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SCHEDULING & SEQUENCING

BY JOHNSON’S RULE
GROUP MEMBERS
 Rajendra kumar

 Pratik

 Puneet

 Pintu
DEFINATION

 Establishing the timing of the use of


equipment, facilities and human activities in an
organization
 Effective scheduling can produce:-
1) Cost savings
2) Increases in productivity
Scheduling Difficulties
 Variability in
 Setup times
 Processing times
 Interruptions
 Changes in the set of jobs
 No method for identifying optimal schedule
 Scheduling is not an exact science
 Ongoing task for a manager
Minimizing Scheduling Difficulties

 Set realistic due dates


 Focus on bottleneck operations
 Consider lot dividing of large jobs
SEQUENCING

JOHNSON’S RULE
SEQUENCING
 Sequencing: Determine the order in which jobs
at a work center will be processed.
 Workstation: An area where one person works,
usually with special equipment, on a
specialized job. Everything is
#1 Priority
 Priority rules: Simple hierarchy
used to select the order in
which jobs will be processed.
 Job time: Time needed for
setup and processing of a job.
Priority Rules
 FCFS - first come, first served
 LTR - Least time required
 LAR/LOR – Least activity required/Fewest
operations required
 EDD - earliest due date Top Priority
 CRS - critical ratio scheduling
JOHNSON’S RULE

 Technique for minimizing completion time for


a group of jobs to be processed on two
machines or at two work centers.
 Minimizes total idle time
 Several conditions must be satisfied
Johnson’s Rule Conditions
 Job time must be known and constant
 Job times must be independent of
sequence
 Jobs must follow same two-step sequence
 Job priorities cannot be used
 All units must be completed at the first
work center before moving to second
Example Of Johnson’s Rule (Two Machines)

Job No. Time on M1 Time on M2 MC1 MC2 Sequence

St. Time End Time St. Time End Time

A 15 11 0 15 15 26 C
B 17 10 15 32 32 42 G
C 9 13 32 41 42 55 D
D 12 15 41 53 55 70 H
E 14 14 53 67 70 84 E
F 12 10 67 79 84 94 I
G 12 14 79 91 94 108 J
H 13 15 91 104 108 123 A
I 15 14 104 119 123 137 B
J 13 13 119 132 137 150 F
Sequence MC1 MC2
(By Johnson's Rule) St. Time End Time St. Time End Time

C 0 9 9 22
G 9 21 22 36
D 21 33 36 51 So we can say that by
H 33 46 51 66 using Johnson’s rule
E 46 60 66 80 of scheduling Time
saved in this case is :-
I 60 75 80 94 150 – 140 = 10
J 75 88 94 107
A 88 103 107 118
B 103 120 120 130
F 120 132 132 140
Johnson’s Rule for Three Machines

 Condition:-Largest time on M2 should be less


than or equal to smallest time on M1 or M2 or
both.
 If condition satisfied then we calculate:-
 R1 = M1 + M2
 R2 = M2 + M3
 This whole can be understand by the help of
following example:-
Job No. Time on M1 Time on M2 Time on M3 MC1 MC2
St. Time End Time St. Time End Time

A 16 12 11 0 16 16 28
B 15 11 12 16 31 31 42
C 12 10 13 31 43 43 53
D 13 9 15 43 56 56 65
E 14 11 17 56 70 70 81
F 15 10 16 70 85 85 95
G 13 9 14 85 98 98 107
H 12 12 17 98 110 110 122
TOTAL 84 115
MC3 R1 R2 SEQUENCE
St. Time End Time M1+M2 M2+M3 (BY JOHNSON'S RULE)

28 39 28 23 C
26 23 G Idle time on
42 54 Machine-2 is:-
54 67 22 23 D 122 – 84 = 38

67 82 22 24 H Idle time on
machine-3 is:-
82 99 25 28 F 146 – 115 = 31
99 115 25 26 E
115 129 22 23 A
129 146 24 29 B
SEQUENCE MC1 MC2 MC3
(BY JOHNSON'S RULE) St. Time End Time St. Time End Time St. Time End Time

C 0 12 12 22 22 35
G 12 25 25 34 35 49
D 25 38 38 47 49 64 Total time saved by
Using Johnson’s rule
H 38 50 50 62 64 81 Is:-
146 – 137 = 06
F 50 65 65 75 81 97
E 65 79 79 90 97 114
A 79 95 95 107 114 125
B 95 110 110 121 125 137
CONCLUSION

 Thus we can say that by using Johnson’s rule


we can do more better sequencing of machines
and can save the time of production.