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Web Browsing & Web Search Tutorial v1.1

Web Browsing & Web Search Tutorial v1.1

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Published by Kefa Rabah
This course module covers web browsing and searching using IE and greater. Microsoft Internet Explorer (IE) has become the overwhelming standard for browsing web pages online with 55% usage. All Windows-based computers come pre-installed with Internet Explorer, and versions appear on other platforms. This prevalence (along with speed, stability, and ease of use) is what has led to IE being the preferred web browser for both creators and users of the World Wide Web (WWW). However, there are other good alternative browsers out there too that you can equally use to surf the web, e.g., Apple’s Safari (~7%), Mozilla Firefox (~23%), Opera (~3%), Google Chrome (~1%) and many more.
This course module covers web browsing and searching using IE and greater. Microsoft Internet Explorer (IE) has become the overwhelming standard for browsing web pages online with 55% usage. All Windows-based computers come pre-installed with Internet Explorer, and versions appear on other platforms. This prevalence (along with speed, stability, and ease of use) is what has led to IE being the preferred web browser for both creators and users of the World Wide Web (WWW). However, there are other good alternative browsers out there too that you can equally use to surf the web, e.g., Apple’s Safari (~7%), Mozilla Firefox (~23%), Opera (~3%), Google Chrome (~1%) and many more.

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Published by: Kefa Rabah on Sep 04, 2009
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05/11/2014

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A hypertext link on the Web, like a link in a chain, connects two points. Links can appear in two
ways: as text that you click or as a graphic that you click. A text link is a word or phrase that
usually appears in a different color or underlined, e.g., a link to Google Home page. A graphic
link is a graphic image that you click to jump to another location, e.g., click the home icon to
jump to Google home page . When you aren't sure whether text or a graphic image is a link,
point to it with the mouse pointer. When you move the mouse pointer over a text or graphic link,
it changes shape from to. The pointer indicates that when you click, you will activate
that link and jump to the new location. The destination of the link appears in the status bar, and
for some graphic links a small identification box appears next to your pointer.

As shown above, the text links are usually underlined and colored. Each link gives Internet
Explorer the information needed to locate the page. When you activate a link, you jump to a new
location, called the target of the link. The target can be either another location on the active
Web page (for example, the bottom of a Web page often contains a link that targets the top), a
different document or file on your computer, or a Web page stored on a remote Web server
anywhere in the world. The amount of time necessary to link to the target, called the response

time, varies, depending upon the number of people trying to connect to the same site, the number
of people on the Internet at that time, speed of your internet connection and the site design.

Activating a link starts a multi-step process. Although Internet Explorer does the work for you,
following the sequence of events is important: it helps you recognize problems when they occur
and understand how to resolve them.

ICT100 – Introduction to Computer Applications

Module 10 - IE Web Browsing & searching v1.1

April 2007, Kefa Rabah, Global Open Versity, Vancouver Canada

www.globalopenversity.org

Global Open Versity, Course: ICT100 – Introduction to Computer Applications

13

Figure 10.13 illustrates the string of events that occur when you link to a site, e.g., click the
following link to: Global Open Versity home page. When you point to a link, the status bar
displays the address of the link's target. When you click a link, the activity indicator
animates, and the status bar displays a series of messages and progress bar indicating that Internet
Explorer is connecting to the file targeted by the link, is transferring data, and finally, is fully
done.

Fig. 10.13: Sequence of web page loading

From Figure 10.13, you can observe how the Web page is build as Internet Explorer transfers
information to your screen in multiple passes as can visualized in the Status progress bar display.
The first wave brings a few pieces to the page; with each subsequent pass, Internet Explorer fills
in more details until the Web page is complete. The progress bar fills in to indicate how much of
the Web page has transferred. The vertical scroll box scrolls up as Internet Explorer adds more
information and detail to the page. Although you don't need to wait until the page is complete
before scrolling or clicking another link, it might be difficult to determine links and other
information until the page is mostly filled in.

ICT100 – Introduction to Computer Applications

Module 10 - IE Web Browsing & searching v1.1

April 2007, Kefa Rabah, Global Open Versity, Vancouver Canada

www.globalopenversity.org

Global Open Versity, Course: ICT100 – Introduction to Computer Applications

14

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