleeding profusely following her
operation this month.
The family has said that as long as the
teen is breathing, there is hope of recovery.
Grillo based his decision on the conclu-
sions of two doctors, court-appointed Dr.
Paul Fisher of Stanford University and the
hospital’s Dr. Robin Shanahan.
Fisher examined the girl for several
hours on Monday and reported to the judge
Tuesday that the teen was brain dead, the
same conclusion Shanahan reached.
Grillo said he had no other choice but to
allow the hospital to remove the ventilator.
“I wish I could fix it, but I can’t,” he said.
The hospital had argued that the teen had
no chance of recovery since all brain func-
tion had ceased.
“Our sincere hope is that the family finds
peace and can come to grips with the
judge’s decision,” hospital attorney Doug
Strauss said outside court after Grillo’s rul-
i ng.
The case is now out of Grillo’s court and
the decision will be up to the California
Court of Appeal if the family decides to pur-
sue its legal case to keep Jahi on the venti-
lator.
Family of the girl declared brain
dead spends holiday at hospital
Comment on
or share this story at
www.smdailyjournal.com
4
Thursday • Dec. 26, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/STATE
Introductory 1-hour custom massage
with free aromatherapy – $49
99*
Radiant skin starts below the surface. Come in for a therapeutic
massage or a signature dermalogica
®
skin treatment and
leave with bright, healthy skin and a sunny disposition.
Experience Massage Heights...
Come for gifts of relaxation & beauty for you and everyone
on your list! You need to experience the luxurious
surroundings and get the afterglow.
massageheights.com
Introductory 1-hour custom facial
with free aromatherapy – $59
99*
. n o - s d n a h s e t u n i M - 0 5 s i e m i t l a i c a f d n a e g a s s a m l a u t c A . y l n o s t s e u G e m i t - t s r i f d n a s r e b m e M r o f d i l a v e t a r y r o t c u d o r t n I *
Additional local taxes and fees may apply. See Retreat for details. Each Massage Heights Retreat is independently owned
and operated. Franchise opportunities available. ©2013 Massage Heights, LLC.
Massage Heights San Mateo
650.488.6881
1100 Park Place, Suite 40
San Mateo, CA 94403
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
A 25-year-old sex offender was arrested
Monday morning after a woman identified
him as a man who allegedly sexually
assaulted her while walking eastbound on
Manor Drive in Pacifica after dropping her
kids off at day care.
About five minutes after the reported
assault, Pacifica police located Jeremy
Castro, 27, on the 400 block of Manor
Drive. The woman identified Castro, of
Pacifica, as the man who attacked her in the
area of Monterey Road at approximately
9:40 a.m. Dec. 23 and police arrested him.
Castro grabbed the woman, groping her
breasts and between her legs as she screamed
and struggled, said District Attorney Steve
Wagstaffe.
He allegedly told responding officers that
he thought the woman was his wife and it
was “just a prank he learned on YouTube,”
according to Wagstaffe.
Castro was booked into the Maguire
Correctional Facility on suspicion of
felony sexual battery, false imprisonment
and violating his misdemeanor probation
imposed for a similar act in San Francisco in
December 2012.
On Tuesday afternoon, he pleaded not
guilty to the new charges and asked for a
court-appointed attorney. He returns to court
Jan. 7 for a preliminary hearing.
Bail was set at $25,000 but he also held
without bail because of the probation viola-
tion.
Pacifica man arrested for
alleged sexual assault
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES — Students enrolled in the
University of California system soon will be
able to take online courses offered by cam-
puses besides their own.
Some UC schools already offer select
online classes, but they’re mostly targeted at
their own students and during the summer.
The new “cross campus enrollment” will
allow students from one school to log on and
attend class taught by another campus, the
Los Angeles Times reported in Wednesday’s
editions.
The $10 million experiment will start off
small, with 11 classes from four campuses in
the winter quarter. It’s funded from a pool of
money for online education and technology
approved by the state Legislature and Gov.
Jerry Brown, who has criticized the UC sys-
tem for being slow to adopt online educa-
tion.
“We’re trying to take the burden off the stu-
dent and put it on technology,” said Mary
Gilly, vice chairwoman of UC’s faculty sen-
ate.
Gilly does not expect a surge in online
enrollment, but she said it would help stu-
dents locked out of a class because it’s full or
held at an inconvenient time.
UC Riverside senior Matthew Emeterio
will take a class on climate change taught by
a UC Davis professor next month. He’ll
attend his regular classes at Riverside during
the day and take the online climate change
course at night and on weekends.
“The convenience factor of it is hard to
overstate,” the political science major said.
“It gives me so much more flexibility. And
being able to squeeze in those extra units
gets me through the graduation requirements
faster.”
Most final exams for the Web-based class-
es will still be administered in a classroom
on campus or at a test center.
Katya Lavine, a senior at the UCLA who
has taken two online classes, said there are
some limits to online education.
“It’s a lot harder to stay on top of the work
and be motivated when you are not going
physically to a class. The lack of face-to-face
classes makes it seem less real,” she said.
Still, Lavine plans to take an online
Spanish course with UC Davis after not
being able to register for the class at her
home campus because of overcrowding.
“For me, it was definitely a good solution,”
the English major said.
UC experiments with online classes across campuses
“The convenience factor of it is hard to overstate. ... It gives
me so much more flexibility. And being able to squeeze in those
extra units gets me through the graduation requirements faster.”
— UC Riverside senior Matthew Emeterio
5
Thursday • Dec. 26, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
NATION
PIGSKIN
Pick ‘em Contest
We are not responsible for late, damaged, illegible or lost entries. Multiple entries are accepted. One prize per household. All applicable Federal, State & Local taxes associ-
ated with the receipt or use of any prize are the sole responsibility of the winner. The prizes are awarded “as is” and without warranty of any kind, express or implied. The
Daily Journal reserves the right in its sole discretion to disqualify any individual it finds to be tampering with the entry process or the operation of the promotion; to be
acting in violation of the rules; or to be acting in an unsportsmanlike manner. Entry constitutes agreement for use of name & photo for publicity purposes. Employees of the
Daily Journal, Redwood General Tire Pros and Original Nick’s are not eligible to win. Must be at least 18 years of age. Call with questions or for clarification (650) 344-5200.
Each winner, by acceptance of the prize, agrees to release the Daily Journal, Redwood General Tire Pros and Original Nick’s from all liability, claims, or actions of any kind
whatsoever for injuries, damages, or losses to persons and property which may be sustained in connection with the receipt, ownership, or use of the prize.
THE DAILY JOURNAL
Redwood General Tire Pros
and Original Nick’s Pizzeria & Pub
PRESENT THE NINTH ANNUAL
PIGSKIN
Pick ‘em Contest
Week Seventeen
PICK THE MOST NFL WINNERS AND WIN! DEADLINE IS 12/27/13
Baltimore Cincinnati
Cleveland Pittsburgh
Carolina Atlanta
Detroit Minnesota
Houston Tennessee
Jacksonville Indianapolis
N.Y. Jets Miami
Washington N.Y. Giants
Buffalo New England
Green Bay Chicago
Denver Oakland
Kansas City San Diego
Tampa Bay New Orleans
St. Louis Seattle
Philadelphia Dallas
San Francisco Arizona
TIEBREAKER: San Francisco @ Arizona
ROAD TEAM HOME TEAM ROAD TEAM HOME TEAM
How does it work?
Each Monday thru Friday we will list the upcoming weeks’ games. Pick the winners of each game
along with the point total of the Monday night game. In case of a tie, we will look at the point
total on the Monday night game of the week. If there’s a tie on that total, then a random drawing
will determine the winner. Each week, the Daily Journal will reward gift certificates to Redwood
General Tire Pros and Original Nick’s. The Daily Journal Pigskin Pick’em Contest is free to play.
Must be 18 or over. Winners will be announced in the Daily Journal.
What is the deadline?
All mailed entries must be postmarked by the Friday prior to the weekend of games, you may
also drop off your entries to our office by Friday at 5 p.m. sharp.
Send entry form to: 800 S. Claremont Street, #210, San Mateo, CA 94402. You may enter as many
times as you like using photocopied entry forms. Multiple original entry forms will be discarded.
You may also access entry entry forms at www.scribd.com/smdailyjournal
NAME ____________________________________
AGE _____________________________________
CITY _____________________________________
PHONE ___________________________________
Mail or drop off by12/27/13 to:
Pigskin Pick’em, Daily Journal,
800 S. Claremont Street, #210,
San Mateo, CA 94402
The Daily Journal will not use
your personal information for
marketing purposes. We respect
your privacy.
REUTERS FILE PHOTO
The Postal Service says it lost $5 billion in the last fiscal year and has been trying to get Congress
to pass legislation to help with its financial woes, including an end to Saturday mail delivery
and reduced payments on retiree health benefits.
By Bradley Klapper
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Mailing a letter is
about to get a little more expensive.
Regulators on Tuesday approved a tem-
porary price hike of 3 cents for a first-
class stamp, bringing the charge to 49
cents a letter in an effort to help the Postal
Service recover from severe mail decreases
brought on by the 2008 economic down-
turn.
Many consumers won’t feel the price
increase immediately. Forever stamps,
good for first-class postage whatever the
future rate, can be purchased at the lower
price until the new rate is effective Jan.
26.
The higher rate will last no more than
two years, allowing the Postal Service to
recoup $2.8 billion in losses. By a 2-1
vote, the independent Postal Regulatory
Commission rejected a request to make the
price hike permanent, though inflation
over the next 24 months may make it so.
The surcharge “will last just long
enough to recover the loss,” Commission
Chairman Ruth Y. Goldway said.
Bulk mail, periodicals and package serv-
ice rates will rise 6 percent, a decision that
drew immediate consternation from the
mail industry. Its groups have opposed any
price increase beyond the current 1.7 per-
cent rate of inflation, saying charities
using mass mailings and bookstores com-
peting with online retailer Amazon would
be among those who suffer. Greeting card
companies also have criticized the plans.
“This is a counterproductive decision,”
said Mary G. Berner, president of the
Association of Magazine Media. “It will
drive more customers away from using the
Postal Service and will have ripple effects
through our economy — hurting con-
sumers, forcing layoffs and impacting
businesses.”
Berner said her organization will consid-
er appealing the decision before the U.S.
Court of Appeals.
For consumers who have cut back on
their use of mail for correspondence, the
rate increase may have little impact on
their pocketbooks.
“I don’t know a whole lot of people who
truly, with the exception of packages,
really use snail mail anymore,” said
Kristin Johnson, a Green Bay, Wis., resi-
dent who was shopping in downtown
Anchorage, Alaska, while visiting rela-
tives and friends. “It’s just so rare that I
actually mail anything at this point.”
The Postal Service is an independent
agency that does not depend on tax money
for its operations but is subject to con-
gressional control. Under federal law, it
can’t raise prices more than the rate of
inflation without approval from the com-
mission.
The service says it lost $5 billion in the
last fiscal year and has been trying to get
Congress to pass legislation to help with
its financial woes, including an end to
Saturday mail delivery and reduced pay-
ments on retiree health benefits.
The figures through Sept. 30 were actual-
ly an improvement for the agency from a
$15.9 billion loss in 2012.
The post office has struggled for years
with declining mail volume as a result of
growing Internet use and a 2006 congres-
sional requirement that it make annual
$5.6 billion payments to cover expected
health care costs for future retirees. It has
defaulted on three of those payments.
The regulators Tuesday stopped short of
making the price increases permanent,
saying the Postal Service had conflated
losses it suffered as a result of Internet
competition with business lost because of
the Great Recession. They ordered the
agency to develop a plan to phase out the
higher rates once the lost revenue is
recouped.
It’s unclear where that would take rates
for first-class postage in 2016. The regu-
lar, inflation-adjusted price would have
been 47 cents next year. If inflation rates
average 2 percent over the next two years,
regulators could deem 49 cents an accept-
able price going forward.
The Postal Service has only twice low-
ered the price of a stamp: in the mid-19th
century from 3 cents to 2 cents, and again
after the end of World War I. In neither case
was the higher price the result of a tempo-
rary authorization.
The new price of a postcard stamp, raised
by a penny to 34 cents in November, also
is effective next month.
The last price increase for stamps was in
January, when the cost of sending a letter
rose by a penny to 46 cents. A postcard
also increased by one cent to 33 cents.
First-class stamps to cost 49 cents as of Jan.26
“I don’t know a
whole lot of people who truly,
with the exception of packages,
really use snail mail anymore. ...
It’s just so rare that I actually mail
anything at this point.”
— Kristin Johnson
6
Thursday • Dec. 26, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
NATION
By Bill Barrow
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ATLANTA — Republicans see the
2014 midterm elections as a chance to
capitalize on voter frustration with the
problem-plagued health care overhaul,
but the GOP first must settle a slate of
Senate primaries where conservatives
are arguing over the best way to oppose
President Barack Obama’s signature
law.
In intraparty skirmishes from
Georgia to Nebraska, the GOP’s most
strident candidates and activists are
insisting on a no-holds-barred
approach. They accuse fellow
Republicans — including several
incumbent senators — of being too soft
in their opposition to the Affordable
Care Act and to the president in general.
The outcomes will help determine
just how conservative the Senate
Republican caucus will be during
Obama’s final two years. And they could
influence which party controls the
chamber, with Democrats hoping that
the most uncompromising Republican
standard-bearers will emerge from the
primaries and fare as poorly in general
elections as their counterparts did in
several 2012 Senate races. Republicans
need to gain six seats for a majority.
Republican Rep. Jack Kingston of
Georgia, who wants to succeed retiring
GOP Sen. Saxby Chambliss, stepped
into the rift recently when he seemed to
scold much of his party during an inter-
view on a conservative talk radio show.
“A lot of conservatives say, ‘Nah,
just step back and let this thing fall to
pieces on its own,” Kingston said.
“Well, I don’t think that’s always the
responsible thing to do.”
Rep. Paul Broun, one of Kingston’s
rivals in a crowded primary field,
pounced immediately, declaring in an
Internet ad, “I don’t want to fix
Obamacare, I want to get rid of it.”
Conservative commentators hammered
Kingston with headlines like
“Kingston has surrendered on
Obamacare.”
In Tennessee, state Rep. Joe Carr
blasted Sen. Lamar Alexander for serv-
ing as a key GOP negotiator in the deal
to end the partial government shutdown
that resulted from House Republicans’
efforts to deny funding for the health
care law. Alexander subsequently
described himself as a “conservative
problem solver,” a characterization that
Carr says “typifies how out of touch he
is.”
Kentucky businessman Matt Bevin is
using a similar line of attack in trying
to unseat Senate Minority Leader Mitch
McConnell, as is Mississippi state
Sen. Chris McDaniel in his primary
challenge to Sen. Thad Cochran. Carr,
Bevin and McDaniel all say they’d be
more like freshmen Sens. Mike Lee of
Utah and Ted Cruz of Texas, tea party
favorites who pushed the defunding
strategy and vexed their longer-serving
colleagues.
Health care divides some
Republican Senate rivals
Bipartisan bill seeks to boost foreign adoptions
Amid partisan conflict in Congress, dozens of lawmakers
from both parties — including staunch liberals and conser-
vatives — have united behind a bill that supporters say
addresses a heart-rending issue beyond politics: the mil-
lions of foreign children languishing in orphanages or oth-
erwise at risk because they have no immediate family.
The bill would encourage more adoptions of foreign
orphans, which have declined steadily in recent years, and
reflects impatience with current policies overseen by the
State Department.
“Every child needs and deserves to grow up in a family, ”
says the bill’s chief advocate, Sen. Mary Landrieu, D-La.
“While our foreign policy has done much to keep children
alive and healthy, it has not prioritized this basic human
right.”
Titled the Children in Families First Act, the measure has
been introduced in slightly different forms in both the
Senate and House. Its co-sponsors range from Sen.
Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., a hero of the Democratic left, to
Rep. Michele Bachmann, R-Minn., a favorite of tea party
conservatives.
Capitol’s historic dome set for two-year renovation
WASHINGTON — Aworld-famous symbol of democracy is
going under cover, as workers start a two-year, $60 million
renovation of the U.S. Capitol dome.
Curved rows of scaffolds, like Saturn’s rings, will encircle
it next spring, enabling contractors to strip multiple layers
of paint and repair more than 1,000 cracks and broken
pieces. The dome will remain illuminated at night and part-
ly visible through the scaffolding and paint-capturing
cloths. But the Washington icon -- and portions of the
Rotunda’s painted ceiling that lies below -- will be signifi-
cantly obscured for many months.
The project is beginning just as the nearby Washington
Monument sheds scaffolding that was used to repair damage
from a 2011 earthquake.
Thousands left without
power across U.S. and Canada
LITCHFIELD, Maine — Utility crews from Maine to
Michigan and into Canada worked Wednesday to restore
power to the more than half a million homes in the U.S. and
Canada that were left in the dark by last weekend’s ice storm
and people slowly trickled out of shelters to spend
Christmas Day at their finally-warm homes.
But not everyone was so lucky, including Ashley Walter,
who was forced to spend Christmas at a shelter set up in a
school in Litchfield, Maine, with her husband, Jacob, and
their month-old daughter, Leah.
The family lost power Saturday, got it back temporarily
then lost it again Sunday and have been without since.
Ashley, 27, and Leah stay warm at the shelter while Jacob
makes frequent trips home to check on their cats and water
pipes.
Around the nation
By Brady McCombs
and Mark Sherman
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SALT LAKE CITY — Advocates on
both sides of the gay marriage debate
predicted that the U.S. Supreme Court
ruling in June that overturned part of a
federal ban on gay marriage would cre-
ate a pathway for states to act.
They were right.
In the six months since the decision,
the number of states allowing gay mar-
riage has jumped from 12 to 18, a trend
that started before the high court rul-
ing that’s been reinforced since.
Judges in New Mexico, Ohio and, most
surprisingly, conservative, Mormon-
heavy Utah all ruled in favor of same-
sex marriage in just the past week.
Both Utah’s case and another in
Nevada will next be heard by federal
appeals courts, putting them on the
path toward the high court. Ohio’s
case, which recognized same-sex death
certificates, also will likely be
appealed.
The series of court decisions has
many asking: When will the Supreme
Court step in and settle the issue for
good?
It may not be that simple.
The cases on the path to the Supreme
Court now differ little from a case jus-
tices refused to hear in June, at the
same time they made their landmark
ruling on the federal law denying tax,
health and other benefits to legally
married same-sex couples.
That case, from California, hinged
on a constitutional amendment defin-
ing marriage as between a man and a
woman.
If the justices had acted, it would
have struck down gay marriage prohi-
bitions across the country.
Instead, the justices passed, relying
instead on a technical legal argument
to resolve the California case and clear
the way for same-sex marriage in the
state, which resumed at the end of June.
That convinces some legal scholars
that the high court won’t take up the
issue again so soon. In a way, they’ve
already passed the buck to the states,
some say, including language in their
Defense of Marriage Act ruling saying
it relegates same-sex marriages to sec-
ond-class status, and “humiliates tens
of thousands of children now being
raised by same-sex couples.”
That language makes it clear state
bans are ripe for challenge, said
Andrew Koppelman, a professor of law
and political science at Northwestern
University. Language from both
Justice Anthony Kennedy’s majority
opinion and Justice Antonin Scalia’s
biting dissent have appeared promi-
nently in subsequent court challenges
and rulings, including in Utah and
Ohio.
Gay marriage’s latest frontier: State courts
“A lot of conservatives say,‘Nah, just
step back and let this thing fall to pieces on its own. ...
Well, I don’t think that’s always the responsible thing to do.”
— Republican Rep. Jack Kingston of Georgia
WORLD 7
Thursday • Dec. 26, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Frances D’Emilio
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
VATICAN CITY — Pope Francis offered
Christmas wishes Wednesday for a better
world, praying for protection for Christians
under attack, battered women and trafficked
children, peace in the Middle East and
Africa, and dignity for refugees fleeing mis-
ery and conflict around the globe.
Francis delivered the traditional ‘’Urbi et
Orbi” (Latin for ‘’to the city and to the
world”) speech from the central balcony of
St. Peter’s Basilica to more than 70,000
cheering tourists, pilgrims and Romans in
the square below.
In his first Christmas message since
being elected pontiff in March, he asked for
all to share in the song of Christmas angels,
‘’for every man or woman ... who hopes for
a better world, who cares for others,”
humbly.
Among places ravaged by conflict,
Francis singled out Syria, which saw its
third Christmas during civil war; South
Sudan; the Central African Republic;
Nigeria; and Iraq.
In Iraq on Wednesday, militants targeted
Christians in two attacks, including a bomb
that exploded near a church during
Christmas Mass in Baghdad. The separate
bombings killed dozens of people.
The Vatican has been trying to raise con-
cern in the world for persecution and attacks
on Christians in parts of the Middle East and
Africa.
“Lord of life, protect all who are persecut-
ed in your name,” Francis said.
Adding an off-the-cuff remark, Francis
said he was also inviting non-believers to
join their desire for peace with everyone
else.
The pope also prayed that God “bless the
land where you chose to come into the world
and grant a favorable outcome to the peace
talks between Israelis and Palestinians.”
Francis then explained his concept of
peace.
“True peace is not a balancing of oppos-
ing forces. It’s not a lovely facade which
conceals conflicts and divisions,” the pope
said. ‘’Peace calls for daily commitment,”
Francis said, reading the pages of his
speech as they were ruffled by a chilly wind.
Francis also spoke of the lives of every-
day people, especially those struggling for
a better life.
Pope’s Christmas wish: Hope for a better world
By Sinan Salaheddin
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BAGHDAD — Militants in Iraq targeted
Christians in three separate Christmas Day
bombings in Baghdad, killing at least 37
people, officials said Wednesday.
In one attack, a car bomb went off near a
church in the capital’s southern Dora neigh-
borhood, killing at least 26 people and
wounding 38, a police officer said.
Earlier, two bombs ripped through a near-
by outdoor market simultaneously in the
Christian section of Athorien, killing 11
people and wounding 21, the officer said.
The Iraq-based leader of the Chaldean
Catholic Church, Louis Sako, said the
parked car bomb exploded after Christmas
Mass and that none of the worshippers were
hurt. Sako said he didn’t believe the church
was the target. There was no immediate
claim of responsibility for the attacks, but
Iraq’s dwindling Christian community,
which is estimated to number about
400,000 to 600,000 people, often has been
targeted by al-Qaida and other insurgents
who see the Christians as heretics.
The U.S. Embassy in Baghdad condemned
the attacks in a statement.
“The Christian community in Iraq has suf-
fered deliberate and senseless targeting by
terrorists for many years, as have many
other innocent Iraqis,” the statement read.
“The United States abhors all such attacks
and is committed to its partnership with the
government of Iraq to combat the scourge of
terrorism.”
Along with Christians, other targets
include civilians in restaurants, cafes or
crowded public areas, as well as Shiites and
members of the Iraqi security forces,
attacked in an attempt to undermine confi-
dence in the Shiite-led government and stir
up Iraq’s already simmering sectarian ten-
sions.
Christmas Day bombings in Iraq’s capital kill 37
Al-Qaida leader
targeting U.N. workers
BAGHDAD — The shadowy leader of a
powerful al-Qaida group fighting in Syria
sought to kidnap United Nations workers
and scrawled out plans for his aides to take
over in the event of his death, according to
excerpts of letters obtained Wednesday by
the Associated Press.
Iraqi intelligence officials offered the AP
the letters, as well as the first known photo-
graph of the Nusra Front leader, Abu
Mohammed al-Golani, the head of one of the
most powerful bands of radicals fighting the
Syrian government in the country’s civil
war.
The officials said they obtained the infor-
mation about al-Golani after they captured
members of another al-Qaida group in
September. They spoke on condition of
anonymity because they weren’t authorized
to speak to journalists.
“I was told by a soldier that he observed
some of the workers of the U.N. and he will
kidnap them. I ask God for his success,” read
an excerpt of a letter given by officials from
Iraq’s Falcon Intelligence Cell, an anti-ter-
rorism unit that works under Prime Minister
Nouri al-Maliki.
Egypt names Muslim
Brotherhood a terrorist group
CAIRO — Egypt’s military-backed inter-
im government declared the Muslim
Brotherhood a terrorist organization
Wednesday, intensifying its campaign of
arrests and prosecutions targeting its mem-
bers and tightening the noose on the group’s
network of charities and businesses.
The unprecedented executive decision
likely ends any chance of reconciliation
between the government and the 85-year-old
Brotherhood, still Egypt’s most organized
political group. It marks a stunning reversal
of fortunes for the long-outlawed organiza-
tion that saw member Mohammed Morsi
reach Egypt’s highest office in the country’s
first democratic election, only to be ousted
in a popularly backed military coup in July.
And it takes a step that not even autocrat
Hosni Mubarak took in his nearly 30-year
rule.
Around the world
REUTERS
Pope Francis waves as he delivers his first ‘Urbi et Orbi’ (to the city and world) message from
the balcony overlooking St. Peter’s Square at the Vatican.
NATION 8
Thursday • Dec. 26, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
CITY OF SAN MATEO
NOTICE OF FUNDING AVAILABLE
COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT BLOCK GRANT FUNDS
The City of San Mateo is now accepting grant proposals from nonprofit
organizations for the provision of human services for the program years of
July 1, 2014 to June 30, 2016.
The Community Grants Program has four core community needs
identified as priorities for funding. These needs are: Basic Human
Needs Services, Youth Services, Senior Services, and Affordable Housing
Services. Funding is provided through the Community Development
Block Grant (CDBG) program and is subject to available funds and City
budget approval. All grants will be available on an open and competitive
basis for eligible programs.
There is approximately $112,000.00 in CDBG funding for this program
year, for a maximum of 7 grants providing services addressing the
community needs priorities. This would result in annual grant amounts
of approximately $16,000.00, with one of those reserved for San Mateo’s
Core Service Provider Samaritan House.
Organizations interested in applying for a grant through this RFP process
are strongly encouraged to attend the pre-application submittal technical
assistance training. Submittals will only be accepted through the on-line
application process established with City Data Services. This training is
scheduled for January 8, 2014, 10:00am-12pm at the San Mateo Main
Library, Oak Room, 55 West 3rd Ave., San Mateo, CA 94403.
Application Deadline: Applications must be received by 5:00 p.m.,
Friday, January 24, 2014.
Specific program information and requisites, and the Request For
Proposal (RFP) submittal are available for download on the City’s website
at http://www.cityofsanmateo.org/bids.aspx or by contacting Chris Wahl,
Neighborhood Improvement and Housing Specialist at (650) 522-7229 or
cwahl@cityofsanmateo.org
By Paul Larson
MILLBRAE –
Have you ever been
entrusted to make
final arrangements
for a funeral?
Those of you
who’ve had this
experience know
that important decisions are required and
must be made in a timely manner. The next
of kin is many times required to search for
information about the deceased which may
not be easily accessible, and must answer
questions without the time to think things
out. Even though your Funeral Director is
trained to guide you every step of the way, it
is still best for you to be prepared with the
proper information if the need should arise.
Ask your Funeral Director what info is
needed before you meet with him/her.
Making funeral arrangements can be very
simple, or can become difficult at times if
you are not prepared. A good Funeral
Director is experienced in leading you with
the necessary requirements, and will offer
details that you may not have thought about
or previously considered as an option.
Allowing him/her to guide you will make
the arrangements go by quickly and easily.
A number of items should be considered
in preparation for the future:
1. Talk to your loved ones about the
inevitable. Give them an indication on what
your wishes are regarding the type of funeral
you want, burial or cremation, etc., and ask
them their feelings about plans for their own
funeral. This is only conversation, but it is
an important topic which will help break the
ice and prevent any type of confusion when
the time comes.
2. Talk to your Funeral Director. Write
down a list of questions and make a phone
call to your Funeral Director asking how to
be prepared. He/she will gladly provide
detailed information and can mail this
information to you for your reference.
Asking questions doesn’t cost anything and
will help you with being organized.
3. Make an appointment and Pre-plan a
Funeral. Many more people are following
through with this step by making Pre-Need
Arrangements. Completing arrangements
ahead of time makes this process more
relaxed, and putting these details behind you
will take a weight off your shoulders. Your
wishes will be finalized and kept on file at
the Mortuary. Your Funeral Director will
even help you set aside funding now as to
cover costs at the time of death. Families
who meet with us at the CHAPEL OF THE
HIGHLANDS are grateful for the chance to
make Pre-Need Arrangements. With their
final details in place it helps to make matters
more calming for surviving loved-ones.
4. Enjoy Life. There are those who dwell
on situations that can’t be controlled.
Taking time to stop and look around at
beauty in the world and appreciate good
things can be therapeutic. If you need to use
a negative statement, try re-wording it into a
positive. Change “I had a lousy day today”
into “Today was demanding, but it made me
appreciate my better days.” As the song
goes: “Accentuate the positive; Eliminate
the negative; Latch on to the affirmative.”
If you ever wish to discuss cremation,
funeral matters or want to make pre-
planning arrangements please feel free to
call me and my staff at the CHAPEL OF
THE HIGHLANDS in Millbrae at (650)
588-5116 and we will be happy to guide you
in a fair and helpful manner. For more info
you may also visit us on the internet at:
www.chapelofthehighlands.com.
Accentuating The Positive
Can Eliminate The Negative
and outstripping spending growth in stores
at the mall.
The problems appear to have affected
many parts of the country. The Associated
Press spoke to people in Alabama,
California, Georgia, Kansas, Louisiana,
Nevada, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Carolina,
Texas and Virginia who didn’t receive pres-
ents in time for Christmas.
Many were left with little or no time to
make alternative plans.
Jeff Cormier and his Dallas family were
among those who ordered gifts that didn’t
arrive.
He had three separate UPS packages —
including two for which he paid extra for
expedited shipping — delayed.
“I’ve had to apologize to three different
people when I thought I had everything
wrapped up and good to go way before,”
Cormier said.
He and his wife are celebrating their baby
daughter’s first Christmas and flew in his
grandmother from Ohio to join them. Her
gift, a customized iPhone cover with a
photo of her new great-granddaughter, did-
n’t come in time for Christmas.
“My wife and I had our presents to open.
Our daughter had her presents to open. And
my grandma, she didn’t have anything to
open,” Cormier said.
“We apologize that our customers did not
receive their packages on Christmas,” said
Natalie Godwin, a spokeswoman for United
Parcel Service Inc.
Godwin said snow and ice in the Midwest
last week and an ice storm that hit Dallas
two-and-a-half weeks ago were partially to
blame. She also said the volume of pack-
ages shipped exceeded the capacity of UPS
but would not share the number of packages
shipped or what the company’s maximum
capacity is.
UPS did not make pickups or deliveries
Wednesday. Extra workers were being
brought in Wednesday night to the compa-
ny’s hub in Louisville, Ky., to sort pack-
ages for Thursday and Friday delivery,
according to Godwin.
Godwin said “UPS will honor its peak
shipments commitments” to customers who
used its air delivery service. Those shipping
by ground have no guarantee past Dec. 11.
Godwin said she didn’t know if customers
would receive refunds.
However, some FedEx customers are able
to pick up packages Christmas Day at their
local FedEx Express centers.
“We’re sorry that there could be delays and
we’re contacting affected customers who
have shipments available for pickup,” said
Scott Fiedler, a spokesman for FedEx Corp.
Between Thanksgiving and Christmas,
FedEx handled 275 million shipments,
according to Fiedler. Those that were not
delivered in time, he said, “would be very
few. ”
Three people told the Associated Press
that when they tracked their packages
online, FedEx said deliveries to their homes
were attempted but failed because “the busi-
ness was closed.” During follow-up calls
with customer service, they said they
learned that the local depot was over-
whelmed and didn’t attempt delivery.
On Sunday, Eric Swanson ordered a doll
for his daughter and a sweater for his wife
through Amazon.com and one of its affiliat-
ed sites. As an Amazon Prime customer,
there was a promise of two-day delivery,
getting the gifts to his Carmichael, Calif.
home just in time for Christmas. One was
shipped via UPS, the other FedEx.
“I thought it would happen,” Swanson
said. Online tracking tools said the pack-
ages would arrive by 8 p.m. Tuesday.
Neither did.
Amazon.com has been notifying some
customers affected by the UPS delays that it
will refund any shipping charges and is giv-
ing them a $20 credit toward a future pur-
chase.
Amazon spokeswoman Mary Osako said
the company processed orders and got them
to its shippers “on time for holiday deliv-
ery” and is now “reviewing the performance
of the delivery carriers.”
While some customers may get money
back, they might think twice about ordering
online next year.
“My wife understands but my 5-year-old
daughter ... I think we’re going to let it be a
surprise when it comes,” Swanson said.
“Next time, if I need to get a gift and cut it
that close, I will just have to enter the fray
and go to the mall.”
Continued from page 1
DELAYS
REUTERS
A Federal Express delivery truck is seen in San Diego.
OPINION 9
Thursday • Dec. 26, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Leaving the pole bare
Editor,
To respond to Matt Grocott’s Dec.
19 letter to the editor, it has been
noted that “Arctic sea ice has been
melting at break-neck speeds in the
past few decades, driven by warming
air temperature, warming ocean water
temperature and new, extreme weath-
er patterns, all of which are caused
by or accelerated by man-made cli-
mate change.
Unfortunately, melting sea ice is a
slippery slope — once it starts, it’s
hard to reverse, and even under nor-
mal climate conditions would take
centuries to reestablish. The lack of
bright white ice on the dark ocean
surface is leading to a temperature
increase that likely extends beyond
the borders of the Arctic, and a
breakdown of the polar vortex,
which is so critical in maintaining a
cold, ice-conducive atmosphere at
the pole. Models suggest sea ice will
disappear by 2100, but most Arctic
sea ice experts are calling for an
summertime ice-free Arctic by 2030.
Extraordinary melting of sea ice in
the Arctic in 2012 shattered the all-
time low sea ice extent record set in
September 2007. The new sea ice
record was set on Aug. 26, 2012, a
full three weeks before the usual end
of the melting season,” according to
the National Snow and Ice Data
Center.
Jerry Emanuel
San Carlos
Duck Dynasty debacle
Editor,
Many printers ink expensive
media minutes and incalculable
Internet exposure discussing the fate
of Phil Robertson. The Affordable
Care Act (Obamacare) roll out
appears to be in trouble. More than
47 million people are on food
stamps. More than 23 million peo-
ple are out of work. American sol-
diers are being killed in Afghanistan
for no apparent reason. Retail stores
are extending their hours to boost
sales. The NSAis apparently spying
on everyone. And no one knows
what happened in Benghazi or who
authorized sending automatic
weapons to the Mexican drug cartels.
What is our media concentrating on?
ATV show that no one watches. Am I
the only one who thinks this is
strange?
Keith C. De Filippis
San Jose
Draper seeks Six Californias
Editor,
Why stop there, Mr. Draper? You
might propose the names: Jefferson
Draper, North Draper, Central
Draper, Draper Valley, West Draper
and South Draper. Oh, and while you
are at it, you might make your Draper
University flag a little larger. It just
doesn’t do quite enough to dwarf the
American flag it flies with.
Adrienne Parker
San Mateo
Letters to the editor
The Fresno Bee
P
eople are uttering the D-word
again.Sen. Dianne Feinstein,
Rep. Jim Costa and many
other lawmakers in the Democratic
and Republican parties want Gov.
Jerry Brown to declare a state drought
emergency.
The first 10 months of 2013 were
the driest on record in California, dat-
ing to 1895, according to the
National Climatic Data Center.
That record follows two years of dry
conditions, so several Northern
California reservoirs are now at less
than 40 percent of capacity, including
Shasta and Oroville at 37 percent, and
Folsom at 21 percent. It’s the same
dusty, economy-sapping story in the
San Joaquin Valley, where irrigation
deliveries are vital to agriculture.
Sprawling Pine Flat Reservoir,
which is fed by the Kings River and
its many Sierra tributaries, is at 17
percent of capacity.
Smaller but vital reservoirs such as
lakes Success (5 percent), Hensley (6
percent), Kaweah (6 percent),
Eastman (9 percent) and Isabella (10
percent) are nearly bone dry.
These levels are reminiscent of the
1976-77 drought, during Brown’s first
term as governor.
Today, 83 percent of the state is in
severe drought, according to the U.S.
Drought Monitor.
Even worse, the Central Valley —
composed of the San Joaquin and
Sacramento valleys — is in extreme
drought.
Last week Brown named a Drought
Management Team to help determine
whether a drought declaration is war-
ranted. That’s a start. But only a start.
We concur with the reaction of state
Sen. Andy Vidak, R-Hanford: “I’m
scratching my head on this one —
Gov. Brown needs a task force to fig-
ure out there’s a drought? It’s time for
leadership, not a task force.
“Brown needs to get ahead of this
quickly to avoid a water emergency.
Hoping for winter storms is not a
strategy.
The state faces severe hardship
already. Two examples suffice.
The fire season usually ends with
our wet winters, but not this year. An
800-acre wildfire burned along the Big
Sur coast last week.
The area, which averaged nearly 45
inches of rain a year between 1981
and 2010, has gotten only 7 inches
this year.
In September, the U.S. Department
of Agriculture declared the state a
drought disaster area. In 2013, State
Water Project allocations were at 35
percent of requested deliveries. The
initial allocation for 2014 is 5 per-
cent, the lowest on record.
Farmers on the west side of the San
Joaquin Valley have increased ground-
water pumping, which causes other
problems.
We have record low groundwater
levels, which is causing the land to
sink.
That, according to the U.S.
Geological Survey, is reducing the
capacity of the Delta-Mendota Canal,
the California Aqueduct and other
canals that deliver water.
This latest drought should remind us
that we have a long-term water imbal-
ance, as Brown cogently said in end-
ing the last drought emergency in
2011: “Drought or no drought,
demand for water in California always
exceeds supply.
“After the 1976-77 drought, a
report on lessons learned concluded
that “water is a limited resource, and
water conservation and water recy-
cling are practical and must become a
way of life.
“It seems we have to learn that les-
son again.
That would be a fine resolution for
the New Year, and for every year.
Hoping for rain not a winning state water plan
Much-needed
exchanging
T
he gift-giving winter holidays are officially
over which can only mean one thing — it’s
time to take back all the bizarre reindeer
sweaters, redundant pre-packaged flask or flashlight
sets and “A Christmas Story” DVDs and go get what you
really want. No need for yet another cheese board or
scarf? Get thee to the return and exchange line pronto.
While you’re at it, there’s plenty of other stuff in the
world worth trading in although some might question
how much value they
actually hold.
For instance, can we
trade in former basket-
baller-turned-even odd-
erball Dennis Rodman
and his bromance with
Kim Jong Un because
frankly it was always
ill-fitting? Actually,
let’s just give him out-
right to North Korea,
complete with a big
fat bow. We could
instead stick him in
the closet with all the
other unwanted junk
like that Salad Shooter
or the fake parakeet that sings but why take up the
room? Besides if Kim doesn’t appreciate the gift it’s
pretty clear what he’ll do with it. Just ask his uncle.
Toronto Mayor Rob Ford is too easy a target and
obviously nothing more than a gag gift. Save him for
next season’s white elephant exchange.
Credit card security breaches can go back, too. I’m
not sure how exactly we return this; ironically, some
refunds require a merchant to swipe a consumer’s card
again which we all know — and yes, Target, I’m talking
to you — might not be the smartest idea at this particu-
lar point in time.
Let’s go back to cold hard cash just like that $5 bill
grandma used to slip in the holiday and birthday card no
matter how old you got or how little that fiver could
buy anymore.
I’ve been trying to exchange real shows for anything
of actual value for more years than I can count but just
like the Strawberry Shortcake cereal my childhood self
once begged for (and got one Christmas — thanks,
Grandma! Better than a $5 bill), the masses tend to pre-
fer saccharine over something more fulfilling. Of
course, if patriarch Phil Robertson’s goose continues
to be publicly cooked, A&E may return “Duck Dynasty”
for us. Too bad the network has no say over the
Kardashian clan and the like because even the most
generous recipient can do without hearing more about
Bruce Jenner’s trachea and Kanye West’s delusions of
self-grandeur.
Also put in the return pile the “legitimate rape”
spouting Republican politicos, NSA spying, the
California Public Utilities Commission’s mixed mes-
sages on Pacific Gas and Electricity’s trustworthiness,
drones, George Zimmerman, the majority of unsolicited
“selfie” portraits floating about and bizarre new flesh-
rotting street drug Krocodil. Although that last one
might ensure not having to buy the recipient a gift the
following year. Users don’t seem to last that long.
That fake interpreter from Nelson Mandela’s memori-
al can stick around a while. Just like that Kung Fu
Hamster a few years back, he’s silly and it’s hard to
believe anybody spent quality money on it. But hey —
at least it brought out a few laughs.
Multi-vitamins and antibacterial soap can go back if
recent reports are true that they do very little for one’s
health. Maybe the refunded money can go for booze and
e-cigarettes instead.
But the biggest thing to return is the draining holiday
shopping season itself. After weeks of crowds, spend-
ing and headaches, nobody really needs to keep that
around.
The only problem with hauling these things back is
the very good chance nobody will accept them, gift
receipt not withstanding.
Oh well. Guess there’s always regifting next year. As
with life, in news everything old is eventually new
again.
Michelle Durand’s column “Off the Beat” runs every
Tuesday and Thursday. She can be reached by email:
michelle@smdailyjournal.com or by phone (650) 344-
5200 ext. 102. What do you think of this column? Send a
letter to the editor: letters@smdailyjournal.com.
Other voices
Follow us on Twitter and Facebook:
facebook.com/smdailyjournal
twitter.com/smdailyjournal
Onlineeditionat scribd.com/smdailyjournal
OUR MISSION:
It is the mission of the Daily Journal to be the most
accurate, fair and relevant local news source for
those who live, work or play on the MidPeninsula.
By combining local news and sports coverage,
analysis and insight with the latest business,
lifestyle, state, national and world news, we seek to
provide our readers with the highest quality
information resource in San Mateo County.
Our pages belong to you, our readers, and we
choose to reflect the diverse character of this
dynamic and ever-changing community.
SMDAILYJOURNAL.COM
Jerry Lee, Publisher
Jon Mays, Editor in Chief
Nathan Mollat, Sports Editor
Erik Oeverndiek, Copy Editor/Page Designer
Nicola Zeuzem, Production Manager
Kerry McArdle, Marketing & Events
Michelle Durand, Senior Reporter
REPORTERS:
Julio Lara, Angela Swartz, Samantha Weigel
Susan E. Cohn, Senior Correspondent: Events
Ricci Lam, Production Assistant
BUSINESS STAFF:
Charlotte Andersen Theresa Daniels
Charles Gould Scott Jacobs
Paul Moisio Kevin Smith
INTERNS, CORRESPONDENTS, CONTRACTORS:
Mari Andreatta Arianna Bayangos
Kerry Chan Caroline Denney
David Egan Darold Fredricks
Dominic Gialdini Tom Jung
Janani Kumar Ken Martin
Jeff Palter Nick Rose
Andrew Scheiner Kris Skarston
Jacqueline Tang Kevin Thomas
Annika Ulrich David Wong
Letters to the Editor
Should be no longer than 250 words.
Perspective Columns
Should be no longer than 600 words.
• Illegibly handwritten letters and anonymous letters
will not be accepted.
• Please include a city of residence and phone number
where we can reach you.
• Emailed documents are preferred:
letters@smdailyjournal.com
• Letter writers are limited to two submissions a
month.
Opinions expressed in letters, columns and
perspectives are those of the individual writer and do
not necessarily represent the views of the Daily Journal
staff.
Correction Policy
The Daily Journal corrects its errors.
If you question the accuracy of any article in the Daily
Journal, please contact the editor at
news@smdailyjournal.com
or by phone at: 344-5200, ext. 107
Editorials represent the viewpoint of the Daily Journal
editorial board and not any one individual.
BUSINESS 10
Thursday • Dec. 26, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Ken Sweet
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEWYORK — 2013 was a great year for
the average investor, but few market
strategists believe that 2014 will be any-
where near as good. The simple strategy of
buying U.S. stocks, selling bonds and
staying out of international markets isn’t
going to work as well as it has, they say.
Some of Wall Street’s biggest
money managers have come up
with a few resolutions to help your
retirement portfolio have a good
year:
• Curb your expectations
Few investors expected 2013 to be as
big as it was. The S&P 500 index is up 28
percent for the year, its best year since
1997. Including dividends, it’s up 30 per-
cent.
On average, market strategists expect
2014 to be somewhat tame. Most are
looking for the S&P 500 to rise to 1,850
to 1,900 points, a gain of just 2 to 4 per-
cent.
• Keep your eye on valuation
Investors bid up stock prices to all-time
highs this year, despite a mediocre econo-
my and corporate profits that were less
than spectacular.
At the beginning of the year, the price-
to-earnings ratio on the S&P 500 was
13.5, meaning investors were paying
roughly $13.50 for every $1 of earnings
in the S&P 500. Now the S&P 500’s P-E
ratio is around 16.7.
While a P/E ratio of 16.7 won’t set off
any alarm bells — the historical average
is 14.5 — it is noticeably higher than it
was a year ago.
Investors have high expectations for
corporate profits next year, based on the
prices they are paying.
“It’s hard to believe that this market can
go much higher from here without some
corporate earnings growth,” said Bob
Doll, chief equity strategist at Nuveen
Asset Management.
Profit margins are already at record
highs, and corporations spent most of
2013 increasing their earnings by cutting
costs or using financial engineering tools
like buying back their own stock.
Earnings at companies in the S&P 500
grew at an 11 percent rate in 2013. The
consensus among market strategists is
that profit growth will slow to around 8
percent in 2014.
However, if the U.S. economy continues
to improve, and corporate profit margi ns
expand, it could justify the prices
investors have been paying for stocks.
• Don’t get caught up in the euphoria
Be wary if your neighbor decides to jump
head-first into the market next year.
A large number of investors have
remained on the sidelines for this five-
year bull market. Since the market bot-
tomed in March 2009, investors pulled
$430 billion out of stock funds, according
to data from Lipper, while putting nearly
$1 trillion into bond funds.
Professional market watchers are con-
cerned that many individual investors,
trying to play a game of catch-up, might
rush into the market with a vengeance
next year. The surge of money could cause
stocks to jump if investors ignore warn-
ings that the market is getting overvalued.
Wall Street calls this phenomenon a
“melt-up.” As you can guess, a “melt-up”
could lead to a “melt-down,” as happened
in the late 1990s with the dot-com bubble.
“I fear people, who sat out 2013, will
jump in too fast next year and get burned,”
said Richard Madigan, chief investment
officer for JPMorgan Private Bank.
Which leads us to:
• Don’t panic, either
Stocks cannot go higher all the time.
Bearish investors have been saying for
months that stocks are due for a pullback
in the near future.
The S&P 500 is up 66 percent since the
stock market’s last major downturn in
October 2011. It has been resilient
through several scares this year, including
the conflict in Syria, the budget crisis and
near-breach of the nation’s borrowing
limit in October.
In their 2014 outlook, Goldman Sachs
analysts said that while the market has
been strong, they see a 67 percent chance
that stocks will decline 10 percent or more
in 2014, which is known as a stock mar-
ket “correction.”
Goldman analysts still expect stocks to
end the year modestly higher.
• Cut your exposure to bonds
Fixed-income investors had a tough year
in 2013. The Barclays Aggregate bond
index, a broad composite of thousands of
bonds, fell 2 percent. Investors in long-
term bonds were hit even harder, losing 15
percent of their money since the begin-
ning of the year, according to comparable
bond indexes.
2014 is not looking good for bond
investors, either.
The Federal Reserve has started to pull
back on its bond-buying economic stimu-
lus program. That means one of the
biggest buyers of bonds for the last year
will slowly exit the market in 2014.
The Fed’s exit could send bond prices
falling.
“Bonds are hardly a place to be in
2014,” Nuveen’s Doll said.
That doesn’t mean investors should
avoid bonds altogether, strategists say.
Instead, investors should reorganize
their portfolio to focus more on bonds
that mature in relatively short periods of
time. The prices of those bonds tend to
fluctuate less than those of bonds that take
longer to mature, and are less likely to
lose value when interest rates rise, as
many expect will happen in 2014.
Madigan said that under normal circum-
stances he would advise investors to hold
bonds that mature in an average of about
five years. This measure is referred to as a
bond’s “duration.”
For 2014, Madigan is advising
investors to restructure their portfolio to
have an average duration of two to two-
and-a-half years.
“Long duration bonds are much more a
riskier asset than a safe asset next year, ”
Madigan said.
• Your stock market alternative in 2014
is ... stocks
Other than stocks, the average investor
typically has access to three other types
of investments: cash, bonds and com-
modities such as gold. None are expected
to perform better than the stock market
next year.
If bonds had a tough 2013, gold
investors got punched in the stomach.
Gold is down 28 percent this year, and is
on its way to its first annual loss since
2000.
Gold is expected to have another tough
year in 2014, with inflation under control
and the Fed expected to gradually exit the
bond market. Analysts at Barclays Capital
expect gold to end 2014 at $1,270 an
ounce, about 6 percent higher than where
it is today.
Cash is expected to provide a near-zero
return next year, as it has for several years
now. Savings and money market-accounts
are returning less than 0.1 percent on
average.
• Study abroad
Several market strategists believe inter-
national stocks will be the place to be
next year. Asian and European stocks did
not perform as well as U.S. stocks in
2013, with the notable exception of
Japan, where the Nikkei 225 index soared
53 percent.
Europe is particularly attractive, they
say. The European Union came out of a
two-year recession in 2013, and the debt
crisis that plagued most of the region has
abated. Some strategists say that Europe is
a couple of years behind the U.S. in its
economic recovery, and stocks could be
relatively cheap in comparison.
“The big debate among my team is
whether international markets will play
catch-up next year,” said Madigan of
JPMorgan Private Bank.
Stock market resolutions for 2014
“It’s hard to believe that this market can go
much higher from here without some corporate earnings growth.”
— Bob Doll, chief equity strategist at Nuveen Asset Management
By Ellen Gibson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
More than 4 million Americans buy a
home each year, but there’s no telling how
many offers are discarded along the way.
And no one wants to get edged out in the
bid for a dream home.
Real estate is rebounding in many
regions of the country, and buyers can face
formidable competition. Of course, the
best way to snag the home you want is to
promise the most money. But there’s more
to making an offer than simply setting
and stating your price.
Here, two top real estate agents in a per-
petually competitive market —
Washington, D.C. — share pointers on
crafting an offer that will outshine the
rest:
SHOW THEM THE MONEY
The key, both said, is assuaging the
sellers’ fears. They worry mainly that the
deal will fall through, so have your financ-
ing in order before you submit an offer.
Make sure the lender checks your credit,
assets and employment status before pre-
approving your loan, and get a detailed
letter with the amount you are authorized
to borrow, recommends Elizabeth
Blakeslee, a Coldwell Banker broker in
the capital region.
Another way to signal you are a serious
buyer is by putting down a
large, good-faith deposit. A
2 percent to 4 percent
escrow deposit is common.
However, Nancy Itteilag of
Long and Foster real estate,
who has been listed among
the top 10 agents in the
country for sales volume by
the Wall Street
Journal/REAL Trends, tells
her clients to write a check
for at least 10 percent.
Within 30 days, the buyer
will need to hand over this
money as part of the down-
payment anyway.
“If the seller has a nice
deposit in escrow, they
know the buyer is not going
to wake up and change their
mind,” she says.
ELIMINATE SURPRISES
The other unknown that keeps sellers up
at night is dread of repairs, says
Blakeslee. Most offers are contingent on a
home inspection. To eliminate that vari-
able, have the inspection done before put-
ting in an offer, and specify any repairs
you expect the seller to make. That way
there won’t be surprises later.
Alternatively, buy a home warranty or
even request that your real estate agent
throw one in as a closing gift. That way
the seller knows that if the heating system
gives out, it will be covered.
“They don’t want the buyer nitpicking
— coming back with ‘the icemaker does-
n’t work’,” Blakeslee says.
Another contingency in most contracts
is the home appraisal. If the value of the
property as assessed is lower than the pur-
chase price, the buyer can back out of the
deal. Most lenders require an appraisal
before underwriting a mortgage, so unless
you are paying cash, you won’t be able to
waive this condition, Blakeslee says.
However, if you are infatuated with the
house, you can volunteer to pay, out of
pocket, the potential difference between a
low appraisal amount and the purchase
price.
OFFER PEACE OF MIND
The goal is to be as accommodating as
possible without sacrificing your family’s
needs. Talk to sellers about furnishings or
appliances they want to take or leave
behind. Also, give the owners plenty of
time to move. Consider allowing them to
stay in the home for a month after the set-
tlement date at no charge, Itteilag says, as
long as they continue to pay utilities. As a
buyer, you don’t have to make a mortgage
payment the first month anyway.
“When you have people who have been
in their homes for 20 years, they don’t
want to be pushed out,” she says.
“Sometimes you can’t put a price tag on
the comfort level you’ve offered them.”
PERSONAL CONNECTION
Make your bid stand out with personal
touches. For instance, write a letter to the
seller detailing why your family fell in
love with the home and the community.
During your house tour, Blakeslee advises
looking for a detail that connects your
family with the previous occupants.
Perhaps they went to the same college you
did, have the same number of children or
share your interest in ice hockey. Seize
the opportunity to explain why you are a
great match.
In addition, be sure your real-estate
agent presents your offer in person,
Itteilag stresses. When agents are face-to-
face with the seller, they can read the situ-
ation clearly and make requests that are
hard to put in writing. For instance, your
agent can tell the listing agent how much
you love the home, hinting that if there is
a stronger offer, you would appreciate the
opportunity to match or beat it.
Finally, while all these tips are helpful,
it’s not your job as a buyer to think strate-
gically, says Itteilag. “Find an excellent
(real estate agent) and let them represent
your interests,” she says.
Beyond money: How to make your home bid stand out
Being
there
is why
I’mhere.
Year in
review
I
know what you’ve been thinking.
“Hey Sports Lounge, where is your
annual year in a review? It’s
Christmas time and 2013 will quickly
morph into 2014. What gives?”
Relax, my faithful readers. Like a lot of
other people, I was
thrown off by the late-
ness of Thanksgiving
which in turn led to sud-
den arrival of Christmas.
But it hasn’t caught me
completely off guard.
I’ve been thinking about
this for the last couple
weeks and I think I have
a highlight reel of sports
in 2013. I don’t usually
do a lot of research for
these kind of lists
because if the highlight
doesn’t jump out at me, it’s not really
highlight now is it?
January through March: The beginning
of 2013 saw the San Francisco 49ers return
to elite status as they marched through the
playoffs and secured on spot in their sixth
Super Bowl. Unfortunately, it didn’t turn
out like the other five as the Baltimore
Ravens withstood a furious second-half
rally by San Francisco to hold off the
49ers, 34-31 — despite a non-holding call
on Baltimore in the end zone that would
have given the 49ers the win. But I’m not
bitter.
On the local front, it was a banner play-
off run for the Burlingame basketball pro-
gram. Both the Panthers boys’ and girls’
teams captured Central Coast Section
championships. The Burlingame boys won
their first section title, somehow avoiding
a matchup with a West Catholic Athletic
League team and beating Santa Cruz 54-51.
It was their first title after six second-place
finishes since 2003 — five of those defeats
coming at the hands of WCAL schools.
The Burlingame girls’ won their second-
ever CCS crown and their first since win-
ning the state title in 1988. It was the
girls’ sixth appearance in a CCS title
game, but their first since 1995.
April through early June: Spring didn’t
provide a ton of highlights. The San
Francisco Giants got off to a solid start to
the season but saw it all go away in a puff
of smoke as soon as Angel Pagan pulled a
hamstring following his inside-the-park
home run on Memorial Day. He would miss
the next several months and the Giants
would plunge to near the bottom of the
National League West standings. Who
would have though Pagan would be the guy
that made the Giants go?
By Josh Dubow
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ALAMEDA — For an organization seek-
ing to rebuild through the draft, the Oakland
Raiders have struggled to find impact play-
ers in the first two drafts under general man-
ager Reggie McKenzie.
Whether because of injuries, a lack of
enough premium picks or bad decisions, the
Raiders have gotten only one starter from
the last two grab bags.
Of the 16 players taken in McKenzie’s
first two draft classes, five are no longer
with the organization, three are on season-
ending injured reserve, and most of the oth-
ers are struggling to get on the field.
With the organization hampered by bad
contracts from departed players that are still
eating up salary cap space, the misses in the
draft are more notable, a clear factor in
another disappointing season in Oakland.
“Sometimes things don’t work out,”
coach Dennis Allen said. “Sometimes mis-
takes are made. But, I’m very confident in
Reggie McKenzie and the personnel staff of
being able to evaluate football players:
quarterbacks, offensive linemen, defensive
lineman. I’m very confident in his ability to
do that. I’m very confident in our ability as
a coaching staff to do that.”
Allen said it is far too early to judge this
year’s draft class, which has been mostly
underwhelming from the top on down. The
biggest disappointments have been first-
round cornerback D.J. Hayden, who strug-
gled before going on IR, and fourth-round
quarterback Tyler Wilson, who spent most
of the year on the practice squad before
being signed by Tennessee last week.
Sixth-round running back Latavius
Murray has also missed the entire season
with an ankle injury.
McKenzie and the Raiders have had much
greater success finding productive undrafted
free agents, with the most notable being
receiver Rod Streater and quarterback Matt
McGloin.
But with little cap room to sign free
agents, the Raiders could ill afford to miss
on their top pick. They traded down nine
spots to take Hayden 12th overall, despite a
near-fatal heart injury that cut short his final
season in college.
Hayden missed most of the offseason pro-
gram and was not allowed to partake in con-
tact for much of training camp because of
the injury. When he did play, he struggled
Raiders struggle to find impact players in draft
Back on
top
Williams wins
third AP Athlete
of Year award
By Howard Fendrich
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Serena Williams likes to make
one thing clear: She is never satisfied,
no matter how many matches and tourna-
ments she wins.
Driven as ever, Williams won plenty this year.
She went 78-4 with 11 titles, including at the French
Open and U.S. Open, raising her Grand Slam champi-
onship total to 17. She compiled a 34-match winning
streak. She earned more than $12 million in prize money, a
record for women’s tennis. In February, she became the oldest
No. 1 in WTA rankings history and never left that perch.
Thanks to all of that, Williams was honored Wednesday as The
Associated Press’ 2013 Female Athlete of the Year. It’s the third AP
award for Williams, following 2002 and 2009. Only two women have
been chosen more often as AP Athlete of the Year since the annual
awards were first handed out in 1931.
“Whenever I lose, I get more determined, and it gives me something
more to work toward,” Williams told the AP in an interview shortly
before the start of the U.S. Open. “I don’t get complacent, and I realize
I need to work harder and I need to do better and I want to do better —
or I wouldn’t keep playing this game.”
The vote by news organizations was about as lopsided as many of
Williams’ matches this season. She received 55 of 96 votes, while
Brittney Griner, a two-time AP Player of the Year in college basketball
and the No. 1 pick in April’s WNBA draft, finished second with 14.
See WILLIAMS, Page 12 See LOUNGE, Page 12
See RAIDERS, Page 14
<<< Page 14, Belichick questions
NFL offseason workout limits
Thursday, Dec. 26, 2013
RUN AT HISTORY: LYNCH LEADS NIU VS UTAH ST IN POINSETTIA BOWL >> PAGE 13
SPORTS 12
Thursday • Dec. 26, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Peninsula
º Loog |ast|og post0ra| chaoge
º |ocrease ath|et|c perIormaoce
º Treat repet|t|ve stress |oj0r|es
º |ocrease mob|||ty & ßex|b|||ty
$50 OFF 3 Session
Mini-Series
º Look 8etter
º Fee| 8etter
º |mprove Post0re
º |mprove 8a|aoce
º 8e||eve 0hroo|c Pain
Pa0| F|tzgera|d
™ r e f l o R d e c n a v d A d e fi i t r e C
www.peo|os0|aro|hog.com
448 h. Sao Nateo 0r|ve, Ste 3 º Sao Nateo º 650-343-0777
Yo0 doo't
have to ||ve
||ke th|s!
Swimmer Missy Franklin was next with
10.
The Male Athlete of the Year recipient
will be announced Thursday.
Williams, who grew up in Compton and
turned 32 in September, produced the
finest women’s tennis season in years.
According to the WTA:
• her .951 winning percentage was the
best since Steffi Graf’s .977 in 1989;
• her 11 titles were the most since
Martina Hingis’ 12 in 1997;
• her winning streak was the longest
since her sister, Venus, had a 35-match run
in 2000.
“She just continues to be an inspiration
to American tennis,” said Gordon Smith,
the executive director of the U.S. Tennis
Association, which runs the U.S. Open.
“Her year this year? Unforgettable.”
By adding a fifth career U.S. Open cham-
pionship, and a second French Open title,
Williams also moved within one Grand
Slam trophy of the 18 apiece won by
Martina Navratilova and Chris Evert. The
record is 24 by Margaret Court.
Pretty heady company.
Evert is one of the only two women with
more AP awards than Williams. Evert won
four from 1974-80, while Babe Didrikson
collected a record six — one for track in
1932, and five for golf from 1945-54.
“Serena already has provided significant
contributions to taking our sport to the
next level. ... She is chasing records and
no doubt will break many records before
she’s finished,” WTA Chairman Stacey
Allaster said. “That obviously just brings
a lot more attention to our sport.”
Two particular moments in 2013 stuck
out to Allaster.
One came at Qatar in February, when
Williams cried after assuring herself of
returning to No. 1 for the first time since
2010, the year the American needed two
operations on her right foot and got blood
clots in her lungs.
“You could see the joy, the tears of joy.
It meant so much to her, from everything
she had been through, to be able to be
back at the top of the sport, a sport that
she does truly love,” Allaster said.
The second moment came during
Wimbledon, when Williams joined other
women who have been ranked No. 1 at a
celebration of the WTA’s 40th anniver-
sary.
“It was an opportunity to see her in a
leadership position. ... She did a remark-
able job at speaking on behalf of all those
great athletes and speaking to future play-
ers,” Allaster said. “There’s a little girl,
perhaps out there in Compton, who is
dreaming of playing on the WTA, and
Serena said, ‘We’re waiting for you, and we
can’t wait to meet you.”’
Continued from page 11
WILLIAMS
The Golden State Warriors, on the other
hand, returned to relevance, not only quali-
fying for the playoffs for only the second
time in about 20 years, but beating Denver
in the first round of the playoffs and push-
ing the San Antonio Spurs to six games in
the second round.
The local scene saw two more CCS titles
earned, but maybe not in a sport you would
expect. No, Serra did not capture a baseball
title, despite rolling into the finals. And
no, Carlmont came up short again in its
quest for another softball championship,
as did Half Moon Bay.
No, the big winners in the Spring were a
pair of badminton players: Burlingame’s
Jan Banquiles and Aragon’s Candy Zhang.
Banquiles, a senior, finally captured an elu-
sive CCS title after steadily climbing the
ranks the previous two seasons. Zhang,
just a freshman, won the first of what some
expect to be several CCS championships.
June through August: Ah, the doldrums of
the sports year. That time between the end
of the Spring high school season and the
start of the Fall season. The biggest story
of the summer was the run of the Belmont-
Redwood Shores Little League baseball
team. The BRS 12-year-old all stars became
the first team from San Mateo County to
advance to the Western Regional tourna-
ment. BRS captured the District 52 title and
went on to win both the Section 3 and
Division 2 crowns to punch their ticket to
San Bernardino with a chance to advance to
the Little League World Series.
BRS won its first four games to advance
to the championship game. It was such a
big deal I decided to make the trip to
Southern California and upon my arrival at
the baseball complex, thought it was a
good omen when I saw one of the intersec-
tions near the ballpark had the street names
of “Belmont” and “World Series.”
Alas, it was not to be as the team from
Chula Vista beat BRS. The boys from the
San Diego area ultimately advanced to the
World Series championship game.
August to December: This was a banner
Fall for county teams, with four teams cap-
turing CCS titles. The Sacred Heart Prep
boys’ and girls’ water polo squads each won
water polo titles. For the girls, it was their
eighth straight CCS championship, while
the boys won their third in a row.
In football, Serra finally won that elusive
Open Division title, while Sacred Heart
Prep won its second consecutive Division
IV title. Both teams were chosen to play in
the Northern California championship
games, with Serra falling to Del Oro, while
SHP shocked just about everyone with a
dominating 42-7 win over El Cerrito.
There was no storybook ending, howev-
er, as the Gators came up short in the
Division III state title game.
And for the third year in a row, the 49ers
clinched a playoff spot following their win
over Atlanta Monday night in the last regu-
lar-season game at Candlestick Park.
So there it is. Alook back at the year
that was. What can we expect in 2014?
That’s for a column next week.
Nathan Mollat can be reached by phone: 344-5200
ext. 117 or by email: nathan@smdailyjournal.com.
You follow him on Twitter@CheckkThissOutt.
Continued from page 11
LOUNGE
“There’s a little girl, perhaps out there
in Compton, who is dreaming of playing on the WTA, and
Serena said,‘We’re waiting for you, and we can’t wait to meet you.”’
— WTA Chairman Stacey Allaster
SPORTS 13
Thursday • Dec. 26, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
]ust be age 62+ and own your own home:
+ Turn home equIty Into cash
+ Pay oII bIIIs & credIt cards
+ No more monthy mortgage payments
+ RemaIn In your home as Iong as you IIve
+ You retaIn ownershIp (tItIe) to your home
+ FHA Insured program
Call today for a free, easy to read quote
650-453-3244
R
EVERSE
MORTGAGE
CALL FOR A FREE BROCHURE OR QUOTE
SERVING THE ENTIRE BAY AREA
Carol ßertocchini, CPA
NMLS ÌD #455078
Reverse Mortgage
SpecIaIIst and a CPA
wIth over 25 years
experIence as a
IInancIaI proIessIonaI
Homeowner must maintain property as primary residence and remain current on
property taxes and insurance
Security 1 Lending.
NMLS ID #107636. Licensed by the
Department of Business Oversight
under the California Mortgage
Lending Act #4131074
By Baernie Wilson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN DIEGO — Jordan Lynch will make a
run at history Thursday night when he suits
up for the final time for No. 24 Northern
Illinois in the Poinsettia Bowl against Utah
State.
Lynch already owns the major college
record for yards rushing for a quarterback
with 1,881. With 119 yards, he can become
the first player to rush for 2,000 yards and
throw for 2,000.
“I’m just really proud of him and wish I
had him for about 10 more years but we
don’t,” NIU coach Rod Carey said. “This is
the last game we get him. That’s the biggest
thing with him.”
Lynch has passed for 2,676 yards and 23
touchdowns. He’s rushed for 22 scores and
even caught a touchdown pass in leading the
Huskies to a 12-1 record.
“Listen, we ask him to do a lot, and it’s
not because that’s our system. It’s because
he can,” Carey said. “Those are the things
that amaze you. He makes the complicated
things and the hard things skillwise look
easy. That’s what amazes you every day. You
tell him one time one play and then it’s
done. It’s locked in a
vault. That’s what is
amazing to me.”
That’s why Lynch was
named to The Associated
Press All-America team
as an all-purpose player.
Utah State coach Matt
Wells knows Lynch has
quite the supporting cast
in fellow 1,000-yard
rusher Cameron Stingily and wide receivers
Tommylee Lewis and Da’Ron Brown.
“Jordan Lynch is fun to watch — it’s not
fun to watch because you understand you’re
going to have to defend him, but from a
quarterback perspective, I’ve got a lot of
respect for him,” said Wells, who played
quarterback at Utah State in the mid-1990s.
“The guy is an 1,800-yard running back,
and by the way he’s over 60-percent com-
pletion and 3-to-1 touchdown-interception
ratio. It’s amazing, and that’s back-to-back
years. As you study him and the things that
he’s done since he’s become a starter, he’s a
flat-out winner,” Wells said.
“I said to Rod last Wednesday when we
were talking, you know, it’s almost like it’s
a once-in-a-lifetime young man to coach
because I know he’s the face of that program
and everything that he’s meant to that staff
and that program and that city, that univer-
sity. ”
Here are five things to look for when
Northern Illinois plays Utah State (8-5):
LYNCH PIN:
Lynch accounts for 65 percent of the NIU
offense with 1,881 yards rushing, 2,676
passing and 43 touchdowns. He’s 24-3 as
the starter in two seasons. His eight 100-
yard rushing games include two of more
than 300 yards.
CONSOLATION PRIZE:
The teams are coming off losses in con-
ference championship games. NIU, the
Mid-American Conference West Division
champion, was routed 47-27 by Bowling
Green in the conference title game. Utah
State, which edged Boise State for the
Mountain West Mountain Division title,
lost 24-17 to Fresno State in the league
championship game.
SKILL GUYS:
Lynch isn’t a one-man band. Cameron
Stingily has 1,081 yards rushing, giving
NIU its first 1,000-yard rushing tandem.
Three wide receivers have at least 30 catch-
es each: Tommylee Lewis has 80 catches for
660 yards and three touchdowns, Da’Ron
Brown has 42 catches for 689 yards and
nine scores and Juwan Brescacin has 30
catches for 469 yards and five TDs.
LINEBACKERS:
Jake Doughty and Zach Vigil lead an
Aggies defense that has intercepted 16
passes in its last nine games and scored
three touchdowns in 2013. Doughty has
140 tackles, two sacks, an interception,
one fumble recovery — which he returned
86 yards for a TD against Fresno State —
and one forced fumble. Vigil has 115 tack-
les, two sacks, one interception, two fum-
ble recoveries and two forced fumbles.
BOWLING: NIU is playing in its sixth
straight bowl game and second Poinsettia
Bowl. It lost 37-7 to TCU in 2006
Poinsettia Bowl. Utah State is playing in
its school-record third straight bowl game.
The Aggies are facing a MAC team in a bowl
for the third straight year and the fourth
time overall. They beat Toledo in last year’s
Famous Idaho Potato Bowl, lost to Ohio in
the 2011 Famous Idaho Potato Bowl and
beat Ball State in the 1993 Las Vegas Bowl.
Lynch leads NIU vs Utah St in Poinsettia Bowl
Jordan Lynch
SPORTS 14
Thursday • Dec. 26, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Need $$$ for
Hol i day Shoppi ng?
DOMINICK’S
JEWELRY
905 Laurel St. San Carlos
650.593.1199
Tu – F: 10 -5; Sa 10-3
D|amonds º Go|d º O|d Jewe|ry
Appra|sa| Serv|ces º Jewe|ry Repa|r
by
keeping up physically with NFL
receivers and allowed opposing quar-
terbacks to have a 110 passer rating
when throwing in his direction,
according to Pro Football Focus.
After allowing two touchdowns on
four passes against Philadelphia on
Nov. 3, Hayden hurt his groin in prac-
tice and was shut down for the season.
“Unfortunately some of these
injuries have limited what some of
these guys can do,” Allen said.
By trading down, the Raiders got an
additional second-round pick they used
on offensive tackle Menelik Watson,
who had played only two seasons of
organized football. Watson also
missed much of training camp and the
start of the season with injuries and is
mostly being used in six-linemen for-
mations.
The highlights from the draft were
third-round linebacker Sio Moore, who
has been a starter all season and has 3
1/2 sacks, and sixth-round tight end
Mychal Rivera, who has 36 catches for
384 yards and four touchdowns. Sixth-
round defensive lineman Stacy McGee
has also shown promise.
Allen said he believes some of these
rookies will be part of the nucleus of
the organization when it ends a run of
11 straight non-winning seasons.
“It’s not a huge percentage where
those guys come in and make a huge
impact early in their career,” Allen
said. “Obviously, you know about the
ones that do, but rookies generally
don’t make a huge impact in their first
year. But there’s a lot of things that we
see in these guys that we can develop
where they can get better, where they
can be the backbone of our team mov-
ing forward.”
McKenzie’s first draft class has pro-
duced even less, although he was ham-
pered by not having a pick until 95th
overall at the end of the third round.
His first pick, offensive lineman
Tony Bergstrom, played sparingly as a
rookie and has spent all of this season
on injured reserve. The most produc-
tive player from that class was fourth-
round linebacker Miles Burris, who
started 15 games as a rookie but missed
the first 10 games this season with a
knee injury. He has played only 30
defensive snaps since his return.
Three of the six players are no
longer with the team. Fifth-round
defensive lineman Jack Crawford has
played 126 defensive snaps this sea-
son and has yet to make a sack in his
career.
Continued from page 11
RAIDERS
George Mason rallies to
beat Saint Mary’s 65-63
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
HONOLULU — Patrick Holloway and Bryon Allen
scored 15 points each as George Mason rallied to beat
Saint Mary’s 65-63 in Wednesday’s seventh-place game
of the Diamond Head Classic.
Johnny Williams added 14 points for the Patriots (6-6),
who trailed the entire game until Allen’s jumper with 2:42
remaining.
James Walker III and Stephen Holt scored 14 points
apiece for the Gaels (9-3) and Brad Waldow scored 10
poi nt s.
Saint Mary’s cut the deficit to one on two occasions in
the final 14 seconds, the last on Walker’s free throw with
7.7 seconds that made it 63-62.
Allen then made two free throws to give George Mason
a 65-62 lead with 6.2 seconds remaining. Holt was then
fouled at midcourt with 3.3 seconds, but only made of his
two free throws. Okoloji was fouled, but missed both of
his attempts.
Waldow’s full-court heave with 1 second remaining went
off the backboard.
By John Wawrow
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ORCHARD PARK, N.Y. — New
England Patriots coach Bill
Belichick is blaming recently insti-
tuted NFL rules shortening offseason
practice time for what he claims to be
an increasing number of player
injuries.
Speaking during a conference call
with Buffalo-area
reporters this week,
Belichick said play-
ers are more vulner-
able to being hurt
because they’re less
prepared. And he
called the new rules
limiting offseason
workouts — includ-
ing training camp
— as being “the wrong approach.”
What’s in question is whether
injuries are, in fact, on the rise since
the new rules were put in place in
2011. NFL spokesman Michael
Signora disputed Belichick, saying
the league has no evidence to back up
his assertions.
The NFL closely monitors injury
data, but declined to release its num-
bers.
Belichick questions NFL
offseason workout limits
Bill
Belichick
SPORTS 15
Thursday • Dec. 26, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
EASTERNCONFERENCE
ATLANTICDIVISION
W L Pct GB
Toronto 11 15 .423 —
Boston 12 17 .414 1/2
New York 9 19 .321 3
Brooklyn 9 19 .321 3
Philadelphia 8 20 .286 4
SOUTHEASTDIVISION
W L Pct GB
Miami 22 6 .786 —
Atlanta 15 13 .536 7
Charlotte 14 15 .483 8 1/2
Washington 12 13 .480 8 1/2
Orlando 8 20 .286 14
CENTRALDIVISION
W L Pct GB
Indiana 23 5 .821 —
Detroit 14 16 .467 10
Chicago 11 16 .407 11 1/2
Cleveland 10 17 .370 12 1/2
Milwaukee 6 22 .214 17
WESTERNCONFERENCE
SOUTWESTDIVISION
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 22 6 .786 —
Houston 18 11 .621 4 1/2
Dallas 16 12 .571 6
New Orleans 12 14 .462 9
Memphis 12 15 .444 9 1/2
NORTHWEST DIVISION
W L Pct GB
Portland 23 5 .821 —
Oklahoma City 23 5 .821 —
Denver 14 13 .519 8 1/2
Minnesota 13 15 .464 10
Utah 8 23 .258 16 1/2
PACIFICDIVISION
W L Pct GB
L.A. Clippers 20 9 .690 —
Phoenix 17 10 .630 2
Golden State 16 13 .552 4
L.A. Lakers 13 16 .448 7
Sacramento 8 19 .296 11
Monday’sGames
New York 103, Orlando 98
Detroit 115, Cleveland 92
Charlotte 111, Milwaukee 110, OT
Miami 121, Atlanta 119, OT
Indiana 103, Brooklyn 86
Dallas 111, Houston 104
Memphis 104, Utah 94
San Antonio 112,Toronto 99
Phoenix 117, L.A. Lakers 90
Golden State 89, Denver 81
New Orleans 113, Sacramento 100
Tuesday’sGames
No games scheduled
Wednesday’sGames
Chicago 95, Brooklyn 78
Oklahoma City 123, New York 94
Miami 101, L.A. Lakers 95
Houston at San Antonio, 8 p.m.
L.A. Clippers at Golden State, late
Thursday’sGames
Atlanta at Cleveland, 4 p.m.
Memphis at Houston, 5 p.m.
San Antonio at Dallas, 5:30 p.m.
L.A. Clippers at Portland, 7:30 p.m.
Tuesday
Baseball
National League
MILWAUKEE BREWERS — Assigned RHP
Michael Olmsted outright to Nashville (PCL).
NEW YORK METS — Claimed RHP Ryan
Reid off waivers from Pittsburgh.
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
NBA— Fined Brooklyn F Paul Pierce $15,000
for making excessive and unnecessary con-
tact with Indiana G George Hill during
Monday’s game.
Wednesday
BASEBALL
National League
LOS ANGELES DODGERS — Agreed to
terms with 3B Juan Uribe.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
DALLAS COWBOYS — Released WR/KR
Micheal Spurlock. Signed QB Jon Kitna.
DETROIT LIONS— Placed TE Brandon Pet-
tigrew on injured reserve.
NEW ORLEANS SAINTS — Signed S Ter-
rence Frederick off of Cleveland’s practice
squad.
NEWYORK GIANTS— Placed S Cooper Tay-
lor on injured reserve.Signed G Eric Herman
from the practice squad and CB Travis
Howard to the practice squad.
NBA GLANCE TRANSACTIONS
NATIONALCONFERENCE
EAST
W L T Pct PF PA
Philadelphia 9 6 0 .600 418 360
Dallas 8 7 0 .533 417 408
N.Y. Giants 6 9 0 .400 274 377
Washington 3 12 0 .200 328 458
SOUTH
W L T Pct PF PA
x-Carolina 11 4 0 .733 345 221
New Orleans 10 5 0 .667 372 287
Atlanta 4 11 0 .267 333 422
Tampa Bay 4 11 0 .267 271 347
NORTH
W L T Pct PF PA
Chicago 8 7 0 .533 417 445
Green Bay 7 7 1 .500 384 400
Detroit 7 8 0 .467 382 362
Minnesota 4 10 1 .300 377 467
WEST
W L T Pct PF PA
x-Seattle 12 3 0 .800 390 222
x-San Francisco 11 4 0 .733 383 252
Arizona 10 5 0 .667 359 301
St. Louis 7 8 0 .467 339 337
AMERICANCONFERENCE
EAST
W L T Pct PF PA
y-New England 11 4 0 .733 410 318
Miami 8 7 0 .533 310 315
N.Y. Jets 7 8 0 .467 270 380
Buffalo 6 9 0 .400 319 354
SOUTH
W L T Pct PF PA
y-Indianapolis 10 5 0 .667 361 326
Tennessee 6 9 0 .400 346 371
Jacksonville 4 11 0 .267 237 419
Houston 2 13 0 .133 266 412
NORTH
W L T Pct PF PA
y-Cincinnati 10 5 0 .667 396 288
Baltimore 8 7 0 .533 303 318
Pittsburgh 7 8 0 .467 359 363
Cleveland 4 11 0 .267 301 386
WEST
W L T Pct PF PA
y-Denver 12 3 0 .800 572 385
x-Kansas City 11 4 0 .733 406 278
San Diego 8 7 0 .533 369 324
Oakland 4 11 0 .267 308 419
x-clinched playoff spot
y-clinched division
Sunday, Dec. 29
Houston at Tennessee, 10 a.m.
Detroit at Minnesota, 10 a.m.
Carolina at Atlanta, 10 a.m.
Cleveland at Pittsburgh, 10 a.m.
Washington at N.Y. Giants, 10 a.m.
Baltimore at Cincinnati, 10 a.m.
Jacksonville at Indianapolis, 10 a.m.
N.Y. Jets at Miami, 10 a.m.
Denver at Oakland, 1:25 p.m.
Kansas City at San Diego, 1:25 p.m.
St. Louis at Seattle, 1:25 p.m.
San Francisco at Arizona, 1:25 p.m.
Green Bay at Chicago, 1:25 p.m.
Tampa Bay at New Orleans, 1:25 p.m.
Buffalo at New England, 1:25 p.m.
Philadelphia at Dallas, 5:30 p.m.
NFL GLANCE
By Beth Harris
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES — Kobe Bryant
wasn’t happy about spending
Christmas Day on the sideline,
unable to help the struggling Los
Angeles Lakers.
It’s a place he’s unaccustomed
to being on the holiday. Bryant
leads the NBA with a record 15
appearances on Christmas Day,
but he’s out an expected four to
six weeks with a fracture in his
left knee.
“It’s strange
to be coming in
on Christmas
and not play-
ing,” he said
before the
Lakers’ 101-95
loss to the
Miami Heat on
We d n e s d a y .
“It’s a foreign feeling, but I’m
here to support my guys.”
LeBron James and Co. have won
six in a row, and the Lakers have
dropped three straight.
“It’s not as special when Kobe’s
not out there,” James said after-
ward.
Bryant’s injury was diagnosed
last week, his second major one
of the season.
He didn’t play his first game
until Dec. 8 after nearly eight
months away while recovering
from a torn Achilles tendon. Then
he got hurt again Dec. 17 at
Memphis while playing his
fourth game in five nights.
“I was fortunate that it was not a
meniscus,” he said.
Initially, Bryant didn’t think he
was seriously hurt against
Memphis. He went down late in
the third quarter, but returned to
finish out the victory in which he
logged a season-high 21 points
in 32 minutes.
“I didn’t know it was fractured,”
he said. “I was expecting a bone
bruise more than anything else. I
thought (the doctor) was joking
when he told me.”
Bryant has been limited to rid-
ing a bike; he isn’t supposed to
put any pressure on his knee.
“It’s just been slow in terms of
laying off it and letting it heal,”
he said. “When you don’t have
activity, you got to watch the
other parts like nutrition.”
Typical of Bryant’s attention to
detail, he said he has been reading
critical comments that suggest he
won’t return this season.
“It’s the same old tune, just
being sung a little more loudly
now,” he said. “These type of
things just help me lock in
more.”
No Kobe on Christmas; says recovery is ‘slow’
Kobe Bryant
16
Thursday • Dec. 26, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SUBURBAN LIVING 17
Thursday • Dec. 26, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ALL ELECTRIC SERVICE™
650-322-9288
FOR ALL YOUR ELECTRICAL NEEDS®
SERVICE CHANGES
SOLAR INSTALLATIONS
LIGHTING / POWER
FIRE ALARM / DATA
GREEN ENERGY
FULLY LICENSED
STATE CERTIFIED
LOCALLY TRAINED
EXPERIENCED
ON CALL 24/7
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
By Kim Cook
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
“To the art of working well, a
civilized race would add the art of
playing well,” philosopher
George Santayana said.
For those with means, pursuing
leisure can involve the finest com-
ponents. Beautiful materials and
craftwork can take these items
into the realm of art.
“The market for these high-end
sporting items is extremely frac-
tured. No one is authentically
showcasing these exceptional
artisans in a way that celebrates
their superior craftsmanship,”
says Pippa McArdle, co-founder of
Bespoke Global, which sells cus-
tom-made home furnishings and
accessories.
So what does play look like, at
the luxury end of the spectrum?
WATER SPORTS
As journalist Tom Brokaw said,
“If fishing is a religion, fly fishing
is high church.” Aficionados
appreciate the craftsmanship of
Willow Reels, started in
Clarkston, Mich., by Chris
Reister. He makes classic fly fish-
ing reels out of aircraft-grade alu-
minum, brass, and ebony, red-
wood, or maple burl. You can buy
the reels laser-cut with scroll, trib-
al or flower motifs, or have your
own design inlaid.
(www.bespokeglobal.com)
In Blue Ridge, Ga., Bill Oyster’s
eponymous company makes sup-
ple bamboo fly rods that he sells
worldwide. Former President
Jimmy Carter has one. The reel
seats are hand-engraved, the cane
is flamed to add spring and
resilience, the finish guides are
bronze and the hardware is blued,
an electrochemical process that
protects against rust. (www. oys-
terbamboo.com)
And then there are boats. Nick
Schade, a designer and boat builder
in Groton, Conn., draws inspira-
tion from early Inuit and Aleut
designs, crafting kayaks and
canoes from a variety of cedars,
fiberglass and carbon-Kevlar
cloth. His Night Heron kayak is in
the Museum of Modern Art’s per-
manent collection. (www.wooden-
boats.com)
Plying the waters in a human-
powered vessel requires a fine pad-
dle; Sanborn Canoe, a Minnesota-
based outfitter, offers some ele-
gant ones, with names like
Minnetonka and Gitchi Gummi.
Made of woods like cedar, aspen
and black walnut, they’re painted
with striking graphics that might
leave you wondering whether to
dip them in the water or mount
them on the wall.
LAND SPORTS
Are teams chasing balls more
your thing? Weekend gridironers
might like one of the footballs or
baseballs made by Leather Head
Sports, started by Cooperstown,
N.Y., homeboy Paul Cunningham.
Rawhide-laced, in colors ranging
from classic tawny caramel to
royal blue and red, the balls are
made of leather from the Horween
company in Chicago.
Leather Head also makes the
Lemon Ball Baseball, inspired by
the original 19th century lemon-
peel-style ball.
Hit a home run with one of
Jamey Rouch’s bats made of
pieced cherry and walnut that
comes from near his studio in
Three Rivers, Mich. (Leather Head
and Rouch:
www.bespokeglobal.com)
Kara Ginther’s hand-tooled bike
seats and saddle bags elevate
cycling to another level. Leaves,
fronds, Scottish knitting patterns
and even zodiac patterns have
inspired her designs.
Pursuing leisure can lead to the realm of art
Billiard Toulet has designed the Lambert pool table,crafted of sleek stainless steel,with a top that slides on when
play is over.
See ART, Page 18
18
Thursday • Dec. 26, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SUBURBAN LIVING
* Manufacturer’s mail-in rebate offer valid for purchases made 2/1/14–3/31/14 from participating dealers in the U.S. only. Offer excludes Nantucket

Window Shadings, a collection of Silhouette
®
Window
Shadings. Rebate will be issued in the form of a prepaid reward card and mailed within 6 weeks of rebate claim receipt. Funds do not expire. Subject to applicable law, a $2.00 monthly fee will be assessed
against card balance 7 months after card issuance and each month thereafter. Additional limitations apply. Ask participating dealer for details and rebate form. ©2014 Hunter Douglas. All rights reserved.
All trademarks used herein are the property of Hunter Douglas.
Vignette
®
Modern Roman Shades
Energy efficient and fashionable.
Vignette
®
Modern Roman Shades insulate your windows to
help keep your home warmer in winter, cooler in summer.
Intelligent choice. Ask for details.
$
25REBATE
on Duette
®
Architella
®
Honeycomb Shades
PER
UNIT*
$
50REBATE
on Silhouette
®
Window Shadings
and Vignette
®
Modern Roman Shades
PER
UNIT*
FEBRUARY 1 – MARCH 31, 2014
39876
Follow Us At Facebook or Twitter
Rebarts Interiors
247 California Dr., Burlingame
990 Industrial Rd #106, San Carlos
Mon-Fri 10:00-5:00
Sat 11:00-4:00
Evening Appointments Available
www.rebarts.com
6 5 0 - 3 4 8 - 1 2 6 8
(www.karaginther.com)
The look and feel of California 1950s surf
culture can be found in purple heart,
mahogany and walnut beach racquet pad-
dles, outfitted with leather grips and loops.
(www.artemare.co )
Remote-control vehicles at the luxury
end are more like mini versions of real cars,
with quality elements like titanium shocks,
steel gears and leather seats. Retailers offer
off-road vehicles, slick sports cars and
speedboats, including several from high-
end maker Traxxas which zoom at speeds up
to 100 mph. (www.trendtimes.com)
AIR SPORTS
Once the sport of kings, falconry has
developed a modern following in groups
like The North American Falconers
Association. Ken Hooke of Wi nni peg,
Manitoba, may be falconry’s pre-eminent
craftsman, making hoods for the sporting
birds.
The hoods are placed over the birds’ heads
to calm them. Hooke makes them out of
calf, goat, and exotic skins such as ostrich,
iguana and red monitor lizard.
(www.bespokeglobal.com; www.falconry-
hoodsinternational.com)
TABLE SPORTS
Alexandra Llewellyn was introduced to
backgammon by her Egyptian step-grand-
father. It became a lifelong passion, and
she now designs eye-catching sets with
photographic images of pheasant feathers,
antlers and vintage female portraits.
“Growing up in the country, I’ve collect-
ed pheasant feathers for years. The peacock
feather design was inspired by the game’s
Persian roots, and the carnival and nude
women evoke gambling and nightclubs in
the 1920s,” Llewellyn says.
She recently made a custom backgammon
set that documented a couple’s life together.
“Their first date, where they lived and their
nationalities inspired the artwork,” she
says. “The leather compartments were
embossed with hand-written quotes from
their love letters, and the playing pieces
were engraved with the places they’ve trav-
eled over the years.”
She also offers custom game pieces made
of malachite, rock crystal, lapis lazuli,
turquoise or jasper, encased in brass.
(www.alexandralldesign.com)
Hattrick backgammon sets, popular with
professional players, are offered with white,
blue, red or green leather playing fields,
marbleized acrylic playing pieces and gold-
plated case locks at www.zontikgames.com.
Chess fans know how dismaying it can be
when an ongoing game gets jostled.
Hammacher Schlemmer offers a wall-
mounted board complete with acrylic
shelves and rosewood and boxwood pieces
that will keep the action safe for days or
weeks. (www.hammacher.com)
Foosball is for more than college pubs.
High-end Italian game-table maker Teckell
offers crystal, walnut and even 24-karat
gold in their collection.
(www.teckell.com)
Billiard Toulet has designed the Lambert
pool table, crafted of sleek stainless steel,
with a top that slides on when play is
over. A soundproofed ball return and tour-
nament-grade cloth are part of the pack-
age, but you can add an LED light set as an
option. (www.quantum-play.com)
The makers of the chess set used by
1972 champions Boris Spassky and
Bobby Fischer also make a range of other
board games, including Scrabble,
Monopol y, Trivial Pursuit and Risk.
They’ll create custom games using exotic
leathers like alligator with stingray, nick-
el, gold or even diamond finishes.
(www.geoffreyparker.com)
And for armchair speed demons, consid-
er Stock Car Racing Simulator, which puts
you at realistic controls to zoom around
one of 21 legendary courses, including the
Daytona International Speedway.
(www.hammacher.com)
Continued from page 17
ART
By Lee Reich
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
If you had driven past my house in recent
days, you might have thought you were
watching a movie in reverse. There I was,
opening trash bags, dumping out leaves and
spreading them over the ground.
These were bags left curbside for me by
neighbors near and far.
It does seem crazy, doesn’t it, gathering
up all these bags and dumping out all those
leaves? But dried, dead leaves contain stored
energy, the sun’s energy. Put them on or in
the soil, as I have been doing, and they
release their energy to support the growth
and activity of fungi, earthworms and other
soil organisms. Mostly, these are friendly
creatures, and nurturing them allows them
to thwart unfriendly organisms, such as
those causing some plant diseases.
Besides disease prevention, when leaves
are gobbled up by soil organisms, the nutri-
ents in them are being released. Think of all
those minerals taken in by a tree’s wide,
spreading and deep roots. Just falling to the
ground all around you, leaves are, pound for
pound, about as rich in minerals as is
manure.
NOT FOR EVERYWHERE
Of course, spreading leaves over the
ground or just leaving them there in the first
place is not an option for every site.
I have spread leaves over a hayfield in
which I’ve planted chestnut trees. In com-
ing years, these trees will shade out the
grass; I’m just helping the ground become
the leaf-blanketed forest floor that it will
eventually turn into.
Beneath a row of dwarf apple trees, a leafy
mulch keeps weeds from growing and steal-
ing nutrients and water from my small trees.
And no need to rake up all the leaves from
even a manicured lawn: A mulching mower
can grind them up to let enough grass peek
through to thrive.
If leaves form such a thick blanket that
raking is necessary, don’t bag them until
you’ve spread all you can under your shrubs
and trees, and over your flower beds. Save
yourself effort and do something for the
plants: At the very least, leave leaves where
they drop.
LEAVES PLUS TIME EQUALS COMPOST
Still drowning in leaves? Hold off a bit
longer before you pack them into trash
bags. Consider packing the leaves into a
dense pile for composting. Leaves make
excellent, weed-free compost if you let
them sit long enough.
In a rush? Then mix in some manure,
sprinklings of soybean meal or other mate-
rials rich in nitrogen.
By next year at this time, most of the
leaves you spread around or piled up this
year will have either settled or evanesced
into thin air, becoming mostly carbon
dioxide and water. A significant but small
portion will endure in the soil, having been
transformed to humus. This humus provides
long-term benefit to the soil, aerating
sticky clays and helping sands sponge up
and hold onto water for plant use.
Roses, rhododendrons, lawns — almost
all plants, in fact — appreciate any leaves
left or applied around their “feet.”
Of course, if everyone follows my advice,
I’ll no longer be importing neighbors’
leaves.
As a general rule, leave the leaves
SUBURBAN LIVING 19
Thursday • Dec. 26, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Lee Reich
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
You might deck your halls with boughs of
homegrown holly, but unless you planned
ahead, those boughs could lack red berries.
And that leads us to some frank talk about sex.
A holly berry, like any other fruit, is a
mature ovary, home for a seed or seeds. Seeds
are what stimulate development of any fruit,
but seeds themselves can’t get started without
sex.
Sex for a plant happens when male pollen
lands on the female part of a flower, called the
stigma, and then grows a pollen tube down
the style, which is attached to the stigma, to
reach and fertilize an egg. The product of this
union is a seed, the development of which
induces the surrounding floral part to swell to
become a fruit.
WHY HOLLY SEX IS IMPORTANT
Why all this concern with holly’s sex life?
You probably didn’t have similar concerns
about this summer’s tomatoes; you planted
whatever varieties you wanted, and then
reaped plenty of swollen ovaries ... er, fruits
... and, incidentally, seeds.
Holly is different because its pollen is
borne on flowers that are strictly male and its
eggs are contained in flowers that are strictly
female. Each tomato flower, in contrast, has
both male and female parts, so can take care of
itself. Similarly self-sufficient are rose flow-
ers, apple flowers, sunflowers and the flowers
of many other plants.
Plants like holly that have single-sex flow-
ers are known botanically as “imperfect”
flowers. They also include many nut trees.
HOLLY KEEP THE SEXES SEPARATE
Holly goes one step further, with whole
plants being either male or female. Such a sit-
uation encourages species diversity by man-
dating cross-pollination among different
plants. Nut trees achieve the same effect with
biochemical or physical barriers, or different
bloom times that prevent male flowers from
pollinating female flowers on the same plant.
Even some perfect flowers, such as apple
blossoms, have biochemical or physical bar-
riers preventing self-pollination.
So the upshot is that you need an all-male
holly tree if you are going to deck your halls
with (berried) boughs from your all-female
holly tree. Amale plant — all leaves and no
berries — is not as showy as a female, but it
only takes one to help a half-dozen or so
females bear fruit. The males, like the
females, do bear flowers, but neither male nor
female holly flowers are worth a second look
unless you want to peer closely to determine
the sex of the plant.
No need, perhaps, to plant a male holly just
to get your female to yield berries. Suitable
pollen could conceivably come from wild or
neighbors’ trees (perhaps a male you kindly
offered to plant in your neighbor’s yard, heh
heh).
GOOD PARTNERS
Making things even more complicated for
those trying to bring about berries, hollies
are not all that promiscuous. Afew different
species supply us with berried boughs —
notably American holly, English holly and
Meserve holly — but generally, each stays
faithful to its own species. (An exception is
English holly, which can pollinate Meserve
holly, a hybrid offspring of the English
species.) And some males cannot adequately
pollinate some females in the same species
because bloom times do not overlap.
If you need a male, breeders have come up
with a number of superior varieties, their gen-
der obvious from their names: for example,
Blue Prince and Blue Boy Meserve, and Jersey
Knight American. These males, as you might
guess, are particularly good mates for the
varieties named, respectively, Blue Princess,
Blue Girl and Jersey Princess.
Hollies need males to look their best
Plants like holly that have single-sex flowers are known botanically as ‘imperfect’ flowers.
DATEBOOK 20
Thursday • Dec. 26, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
THURSDAY, DEC. 26
CuriOdyssey Winter Camp. 1651
Coyote Point Drive, San Mateo.
Running on Dec. 26, 27 and 30. Each
day features an engaging science
theme. To register go to
www.CuriOdyssey.org/activities/win-
ter-camps. first-, second- and third-
graders only. For more information
call 342-7755.
Broadway by the Bay Presents: ‘It’s
aWonderful Life: A LiveRadio Play.’
Fox Theatre, 2215 Broadway,
Redwood City. Through Dec. 29. For
more information call 579-5565.
Off the Grid: Burlingame. 5 p.m. to 9
p.m. Broadway Caltrain Station on
California Drive and Carmelita Ave.,
Burlingame. There will be a 10-vendor
lineup. For more information call (415)
274-2510.
FRIDAY, DEC. 27
CuriOdyssey Winter Camp. 1651
Coyote Point Drive, San Mateo.
Running on Dec. 26, 27 and 30. Each
day features an engaging science
theme. To register go to
www.CuriOdyssey.org/activities/win-
ter-camps. first-, second- and third-
graders only. For more information
call 342-7755.
Annual Lego Holiday
Extravaganza. 11 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
Museum of American Heritage, 351
Homer Ave., Palo Alto. The Museum of
American Heritage (MOAH), The Bay
Area Lego User Group (BayLUG) and
Bay Area LegoTrain Club (BayLTC) are
co-hosting the 2013/14 Lego Holiday
display at MOAH. Enjoy a variety of
Lego creations made by members of
the club, featuring train layouts, Bay
Area landmarks, castles, miniature
cities, sculptures and more. Admission
is $2. Exhibit runs through Jan. 19 on
Friday, Saturday and Sunday.
Reel Comic Relief:‘When Harry Met
Sally.’ 7 p.m. Belmont Library, 1110
Alameda de las Pulgas, Belmont. Free.
Part of the Reel Comic Relief Belmont
Adult Film Festival. For more informa-
tion contact conrad@smcl.org.
Tommy Castro and the Painkillers
plus The Mighty Mike Schermer
Band. 8 p.m. Club Fox, 2209
Broadway, Redwood City. $20 per per-
son. For more information call (877)
435-9849 or go to
www.clubfoxrwc.com.
SATURDAY, DEC. 28
Annual Lego Holiday
Extravaganza. 11 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
Museum of American Heritage, 351
Homer Ave., Palo Alto. The Museum of
American Heritage (MOAH), The Bay
Area Lego User Group (BayLUG) and
Bay Area LegoTrain Club (BayLTC) are
co-hosting the 2013/14 Lego Holiday
display at MOAH. Enjoy a variety of
Lego creations made by members of
the club, featuring train layouts, Bay
Area landmarks, castles, miniature
cities, sculptures and more. Admission
is $2. Exhibit runs through Jan. 19 on
Friday, Saturday and Sunday.
Finding Love in 2014 Keynotes
Singles Convention. 7:30 p.m.
Marriott Hotel, 1770 S. Amphlett Blvd.,
San Mateo. Susan Bradley is the
author of ‘How to Be Irresistible to the
Opposite Sex,’ ‘Irresistible
Prescriptions for Love’ and the forth-
coming ‘I Know Why You Are Still
Single.’ $20 at the door. For more infor-
mation call (415) 507-9962.
SUNDAY, DEC. 29
Annual Lego Holiday
Extravaganza. 11 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
Museum of American Heritage, 351
Homer Ave., Palo Alto. The Museum of
American Heritage (MOAH), The Bay
Area Lego User Group (BayLUG) and
Bay Area LegoTrain Club (BayLTC) are
co-hosting the 2013/14 Lego Holiday
display at MOAH. Enjoy a variety of
Lego creations made by members of
the club, featuring train layouts, Bay
Area landmarks, castles, miniature
cities, sculptures and more. Admission
is $2. Exhibit runs through Jan. 19 on
Friday, Saturday and Sunday.
Last Sunday Ballroom Tea Dance
with Bob Gutierrez Band. 1 p.m. to
3:30 p.m. San Bruno Senior Center,
1555 Crystal Springs Road. $5. For
more information call 616-7150.
MONDAY, DEC. 30
CuriOdyssey Winter Camp. 1651
Coyote Point Drive, San Mateo.
Running on Dec. 26, 27 and 30. Each
day features an engaging science
theme. To register go to
www.CuriOdyssey.org/activities/win-
ter-camps. first-, second- and third-
graders only. For more information
call 342-7755.
TUESDAY, DEC. 31
New Year’s Party. 10:30 a.m. to 1:30
p.m. San Bruno Senior Center, 1555
Crystal Springs Road. Salmon or prime
rib lunch, Champagne toast at noon,
and dancing to ‘The Knights of
Nostalgia’ Band. $10. For more infor-
mation call 616-7150.
Countdown to Happy ‘Noon’ Year!
11:30 a.m. San Mateo Public Library,
55 W. Third Ave., San Mateo. Hear sto-
ries, make a craft and enjoy refresh-
ments as we count down to the
‘Noon’ year! Free. For more informa-
tion call 522 -7838.
AlternativeNewYear’sEve.6:30 p.m.
to 9:30 p.m. Mercy Center in
Burlingame. There will be a quiet, can-
dle-lit chapel, Taizé chants, a walk on
the labyrinth and art activities. Visitors
can stay the night. Free. For more
information call 340-7474.
NewYear’s Eve Vigil Mass. 7:30 p.m.
Our Lady of Angels Catholic Church,
1721 Hillsdale Drive, Burlingame. Free.
For more information call 347-7768.
Rock in the New Year with
RockSkool — The Ultimate Party
Rock Tribute. 8 p.m. Club Fox, 2209
Broadway, Redwood City. $20 per per-
son. For more information call (877)
435-9849 or go to
www.clubfoxrwc.com.
New Year’s Eve Dance Party. 9:15
p.m. to 12:15 a.m. Cubberley Pavilion,
4000 Middlefield Road, Palo Alto. $15.
For more information email
cheryl@boogiewoogieballroom.com.
WEDNESDAY, JAN. 1
New Year’s Day Worship. 8 a.m., 11
a.m., 7:30 p.m. Our Lady of Angels
Catholic Church, 1721 Hillsdale Drive,
Burlingame. Free. For more informa-
tion call 347-7768.
RacetoEndWorld Hunger. 9:30 a.m.
Mountain View Kite Flying Park, 3070
Shoreline Blvd., Mountain View. 5k run
and walk/race proceeds go locally to
Second Harvest Food Bank of Santa
Clara and San Mateo counties, the
Health Trust and internationally to
fund women and micro finance pro-
grams. $40 the day of the race, $35 by
Dec. 30. Fee includes technical T-shirt
and chip. For more information call
574-2994.
New Year’s Day Worship. 9:30 a.m.
Robert’s Church, 1380 Crystal Springs
Road, San Bruno. Free. For more infor-
mation call 589-2800.
THURSDAY, JAN. 2
Winter Break Explorer Day. 10 a.m.
to 3 p.m. 1651 Coyote Point Drive, San
Mateo. Explore the science of the
world. Free. For more information go
to www.CuriOdyssey.org.
FRIDAY, JAN. 3
Winter Break Explorer Day. 10 a.m.
to 3 p.m. 1651 Coyote Point Drive, San
Mateo. Explore the science of the
world. Free. For more information go
to www.CuriOdyssey.org.
Free Friday at the San Mateo
County History Museum. 10 a.m. to
4 p.m. 2200 Broadway, Redwood City.
In addition to free admission, there
will be two programs throughout the
day. For more information call 299-
0104 or go to www.historysmc.org.
Annual Lego Holiday
Extravaganza. 11 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
Museum of American Heritage, 351
Homer Ave., Palo Alto. The Museum of
American Heritage (MOAH), The Bay
Area Lego User Group (BayLUG) and
Bay Area LegoTrain Club (BayLTC) are
co-hosting the 2013/14 Lego Holiday
display at MOAH. Enjoy a variety of
Lego creations made by members of
the club, featuring train layouts, Bay
Area landmarks, castles, miniature
cities, sculptures and more. Admission
is $2. Exhibit runs through Jan. 19 on
Friday, Saturday and Sunday.
Registration Deadline for New
Volunteer Recruitment at Fioli. The
deadline for the New Volunteer
Recruitment (Jan. 11) is 4 p.m. today.
Attendees can register by emailing
volunteer@fioli.org.
SATURDAY, JAN. 4
Annual Lego Holiday
Extravaganza. 11 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
Museum of American Heritage, 351
Homer Ave., Palo Alto. The Museum of
American Heritage (MOAH), The Bay
Area Lego User Group (BayLUG) and
Bay Area LegoTrain Club (BayLTC) are
co-hosting the 2013/14 Lego Holiday
display at MOAH. Enjoy a variety of
Lego creations made by members of
the club, featuring train layouts, Bay
Area landmarks, castles, miniature
cities, sculptures and more. Admission
is $2. Exhibit runs through Jan. 19 on
Friday, Saturday and Sunday.
San Mateo Professional Alliance
Weekly Networking Lunch. Noon to
1 p.m. Spiedo Ristorante, 223 E. Fourth
Ave., San Mateo. Free admission, but
lunch is $17. For more information call
430-6500.
Historical, Cultural and Social Links
to Downton Abbey. 1 p.m. to 3:30
pm. San Mateo Main Library, 55 W.
Third Ave., San Mateo. Dr. DiAnn Ellis
will cover the world of Downton
Abbey and Victorian and Edwardian
periods. Tea and biscuits will be
served at intermission. Free. For more
information or to RSVP, call 522-7818.
Feast of Epiphany. 4:30 p.m. Robert’s
Church, 1380 Crystal Springs Road,
San Bruno. Free. For more information
call 589-2800.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
according to the air district.
Those with respiratory conditions,
children and elderly residents are
advised to limit outdoor activity dur-
ing Spare the Air days.
Residents who violate the ban will
be levied a $100 fine or can take a
wood-smoke awareness classes.
Repeat violators will receive a fine of
$500 or more.
More information about Spare the
Air alerts is available at the air dis-
trict’s website at www.sparetheair.org.
This is the season’s 19th alert. The
season runs until Feb. 28.
Continued from page 1
AIR
governor’s new school finance reform
plan that created a local control fund-
ing formula that will like reduce the
extra property tax returned to local
entities.
In the last fiscal year, the county’s
overall tax revenues increased by $73
million. Of that, $17.7 million was
one-time money from dissolution of
the former redevelopment agencies and
$24.9 million was an increase in
excess property taxes left over after
funding schools. Sales and use tax rev-
enue also went up $14.6 million large-
ly due to the Measure Ahalf-cent sales
tax approved in November 2012.
Another voter-approved tax — a 2.5
percent vehicle rental business license
tax approved in June 2012 — also
meant $7.9 million in new tax revenue
for the county dating from July 1,
2012.
On top of looking at what money
may be — or not be — coming into the
county, the 16-page report also sum-
marizes where the county is commit-
ting its funds. The county has a grow-
ing list of deferred maintenance proj-
ect and budgets over the next two years
spending more than $50 million on
facilities and another $50 million on
information technology. Some of the
work will be funded by the Measure A
half-cent sales tax revenue.
The capital improvement budget is
$136 million this fiscal year followed
by $83 million the next. This includes
$158 million in bonds and general
fund investments in the upcoming
Maple Street Correctional Center cur-
rently being built.
The county’s jails, new and existing,
are also key factors in the county’s
capital assets which increased 2 per-
cent, or $15 million, to $856 million.
This includes $11.3 million for the
Maple Street jail and a half-million to
upgrade the heating, ventilation and
air conditioning systems for the exist-
ing Maguire Correctional Facility and
county hospital.
The county’s long-term debt dropped
$15 million, or 4 percent, this last fis-
cal year although that figure does not
include pensions and other retirement
liabilities.
The full report is available online at
www. c o . s a n ma t e o . c a . u s / c o n -
troller/2013PAFR.pdf.
michelle@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 102
Continued from page 1
REPORT
By Jonathan Landrum Jr.
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ATLANTA— It’s been a tough couple
of years for Monster.
The audio cable company was in a
coveted position as the decade began
after launching what became the
hottest headphones on the market,
Beats by Dre. The audio devices had
hip-hop/production legend Dr. Dre as
a namesake and soon became synony-
mous with headphone chic.
Celebrities like LeBron James, Diddy,
Lady Gaga and Justin Bieber launched
their own signature Beats by Dre
lines, and a host of other performers,
athletes and entertainers became unof-
ficial representatives as the most
famous faces on the planet sported
Beats on their ears.
But Beats Electronics ended its part-
nership with Monster last year. Even
though Beats is still superhot,
Monster CEO Noel Lee believes his
San Francisco-based company has the
proper pieces in place to regain its
mojo.
“It left us having to reinvent our-
selves, and that’s what we are going to
do,” said self-proclaimed “Head
Monster” Lee.
Monster is pushing out headphones,
tablets, slim battery power adapters
and portable DJ turntable mixers. The
company is also tapping stars like
Shaquille O’Neal, Nick Cannon, Jason
Aldean, Meek Mill and Drew Brees as
its pitchmen.
Lee, who often rides a gold-plated
Segway because of a neurodegenerative
disease, is seen as an eccentric cham-
pion of the privately owned Monster.
Aconfident individual, he takes a lot of
the credit for the stylish Beats by Dre
headphones. He said the key contribu-
tion of Beats Electronics, founded Dr.
Dre and Interscope Records chairman
Jimmy Iovine, was marketing (though
he allows that Robert Bruner, chief
designer at Beats, did the industrial
design).
“People have to realize that them
was us,” Lee said. “Monster did that.
Beats supplied the marketing. We sup-
plied all the distribution, all the tech-
nology, all the engineering that went
into the product. What we didn’t have
was the marketing clout before.”
Now, Lee says he does with music
producer Swizz Beatz, who purchased a
co-ownership stake in the company
this year. But don’t expect Swizz Beatz
to follow in the footsteps of Dr. Dre
and release his own line anytime soon.
His focus has been to make the
Monster brand appealing to consumers
in the same way he helped in Reebok’s
return to relevance.
“I’m here to show the world who we
are,” said Swizz Beatz, who has
appeared in a commercial with A$AP
Rocky to promote Monster’s DNA
headphones. “There are so many being
powered and plugged by Monster, but
hardly anyone knows that. It’s all
about getting back to the roots and
showing people what we’re all about.”
After Swizz Beatz was brought into
the fold, he persuaded retired basket-
ball champion O’Neal to be part of the
Monster team. It was an easy decision
for O’Neal, who still has strong mar-
keting power.
“People ask me all the time, ‘How do
you pick a partner?”’ O’Neal said. “It’s
simple. I’ve got to believe in the prod-
uct. I believe in this. For me, it’s never
about money starting off. I learned a
long time ago, when you invest your
money, time and it’s something you
believe in, it will hit in the long run.
Monster is proven.”
Monster, which was founded by Lee
in 1978, became known for selling
pricey video and audio cables. Monster
eventually partnered with Beats,
launching Beats by Dre in 2008. Both
companies flourished together over the
next five years. In its last year with
Monster, 2012, Beats by Dre captured
53 percent of the $1 billion annual
headphone market, according to the
NPD Group, a market research group.
But Beats decided not to renew a five-
year contract with Monster in early
2012 after HTC bought a majority
stake in the company for $300 million
(it later sold half the shares back to
Monster). Since the split, Beats’ mar-
ket share has increased to 57 percent.
Monster looks to rebuild brand after loss of Beats
COMICS/GAMES
12-26-13
WEDNESDAY’S PUZZLE SOLVED
PREVIOUS
SUDOKU
ANSWERS
Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 • La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifieds
Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifieds
Boggle Puzzle Everyday in DateBook


Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.
K
e
n
K
e
n
®
is
a
r
e
g
is
te
r
e
d
tr
a
d
e
m
a
r
k
o
f N
e
x
to
y
, L
L
C
. ©
2
0
1
3
K
e
n
K
e
n
P
u
z
z
le
L
L
C
. A
ll r
ig
h
ts
r
e
s
e
r
v
e
d
.
D
is
t. b
y
U
n
iv
e
r
s
a
l U
c
lic
k
fo
r
U
F
S
, In
c
. w
w
w
.k
e
n
k
e
n
.c
o
m
1
2
-
2
6
-
1
3
ACROSS
1 Prepare mushrooms
6 Spin
11 Panoramas
12 Nap
13 Riverbank clowns
14 Stems from
15 Car deal
16 Looked over
17 Jiffies
19 “— do for now”
23 Corp. bigwig
26 Put up shingles
28 Make tracks
29 Weaken
31 Portents
33 Letter closing word
34 Pointy beard
35 “Nightmare” street
36 Cable channel
39 Lot of bills
40 Run quickly
42 Drawn up
44 Hymn finale
46 Metal fastener
51 Room warmer
54 Epic by Virgil
55 Dogie, for one
56 Postpones
57 Gem measure
58 Be crazy about
DOWN
1 Venue
2 Film terrier
3 Versatile vehicles
4 Weight deductions
5 Dangerous curve
6 Install electricity
7 Children’s classic
8 Mir successor
9 AAA suggestion
10 Scale notes
11 Library abbr.
12 Go-ahead (hyph.)
16 Environmental prefix
18 Sooner than anon
20 Iota preceder
21 Like some jackets
22 — majeste
23 String quartet member
24 Purple fruits
25 California’s Big —
27 Egg — yung
29 Colored
30 Half an African fly
32 Gullet
34 Wildebeest
37 Prow opposite
38 “Tai —”
41 Kind of yoga
43 At bay
45 Carnivore’s diet
47 PC fodder
48 Change direction
49 Limerick locale
50 NFL scores
51 This, in Latin
52 Memorable decade
53 Spring mo.
54 Oklahoma town
DILBERT® CROSSWORD PUZZLE
CRANKY GIRL®
PEARLS BEFORE SWINE®
GET FUZZY®
THURSDAY, DECEMBER 26, 2013
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) — A disruption
may arise from a sudden change of plans. Don’t
concern yourself with what others do. Go your
own way, and force others to take a second look
at how you handle yourself.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) — Develop a new skill
or idea. You can then turn it into a means to financial
or emotional gain. Plan a romantic or otherwise
enriching getaway — it could have very good results.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) — Not everyone will
agree with you, and that’s OK. Avoid arguing over
petty details. Your time is better spent researching
and developing new ventures. Don’t accommodate
unreasonable demands.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) — If someone is being
critical, make a quick escape. Short trips and meeting
with friends will allow you to mingle with people who
appreciate your knowledge and sense of humor.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) — Look into developing
a new hobby or take some time to plan a winter
getaway. Don’t allow uncertainties or complications
imposed by others to bother you. If you take
control, you will be able to let go.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) — If you get ahead of
yourself, you’ll have to retrace your steps. Examine
your options. Your personal contributions will
inspire the right kind of interest.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) — Now is a time for
reminiscing. Hold on to those memories that make you
feel happy and encourage you to create more happy
times to remember down the road.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) — Take the time to relax and
enjoy the festivities. Meeting up with friends will be
pleasurable and will lead to new ideas for improving
your future. A change of scenery is what you need.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) — Give yourself
the spa treatment and do not feel obliged to
contribute more than your share of the domestic
responsibilities. Don’t fret over what others want.
Take time to do what makes you happy.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) — Do some running
around or get together with someone with whom
you can share your experiences. Love and romance
are in the air and will make an ordinary day become
spectacular. Be open about your plans.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) — Be a homebody and
effect changes that will make you more comfortable or
simplify a project. Don’t impose limitations. Discipline
and hard work are all that you need to meet your goals.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) — Some personal
adjustments will help you attract attention. If you
are honest, you will get the aid you need. Love and
romance are highlighted.
COPYRIGHT 2013 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
Thursday • Dec. 26, 2013 21
THE DAILY JOURNAL
22
Thursday • Dec. 26, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
DELIVERY
DRIVER
PENINSULA
ROUTES
Wanted: Independent Contractor to provide
delivery of the Daily Journal six days per week,
Monday thru Saturday, early morning.
Experience with newspaper delivery required.
Must have valid license and appropriate insurance
coverage to provide this service in order to be
eligible. Papers are available for pickup in down-
town San Mateo at 3:30 a.m.
Please apply in person Monday-Friday, 9am to
4pm at The Daily Journal, 800 S. Claremont St
#210, San Mateo.
GOT JOBS?
The best career seekers
read the Daily Journal.
We will help you recruit qualified, talented
individuals to join your company or organization.
The Daily Journal’s readership covers a wide
range of qualifications for all types of positions.
For the best value and the best results,
recruit from the Daily Journal...
Contact us for a free consultation
Call (650) 344-5200 or
Email: ads@smdailyjournal.com
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
110 Employment
TAXI & Limo Driver, Wanted, full time,
paid weekly, between $500 and $700
cash, (650)921-2071
110 Employment
CAREGIVERS
2 years experience
required.
Immediate placement
on all assignments.
Call (650)777-9000
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
110 Employment
CUSTOMER CONTACT -
OUTSIDE POSITION
FULL TIME/PART TIME
$15.62 per hour start
to $35 per hour
with bonuses
Full training and expenses
Mr. Connors (650)372-2810
CAREGIVERS, HHA, CNA’S
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY
15 N. Ellsworth Avenue, Ste. 201
San Mateo, CA 94401
PLEASE CALL
650-206-5200
Please apply in person from Monday to Friday
(Between 10:00am to 4:00pm)
You can also call for an appointment or
apply online at
www.assistainhomecare.com
ASSISTA
IN-HOME CARE
110 Employment
INSPECTOR / HOME -
DO YOU HAVE
A LADDER?
DRAW A DIAGRAM?
USE A TAPE MEASURE?
CAMERA?
Full training, to do inspections
for our 28 year old company.
Good pay. And expenses.
Mr. Inez, (650)372-2813
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
180 Businesses For Sale
ESTABLISHED BUSINESS FOR SALE
in Downtown San Mateo (510) 962 -
1569
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258717
The following person is doing business
as: Joya Limo, 435 North San Mateo
Drive #4, SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Joya ASM, Inc., same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by a Corporation The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN .
/s/ Santiago Miranda Adolfo /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 12/03/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/05/13, 12/12/13, 12/19/13, 12/26/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258600
The following person is doing business
as: Autosense, 219 Old County Road,
Suite D, SAN CARLOS, CA 94070 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Jeremy Sklyar, 544 Fathom Dr., San Ma-
teo, CA 94404 and Sean Patrick Ellis,
600 Niagara Ave., San Francisco, CA
94112. The business is conducted by a
General Partnership The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN .
/s/ Jeremy Sklyar/
/s/ Sean P. Ellis /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/20/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/05/13, 12/12/13, 12/19/13, 12/26/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258598
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Hookahup Hookah Delivery,
3450 Edison St., SAN MATEO, CA
94403 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owners: 1) Fares Saadeh, same ad-
dress, 2) Ibrahim Rabah, same address,
3) Faris Nasser, same address The busi-
ness is conducted by Copartners The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN .
/s/ Fares Saadeh /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/20/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/05/13, 12/12/13, 12/19/13, 12/26/13).
23 Thursday • Dec. 26, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
LEGAL NOTICES
Fictitious Business Name Statements, Trustee
Sale Notice, Alcohol Beverage License, Name
Change, Probate, Notice of Adoption, Divorce
Summons, Notice of Public Sales, and More.
Published in the Daily Journal for San Mateo County.
Fax your request to: 650-344-5290
Email them to: ads@smdailyjournal.com
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258661
The following person is doing business
as: Jeffrey Rent, 2739 El Camino Real,
REDWOOD CITY, CA 94061 is hereby
registered by the following owner: James
Thompson, 2224 Davis Drive, Burlin-
game, CA 94010 and Jeffrey T. Kockos,
2155 Ward Way, Woodside, CA 94062.
The business is conducted by a General
Partnership. The registrants commenced
to transact business under the FBN .
/s/ James Thompson and Jeffrey T.
Kockos /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/26/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/05/13, 12/12/13, 12/19/13, 12/26/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258733
The following person is doing business
as: GLS Appliances, 652 Leahy Street,
REDWOOD CITY, CA 94061 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Grego-
ry Shneyer, same address. The business
is conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN .
/s/ Gregory Shneyer /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 12/03/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/05/13, 12/12/13, 12/19/13, 12/26/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258500
The following person is doing business
as: Mexicana Airlines, 9841 Airport Blvd.,
Suite 400, LOS ANGELES, CA 90045 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Compania Mexicana De Aviacion, SA DE
CV, XOLA #535 Colonia Del Valle . The
business is conducted by a Corporation.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 12/12/1991.
/s/ Maru E. Johansen /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/13/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/05/13, 12/12/13, 12/19/13, 12/26/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258658
The following person is doing business
as: JB Change Consulting, 1250 Dewey
Street, REDWOOD CITY, CA 94061 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Janet Birgenheier, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 11/21/2013.
/s/Janet Birgenheier /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/26/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/05/13, 12/12/13, 12/19/13, 12/26/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258832
The following person is doing business
as: My Legal Document, 1000 National
Ave., #240, SAN BRUNO, CA 94066 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Winston Arver, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN N/A.
/s/ Winston Arver /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 12/11/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/12/13, 12/19/13, 12/26/13, 01/02/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258784
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Laguna Glen, 2) Laguna San Juan
Capistrano, 2180 Sand Hill Rd., Ste. 100,
MENLO PARK, CA 94025 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Laguna
Glen San Juan Capistrano CCRC, LLC,
CA. The business is conducted by a Lim-
ited Liability Company. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN.
/s/ Warren Spieker /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 12/09/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/12/13, 12/19/13, 12/26/13, 01/02/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258591
The following person is doing business
as: The Vapor Bar, 840 B El Camino Re-
al 1, BELMONT, CA, 94002 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Hani
Tannous, 217 Santa Dominga, San Bru-
no, CA 94066. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN.
/s/ Hani Tannous /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/19/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/19/13, 12/26/13, 01/02/13, 01/09/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258886
The following person is doing business
as: Redwood Grove Publishing, 1710
Croner Avenue, MENLO PARK, CA
94025 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Camilo Colorado, same ad-
dress. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced
to transact business under the FBN.
/s/ Camilo Colorado /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 12/16/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/19/13, 12/26/13, 01/02/13, 01/09/14).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258911
The following person is doing business
as: Quality Comfort Heating & Air Condi-
tioning, 320 Azalia Dr., EAST PALO AL-
TO, CA 94303, is hereby registered by
the following owner: Javier Valencia, Jr.,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN 07/26/2013.
/s/ Javier Valencia, Jr. /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 12/17/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/19/13, 12/26/13, 01/02/13, 01/09/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258866
The following person is doing business
as: GES Logistics, 460 Grandview Dr.,
#B, SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA
94080, is hereby registered by the fol-
lowing owner: Global Experience Spe-
cialists, Inc., NV. The business is con-
ducted by a Corporation. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN 07/26/2013.
/s/ Diana L. Watson /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 12/12/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/19/13, 12/26/13, 01/02/13, 01/09/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258825
The following person is doing business
as: ASmile4UfromJanet, 730 2nd Ave.,
SAN BRUNO, CA 94066, is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Janet
Miles, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN 04/25/2012.
/s/ Diana L. Watson /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 12/11/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/19/13, 12/26/13, 01/02/13, 01/09/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258883
The following person is doing business
as: Bistro Vida, 641 Santa Cruz Ave.,
MENLO PARK, CA 94025 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: 641 Santa
Cruz Avenue, Inc, CA. The business is
conducted by a Corporation. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN 09/02/1997.
/s/ Diana L. Watson /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 12/13/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/19/13, 12/26/13, 01/02/13, 01/09/14).
210 Lost & Found
LOST AFRICAN GRAY PARROT -
(415)377-0859 REWARD!
LOST DOG-SMALL TERRIER-$5000
REWARD Norfolk Terrier missing from
Woodside Rd near High Rd on Dec 13.
Violet is 11mths, 7lbs, tan, female, no
collar, microchipped. Please help bring
her home! (650)568-9642
LOST GOLD Cross at Carlmont Shop-
ping Cente, by Lunardi’s market
(Reward) (415)559-7291
LOST GOLD WATCH - with brown lizard
strap. Unique design. REWARD! Call
(650)326-2772.
LOST ON Sunday 03/10/13, a Bin of
Documents on Catalpa Ave., in
San Mateo. REWARD, (650)450-3107
LOST SET OF CAR KEYS near Millbrae
Post Office on June 18, 2013, at 3:00
p.m. Reward! Call (650)692-4100
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
REWARD!! LOST DOG - 15LB All White
Dog, needs meds, in the area of Oaknoll
RWC on 3/23/13, (650)400-1175
295 Art
ART: 5 prints, nude figures, 14” x 18”,
signed Andrea Medina, 1980s. $40/all.
650-345-3277
296 Appliances
AMANA HTM outdoor furnace heat ex-
changer,new motor, pump, electronics.
Model ERGW0012. 80,000 BTU $50.
(650)342-7933
COIN-OP GAS DRYER - $100.,
(650)948-4895
ELECTRIC DRYER (Kenmore) asking
$95, good condition! (650)579-7924
FRIGIDAIRE ELECTRIC stove, $285. as
new! (650)430-6556
GAS STOVE (Magic Chef) asking $95,
good condition! (650)579-7924
LEAN MEAN Fat Grilling Machine by
George Foreman. $15 (650)832-1392
LG WASHER/ DRYER in one. Excellent
condition, new hoses, ultracapacity,
7 cycle, fron load, $600, (650)290-0954
MAYTAG WALL oven, 24”x24”x24”, ex-
cellent condition, $50 obo, (650)345-
5502
PREMIER GAS stove. $285. As new!
(650)430-6556
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
ROTISSERIE GE, IN-door or out door,
Holds large turkey 24” wide, Like new,
$80, OBO (650)344-8549
SANYO MINI REFRIGERATOR- $40.,
(415)346-6038
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SMALL REFRIGERATOR great for of-
fice or studio apartment . Good condition
$40.00 (650)504-6058
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
297 Bicycles
GIRLS BIKE 18” Pink, Looks New, Hard-
ly Used $80 (650)293-7313
GIRLS SCHWINN Bike 24” 5 speed in
very good condition $75 (650)591-3313
SCHWINN 20” Boy’s Bike, Good Condi-
tion $40 (650)756-9516
298 Collectibles
101 MINT Postage Stamps from Eu-
rope, Africa, Latin America. Pre 1941,
All different . $6.00, (650)787-8600
120 Foreign (70), U.S. (50) USED Post-
age Stamps. Most pre-World War II. All
different, all detached from envelopes.
$5.00 all, 650-787-8600
1920'S AQUA Glass Beaded Flapper
Purse (drawstring bag) & Faux Pearl
Flapper Collar. $50. 650-762-6048
1940 VINTAGE telephone bench maple
antiques collectibles $75 (650)755-9833
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
2 VINTAGE Light Bulbs circa 1905. Edi-
son Mazda Lamps. Both still working -
$50 (650)-762-6048
4 NOLAN RYAN - Uncut Sheets, Rare
Gold Cards $90 (650)365-3987
400 YEARBOOKS - Sports Illustrated
Sports Book 70-90’s $90 all (650)365-
3987
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23”, $50. OBO,
(650)754-3597
BOX OF 2000 Sports Cards, 1997-2004
years, $20 (650)592-2648
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
FRANKLIN MINT Thimble collection with
display rack. $55. 650-291-4779
JAPANESE MOTIF end table, $99
(650)520-9366
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MEMORABILIA CARD COLLECTION,
large collection, Marilyn Monroe, James
Dean, John Wayne and hundreds more.
$3,300/obo.. Over 50% off
(650)319-5334.
SCHILLER HIPPIE poster, linen, Sparta
graphics 1968. Mint condition. $600.00.
(650)701-0276
TATTOO ARTIST - Norman Rockwell
figurine, limited addition, $90.,
(650)766-3024
TEA POTS - (6) collectables, good con-
dition, $10. each, (650)571-5899
TRIPOD - Professional Quality used in
1930’s Hollywood, $99, obo
(650)363-0360
UNIQUE, FRAMED to display, original
Nevada slot machine glass plate. One of
a kind. $50. 650-762-6048
300 Toys
14 HOTWHEELS - Redline, 32
Ford/Mustang/Corv. $90 all (650)365-
3987
‘66 CHEVELLE TOY CAR, Blue collecti-
ble. $12. (415)337-1690
LEGO - unopened, Monster truck trans-
porter, figures, 299 pieces, ages 5-12.
$27.00 (650)578-9208
300 Toys
MAHJONG SET 166 tiles in case good
condition $35.00 call 650-570-602
PINK BARBIE 57 Chevy Convertible
28" long (sells on E-Bay for $250) in box
$99 (650)591-9769
RADIO CONTROL car; Jeep with off
road with equipment $99 OBO
(650)851-0878
TONKA EXCAVATOR, two arms move,
articulated,only $22 (650)595-3933
TOY - Barney interactive activity, musical
learning, talking, great for the car, $16.
obo, (650)349-6059
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14” x 21”, carved top, $45.,
(650)341-7890
ANTIQUE CRYSTAL/ARCADE Coffee
Grinder. $80. 650-596-0513
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE OLD Copper Wash Tub, 30 x
12 x 13 with handles, $65 (650)591-3313
ANTIQUE WASHING MACHINE - some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
BOX FULL TOYS Original Pkg., 40’s -
50’s, $90 for all (650)365-3987
MAHOGANY ANTIQUE Secretary desk,
72” x 40” , 3 drawers, Display case, bev-
elled glass, $500. (650)766-3024
OLD VINTAGE Wooden “Sea Captains
Tool Chest” 35 x 16 x 16, $65 (650)591-
3313
STERLING SILVER loving cup 10" circa
with walnut base 1912 $65
(650)520-3425
303 Electronics
27” SONY TRINITRON TV - great condi-
tion, rarely used, includes remote, not flat
screen, $65., (650)357-7484
32 “ FLAT SCREEN TV - Slightly Used.
HDMI 1080, $100 (650)283-0396
46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
AUTO TOP hoist still in box
$99.00 or best offer (650)493-9993
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
BLACKBERRY PHONE good condition
$99.00 or best offer (650)493-9993
DVD PLAYER, $25. Call (650)558-0206
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
IPHONE GOOD condition $99.00 or best
offer (650)493-9993
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
NIKON FG SLR body w 3 Vivitar zoom
lenses 28-70mm. 28-219 & 85-205, Ex-
cell Xond $ 99 SOLD!
PHILLIPS ENERGY STAR 20” color TV
with remote. Good condition, $20
(650)888-0129
SAMSUNG 27" TV Less than 6 months
old, with remote. Moving must sell
$100.00 (650) 995-0012
SAMSUNG, FLAT screenTV, 32” like
new! With Memorex DVD player, $185
(650)274-4337
SET OF 3 wireless phones all for $50
(650)342-8436
SLIDE PROJECTOR Air Equipped Su-
per 66 A and screen $30 for all
(SOLD
SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with re-
mote good condition $99 (650)345-1111
304 Furniture
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
2 TWIN Mattresses - Like New - $35
each , OBO (650)515-2605
304 Furniture
ALASKAN SCENE painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
AMOIRE ENTERTAINMENT cabinet $50
(650)622-6695
ANODYZED BRONZE ETEGERE Tall
banker’s rack. Beautiful style; for plants
flowers sculptures $70 (415)585-3622
BBQ GRILL, Ducane, propane $90
(650)591-4927
BRASS DAYBED - Beautiful, $99.,
(650)365-0202
CHAIRS 2 Blue Good Condition $50
OBO (650)345-5644
CHANDELIER, ELEGANT, $75.
(650)348-6955
CHINA CABINET, 53” x “78” wooden
with glass. Good shape. $120 obo.
(650)438-0517
CHINESE LACQUERED cabinet, 2
shelves and doors. Beautiful. 23 width 30
height 11 depth $75 (650)591-4927
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DINNING ROOM table with chairs excel-
lent condition like new. $99.00 (650)504-
6058
DISPLAY CABINET 72”x 21” x39 1/2”
High Top Display, 2 shelves in rear $99
(650)591-3313
DRESSER - 6 drawer 61" wide, 31" high,
& 18" deep $50 SOLD
DRESSERlarge, $55. Call
(650)558-0206
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
DURALINER ROCKING CHAIR, Maple
Finish, Cream Cushion w matching otto-
man $70 (650)583-4943.
END TABLE, medium large, with marble
top. and drawer. $60 or best offer,
(650)681-7061
EZ CHAIR, large, $15. Call (650)558-
0206
FLAT TOP DESK, $35.. Call (650)558-
0206
I-JOY MASSAGE chair, exc condition
$95 (650)591-4927
KING SIZE Brass bed frame. $200 OBO
(650)368-6674
KITCHEN CABINETS - 3 metal base
kitchen cabinets with drawers and wood
doors, $99., (650)347-8061
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
MATCHING RECLINER, SOFA & LOVE
SEAT - Light multi-colored fabric, $95.
for all, (650)286-1357
MIRRORS, large, $25. Call
(650)558-0206
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
NATURAL WOOD table 8' by 4' $99
(650)515-2605
OUTDOOR WOOD SCREEN - NEW $85
RETAIL $130 (650)873-8167
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PATIO TABLE with 4 chairs, glass top,
good condition 41” in diameter $95
(650)591-4927
PEDESTAL SINK $25 (650)766-4858
PORTABLE JEWELRY display case
wood, see through lid $45. 25 x 20 x 4 in-
ches. (650)592-2648.
QUEEN SIZE Hide a Bed, Like new
$275, SOLD
RECLINER CHAIR very comfortable
coast $600.00 sacrifice $80.00
(650)504-6058
RECLINING CHAIR, almost new, Beige
$100 SOLD
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
SOFA 7-1/2' $25 (650)322-2814
304 Furniture
ROCKING CHAIR Great condition,
1970’s style, dark brown, wooden,
suede cushion, photo availble, $99.,
(650)716-3337
ROCKING CHAIR w/wood carving, arm-
rest, rollers, swivels $99, (650)592-2648
SEWING TABLE, folding, $20. Call
(650)558-0206
SHELVING UNIT from IKEA interior
metal, glass nice condition $50/obo.
(650)589-8348
SOFA EXCELLENT CONDITION. 8FT
NEUTRAL COLOR $99 OBO (650)345-
5644
SOFA PASTEL color excellent
condition $99 (650)701-1892
SOLID WOOD oak desk $50 (650)622-
6695
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
TEA / UTILITY CART, $15. (650)573-
7035, (650)504-6057
TEACART - Wooden, $60. obo,
(650)766-9998
TOWER BOOK Shelf, white 72” tall x 13”
wide, $20 (650)591-3313
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
TV STAND brown. $40.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
TV STAND, with shelves, holds large TV,
very good condition. $90. (650)573-7035,
(650)504-6057.
TWINE BED including frame good con-
dition $45.00 (650)504-6058
WALL CLOCK - 31 day windup, 26 “
long, $99 (650)592-2648
WHITE 5 Drawer dresser.Excellent con-
dition. Moving. Must sell $90.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
WICKER DRESSER, white, 3 drawers,
exc condition 31 width 32 height 21.5
depth $35 (650)591-4927
WOOD BOOKCASE unit - good condi-
tion $65.00 (650)504-6058
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE” decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Three avail-
able, Call (650)345-5502
BRADFORD COLLECTOR Plates THAI
(Asian) - $35 (650)348-6955
CANNING POTS, two 21 quart with lids,
$5 each. (650)322-2814
COFFEE MAKER, Makes 4 cups $12,
(650)368-3037
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
GAS STOVE - Roper, Oven w 4 Burners,
good condition $95 (650)515-2605
HOUSE HEATER Excellent condition.
Works great. Must sell. $30.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
KIRBY VACUUM cleaner good condition
with extras $90 OBO SOLD!01976533
MANGLE-SIMPLEX FLOOR model,
Working, $20 (650)344-6565
MONOPOLY GAME - rules, plastic real
estate, metal counters, all cards and pa-
per money $10 (650)574-3229
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
PUSH LAWN MOWER - very good
condition $25., (650)580-3316
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
VACUMN EXCELLENT condition. Works
great.Moving. Must sell. $35.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
VINTAGE VICTORIAN cotton lawn
dress, - $65. (650)348-6955
307 Jewelry & Clothing
PRO DIVER Invicta Watch. Brand new in
box, $60. (650)290-0689
24
Thursday • Dec. 26, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 Chess side
6 Chest bone
9 Stripped
14 Ancient region in
Asia Minor
15 Republic on St.
George’s
Channel: Abbr.
16 Basket willow
17 Pompeii
attraction
18 Quicken Loans
Arena NBAer
19 Strike site
20 Place to see FDR
21 40-decibel unit
22 St. Pat’s Day,
e.g.
23 Pretend to be
24 Cricket call
26 French pop
29 Large primates
31 Barbary Wars
participant, now
33 One of the smart
set
36 Seaweed extract
37 Ballpark fig.?
38 Boxing biopic
39 Minnesota’s state
fish, and a hint to
all 12 border
answers in this
puzzle
41 Chum
42 Do goo
43 Covent Garden
highlight
44 Dalmatian’s spot
46 Slothfulness
48 Meyers of “SNL”
49 Motor suffix
50 “Coffee __?”
52 Pequod captain
56 Shade provider
58 Put in shells, say
59 Little brook
60 Prove untrue
62 Like the vbs.
“creep” and
“weep”
63 “Please, Mom?”
64 Lay to rest
65 Bolted down
some nuts
66 ’50s movie
monster
destroyed at
Mount Aso
67 Calm water
metaphor
68 Rosy
69 Brooks
Robinson’s base
DOWN
1 Swallows, e.g.
2 Acerbic
dispatcher on
“Taxi”
3 Moving manga
4 Multiplexes
5 __ in kilo
6 Some copiers
7 “Argo” extra
8 Drink
9 Conductor of the
first rescue
mission
10 At an angle
11 Best-selling
program, in tech
lingo
12 Broad foot letters
13 Like some humor
21 Novel query
requirement
25 What possums
do when
threatened
27 Bing, to Google
28 Two under par
30 Investigate,
tabby-style
32 Classic
33 Hogwarts
teaching
34 Kagan who
clerked for
Thurgood
Marshall
35 Rosetta Stone
discovery area
36 Like
40 1997 film with the
tagline “Coming
soon. Honest.”
45 Giza pyramid
builder
47 Depends (on)
48 Like some
sesame-crusted
tuna
51 Rich cake
53 Language that
gives us
“pajamas”
54 Scene of some
sworn
statements
55 Compulsory
poker bet
57 Seas, to
Cezanne
60 Important
61 Blowup: Abbr.
63 Old PC monitor
By C.C. Burnikel
(c)2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
12/26/13
12/26/13
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
LADIES GLOVES - gold lame' elbow
length gloves, size 7.5, $15. new,
(650)868-0436
308 Tools
BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269
CEMENT/ CONCRETE hand mixing box
Like New, metal $25 (650)368-0748
CRACO 395 SP-PRO, electronic paint
sprayer.Commercial grade. Used only
once. $600/obo. (650)784-3427
CRAFTMAN JIG Saw 3.9 amp. with vari-
able speeds $65 (650)359-9269
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN 9" Radial Arm Saw with 6"
dado set. No stand. $55 (650)341-6402
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
LOG CHAIN (HEAVY DUTY) 14' $75
(650)948-0912
NEW 18VOLT Drill/Driver w/ light,
warranty, only $29.99 (650)595-3933
PUSH LAWN mower $25 (650)851-0878
ROLLING STEEL Ladder10 steps, Like
New. $475 obo, (650)333-4400
TOOL BOX full of tools. Moving must
sell. $100.00 (650) 995-0012
309 Office Equipment
CANON COPIER, $55. Call
(650)558-0206
DESK - 7 drawer wood desk, 5X2X2.5'
$25., (650)726-9658
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20., (650)871-7200
16 BOOKS on Histoy if WWII Excllent
condition $95 all obo, (650)345-5502
2 FLOWER pots with Gardenia's both for
$20 (650)369-9762
4 IN 1 STERO UNIT. CD player broken.
$20., (650)834-4926
70 BAMBOO POLES - 6 to 12ft. long
$40. for all can deliver, (415)346-6038
Alkaline GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM - ,
PH Balance water, anti-oxident proper-
ties, new, $100., (650)619-9203.
ALUMINUM WINDOWS - (10)double
pane, different sizes, $10. each,
(415)819-3835
ANTIQUE CAMEL BACK TRUNK -wood
lining. (great toy box) $99.,
(650)580-3316
ANTIQUE KILIM RUNNER woven zig
zag design 7' by 6" by 4' $99.,
(650)580-3316
ANTIQUE LANTERN Olde Brooklyn lan-
terns, battery operated, safe, new in box,
$100, (650)726-1037
ARTIFICIAL FICUS TREE 6 ft. life like,
full branches. in basket $55. (650)269-
3712
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
BALANCING SANTA, Mint condition,
Santa rocks back/forth, 20 in high, sturdy
metal, snowman, chimney, $12.00
(650)578-9208
BLACK LEATHER Organizer, Unop-
ened, Any Year, Cell Holder, Wallet, Cal-
ender., In Box $12 (650)578-9208
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
BODY BY JAKE AB Scissor Exercise
Machine w/instructions. $50.00
(650)637-0930
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
DRAIN CLEANER Snake 6' long,
new/unused only $5 (650)595-3933
310 Misc. For Sale
BUFFET CENTERPIECE: Lalique style
crystal bowl. For entre, fruit, or dessert
$20 (415)585-3622
CHEESESET 6 small and 1 large plate
Italian design never used Ceramica Cas-
tellania $25. (650)644-9027
COPPERLIKE CENTERPIECE, unused
oval, 18 inches high, x 22 x 17,$10.00
(650)578-9208
DOWN PILLOW; Fully Stuffed, sterilized,
allergy-free ticking. Mint Condition $25
(650)375-8044
DVD'S TV programs 24 4 seasons $20
ea. (650)952-3466
ELECTRIC IMPACT wrench sockets
case warranty $39.95 (650)595-3933
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good
condition $50., (650)878-9542
EXOTIC EROTIC Ball SF & Mardi gras 2
dvd's $25 ea. (415)971-7555
EXTENDED BATH BENCH - never
used, $45. obo, (650)832-1392
FRONT LOADER, bucket & arm move,
articulated $12.50 (650)595-3933
FULL SIZE quilted Flowerly print green &
print $25 (650)871-7200
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GOURMET SET for cooking on your ta-
ble. European style. $15 (650)644-9027
GRANDFATHER CLOCK with bevel
glass in front and sides (650)355-2996
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10),
(650)364-7777
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
HONEYWELL HEPA Filter $99
(650)622-6695
HUMAN HAIR Wigs, (4) Black hair, $90
all (650)624-9880
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
310 Misc. For Sale
IGLOO COOLER - 3 gallon beverage
cooler, new, still in box, $15.,
(650)345-3840
JAPANESE SAKE Set, unused, boxes,
Geisha design on carafe and 2 sake
cups, $7.00 (650)578-9208
JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
K9 ADVANTIX - for dogs 21-55 lbs.,
repels and kills fleas and ticks, $60.,
(650)343-4461
KENNESAW ORIGINAL salute cannon
$30. (650)726-1037
LAMPSHADE - Shantung, bell shaped,
off white, 9” tall, 11” diameter, great con-
dition, $7., (650)347-5104
LANDSCAPE PICTURES (3) hand
painted 25" long 21" wide, wooden
frame, $60 for all 3, (650)201-9166
LAWN CHAIRS (4) White, plastic, $8.
each, (415)346-6038
LITTLE PLAYMATE by IGLOO-10"x10",
cooler includes 2 icepaks, 1 cooler pack
$20 (650)574-3229
MANUAL LAWN mower ( by Scott Turf )
never used $65 (650)756-7878
MARTEX BATH TOWELS(3) 26"x49",
watermelon color $15 (650)574-3229
MARTEX HAND TOWEL(5) 15"x28", wa-
termelon color $10 (650)574-3229
MEDICINE CABINET - 18” X 24”, almost
new, mirror, $20., (650)515-2605
MEN’S LEATHER travel bags (2), used
$25 each.(650)322-2814
MERITAGE PICNIC Time Wine and
Cheese Tote - new black $45
(650)644-9027
MIRROR 41" by 29" Hardrock maple
frame $90 OBO (650)593-8880
NATIVITY SET, new, beautiful, ceramic,
gold-trimmed, 11-pc.,.asking: $50.
Call: 650-345-3277 /message
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
OUTDOOR GREENHOUSE. Handmade.
33" wide x 20 inches deep. 64.5 " high.
$70.00 (650)871-7200
OVAL MIRROR $10 (650)766-4858
PET CARRIER Excellent Condition Very
Clean Size small "Petaire" Brand
$50.00 (650)871-7200
PILGRIM DOLLS, 15” boy & girl, new,
from Harvest Festival, adorable $25 650-
345-3277
310 Misc. For Sale
PRINCESS PLANT 6' tall in bloom pot-
ted $15 (415)346-6038
QUEENSIZE BEDSPREAD w/2 Pillow
Shams (print) $30.00 (650)341-1861
RED DEVIL VACUUM CLEANER - $25.,
(650)593-0893
REVERSIBLE KING BEDSPREAD bur-
gundy; for the new extra deep beds. New
$60 (415)585-3622
RICHARD NORTH Patterson 5 Hard-
back Books @$3.00 each (650)341-1861
ROGERS' BRAND stainless steel steak
knife: $15 (415)585-3622
SCREWDRIVERS, SET of 6 sealed
pack, warranty only $5 (650)595-3933
SET OF 11 Thomas registers 1976 mint
condition $25 (415)346-6038
SF GREETING CARDS -(300 with enve-
lopes) factory sealed, $10 (650)365-3987
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48” x 69”
$70 (650)692-3260
SINGER SEWING machine 1952 cabinet
style with black/gold motor. $35.
(650)574-4439
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
TRAVIS MCGEE (Wikipedia) best mys-
teries 18 classic paperbacks for $25.
Steve (650) 518-6614
TWIN BEDDING: 2 White Spreads,
Dust-Ruffles, Shams. Pink Blanket,
Fit/flat sheets, pillows ALL $60 (650)375-
8044
TWIN SIZE quilt Nautica, New. Yellow,
White, Black Trim “San Marino" pattern
$40 Firm (650)871-7200.
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VINTAGE WHITE Punch Bowl/Serving
Bowl Set with 10 cups plus one extra
$40. (650)873-8167
VINYL SHOWER CURTAIN
black/gold/white floral on aqua $10
(650)574-3229
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WEST AFRICAN hand carved tribal
masks - $25 (650)348-6955
WHEEL CHAIR asking $75 OBO
(650)834-2583
WOMEN'S LADY Cougar gold iron set
set - $25. (650)348-6955
311 Musical Instruments
ACOUSTIC GUITAR no brand $65
(650)348-6428
FENDER BASSMAN 25 watt Bass am-
plifier. $50. 650-367-8146
GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO -
Appraised @$5450., want $3500 obo,
(650)343-4461
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
K MANDOLIN - A Style, 1940’2 with
Case, $50 firm SOLD!
NEAPOLITAN MANDOLIN With case
sounds good $75 SOLD!
OLD USED Tube Amplifer, working con-
dition $25 SOLD!
SHERMAN CLAY Player Piano, with 104
player rolls, $1000, (650)579-1259
UKULELE STILL in box unused, no
brand $35 SOLD!
312 Pets & Animals
BAMBOO BIRD Cage - very intricate de-
sign - 21"x15"x16". $50 (650)341-6402
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
AUTHENTIC PERUVIAN VICUNA PON-
CHO: 56” square. Red, black trim, knot-
ted fringe hem. $99 (650)375-8044
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
HOODED ALL-WEATHER JACKET:
reversible. Outer: weatherproof tan color.
Iner: Navy plush, elastic cuffs. $10
(650)375-8044
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES DONEGAL design 100% wool
cap from Wicklow, Ireland, $20. Call
(650)341-8342
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES FUR Jacket (fake) size 12 good
condition $30 (650)692-3260
LADIES WINTER coat 3/4 length, rust
color, with fur collar, $30 obo
(650)515-2605
LADIES WOOL BLAZER: Classic, size
12, brass buttons. Sag Harbor. Excellent
condition. $15.00 (650)375-8044
LARRY LEVINE Women's Hooded down
jacket. Medium. Scarlet. Good as new.
Asking $40 OBO (650)888-0129
LEATHER JACKET Classic Biker Style.
Zippered Pockets. Sturdy. Excellent Con-
dition. Mens, XL Black Leather $50.00
(650)357-7484
LEATHER JACKET, brown bomber, with
pockets.Sz XL, $88. (415)337-1690
LEATHER JACKETS (5) - used but not
abused. Like New, $100 each.
(650)670-2888
MENS JEANS (11) Brand names various
sizes 32,33,34 waist 30,32 length $100.
for all (650)347-5104
MENS WRANGLER jeans waist 31
length 36 five pairs $20 each plus bonus
Leonard (650)504-3621
MINK CAPE, beautiful with satin lining,
light color $75 obo (650)591-4927
NIKE PULLOVER mens heavy jacket
Navy Blue & Red, Reg. price $200 sell-
ing for $59 (650)692-3260
PROM PARTY Dress, Long sleeveless
size 6, magenta, with shawl like new $40
obo (650)349-6059
VELVET DRAPE, 100% cotton, new
beautiful burgundy 82"X52" W/6"hems:
$45 (415)585-3622
VINTAGE 1970’S GRECIAN MADE
DRESS SIZE 6-8, $35 (650)873-8167
WHITE LACE 1880’s reproduction dress
- size 6, $100., (650)873-8167
WINTER COAT, ladies european style
nubek leather, tan colored, green lapel &
hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10 labeled Du-
plex and is priced at $15 (650)574-4439
317 Building Materials
(1) 2" FAUX WOOD WINDOW BLIND,
with 50" and 71" height, still in box, $50
obo (650)345-5502
30 FLUORESCENT Lamps 48" (brand
new in box) $75 for all (650)369-9762
BATHROOM VANITY, antique, with top
and sink: - $65. (650)348-6955
BRAND NEW Millgard window + frame -
$85. (650)348-6955
PVC - 1”, 100 feet, 20 ft. lengths, $25.,
(650)851-0878
318 Sports Equipment
2 BASKETBALLS Spalding NBA, Hardly
used, $30 all (650)341-5347
2 SOCCER balls hardly used, $30 all
San Mateo, (650)341-5347
AB LOUNGE exercise machine cost
$100. sell for $25. Call 650-570-6023
FISHERS MENS skis $35 (650)322-2814
25 Thursday • Dec. 26, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
318 Sports Equipment
BOWLING BALLS. Selling 2 - 16 lb.
balls for $25.00 each. (650)341-1861
BUCKET OF 260 golf balls, $25.
(650)339-3195
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18” di-
meter, “Halex” brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
DL1000 BOAT Winch Rope & More,
$50., (650)726-9658
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
GOTT 10-GAL beverage cooler$20.
(650)345-3840
KIDS 20" mongoose mountain bike 6
speeds front wheel shock good condition
asking $65 (650)574-7743
LADIES BOWLING SET- 8 lb. ball, 7 1/2
sized shoes, case, $45., (650)766-3024
LADIES STEP thruRoadmaster 10
speed bike w. shop-basket Good
Condition. $55 OBO call: (650) 342-8510
LOOKING TO PURCHASE A TOTAL
GYM Price Negotible. SOLD
MENS ROLLER Blades size 101/2 never
used $25 (650)520-3425
POWER PLUS Exercise Machine $99
(650)368-3037
REI 2 man tent $40 (650)552-9436
SALMON FISHING weights 21/2 pound
canon balls $25 (650)756-7878
Say Goodbye To The 'Stick In
Style & Gear Up For a Super
Season!
49er Swag at Lowest Prices
Niner Empire
957C Industrial Rd. San Carlos
T-F 10-6; Sa 10 -4
ninerempire.com
(415)370-7725
SCHWINN 26" man's bike with balloon
tires $75 like new (650)355-2996
SMALL TRAMPOLINE $5.00 call 650-
570-6023
STATIONARY BIKE, Volt, Clean, $15
SOLD!
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
VINTAGE ENGLISH ladies ice skates -
up to size 7-8, $45., (650)873-8167
WET SUIT - medium size, $95., call for
info (650)851-0878
WO 16 lb. Bowling Balls @ $25.00 each.
(650)341-1861
322 Garage Sales
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
335 Garden Equipment
CRAFTSMAN 5.5 HP gas lawn mower
with rear bag $55., (650)355-2996
GAS ENGINE String Trimmer - Homelite
- 25cc engine. Excellent Cond.$70
(650)654-9252
LAWNMOWER - American made, man-
ual/push, excellent condition, $50.,
(650)342-8436
REMINGTON ELECTRIC lawn mower,
$40. (650)355-2996
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
CLASSICAL YASHICA camera
in leather case $25. (650)644-9027
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
VIVITAR ZOOM lens-28mm70mm. Filter
and lens cap. Original owner. $50. Cash
SOLD
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $99
(415)971-7555
345 Medical Equipment
INVERSION TABLE relieves pressure
on back. Cost $100.00 sell for $25.
(650)570-6023
MEDICAL EQUIPMENT - Brand new
port-a-potty, never used, $40., Walker,
$30., (650)832-1392
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
380 Real Estate Services
HOMES & PROPERTIES
The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
weekly Real Estate Section.
Look for it
every Friday and Weekend
to find information on fine homes
and properties throughout
the local area.
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
studios and 1 bedrooms, New carpets,
new granite counters, dishwasher, balco-
ny, covered carports, storage, pool, no
pets. (650)592-1271
REDWOOD CITY 1 bedroom apartment
$1350. month, $1000 deposit, close to
Downtown RWC, Absolutely no animals.
Call (650)361-1200
SAN MATEO Complete remodeled 2
bdrm 1 bath. Includes parking spot.. Wa-
ter and garbage paid. . $2500/month +
dep. RENTED!
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
470 Rooms
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49.-59.daily + tax
$294.-$322. weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator & A/C
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $40
We’ll run it
‘til you sell it!
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
FLEETWOOD ‘93 $ 3,500/offer. Good
Condition (650)481-5296
MERCEDES ‘06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
625 Classic Cars
FORD ‘63 THUNDERBIRD Hardtop, 390
engine, Leather Interior. Will consider
$6,900 OBO (650)364-1374
630 Trucks & SUV’s
FORD ‘98 EXPLORER 6 cylinder, 167K
miles, excellent condition, good tires,
good brakes, very dependable! $2,400 or
best offer. Moving, must sell! Call
(650)274-4337
635 Vans
‘67 INTERNATIONAL Step Van 1500,
Typical UPS type size. $2500, OBO,
(650)364-1374
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
MOTORCYCLE GLOVES - Excellent
condition, black leather, $35. obo,
(650)223-7187
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAGS with
brackets and other parts, $35.,
(650)670-2888
670 Auto Service
GRAND OPENING!
Sincere Affordable Motors
All makes and models
Over 20 years experience
1940 Leslie St, San Mateo
(650)722-8007
samautoservices@gmail.com
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
CAR TOWchain 9' $35 (650)948-0912
HONDA SPARE tire 13" $25
(415)999-4947
HONDA WHEELS with tires. Good
tread/ 14 in. 3 for $99 (415)999-4947
MECHANIC'S CREEPER vintage, Com-
et model SP, all wood, pillow, four swivel
wheels, great shape. $40.00
(650)591-0063
NEW BATTERY and alternator for a ‘96
Buick Century never used Both for $80
(650)576-6600
NEW, IN box, Ford Mustang aluminum
water pump & gasket, $60.00. Call
(415)370-3950
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, 1
gray marine diesel manual $40
(650)583-5208
SHOP MANUALS for GM Suv's
Year 2002 all for $40 (650)948-0912
TIRE CHAIN cables $23. (650)766-4858
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
35 Years Experience
1823 El Camino
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $40
We will run it
‘til you sell it!
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
Carpentry
D n’ J REMODELING
Finish Carpentry
• Windows • Doors •
• Cabinets • Casing •
• Crown Moulding •
• Baseboards •
• Mantels • Chair Rails •
(650)291-2121
Cabinetry
Cleaning
ANGELICA’S HOUSE
CLEANING & ERRAND
SERVICES
• House Cleaning • Move In/Out
Cleaning • Janitorial Services
• Handyman Services • General
Errands • Event Help
$65 Holiday Special,
call or email for details
(650)918-0354
myerrandservicesca@gmail.com
Cleaning Concrete
Construction
Construction
DEVOE
CONSTRUCTION
Kitchen & Bath
Remodeling
Belmont, CA
(650) 318-3993
O’SULLIVAN
CONSTRUCTION
(650)589-0372
New Construction, Remodeling,
Kitchen/Bathrooms,
Decks/ Fences
Licensed and Insured
Lic. #589596
WARREN BUILDER
Contractor & Electrician
Kitchen, Bathroom, Additions
Design & Drafting Lowest Rate
Lic#964001, Ins. & BBB member
Warren Young
(650)465-8787
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed • Insured • Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
Doors
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
Gardening
GENERAL
LANDSCAPE
MAINTENANCE
Commercial & Residential
Gardening
New lawn &
sprinkler installation,
Trouble shooting and repair
Work done by the hour
or contract
Free estimates
Licensed
(650)444-5887, Call/Text
glmco@aol.com
Flooring
SHOP
AT HOME
WE WILL
BRING THE
SAMPLES
TO YOU.
Call for a
FREE in-home
estimate
FLAMINGO’S FLOORING
CARPET
VINYL
LAMINATE
TILE
HARDWOOD
650-655-6600
SLATER FLOORS
. Restore old floors to new
. Dustless Sanding
. Install new custom & refinished
hardwood floors
Licensed. Bonded. Insured
www.slaterfloors.com
(650) 593-3700
Showroom by appointment
26
Thursday • Dec. 26, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Gutters
GUTTER
CLEANING
GUTTERS AND ROOF
REPAIR
• New Installation seamless,
• Cleaning and Screening,
• Commercial and Residential
Power Washing
Free Estimates
(650)669-6771
Lic.# 910421
O.K.’S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutters
Down Spouts
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Roof & Gutter Repairs
Friendly Service
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
(650)556-9780
Handy Help
AAA HANDYMAN
& MORE
Repairs • Maintenance • Painting
Carpentry • Plumbing • Electrical
Contractor Lic. 468963 Since 1976
Bonded and Insured
All Work Guaranteed
(650) 995-4385
DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
Kitchen/Bathroom Remodeling,
Tile Installation,
Door & Window Installation
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
SENIOR HANDYMAN
“Specializing in Any Size Projects”
•Painting • Electrical
•Carpentry •Dry Rot
40 Yrs. Experience
Retired Licensed Contractor
(650)201-6854
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
•Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
•Refinish
•High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
CHAINEY HAULING
Junk & Debris Clean Up
Furniture / Appliance / Disposal
Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo
Starting at $40& Up
www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
Landscaping
Moving
Bay Area
Relocation Services
Specializing in:
Homes, Apts., Storages
Professional, friendly, careful.
Peninsula’s Personal Mover
Commercial/Residential
Fully Lic. & Bonded CAL -T190632
Call (650) 630-0424
Painting
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Quality Work, Reasonable
Rates, Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
MK PAINTING
Interior and Exterior,
Residental and commercial
Insured and bonded,
Free Estimates
Peter McKenna
(650)630-1835
Lic# 974682
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
Painting
NICK MEJIA PAINTING
A+ Member BBB • Since 1975
Large & Small Jobs
Residential & Commercial
Classic Brushwork, Matching, Stain-
ing, Varnishing, Cabinet Finishing
Wall Effects, Murals, More!
(415)971-8763
Lic. #479564
Plumbing
Remodeling
HARVEST KITCHEN
& MOSAIC
Cabinets * Vanities * Tile
Flooring * Mosaics
Sinks * Faucets
Fast turnaround * Expert service
920 Center St., San Carlos
(650)620-9639
www.harvestkm.com
Tree Service
Hillside Tree
Service
LOCALLY OWNED
Family Owned Since 2000
• Trimming Pruning
• Shaping
• Large Removal
• Stump Grinding
Free
Estimates
Mention
The Daily Journal
to get 10% off
for new customers
Call Luis (650) 704-9635
Window Washing
EXTERIOR
CLEANING
SERVICES
- window washing
- gutter cleaning
- pressure washing
- wood restoration
- solar panel cleaning
(650)216-9922
services@careful-clean.com
Bonded - Insured
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
27 Thursday • Dec. 26, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Attorneys
• BANKRUPTCY •
Huge credit card debit?
Job loss? Foreclosure?
Medical bills?
YOU HAVE OPTIONS
Call for a free consultation
(650-363-2600
This law firm is a debt relife agency
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Clothing
$5 CHARLEY'S
Sporting apparel from your
favorite teams,low prices,
large selection.
450 San Bruno Ave.
San Bruno
650 771 -5614
Food
GET HAPPY!
Happy Hour 4-6• M-F
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
JACK’S
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
NEW ENGLAND
LOBSTER CO.
Market & Eatery
Now Open in Burlingame
824 Cowan Road
newenglandlobster.net
LIve Lobster ,Lobster Tail,
Lobster meat & Dungeness Crab
Food
PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA
Because Flavor Still Matters
365 B Street
San Mateo
www.sfpanchovillia.com
PRIME STEAKS
SUPERB VALUE
BASHAMICHI
Steak & Seafood
1390 El Camino Real
Millbrae
www.bashamichirestaurant.com
VEGETARIAN
BAMBOO GARDEN
Lunch & Dinner
Only Vegetarian Chinese
Restaurant in Millbrae!
309 Broadway, Millbrae
(650)697-6768
Financial
RELATIONSHIP BANKING
Partnership. Service. Trust.
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
Half Moon Bay, Redwood City,
unitedamericanbank.com
San Mateo
(650)579-1500
Furniture
WESTERN FURNITURE
Grand Opening Sale
Everything Marked Down !
601 El Camino Real
San Bruno, CA
Mon. - Sat. 10AM -7PM
Sunday Noon -6PM
We don't meet our competition,
we beat it !
Guns
PENINSULA GUNS
(650) 588-8886
Handguns.Shotguns.Rifles
Tactical and
Hunting Accessories
Buy.Sell.Trade
360 El Camino Real, San Bruno
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
DENTAL
IMPLANTS
Save $500 on
Implant Abutment &
Crown Package.
Call Millbrae Dental
for details
650-583-5880
EYE EXAMINATIONS
579-7774
1159 Broadway
Burlingame
Dr. Andrew Soss
OD, FAAO
www.Dr-AndrewSoss.net
NCP COLLEGE OF NURSING
& CAREER COLLEGE
Train to become a Licensed
Vocational Nurse in 12 months or a
Certified Nursing Assistant in as little
as 8 weeks.
Call (800) 339-5145 for more
information or visit
ncpcollegeofnursing.edu and
ncpcareercollege.com
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
STUBBORN FAT has met its match.
FREEZE Your Fat Away with
COOLSCULPTING
Bruce Maltz, M.D.
Carie Chui, M.D.
Allura Skin & Laser Center, Inc.
280 Baldwin Ave., San Mateo
(650) 344-1121
AlluraSkin.com
Insurance
AANTHEM BLUE
CROSS
www.ericbarrettinsurance.com
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
AFFORDABLE
HEALTH INSURANCE
Personal & Professional Service
JOHN LANGRIDGE
(650) 854-8963
Bay Area Health Insurance Marketing
CA License 0C60215
a Diamond Certified Company
HEALTH INSURANCE
All major carriers
Collins Insurance
Serving the Peninsula
since 1981
Ron Collins
650-701-9700
Lic. #0611437
www.collinscoversyou.com
PARENTI & ASSOCIATES
Competitive prices and best service to
meet your insurance needs
* All personal insurance policies
* All commercial insurance policies
* Employee benefit packages
650.596.5900
www.parentiinsurance.com
1091 Industrial Rd #270, San Carlos
Lic: #OG 17832
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
est. 1979
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues, Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
ASIAN MASSAGE
$45 per Hour
Present ad for special price
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
ENJOY THE BEST
ASIAN MASSAGE
$40 for 1/2 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
851 Cherry Ave. #29, San Bruno
in Bayhill Shopping Center
Open 7 Days 10:30am- 10:30pm
650. 737. 0788
Foot Massage $19.99/hr
Free Sauna (with this Ad)
Body Massage $39.99/hr
Hot StoneMassage $49.99/hr
GRAND OPENING
RELAX
REJUVENATE
RECHARGE
in our luxury bath house
Water Lounge Day Spa
2500 S. El Camino
San Mateo
(650)389-7090
UNION SPA
Grand Opening
Open Daily
Full Massage and
Brazilian Wax
(650)755-2823
7345 Mission St., Daly City
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes • Multi-family •
Mixed-Use • Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Real Estate Services
VIP can help you with all of your
real estate needs:
SALES * LEASING * MANAGEMENT
Consultation and advice are free
Where every client is a VIP
864 Laurel St #200 San Carlos
650-595-4565
www.vilmont.com
DRE LIC# 1254368
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living
Care located in
Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
&
Burlingame Villa
- Short Term Stays
- Dementia & Alzheimers
Care
- Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
NAZARETH VISTA
Best Kept Secret in Town !
Independent Living, Assisted Living
and Skilled Nursing Care.
Daily Tours/Complimentary Lunch
650.591.2008
900 Sixth Avenue
Belmont, CA 94002
crd@belmontvista.com
www.nazarethhealthcare.com
Travel
FIGONE TRAVEL GROUP
(650) 595-7750
www.cruisemarketplace.com
Cruises • Land & Family vacations
Personalized & Experienced
Travel Service
Family Owned & Operated
Since 1939
CST#100209-10
28
Thursday • Dec. 26, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
C oi ns º Dent al º J ewe l r y º S i l ver º Wat ches º Di amonds
1211 80t||0¶zM0 âä0 º 650-34I-I00I
Expert Fine Watch
& Jewelry Repair
Not affiliated with any watch company.
Only Authentic ROLEX Factory Parts Are Used
º 0eaI With £xperts º 0uick 8ervice
º 0nequaI 0ustomer 0are
www.8est8ated6oId8uyers.com
Tuesday - Saturday
11:00am to 4:00pm
www.BestRatedGoldBuyers.com
KUPFER JEWELRY BURLINGAME
(650) 347-7007
MUST PRESENT COUPON.
EXPIRES 12/31/13
WEBUY
$50
OFF
Established 1979
ROLEX SERVICE
OR RE PAIR

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->