HEARTBEAT OF THE NATION

1200
Ks.

WWW.MMTIMES.COM

ISSUE 709 | DECEMBER 23 - 29, 2013

Connect with us @
SMS
09 5000 613

OPINION

Why the govt has a booze problem
THOMAS KEAN tdkean@gmail.com LIKE an incorrigible boozehound, the government is in denial. Not only can it not see it has a problem; it actually seems to think it is doing a good job. The reality is quite different. Its crackdown on illegal alcohol imports has been devoid of transparency and coordination, and has alienated consumers, importers and retailers. In recent months hundreds of thousands of bottles of illegally imported alcohol – mostly wine – have been confiscated. Charges have been filed against company directors, and once-thriving businesses are on the brink of closure. Retail outlets have pulled stock from shelves. Many of those that continued to sell imported alcohol despite the crackdown are out of stock or desperately low, and prices have spiked. Consumers have been left with the tragi-comic choice of pineapple or damson wine from Shan State. Some will say these distribution businesses got their just deserts, as the imported alcohol they were profiting from was not brought into the country legally. But what should not be overlooked is that the various illegal mechanisms for getting alcohol into Myanmar – from borrowed hotel and duty-free licences to kickbacks to customs officials at the port or border – are simply the result of a colossal failure of trade policy. MORE ON NEWS 4

email

newsroom@mmtimes.com

facebook twitter
NEWS 4

facebook.com/themyanmartimes @TheMyanmarTimes

Lawyers oppose YCDC park projects
The Lawyers’ Network alleges that YCDC may have violated its own planning rules by awarding parkland to a consortium of developers.

FEATURE 14-15

Despite conflict, they still know it’s Christmas
Civil society groups in northern Myanmar vow to put on a traditional Kachin Christmas celebration in spite of the continued conflict in the state.

BUSINESS 26-27

Delaying IP laws will hurt business: experts
Legislation to overhaul outdated or non-existent intellectual property laws is urgently needed to protect both local and foreign businesses.

BUSINESS 28

72
PHOTO: LWIN KO TAIK

PAGE

Angry fans riot after SEA Games loss
Hundreds of irate football fans torched flags, jerseys and a billboard after the national football team’s loss to Indonesia on December 17, in ugly scenes that have cast a pall over the otherwise smooth hosting of the Southeast Asian Games.

Alcohol prices spike as stocks near depletion
The price of popular brands of imported alcohol has risen 50-100 percent because of a government crackdown on illegal imports.

Secretive firms sanctioned
The United States Department of Treasury has announced fresh sanctions against three firms and one individual that it says have links to arms deals with North Korea – an allegation that two of the companies describe as baseless. NEWS 3

2 THE MYANMAR TIMES DECEMBER 23 - 29, 2013

Page 2

online editor Kayleigh Long | kayleighelong@gmail.com

THE INSIDER: The local lowdown & best of the web
Calling all masochists
A bus company will soon launch a Yangon to Bangkok route, taking passengers through the Myawaddy border crossing. According to a report in Eleven media, the Yangon Air Bus Taxi Company say the trip will take approximately 12 hours However, something about the estimated travel time seems off. The bus from Bangkok to Chiang Mai alone usually takes about 11 hours, assuming there are no delays – which there usually are. The other obvious factor that might contribute to the journey taking somewhat longer is that the roads on the Myanmar leg are a little more rugged than the vast Bangkok-Chiang Mai highways. With spots on the 120-seat double-decker bus reportedly going for some K30,000 for locals and K40,000 for foreigners (near enough to the cost of a one-hour trip on AirAsia), there’s not much incentive for travellers – with the exception of those with a crippling fear of flights, or a passionate love for buses.

‘He jokes in meetings that it is all a military operation,’ whispers one [hotel group] manager. ‘Everyone laughs but no one knows if he means it.’
An unnamed source in the hotels industry tells The Economist about meeting with blacklisted tycoon Zaw Zaw.

U Ye Htut makes a wee mistake

When Myanmar was Burma...
Archival material provided by Pansodan Gallery

Deputy Information Minister U Ye Htut last week urged his Facebook fan base of some 58,000 people to carefully check their posts before uploading, after he committed a mildly embarrassing error in posting a photo he claimed to have taken himself. He uploaded an image of a poster in a car workshop that warned customers not to talk about the Myanmar football team after its defeat by Indonesia. U Ye Htut said he took the picture en route to his office in Nay Pyi Taw. A photographer came forward and claimed ownership of the image, saying he shot it in Mandalay rather than the capital. U Ye Htut responded by posting a similar picture, explaining that he had posted it in haste because he was overwhelmed with the need to urinate. “I couldn’t wait until the photo was loaded on my Facebook as I urgently need to relieve myself,” he posted. U Ye Htut issued an apology for the mistake, saying he had no intention to fraudulently claim the picture as his own and wished to highlight the sense of “frustration and hopelessness” many Myanmar people feel over the national football team.

Rodman holds court in the DPRK

De facto diplomatic attaché to Pyongyang Dennis Rodman has made his return to the DPRK, and has busied himself organising an exhibition game between North Korea and a team of ex-NBA players scheduled for January 8, to mark the birthday of reclusive leader Kim Jong-Un. AP photographer David Guttenfelder posted a picture of Rodman courtside last week, giving a pep talk to North Korean athletes while smoking a fat cigar. While some question the value of his unique outreach to the hermit state, it seems he does have some affairs of state he intends to bring to the fore with the Dear Leader, telling media he would have “a good conversation” with Kim “to help the world”, but neglected to elaborate on just what that would entail.

Boom, baby

The New Light of Myanmar marks the 15-year anniversary of National Armed Forces Day in 1960

A new report claims Barcelona’s run to the Champions League final in May 2009 triggered a baby boom, with media reports lending credence to claims the birth rate in Catalonia rose by an astonishing 45 percent nine months after a dramatic semi-final in which Andres Iniesta scored an injury-time winner against Chelsea. As the SEA Games draws to a close, one wonders if it will have a similar impact. Only time will tell.

Chun Chun for NOW! magazine. Photo: by Pyae Han (ColorMax)

Style

Statement

www.mmtimes.com

NEWS EDITOR: Thomas Kean | tdkean@gmail.com

News 3

T

INVESTIGATION
Japanese authorities in August 2012. He said the incident, while it occurred after the transition to quasicivilian rule, pertained to contracts signed by the military regime. “Under the old contracts there were some [weapons or military equipment] Myanmar still needed to get from North Korea. These are not new contracts [signed by] President U Thein Sein’s government,” the official said. The official added that the government had been forced to build military relations with and buy equipment from countries like North Korea, China and Russia because the US and its Western allies had introduced an arms embargo, which remains in place. “For our nation’s defence, the Myanmar government had to buy weapons from countries like North Korea, China and Russia. The current Pyithu Hluttaw speaker Thura U Shwe Mann himself went to North Korea and was involved in the negotiations,” the official added. He said Myanmar had already clarified its position on North Korea’s ties to the international community and expressed confidence the latest move would not hurt relation between Myanmar and its new foreign partners, such as the US, the European Union and Japan. In July, the Treasury department announced it had sanctioned Lieutenant General Thein Htay from the DDI for its links to North Korea. While it has clearly set its sights on the directorate, it has overlooked the role played by figures such as Thura U Shwe Mann, who led a parliamentary delegation to Washington in June. Derek Mitchell, the US ambassador to Myanmar, told local newspaper editors on December 19 that the US had reason to believe that both Lt Col Kyaw Nyunt Oo and Lt Gen Thein Htay have been actively engaged in activities that violate Resolution 1874. “We will not rest until we are confident there is a complete cessation [of military ties with North Korea] consistent with UN Security Council resolutions,” he said. In May 2012, President U Thein Sein admitted during a meeting with South Korean President Lee Myungbak that Myanmar had purchased weapons from North Korea over the preceding two decades, the New York Times reported. The president vowed that these purchases would end but Myanmar and North Korea analyst Bertil Lintner recently wrote that he believed this was not the case. “In fact,” he wrote in September, “evidence abounds that weapons exchanges continue, only more discreetly.”

here is no company signboard. The door is locked and has no bell. The small, white, two-storey house at the rear of the lot looks like it has been abandoned for years. Yet according to the United States Treasury, this building on Kabar Aye Pagoda Road in Yangon’s Mayangone township is home to Soe Min Htike Company, one of three private firms sanctioned last week for their alleged involvement in weapons deals between Myanmar and North Korea. “They never had a company signboard. It’s always been like this,” said a man in his early 40s who works in the office of a construction company beside the building in question. “We’ve heard that they are involved in something [unusual],” said another man, this one his early 50s, sitting next to him. When The Myanmar Times asked whether this included “weapons deals with North Korea”, he replied, “Yes. But we can’t say for sure it’s true.” Both said they knew it was the listed address of Soe Min Htike because people responding to the company’s recruitment ads would regularly wander into the area and ask if the address is correct, most recently about three months ago. The building, though, has never really had the trappings of an office, such as staff, equipment and stationery. “After five o’clock in the evening, some people will go in and out sometimes,” one neighbour said. On December 17, the US Treasury Department announced sanctions against Lieutenant Colonel Kyaw Nyunt Oo, a staff officer at the Tatmadaw’s Directorate of Defence Industries, as well as three companies: Soe Min Htike Co Ltd, Asia Metal Company and Excellence Mineral Manufacturing Company. The statement said that they have all had ties with the DDI, which the Treasury placed on its sanctions list in 2012. The statement gave two office addresses for Soe Min Htike, which the department said has been a procurement agent for the DDI, especially in importing foreign supplies and equipment, for 30 years. As of February, the department said, about 30 North Korean officials are thought to have been working at the DDI. When The Myanmar Times visited the second listed address for Soe Min Htike, on Kan Street in Hlaing township, on December 19, residents also confirmed it was the company’s office. However, a man emerged from the four-storey residence, hidden behind a 20-foot steel door, and insisted he didn’t know anything about Soe Min Htike. “We are not even a company

A taxi passes gates leading to the office of Soe Min Htike company, which has been sanctioned by the US. Photo: Aung Htay Hlaing

Secretive firms hit with US sanctions
Ramshackle offices, companies with no signboards, Taiwan-based firms – these are the latest targets of a US push for Myanmar to end military ties with North Korea
– this is just a house,” said the man, who appeared to be in his early 30s and was wearing a longyi and a white shirt. He then backtracked and said the company had been “abolished” in 2008, before a woman joined him and both asked repeatedly, “Who told you that we are Soe Min Htike Company?” Asia Metal Company, which was sanctioned for constructing buildings and supplying construction materials for a DDI factory, was less evasive. General manager Ko Htain Lin told The Myanmar Times on December 18 that he had been surprised by the US Treasury’s decision, which he said would harm the company’s image and operations. “I consider this is a mistake. All we did was construct warehouses in Magwe Region between 2008 and 2010 [for the DDI]. We didn’t do anything else,” he said. “At that time we really didn’t know construction tools. We are not related to North Korea or military in this country at all,” the woman said. The Treasury said the sanctions were designated under Executive Order 13619, which was signed by US President Barack Obama in July 2012 to block those who are concidered a threat to peace, security or stability in Myanmar. The statement said the sanctions target only Lt Col Kyaw Nyunt Oo and the DDI but not the Myanmar government, which has publicly pledged to abide United Nations Security Council Resolution 1874, which prohibits the purchase of military equipment and assistance from North Korea. A senior official from the President’s Office, who asked not to be named, told The Myanmar Times that the sanctions were levied for “old cases” related to the seizure of a ship heading to Myanmar with weapons material from North Korea by NAN TIN HTWE TIM MCLAUGHLIN

that it broke the international rules and regulations.” The third sanctioned company, Excellence Mineral Manufacturing, was established in 1980 and has almost 200 employees, according to its profile on Myanmaryp.com, a business directory. The profile also says it is based in Taiwan and North Carolina in the US, and posts are written under the name Ken Wu. A Yangon-based employee, who asked not to be named, said in a phone interview the company has no links to North Korea. “We are just a small company, with a small factory producing some hardware and

4 News

THE MYANMAR TIMES DECEMBER 23 - 29, 2013

Lawyers protest YCDC parkland developments
The Lawyers’ Network questions YCDC decision to lease parkland for construction projects, including a US$127.5 million development beside Kandawgyi Lake

CONTINUED FROM NEWS 1 Not only have these illegal imports been tolerated, they appear to have been encouraged for much of the past two decades. While the state missed out on millions of dollars a year in tax revenue, hundreds, if not thousands, of well-connected individuals personally profited. Favoured companies were allowed to act with impunity, using hotel and duty-free licences to on-sell to distributors and retailers. No real effort was made to staunch the flow of illegal booze into Myanmar. Or, at least, until September, when the recent crackdown was launched. While any effort to enforce the law should be welcomed, an assessment should first be made of whether the legal or policy framework is sound. Clearly, in this case, it is not. The government appears to be aware of the problems; it recently told The Myanmar Times it would liberalise alcohol imports early next year, starting first with wine. The benefits are obvious. Consumers can be confident they are buying the genuine product; the state earns tax revenue; and importers, distributors and retailers know where they stand legally. Those who continue to import legally will clearly be outside the law. At this moment, however, almost anyone selling imported alcohol in Myanmar is breaking the law, either because it was imported illegally, no tax has been paid on it or both. For most businesses, there is also no legal alternative because of the restrictions on the issuing of import licences. The time to launch a crackdown is after a change in policy that has been clearly communicated to all stakeholders and they have had time to comply. The events of the past three months have only served to highlight the government’s policy failings and sow confusion in the marketplace. But as well as poor sequencing, the government has also been guilty of poor communication. Little effort has been made to explain its strategy to stakeholders or the broader public. While it says it acts on “tip-offs”, there is no transparency over where this information comes from, and no investigation into the motives of those supplying the information. The lack of coordination between ministries is also concerning. This has led to the absurd situation where City Mart Holdings’ distributor, Premium

NOE NOE AUNG
noenoeag@gmail.com

Distribution, has been raided and a director charged, yet no action is likely to be taken against the companies that allegedly sold it the alcohol. The hotels that imported the alcohol for Quarto Products, meanwhile, have also escaped punishment – because, the Ministry of Commerce says, the import permits were issued by the Ministry of Hotels and Tourism and therefore not its responsibility. As a result of the confusion and bungling, many people are rightly asking: Why have certain importers and distributors been targeted and not others? Why does the focus appear to be more on wine and not whisky or other liquors? Why are some importers still able to operate with impunity?

A LAWYERS’ group is protesting a city decision to allow the construction of a high-rise building on what used to be a public park, saying the city needs its green space. The Lawyers’ Network says it will raise the matter with the Yangon Region Hluttaw and has suggested municipal authorities have broken their own planning laws. “Yangon City Development Committee is leasing out public parks and playgrounds for construction projects. The city needs parks and playgrounds as well as new buildings for its development. We object to this decision,” U Aye Min, a member of the Lawyers’ Network who is leading the objection, told The Myanmar Times on December 19. A civil society group called Democratic Force that is associated with the objection joined Lawyers’ Network in a protest walk from Mingalar Taung Nyunt township to City Hall on December 9. “Officials took no notice,” he said. Asia Myanmar Consortium Development (AMCD), a consortium of five property developers, was awarded the right to develop the Theinbyu compound – previously a driving school – in 2012. The details of the deal have never been officially disclosed to the public and in August of this year the local Pyithu Hluttaw representative, Daw Phyu Phyu Thin from the National League for Democracy, asked if YCDC intended to restore the park to public use. Yangon Mayor U Hla Myint responded that there were no such plans, according to U Aye Min.

The events of the past three months have only served to sow confusion and highlight the government’s policy failings.
At a time when the government is trying to introduce stable and sound economic policies that encourage foreign investment and promote a level playing field between all businesses to replace the rampant cronyism of past decades, the events of the past few months represent an unmitigated disaster. You need look no further than the empty shelves and shuttered shops for evidence of that. If the government is serious about tackling illegal alcohol imports and intent on a crackdown, it should take action against all those profiting from the practice. This means not only distributors, but also retailers, illegal importers, hotels and duty-free shops, and customs and other government officials. Civil servants should also set an example by not accepting gifts of imported alcohol – unless, of course, the giver can prove it was imported legally. If the government is not prepared to do that, then it should end the farce by fixing its broken trade policy instead of hand-picking businesses to close down.

Builders work at the Theinbyu site last week. Photo: Zarni Phyo

“We will raise the question of YCDC’s use of public space in the next session of Yangon Region Hluttaw,” said U Aye Min, adding that the group is cooperating with region hluttaw MPs. He said the Lawyers’ Network is aware of five public parks and playgrounds, including Theinbyu and Yar Pyae in Tarmwe, that have been awarded to developers. “Theinbyu is included in a green zone according to the government’s environmental plan, and it is close to Kandawgyi Park. It is also on Kan Yeik Thar Road, which YCDC says is also in the environmental zone and should not contain high-rise buildings. It looks like YCDC is breaking its own rules,” said U Aye Min. “If regional governments want to allow construction in public spaces, they must report it to the hluttaw,” he added. A representative from AMCD, which plans to build a hotel and

residences at the Theinbyu site, initially agreed to an interview last week but then backtracked and said the company would make a public announcement in the coming days. “This compound was rented to a driving school last year, and has not been used for public access since. Using it for construction won’t make a big difference in my opinion,” said an AMCD official, who asked not to be named. YCDC officials did not respond to requests for comment. According to media reports, the consortium plans to invest K125 billion (US$127.5 million) in the project, with profits to be split equally between the companies and YCDC. The consortium says on its website that it has received approval from YCDC and the Yangon Region government for the Palace De Royal Lake project but is still waiting permission from the Union Government.

www.mmtimes.com

News 5

Controversy over hosts for SEA Games ceremonies
Ministry of Culture dashes hopes of volunteers for presenter jobs at opening and closing ceremonies
CHIT SU EI EI THU newsroom@mmtimes.com THE fairness of the selection process for announcers and presenters for the Southeast Asian Games opening and closing ceremonies has been questioned. Several of those who took part told The Myanmar Times last week that some of those chosen, including singer Swe Hein, only joined the selection process at the final stage. About 50 responded to a Ministry of Culture call in state media for eight volunteers – four men and four women – and this was gradually reduced to six finalists through a four-stage selection process. However, only one person from this group – Ma Eaint Phu Phu Aung – actually took part in the opening ceremony on December 11, said Ko Rkar Ko Ko, who was one of the last six applicants. Ko Swe Hein, Ko Zaw Myo Oo, Ma Su Ya Min, Ma Chaw Su Su Kyi and Ma Aye Aye Myat also took part in the opening ceremony. But Ko Rkar Ko Ko said most of this group appeared only at the very last stage of the selection process, while Ma Su Ya Min had been rejected at an earlier stage, when the applicants were reduced from eight to six. “I thought that I had been chosen when they told me I was in the final eight people. They rejected another two people without telling us why, and then finally only Ma Eaint Phu Phu Aung was involved,” he told The Myanmar Times last week. “Then one of the two people rejected near the end, Ma Su Yamin, ended up being a presenter at the ceremony. I don’t understand how she can be involved if she was rejected,” he said. Ko Aung Zin Phyo Thein, who was also one of the last six who applied through normal channels, said he was surprised to meet Ko Swe Hein and other new applicants at the final stage. He also thought he had been selected as a presenter because designer Pyi Soe Aung came and took his measurements to make an outfit for the opening ceremony. “I turned down the chance to go to a leadership development program in Malaysia because it coincided with the SEA Games. And I also cancelled my diploma in international business at the Singapore Institute of Management,” Ko Aung Zin Phyo Thein said. “They asked me to translate the script and some songs but then I never heard from them again. I just want to say the Ministry of Culture did not conduct this process properly and as a result we wasted our time, money and energy. This has really shaken my confidence in the government,” he said. A Ministry of Culture letter sent to volunteers after the fourth stage of the selection process lists six people as opening ceremony presenters, including Ko Aung Zin Phyo Thein, Ko Rkar Ko Ko and Ma Eaint Phu Phu Aung. But Daw Nandar Mhon, a director general in the Ministry of Culture and one of the organisers of the selection process, said everything had been conducted fairly. She said the process would be explained after the closing ceremony on December 22. “I don’t see why I need to give any reason for what happened. We selected [the presenters] through a vote, according to our rules. The files of all applicants have been sent to the vice president and we will make a further announcement after the SEA Games finish,” she said. Ko Swe Hein said he applied for the position in October – after the original June 30 deadline – but completed everything the ministry asked of him. “I applied late and I didn’t think they would accept it,” the singer said. “I had to sit three or four tests and I also gave them one of my DVDs.”

Freeze to continue as records tumble
AYE SAPAY PHYU ayephyu2006@gmail.com IT may not be a white Christmas, but record-breaking low December temperatures are expected to fall further in the coming days, an official of the Department of Meteorology and Hydrology said last week. Director U Kyaw Lwin Oo said temperatures were 3 to 6 Celsius below the December average, a trend likely to continue this week. In some parts of the country, such as Chin and southern Shan states, the mercury has already dipped below freezing point. “Temperatures have fallen around the country since December 16 because of cold air from India and a stronger seasonal high-pressure area from China. According to current conditions, the temperature will be below the monthly average over the coming five to seven days,” he said on December 18.

Temperature, in Celsius, recorded at Haka in Chin State on December 18

-2

The department said upper Sagaing, Bago and Ayeyarwady regions were 5-6C below their December average, while lower Sagaing, Mandalay and Yangon regions were 3-4C cooler than normal on December 16. Mawlaik in Sagaing Region, Chauk in Magwe Region and Tharyarwady in Bago Region reached record lows in the early morning of December 18, at 7.5C, 8.5C and 6.5C respectively.

Temperatures dipped below freezing on December 18 in the hilly region of Haka in Chin State (-2C), Loilen in southern Shan State (-1C), and Pyin Oo Lwin and Mogok in Mandalay Region (both 0C). Salai Biak Lian Sang, a teacher in Falam, Chin State, said residents had been enduring freezing temperatures since December 16. He said it was the coldest whether he could recall in almost two decades. “There is ice on the plants. Cloudy weather is blocking out the sun. I can’t sit in the house more than two hours because of the chill. We have to wear three layers of clothing, hats, gloves, socks and blankets,” he said on December 19. “Students, office workers and old people warm themselves with hot-water bags, or make a fire. It’s too cold to ride a motorcycle. I like to celebrate Christmas in cold weather, but this is too much.”

Sagaing residents call for land ownership transparency
SI THU LWIN sithulwin.mmtimes@gmail.com RESIDENTS from Sagaing’s Shwe Min Won ward are upset over the blocking of the ward’s 24th Street, in an apparent breach of zoning rules. On December 12 they staged a demonstration over the perceived lack of local government transparency, walking from Tagaung ward near Sagaing Bridge to the area in question and staging a one-hour protest. The blocked site is classified as a street on Settlements and Land Records Department cadastral maps, residents said, but had been allocated by the Sagaing District Peace and Development Council to an unknown person or company in 1997. The Myanmar Times was unable to reach local officials for comment last week. “The street has been blocked off by a fence since last July. The first time we complained about it officials came and checked … but we want to know both the seller and buyer of the land,” said Ko Nyi Nyi Lwin, who arranged permission for the protest. While the demonstration took place legally, authorities allowed only 100 people to take part although organisers had said 200 people were

Sagaing residents stage a demonstration calling for transparency over land ownership in Shwe Min Won ward on December 12. Photo: Si Thu Lwin

expected. “We have sent complaint letters to the Anti-Corruption Commission and [Sagaing Region] Chief Minister’s Office. They came and checked

the site but that was three months ago and we haven’t heard anything so we feel like there is no rule of law,” said ward resident U Soe Oo. – Translation by Zar Zar Soe

6 News

THE MYANMAR TIMES DECEMBER 23 - 29, 2013

Army captain arrested after bank hold-up
A CAPTAIN from an armoured regiment in Meiktila township has been arrested while allegedly trying to hold up an Innwa Bank branch in the town. The man will be tried by a military tribunal and faces up to 10 years in prison if found guilty, said Police Captain Myint Than, the head of Meiktila 2 police station. The attempted robbery took place at about 10:30am on December 17. “He [allegedly] robbed the bank wearing a black mask. The bank’s security staff and local police worked together to help arrest him. Nobody was hurt,” Pol Cap Myint Than said. “After interrogating him we found out he is a captain from the local armoured regiment. We have transferred him to his regiment and a military tribunal will hear the case.” Meiktila residents said they were shocked when they heard about the attempted robbery on the bank, which is on the Yangon-Mandalay Highway to the west of Myoma Market. “We don’t want to see any further problems in the city. We’re still trying to get over the religious conflict [in March] and we want peace and stability,” said Ko Min, who runs a shop in Myoma Market. – Si Thu Lwin, translation by Thiri Min Htun

Committee rejects Military Intelligence prisoner proposal
Political prisoner committee could still push for release of former MI on humanitarian grounds in early 2014
WA LONE walone14@gmail.com AS the deadline approaches for the release of the last political prisoners still behind bars, a dispute has arisen concerning the status of former members of Military Intelligence. Members of the Political Prisoner Scrutiny Committee have rejected a request that former MI officials should be included in a future presidential amnesty for political prisoners but could still push for their release early next year on “humanitarian grounds”. In July, U Thein Sein promised during a speech in London that his government would free all political prisoners by the end of the year, and the committee expects to submit a final list of names for consideration on December 21, members say. However, this has been complicated by a proposal from opposition Pyithu Hluttaw representative U Thein Nyunt to consider classifying 21 former members of U Khin Nyunt’s MI network as political prisoners was submitted to the committee in November. The men were arrested after a “They are not political prisoners – they are the ones who locked the political prisoners up,” he said. “It is essential for [former MI personnel] to apologise to the Myanmar people for all that they did wrong to the Myanmar people in the past rather than bluffing and trying to defend themselves.” However, the debate over MI prisoners is not the only challenge the committee’s members face. Most political prisoners jailed on clearly political charges, such as the collaboration with armed ethnic groups or the Electronic Transaction Act, have already been released and those that remain have been convicted with criminal offences, including murder, rape and narcotics trafficking, said committee member U Nyo Tun. He said this has meant the committee has to look into the backgrounds of potential political prisoners to see whether the charges were likely to have been politically motivated. “We are trying to get them all released by the end of this year,” he said. Ko Ko Gyi agreed the nature of the charges against the remaining prisoners has made the committee’s job harder. “The cases of the remaining political prisoners are very complicated and difficult to handle,” he said. Since coming to office, President U Thein Sein has overseen the release of more than 1000 political prisoners, according to the association of former political prisoners, including 296 in 2011, a further 536 in 2012 and 326 so far this year. Most recently, 41 were freed in an amnesty on December 11. While only around 40-50 are thought to remain in prison, about 200 are currently on trial, the Assistance Association for Political Prisoners says.

Former Military Intelligence chief U Khin Nyunt speaks to The Myanmar Times shortly after his release from house arrest in January 2012. Photo: Kaung Htet

VACANCY ANNOUNCEMENT
The Embassy of Japan is currently seeking an individual for the position of an assistant. The successful candidate must be a Myanmar national a Japanese and should possess following qualifications: • • • • • • University Graduate Excellent proficiency in Japanese and Myanmar writing and speaking Effective communications skills Secretarial skills Computer literate English language skills and knowledge on Japanese culture and experience as MEXT scholarship student are advantages

Only short-listed candidates will be contacted. Applications with detailed resume, copies of certificates in accomplished fields, one recent photograph and recent medical certificates are to be submitted to the Embassy of Japan at No. 100, Natmauk Road, Bahan Township, Yangon by mail or email at info.cul@yn.mofa.go.jp by December 26, 2013.

power struggle in 2004 that saw MI disbanded and then-Prime Minister U Khin Nyunt placed under house arrest. While he was released in January 2012, some who were sentenced under the emergency provisions act remain behind bars. Committee member U Ye Aung said the proposal had been opposed by most committee members, including members of the government. Based on that decision the fate of the MI inmates “does not concern our committee”, he said. However, U Thein Nyunt told The Myanmar Times last week that he has subsequently amended his proposal so that it instead recommends the committee advocate the release of MI prisoners on humanitarian grounds, noting that he did so at the request of their relatives. “Most of the members refused

my original proposal so I amended the title, proposing they are civilian prisoners who should be released on humanitarian grounds, and no one opposed it,” he said. He said he believes they should be considered political prisoners because they were jailed as part of a power struggle. He said their trials also fell short of international human rights standards. “They have been sentenced to many years in jail by a military court without any access to a lawyer,” he said. 88 Generation leader and committee member Ko Ko Gyi said he did not object to the humanitarian argument. “I don’t oppose releasing them for humanitarian reasons.” But political analyst U Yan Myo Thein said the committee “should not advocate” for the release of MI prisoners.

TRADE MARK CAUTION
Notice is hereby given that BIOFARMA of 50, rue Carnot 92284 Suresnes cedex , FRANCE, is the Owner and Sole Proprietor of the following trademarks:-

COVERSYL PLUS
(Reg: No. IV/13937/2013) In respect of: “Pharmaceutical and sanitary preparations; dietetic substances adapted for medical use; food for babies; disinfectants; preparations for destroying vermin; fungicides, herbicides” In class 05

(Reg: No.IV/13938/2013) In respect of: “Pharmaceutical preparations for preventive and/or curative treatment of osteoporosis.” In class 05 Any fraudulent imitation or unauthorized use of the said trademark or other infringements whatsoever will be dealt with according to law. U Nyein Kyaw B.Sc., Dip Engg., R.L., D.B.L. For BIOFARMA Room 007, Inya Lake Hotel 37, Kaba Aye Pagoda Road Mayangone Tsp, Yangon, Myanmar Tes: (951) 9662866 E-mail: nyeinkyaw@rajahtann.com Date: 23rd December, 2013

PROTAXOS

www.mmtimes.com

News 7

KNU denies car permit allegations
WA LONE walone14@gmail.com AN ETHNIC armed group has angrily denied media accusations concerning the abuse of permits to import cars tax-free that formed part of a ceasefire deal. The Daily Eleven newspaper says the government gave the permits to the Karen National Union, and that subsequently they were used to import luxury vehicles without paying taxes. the difficulties we faced in operating, so the government provided these car permits as a temporary measure to help solve our problems,” he said. According to a list provided by KNU, the government gave 14 ethnic armed groups permits to import 290 cars tax-free, and 580 permits that reduced tax by 40 percent. In an article on November 25, Daily Eleven criticised the Myanmar Peace Center and ethnic armed groups, calling for more transparency and alleging possible misappropriation of funds that were supposed to be used for the peace process. A senior official from the peace centre, who asked not to be named, told The Myanmar Times that the allegations were baseless and it would be “impossible” for corruption to occur. “We received funds from the European Union for the peace talks. Their funding control system is very strict and contains safeguards against corruption,” the official said. In September 2012, the All Burma Student Democratic Front (ABSDF) also accepted 20 tax-free car import permits and 40 permits for a 60pc tax reduction as part of its ceasefire agreement with the government. ABSDF secretary U San Ni said the group sold all of the permits to raise money for its future activities. “The CEC will manage this money systematically,” he said, and plans to spend it on “projects connected with the peace process and to maintain our organisation”.

Confusion as govt delays MPT partner decision
TIM MCLAUGHLIN AUNG SHIN newsroom@mmtimes.com A MYANMA Posts and Telecommunications official has confirmed that the announcement of a foreign partner for the state-owned telecoms enterprise has been delayed but offered no explanation or an alternative date. As The Myanmar Times reported last week, the three consortiums in the running for the partnership had been told the announcement would be made on December 18. MPT managing director U Aung Maw confirmed the delay on December 19 but said he had been instructed not to speak to the media on the matter and would not comment further. Consortiums headed by France’s Orange Group, Japan’s KDDI and Singapore’s SingTel – which were beaten by Telenor and Ooredoo in a hotly contested licence auction in June – are being considered by the government. KDDI leads a consortium with Japan’s Sumitomo and two local partners: Myanmar Information and Communication Technology Development Corporation and A1 Construction Company. SingTel is in a consortium with KBZ Group and Myanmar Telephone Company. Orange is working with Marubeni Corporation of Japan. A spokesperson for KDDI refused to comment on the delay, saying only

Number of tax-free car import permits the government gave to armed ethnic groups in February

290

A Myanma Posts and Telecommunications SIM card. Photo: Staff

Eleven and other local newspapers say the deal has cost the country millions of dollars in lost taxes. The KNU denies the allegations. Phado Mann Nyein Maung, a central executive committee member of the organisation, said the newspaper was ignorant of the facts. President U Thein Sein gave the permits to the armed groups on February 13 last year at a Union Day meeting at his Nay Pyi Taw farm, Phado Mann Nyein Maung said. “We explained to the government

that the timeline for the announcement was in the hands of MPT. Orange officials visiting Myanmar last week did not return a request for comment. SingTel has offered only that the company “continues[s] to seek opportunities in Myanmar”, while German consulting firm Roland Berger, which is thought to be managing the process, could not be reached for comment. The government invited the three consortiums to submit proposals for the partnership in early November. All three responded prior to the December 5 deadline. While the government has previously announced plans to

bring in a foreign partner, details of the process were not released to the public and were described by an official from KDDI as “confidential”. The partnership is seen as an important step for MPT as it prepares to face new competition from Telenor and Ooredoo. Their entry would end the state-run operator’s decades-old stranglehold on the sector but neither the Norwegian or Qatari firm have received their operator licences. Matchima Chanswangpuwana, head of communications at Telenor Myanmar, said in November that the company expects to sign by the end of the year.

8 News
Managing Director and Editor-in-Chief (MTE) Ross Dunkley rsdunkley@gmail.com Chief Operating Officer – Wendy Madrigal madrigalmcm@gmail.com General Counsel and Deputy Editor-in-Chief – Zaw Myint Editor-in-Chief (MTM) – Dr Tin Tun Oo drtto@myanmartimes.com.mm EDITORIAL newsroom@mmtimes.com Editor MTE – Thomas Kean tdkean@gmail.com Editor MTM – Sann Oo sannoo@gmail.com Chief of Staff – Zaw Win Than zawwinthan@gmail.com Editor Special Publications – Myo Lwin myolwin@myanmartimes.com.mm Mandalay Bureau Chief – Jeremy Mullins Business Editor MTE – Philip Heijmans pheijmans13@gmail.com World Editor MTE – Bridget Di Certo bridget.dicerto@gmail.com The Pulse Editor MTE – Manny Maung manny.maung@gmail.com Sport Editor MTE – Tim McLaughlin timothy.mclaughlin3@gmail.com Online Editor MTE – Kayleigh Long kayleighelong@gmail.com Chief Sub Editor MTM – Aye Sapay Phyu Business Editor MTM – Tin Moe Aung Property Editor MTM – Htar Htar Khin property@myanmartimes.com.mm Timeout Editor MTM – Moh Moh Thaw mohthaw@gmail.com Senior Editor MTM – Thet Hlaing News Editor (Mandalay) – Khin Su Wai Head of Translation Dept – Ko Ko Head of Photographics – Kaung Htet Photographers – Boothee, Aung Htay Hlaing, Thiri PRODUCTION production@myanmartimes.com.mm Art Directors – Tin Zaw Htway, Ko Pxyo MCM PRINTING printing@myanmartimes.com.mm Head of Department – Htay Maung Factory Administrator – Aung Kyaw Oo (3) Factory Foreman – Tin Win ADVERTISING advertising@myanmartimes.com.mm Deputy National Sales Directors – Chan Tha Oo, Nay Myo Oo, Nandar Khine, Nyi Nyi Tun Classifieds Manager – Khin Mon Mon Yi classified@myanmartimes.com.mm ADMIN, FINANCE & IT Finance Manager – Mon Mon Tha Saing finance@myanmartimes.com.mm HR – Khine Su Yin, Han Oo Khin Publisher – Dr Tin Tun Oo, Permit No: 04143 Information Technology Manager – Kyaw Zay Yar Lin DISTRIBUTION & CIRCULATION Circulation & Distribution Director – Jesse Gage distmgr@myanmartimes.com.mm ADVERTISING & SUBSCRIPTION ENQUIRIES Telephone: (01) 253 642, 392 928 Facsimile: (01) 254 158 administration@myanmartimes.com.mm The Myanmar Times is owned by Myanmar Consolidated Media Ltd and printed by MCM Commercial Printing with approval from MCM Ltd and by Shwe Zin Press (0368) with approval from MCM Ltd. The title The Myanmar Times, in either English or Myanmar languages, its associated logos or devices and the contents of this publication may not be reproduced in whole or in part without the written consent of the Managing Director of Myanmar Consolidated Media Ltd.

Views
TOILY KURBANOV
toily.kurbanov@undp.org

THE MYANMAR TIMES DECEMBER 23 - 29, 2013

First-year Myanmar lessons
A primary school teacher leads a class in a rural school. Photo: Kaung Htet

JUST one year ago the restrictions on the United Nations Development Programme’s mandate in Myanmar were lifted after more than two decades. As the new country director, I received a brief that indicated the agency could now respond to changes in the “development context”, support the “progress of reforms” and offer “development solutions to partners”. After a year on the job, I have learned that the thrust of that brief was right but its underlying assumptions were not nearly nuanced enough. First of all, there is no single “development context” in Myanmar. The country is too diverse to be described by one set of conditions. On one hand there are Rakhine and Kachin states, where challenges are largely humanitarian: recurrent violence, displaced populations and continued human suffering. Then there are Shan State and southeastern Myanmar, where armed conflicts have stopped but peace remains fragile, and needs to be reinforced through a political process and post-conflict recovery that can show a tangible peace dividend. There are distinct characteristics of regions dominated by the Bamar majority, including rural poverty, land disputes, outward migration, and issues of trust between authorities and communities. When experts refer to a “least developed country”, the label is entirely accurate for upper and lower Myanmar. And finally, there are also Yangon and Mandalay: not least developed cities at all, but fast-growing Asian megalopolises facing issues of congestion, access to services and sustainable use of scarce resources. Given this almost unparalleled diversity of development contexts, policy priorities in Myanmar cannot be examined through a single lens or context. One size fits all simply does not apply. Development terms like poverty reduction, community resilience or inclusive governance will mean different things in different states and regions.

A second lesson is that the “progress of reforms” is not a straight path. Very few reforms take a country straight from point A to point B, and probably none will do so in a linear fashion. As we are seeing in Myanmar, one step is to announce a reform – whether on anticorruption or decentralisation – and another is to start actually implementing it. That there might be a lag between the two does not necessarily suggest a deficit of intentions. Often it takes time to broaden the

champions. We should allow for nonlinear progression, expect the process to go in circles and make room for trial and error as long as the overall direction is not lost and the momentum continues. And the third lesson: In development, “partnerships” matter more than “solutions”. The UNDP has expanded its partnerships in Myanmar throughout this year. Working with ministries, parliament, civil society and local governments we have learned to pay more

We should allow for non-linear progression, expect the reform process to go in circles and make room for trial and error.
reform coalitions or indeed to tailor intended policy change to Myanmar’s different development contexts. Once a reform begins being implemented, it may pick up momentum, lose it and get back on track again because of competing agendas or the government’s implementation capacity. As we look into the government’s four waves of reform – political, economic, administrative and private sector – we must recognise the tremendous challenges faced by reform attention to evolving perspectives and develop a more nuanced understanding of the capacity of partners. In the process we also learned to de-emphasise the purity of development solutions. As UNDP administrator Helen Clark recently said, “Our role is never to deliver ready-made solutions, but rather to support the emergence of networks of change agents empowered to decide for themselves what needs to be done.” That Myanmar’s reforms have so far

been driven by a relatively small circle of people within and outside the government does pose challenges. Slowly but surely, however, the reform momentum is expanding beyond big-ticket items and outside of the centres of power. Increasingly, it is about the leadership of people, including remarkable individuals I have been privileged to meet throughout the country: a township administrator in Mon State who has strong commitment to providing essential people-centred services; a female NGO activist in Mandalay who courageously stood up for woman-led households that lose out in land disputes; a newly minted entrepreneur in Myitkyina who worked his way out of poverty through a microfinance loan and is creating jobs for others. It is these hardworking and courageous people who personify my Myanmar lessons in development. As we are beginning to see the full potential of the networks of change agents dispersed across the country, we hope these emerging leaders across the country will keep this historic transformation on track. And we might all learn a few more lessons in development along the way.
Toily Kurbanov was appointed country director of the UNDP in Myanmar in September 2012. He joined the UNDP in 2004 and prior to his current assignment was UNDP deputy resident representative in Fiji, where he led its program and operations in nine Pacific Island countries.

Volunteering: a misconception
AUNG ZIN PHYO THEIN
aungzin149@gmail.com

Myanmar Consolidated Media Ltd. www.mmtimes.com Head Office: 379/383 Bo Aung Kyaw Street, Kyauktada Township, Yangon, Myanmar. Telephone: (01) 253 642, 392 928 Facsimile: (01) 392 706 Mandalay Bureau: Bld Sa/1, Man Mandalar Housing, 35th Street, between 70th and 71st streets, Yan Myo Lone Quarter, Chan Aye Thar San Township. Tel: (02) 65391, 74585. Fax: (02) 24460 Email: mdybranch@myanmartimes.com.mm Nay Pyi Taw Bureau: No. 10/72 Bo Tauk Htein St, Yan Aung (1) Quarter, Nay Pyi Taw-Pyinmana. Tel: (067) 23064, 23065 Email: capitalbureau@myanmartimes.com.mm

VOLUNTEERING is in vogue. At some private schools in Yangon, students can often be found helping out at a variety of charities; mostly homes for the aged, but also schools for the blind, orphanages and monasteries. Students saving the world, smiles all around – what could possibly be the problem? But take a closer look and the truth is far less pleasant. Many toil away with the aim of getting a letter of recognition for services to the community that can boost their application when applying to university and help them “stand out from the crowd”. Some students have even been known to get their housekeepers or other staff to do the work, while they get to take the credit.

I’m not implying that all students behave in this way. Some genuinely do it out of goodwill and a devotion to helping others. But for many this is not the case. However, I do not blame the students entirely. What I do find fault with is the system and philosophy of mandatory volunteering. Most of today’s elite universities and colleges want to see a smattering of social work on students’ résumés. They want to see instances where “the individual has shown unique, exceptional qualities of devotion to a better cause”. But how can these institutions expect anything unique from Myanmar students when all volunteering here is almost identical? More importantly, how can they differentiate a dedicated volunteer from one who merely dabbles for their own benefit? In Western countries the concept of mandatory volunteering has also come under fire. “For some, involvement often consists solely of collecting the

sheets confirming students’ activity and recording data for transcript purposes,” Stephen D Brown, a researcher at Canada’s Wilfrid Laurier University, said following a study of Ontario’s mandatory 40-hour high school public service component, according to the Southern Ontario Social Economy Research Alliance. Most of the students had not relished such volunteering at all, according to a research paper titled “The Impact of High School Mandatory Community Service Programs on Subsequent Volunteering and Civic Engagement”. “The 40 hours were not volunteering at all,” Jerome Mackenzie, a firstyear business student, told researchers. “Why? Because students are receiving something in return and they are told they had to do it.” Despite the attitudes conveyed, the Canadian Ministry of Education has stated that the aim of the mandatory service, which was introduced in 1999 and revised four years later to include

the 40-hour stipulation, is to “encourage students to develop an awareness and understanding of civic responsibility and the role they can play in supporting their communities”, according to the Michigan Journal of Community Service Learning. The journal has reported that some parts of the United States are facing a similar situation, particularly in the state of Maryland. In 1997, Maryland became the first state to institute a mandatory “service learning” high school requirement, which stated that students had to complete a minimum of 75 hours of public service in order to graduate. Since then, the number of volunteers has increased dramatically, both in Maryland and throughout the US, the journal reported. In the latest survey, more than a third of all first-year university students graduating from high school have participated in at least one form of volunteering. MORE ON NEWS 9

www.mmtimes.com

Migrant rage boils over
ROGER MITTON
roger.mitton@gmail.com

Views
dormitory with rows of bunks stacked to the ceiling. My first thought was of a concentration camp. My second was of the doss house in George Orwell’s The Road to Wigan Pier with its stifling dank air, and suffocating stench of boiled cabbage and sweaty socks. The workers crowded round and told me about the irregular water supply, the endemic bedbugs, the lack of air-con and many other gripes. There were 3200 of them staying at this Kaki Bukit site, most from Bangladesh, India and Myanmar. They get up at 5:30am, go to work at 7am and normally do two hours’ overtime, which means they finish at 7:30pm and get back to their bunks an hour later. They do this six days a week and get about US$20 a day. Last December, 200 of their colleagues, mostly construction workers and bus drivers, staged Singapore’s first strike in three decades to protest poor pay and unhygienic dorms. Calling the stoppage “a threat to public order”, the government sent in the riot squad and the workers were variously jailed, fined and deported. Belatedly, their employers agreed to fumigate the bedbug-infested dorms and investigate unpaid back wages and other grievances. Reporting this, I concluded, “The message is clear. The workers are not all right, Jack. Quite the opposite, they are angry and ready to rumble.” On December 8, they started to rumble.

News 9

EARLIER this month, an event occurred in Singapore that had been on the cards for years, if not decades, and the wonder was that it had not happened sooner. Like the Arab Spring, the masses toppling the Berlin Wall, the marches for gay rights and myriad other public eruptions, it seemed like everyone said to themselves, Yeah, that’s been coming a while. But the events of Sunday, December 8, were not just a racial riot, and not just disadvantaged Indians venting their despair; no, it was the first sign that Singapore’s demographic pressure cooker has started to blow its lid. Those who know the conditions under which more than a quarter of the city state’s population live and work were less shocked that the riot occurred than that it did not spread and cause greater carnage. For he who rides a tiger cannot dismount. And in contracting over a million South Asians to do its dirty work – all the harsh, grotty jobs that effete Singaporeans will not do – the island republic mounted a very fearful tiger. It cannot now get off without effectively committing economic suicide. As the local academic, Mukul Asher,

once told me, “Singapore has been able to use these foreign workers and their low wages and conditions to maintain its competitiveness and high growth rates.” The trashed stores, overturned police cars and torched buses in its Little India district, however, exposed the danger of this exploitative policy. But instead of dwelling on forensic analysis, let’s try to personalise the plight of those who, wrongly, but understandably, ran amok. After I’d interviewed Asher for a story about Singapore’s poor, a colleague from the Straits Times directed me to districts where the down and out live. The areas were a real eye-opener and would not have been out of place in the seedier parts of Pathein or Phnom Penh. Walking around, I met some Bangladeshi workers who had come out to shop and meet friends – it was a Sunday, their one day off each week. We chatted and then went to Serangoon Road for something to eat. No one drank any booze; in fact, I don’t recall seeing anyone drinking, let alone getting drunk – the spurious official reason for last Sunday’s riot. When it grew dark, they took me to Kaki Bukit in eastern Singapore, where there are vast sheds housing hundreds of thousands of foreign workers. One of them loaned me his key card to go through the turnstile and we climbed the bare stairs to the third floor where we entered a long, narrow

TRADEMARK CAUTION NOTICE
LRC Products Limited, a company organized under the laws of England and having its principal office at 103-105 Bath Road, Slough, SL1 3UH, England is the owner and sole proprietor of the following Trademarks:-

DUREX
Reg. Nos. 4/6919/2013 for Int’l Class 3, 4/6920/2013 for Int’l Class 5 & 4/6921/2013 for Int’l Class 10

Reg. Nos. 4/6922/2013 for Int’l Class 3, 4/6923/2013 for Int’l Class 5 & 4/6924/2013 for Int’l Class 10 Used in respect of:Non-medicated wipes impregnated with a cosmetic; non-medicated wipes impregnated with a a soap or a cleaning preparation, not for personal use; non-medicated wipes impregnated with a soap or a cleaning preparation for personal use; toiletries, soaps, not for personal use; cleaning preparations, not for personal use; soaps, for personal use; cleaning preparations for personal use; dentifrices; tooth cleaning preparations; non-medicated preparations for the bath in the form of salts (oils and soaks); moisturizing preparations; essential oils; massage oils; massage creams; massage gels; room sprays(fragrances, other than for personal use); nonmedicated preparations for the care of intimate parts of the body. (International Class 3) Contraceptive preparations and substances; spermicidal gels, liquids and creams; hygienic lubricants and disinfectants for use in the area of the vagina, penis and anus; personal lubricants; lubricants, gels, liquids and creams for sexual health and/ or enhancing sexual performance; supplements for sexual health and/or enhancing sexual performance; pharmaceutical preparations and substances all relating to sexual health and/or sexual performance; diagnostic preparations and substances all for gynaecological testing purposes or for the diagnosis of sexually transmiteed diseases .(International Class 5) Condoms; contraceptive, hygienic or prophylactic devices; massage apparatus, instruments and appliances; electric and electronic massage apparatus, instruments and appliances; body massagers; personal massagers; vibrators; vibrating rings; marital aids; sex toy; sex aids; parts and fittings for all the aforesaid goods. (International Class 10) Any unauthorised use, imitation, infringements or fraudulent intentions of the above mark will be dealt with according to law. Tin Ohnmar Tun, Tin Thiri Aung & The Law Chambers Ph: 0973150632 Email:law_chambers@seasiren.com.mm (For.Domnern Somgiat & Boonma, Attorneys at Law, Thailand) Dated. 23rd December, 2013

CONTINUED FROM NEWS 8 It is here that presents the starkest contrast between American schools and Myanmar’s private schools, many of which, interestingly, try to follow American curricula. The schools in Myanmar emphasise only large-scale displays of “charity and benevolence” – wiping floors at homes for the aged, teaching the ABCs to poverty-stricken children, conducting an environmental campaign, or donating funds to orphanages and blind schools. Some even record heart-touching “heal the world” videos. If an individual fails to be a part

of these activities then he or she, regardless of any out-of-school volunteering they do, risks losing the all-valued letters recognising their service to the community. To their American counterparts, however, volunteering comprises a huge variety of activities, ranging from working in soup kitchens and donating blood to even babysitting, being part of a band or arranging a senior citizens’ prom. But the issues are the same – by making volunteering a compulsory requirement, it takes out the spirit of volunteering, in direct contradiction to its aim. Making credit and transcript recognition an incentive for volunteer-

ing has devalued it as an act and we should ask the question: Is it worth forcing our students to volunteer? Frankly, I believe schools and colleges should not make it a requirement. It is time-consuming and more often than not does not make us better people. The values we hold are far more important than some show of incentive-based volunteering.
Aung Zin Phyo Thein, 17, studied at the Diplomatic School Yangon from kindergarten to grade 10 and is in the second year of an international baccalaureate program at Horizon International School.

10 News

THE MYANMAR TIMES DECEMBER 23 - 29, 2013

Strong winds kill one in southern Shan State
AYE SAPAY PHYU ayephyu2006@gmail.com A BOY was killed when the wind blew his house down in Shan State last week, an official of the welfare ministry’s Relief and Resettlement Department (RRD) said on December 20. U Aung Kyaw, assistant director of the department, said the 14-year-old died in War Pyar village in Pindaya township, southern Shan State, on December 14. “Two houses were knocked down and a house was damaged by strong wind about 12:45 pm on December 14. The boy was killed in the damaged house,” he said. He said the wind also affected two other villages in the township. “Strong winds damaged the roof of a monastery and 23 houses, and three houses collapsed in Ku Kaw village. The roofs of two houses were also blown off in Da Yal Pyin village,” he said. He said that the department provided K50,000 for the families affected by the damage. U Kyaw Lwin Oo, director of the Department of Meteorology and Hydrology, said rain, strong winds and hail in midDecember in some parts of upper Myanmar were the result of a weather system from northern India. There were further reports of stormy weather in Sagaing Region and Shan State on December 15. The state-owned Myanmar Alin newspaper reported on December 17 that more than 210 acres of paddy almost ready for harvest was destroyed by hail in Kyunhla and Kanbalu townships in Sagaing Region.

Economist calls for caution on pace of banking reforms
THOMAS KEAN tdkean@gmail.com PROMINENT economist U Myint has argued that Myanmar should take more time to weigh up the potential consequences before allowing “big” foreign banks, institutional investors and finance firms into Myanmar. In a presentation to the National Defense University earlier this month, U Myint, an economic adviser to President U Thein Sein, told the audience that the Central Bank of Myanmar was still too weak to properly supervise a liberalised financial sector. “The Central Bank of Myanmar got independence only a few weeks ago. Its hands are full trying to get the exchange rate right and supervising banks in the country that are still in the rudimentary stage of development,” said U Myint, who is also the head of the Centre for Economic and Social Development at the Myanmar Development Resource Institute. “So if the big players at the gate, such as big banks that even the United State’s Federal Reserve could not properly supervise, are invited to come in, the costs and benefits of such a move to the country and its people will need to be carefully weighed and given serious thought and consideration,” U Myint said. “To do this we need time. Time is needed for the CBM to get its act together. Time is needed to enable our banks to engage more fruitfully with the big players from abroad for mutual and equitable benefit. “Only by engaging with them will our banks be able to acquire knowledge and experience and will be able to operate and provide services at international standards.”

Migrant workers stage a demonstration in Thailand on December 18. Photo: Supplied/Migrant Worker Rights Network

Govt announces extra support for migrants
Worker ambassadors to be appointed to embassies in South Korea and Kuwait
PYAE THET PHYO pyaethetphyo87@gmail.com MYANMAR workers in Singapore and Kuwait are to get more help from their government. The Ministry of Labour, Employment and Social Security says it will appoint worker ambassadors to those two countries, in addition to officials already operating in Thailand, Malaysia and South Korea. Speaking on International Migrants’ Day on December 18, labour minister U Aye Myint said about 5 percent of the country’s population had worked overseas as migrant workers, and in many cases sent home thousands of dollars a year in remittances to support their families. “They contribute to the development of the economy both of their own country and the country they are working in,” he said. Labour offices register people wishing to work in other countries, and help them join licensed overseas employers, he added. The ministry has sent Myanmar workers to Thailand, Singapore, Malaysia, South Korea, Japan and the Middle East in cooperation with 175 employment agencies. “The department helps people receive training and protects their rights under the law. It holds job fairs and it plans to create more job opportunities here and abroad,” said U Aye Myint. “We plan to appoint worker ambassadors to Singapore and Kuwait as well.” The Thailand-based Migrant Worker Rights Network used the day to call for “campaigns to promote protection of migrant rights by publicising activities and news regarding the human rights and fundamental freedoms of all migrant workers”. It said that despite the importance of migrant workers to Thailand’s economy, they are often poorly treated by officials or employers and denied human rights and decent work conditions. “Migrants still face wage deductions and unlawful salaries, dangerous and unhygienic working conditions, detention in slave-like conditions and too frequently fall victim to human trafficking,” the organisation said. – Translation by Thiri Min Htun

‘Time is needed to enable our banks to engage more fruitfully with the big players from abroad.’
U Myint Economic adviser to the president

His comments come following reports that the government is considering allowing several foreign banks to establish 100-percent foreign-owned subsidiaries in Myanmar, a move seen as threatening to the country’s nascent domestic banking sector. Showing his trademark sense of humour, U Myint suggested Myanmar look to China, which waited decades after initiating reforms to open up its banking sector, for guidance on sequencing financial sector liberalisation. Noting that Deng Xiaoping once described the reforms that he initiated in 1979 as “groping for stones to cross a river”, U Myint argued that “perhaps it will be wise for us to do some groping for stones at this stage, instead of jumping into the river and rushing to swim across to the other side”.

www.mmtimes.com

News 11

ADB urges more investment in Mandalay water supply system
Review of tax collection also needed, ADB says, as research shows that 13 of 14 MCDC departments levy taxes
SI THU LWIN sithulwin.mmtimes@gmail.com THE Asian Development Bank has urged Mandalay municipal authorities to focus their attention on supplying running water to all of the city’s households, following a survey of 600 homes in October and November. The survey of economic and social conditions was conducted as part of its new cooperation with Mandalay City Development Committee, which is aiming to turn Mandalay into a “green”, or environmentally friendly, city. Speaking at a recent city development forum at Mandalay’s Swan Hotel earlier this month, ADB expert Alistair Blunt said the committee also needs to improve the city’s sanitation and rubbish collection systems, while also taking steps to control pollution, particularly wastewater. “The main problem is running water. According to our survey, we found that running water can’t be used as drinking water. There have been few investments in running water and both the quality and [provision] of water [need to improve],” Mr Blunt said.
Mandalay’s railway station and commercial centre. Photo: Si Thu Lwin

Mysterious language stumps researchers
KHIN SU WAI jasminekhin@gmail.com A RECENTLY discovered stone inscription in five languages – including one that is yet to be identified – is thought to be the oldest of its kind yet found in Myanmar, a prominent archaeologist says. The royal inscription, found in Mandalay Region’s Myittha township in early November, also features text in Myanmar, Pyu, Mon and Pali. U Win Maung (Tampawady) said at a ceremony in Mandalay on December 14 that the inscription, which describes the donations of King Sawlu, who ruled Bagan from 1078-84, is “undoubtedly” older than the Gubyaukgyi inscription from 1113, which is considered the oldest known stone inscription in Myanmar. It is also older than the Myazedi and Yazakumar inscriptions, he said. While the stone is incomplete, it is thought to have been almost 6 feet (1.8 metres) high. “These royal inscriptions were made by King Sawlu during the Bagan period because they mention Sawlu’s royal titles,” U Win Maung said at a ceremony dedicated to the anniversary of the birth of U Mg Mg Tin, a noted archaeologist.

The survey also found that most underground water “can’t be used for domestic purposes” because it is of poor quality, he added. ADB has set up an office inside the MCDC compound to gather data on the city’s residents, observe MCDC departments and work more closely with the committee’s officials. In seven poor wards in Chan Mya Thar Si and Pyigyitagun townships, the ADB is also expected to provide US$2 million in assistance in 2014 for community development.

Mr Blunt said important decisions on land use would also shape the direction of the city’s growth. “Mandalay has good prospects for development if it occurs systematically through long-term projects. If military-owned land is managed systematically, it will be convenient for the increase of population in the city,” he said. “We’ve found that Patheingyi township can be expanded if there is a need to widen the town to cater to the grow-

ing population. And there will be room for investment in the northern area. But if land needs to be confiscated for new developments then fair compensation should be given to the farmers.” Participants at the forum also discussed the weaknesses in the municipal council, particularly the collecting of a wide variety of taxes. One ADB expert said the bank had found that 13 of the committee’s 14 department collect some kind of taxes. This is problematic in terms of financial transparency and “makes people confused about the collection of taxes”. He recommended the introduction of computerised bookkeeping to improve efficiency and accountability. “I don’t mean the current procedure is inaccurate … [but] if a computer system is used for finances we can clearly see the balance sheet.” An MCDC official said the authorities have already learned the cost of poorly planned development, pointing to the lack of wastewater treatment in the city’s industrial zone, where 97 factories discard 400,000 gallons (1.8 million litres) of wastewater each day. – Translation by Thiri Min Htun

Nagoya University joins debate on reform of education
EI THAE THAE NAING eithaethaenaing@gmail.com EDUCATION reforms in Myanmar will benefit from the experience of Japan. Experts from Nagoya University have been discussing their national experience with their Myanmar counterparts. On December 17, representatives of the Yangon Institute of Education and Nagoya University discussed educational policy at the Diamond Jubilee Hall of Yangon University. Reformers will consider the advantages and disadvantages of the Japanese system as they draw up plans for Myanmar’s national education system, said U Aung Min, the institute’s rector. “We are now formulating national education policy and law, so Nagoya University will share their experience with us,” said U Aung Min, adding, “Japan has undergone four [periods of ] educational reform. We can learn from them as we complete our own law and policy.” Retired director general of the Department of Basic Education U Than Oo said the Japanese experience could help guide the upcoming national education law, which he described as “central to reform efforts”. “To help us get it right, we will discuss and compare with Japan’s system. Because we are coming to this late, we have a chance to learn from others,” he said. Nagoya University has also reached an agreement with Yangon University on setting up a legal research centre. “We explained the educational system in Japan and point out its advantages and disadvantages and how they might apply to Myanmar,” said Tetsuhiko Nakajima, a professor at Nagoya University.

12 News

THE MYANMAR TIMES DECEMBER 23 - 29, 2013

Visa-free deal signed with Cambodia
Myanmar nationals can visit Cambodia for up to 14 days without a visa under a new agreement signed earlier this month
ZAW WIN THAN zawwinthan@gmail.com TOURISM in both Myanmar and Cambodia is likely to receive a boost from a visa exemption agreement signed last week in Nay Pyi Taw by the two governments, experts predict. The December 12 agreement was signed by Deputy Minister for Foreign Affairs U Tin Oo Lwin and Sieng Burvuth, Cambodia’s ambassador to Myanmar. Under the agreement, Myanmar citizens will be permitted to visit Cambodia for up to 14 days without a visa, and vice versa. Direct air links between the two countries were launched in early 2011 by Myanmar Airways International (MAI), which opened a service between Yangon and Siem Reap, then to Phnom Penh. MAI’s marketing manager Daw Aye Mra Tha said the relaxing of visa requirements would likely encourage more tourists to fly the route. “Cambodia has been offering visa on arrival since we started our operation to Siem Reap. I welcome this visa exemption agreement,” she said. A Yangon-based businessperson who frequently travels abroad also said he welcomed the agreement. “This agreement means no more queuing for Myanmar visitors [when they arrive in] Cambodia. It would be very useful if our government could reach similar

‘It would be very useful could reach similar agreements with other regional countries.’
Yangon-based business traveller

agreements with other regional countries, like Thailand.” Myanmar has targeted visa exemption agreements with all nine fellow ASEAN members but Cambodia is only the third to sign such a deal. An agreement with Laos was signed in 2009, while on September 26 Vietnam agreed to the visa exemption program. Thailand and Indonesia have agreed in principle to the arrangement but the formal signing has not yet taken place.

TRADE MARK CAUTION
NOTICE is hereby given that Hankook Tire Co., Ltd. a company organized under the laws of Korea and having its principal office at 133, Teheran-ro(Yeoksam-dong), Gangnam-gu, Seoul, 135-723, Korea is the owner and sole proprietor of the following trademarks:(Reg: Nos. IV/349/2009 & IV/8291/2013) (Reg: Nos. IV/9105/2011 & IV/8292/2013) (Reg: No. IV/9103/2011 & IV/8294/2013) (Reg: Nos. IV/9102/2011 & IV/8295/2013)

Husband of school for deaf founder returns, 50 years on
THAN NAING SOE thennaingsoe@gmail.com DAVID Smith and his wife Sandra were forced to leave Myanmar in 1964 when General Ne Win’s government turned on foreigners. While the couple rebuilt their life in the United Kingdom after their eviction, the legacy of their time in Myanmar remained in the form of a school for the deaf in Mandalay’s Chan Mya Thar Si township. Mrs Smith, who passed away earlier this year, set up the school in 1962 – when she was just 23 – on land owned by a Christian mission. Earlier this month, Mr Smith returned to Myanmar for the first time in almost 50 years. He said he was “so happy” to find a thriving school of almost 200 students, offering classes from grade one to seven. “My wife delivered leaflets around Mandalay city riding a bicycle. The leaflets said, ‘Please contact me when you see a deaf child.’ Along with three Burmese people, she started the school with just two students at the beginning. She faced many difficulties,” Mr Smith said last week. Barely two years later, in October 1964, they were forced to leave, so Mrs Smith established a committee to transfer management of the school to Myanmar people.
David Smith during a visit to Mandalay earlier this month. Photo: Than Naing Soe

VENTUS

VANTRA Dynapro

OPTIMO

(Reg: Nos. IV/9101/2011 & IV/8296/2013) (Reg: Nos. IV/9100/2011 & IV/8297/2013) The above six trademarks are in respect:“Air pumps [vehicle accessories]; air vehicles; anti-skid chains; automobile tires; automobiles; bicycle handle bars; bicycles tires; bicycles; brake lining for vehicles; casings for pneumatic tires; seat covers for vehicles; covers for tyres; covers for vehicles wheels; motorcycle tires; adhesive rubber patches for repairing inner tubes; inner tubes for bicycles; inner tubes for motorcycles; inner tubes for pneumatic tires; inner tubes for vehicle wheels; inner tubes for vehicle tires; luggage nets for vehicles; pneumatic tires; repair outfits for inner tubes; rims for vehicle wheels; saddle covers for bicycles; saddle cover for motorcycles; safety belts for vehicle seats; brake segments for vehicles; shock absorbers for vehicle; ski carriers for cars; spikes for tires; studs for tires; tires for vehicle wheels; tires, solid, for vehicle wheels; treads for retreading tires; treads for vehicles [roller belts]; treads for vehicle [tractor type]; tubeless tires for bicycles; tubeless tires for motorcycles; valves for vehicle tires; vehicle wheel tires; vehicle wheels; electric; boats; locomotive; windscreen wipers; windscreens” Class: 12 (Reg: Nos. IV/9104/2011 & IV/8293/2013) in respect of:- “Automobile tires; inner tubes for vehicle wheels; tires for vehicle wheels; inner tubes for vehicle tires; pneumatic tires; tires, solid, for vehicle wheels; vehicle wheel tires” Class: 12 (Reg: Nos. IV/2373/2000 & IV/8298/2013) (Reg: Nos. IV/2375/2000 & IV/8299/2013) The above two trademarks are in respect of:“Tire, tube for vehicles” Any fraudulent imitation or unauthorized use of the said trademarks or other infringements whatsoever will be dealt with according to law. U Kyi Win Associates for Hankook Tire Co., Ltd. P.O. Box No. 26, Yangon. Phone: 372416 Dated: 23rd December, 2013

enfren

This school moved to its current site in 1978 when it became self-supporting and overseen by the municipal authorities. On September 19, 1981, the Ministry of Social Welfare, Relief and Resettlement marked International Day for Disabled People by taking responsibility for the school. Today it has 193 students. Mr Smith said his return to Myanmar was prompted by a desire to set the record straight by crediting the founding of the school to his wife. “My wife died on May 7 this

year. Two days later my son-in-law showed me the school’s website on Google. I got a surprise when I saw it. The website said I was the founder, but actually it was my wife,” he said. He has now agreed to help the school improve its support to Mandalay’s deaf community, headmaster Daw Sein Mya Mya Thuzar said. “Mr Smith visited the school on December 13 and said he will try and donate whatever the school needs,” she said. – Translation by Zar Zar Soe

KINERGY

BMW gives 95 cars for ASEAN meetings
GERMAN car manufacturer BMW and its local agent, Octagon International Services – part of businessman U Aik Htun’s Shwe Taung empire – have donated 95 new luxury cars for use during next year’s ASEAN meetings. The cars include BMW 5 and 7 Series executive sedans, as well as BMW X5 Sports Activity Vehicles, the state-run New Light of Myanmar reported last week. An Octagon representative said at a ceremony in Yangon on December 18 the donation is aimed at ensuring the convenience of leaders and ministers attending the two ASEAN summit meetings that Myanmar will host in 2014. Deputy Minister for Foreign Affairs U Zin Yaw accepted the vehicles on behalf of the government. Myanmar will chair the 10-member ASEAN grouping for the first time in 2014 and host more than 1000 ASEANrelated meetings. BMW Group Asia appointed Octagon subsidiary Prestige Automobiles as its authorised distributor on December 5. The first BMW showroom is expected to open in 2014. – Myo Lwin

CENTUM

OPTIMO K406

They know it’s Christmas in Kachin State
BILL O’TOOLE
botoole12@gmail.com

DESPITE being far from home and working with limited means, Kachin refugee groups around Myitkyina have vowed to put on a traditional Kachin Christmas. “We’re going to put on the best celebration we can with the supplies we’ve got,” said Reverend Aung Myat, an administrator from the Jan Mai refugee camp in Myitkyina, which is home to about 1000 internally displaced persons (IDPs). As Daw Khon Ja of the Kachin Peace Network explained, Christmas is still a relatively new concept in the long history of the Kachin people. She said that from the moment Christianity arrived in Myanmar via missionaries from the West, Kachin people have celebrated in their own way. “Even before [Christianity was introduced], Kachin celebrations always involved gathering together for singing and dancing,” she said.

Daw Khon Ja, who divides her time between Myitkyina and Yangon, explained that traditionally the residents of several villages or townships gather on Christmas Eve to take part in what she described as a line dance: “Something simple that all ages can dance to.” While the dancing is fun for every one, it is of secondary importance to the singing. Daw Khon Ja and Rev Aung Kyat both affirmed that the Kachin affinity for singing fits nicely

‘Many of these people have not been home for so long. Sometimes the songs remind them of how much they miss their homes.’
Reverend Aung Myat Jan Mai refugee camp administrator

into the Christian traditions of hymns and gospel. Once the sun goes down, the assembled Kachin alternate singing songs about the birth of Jesus and about paying tribute to their home villages. According to Daw Khon Ja, each village has its own anthem describing the local scenery. “You could draw a map of Kachin by listening to the songs,” she said. Sadly, these traditions are just a few of the many aspects of life in Kachin State that has been derailed by the region’s ongoing civil war. Even with the Kachin Independence Army and the government engaged in peace talks, minor skirmishes in rural areas remain common and make securing large gatherings all but impossible. Daw Khon Ja was quick to point out that with so many people in the countryside forced to abandon their homes, there wouldn’t be many attendees even if some intrepid church tried to organise a large-scale Christmas event. Still, Daw Khon Jaw and many other activists believe these traditions need to be preserved for the role they play in uniting the Kachin people. In that spirit, IDP camps around

A Kachin church group sings Christmas carols in Laiza. Photo: Niels Huby

Myitkyina, as well as cities with large IDP populations such as Bhamo and Laiza, will be holding scaled-down versions of the traditional Christmas celebrations. Local churches will be donating the essentials, which include small gifts for children and Kachin rice wine for adults. Although gift-giving is a Christmas tradition, Daw Khon Jaw said bestowing lavish, expensive presents has never been a key component of their Christmas experience – it’s more about imparting a Christian sense of generosity.

As for the singing, Rev Aung Kyat said the same songs will be sung this year, adding that if 2012 was any indication, these will be emotional moments during the festivities. “Many of these people have not been home for so long. Sometimes the songs remind them of how much they miss their homes,” he said. When asked if they would ever skip the singing and spare the IDPs, Rev Aung Kyat said the people wouldn’t hear of it: Christmas without their hometown anthems would be “impossible”.

TRADE MARK CAUTION
COSMOSTEEL HOLDINGS LIMITED, a company incorporated in Singapore, of 50 Raffles Place, #06-00 Singapore Land Tower, Singapore 048623, is the Owner of the following Trade Mark:-

Reg. No. 12847/2013 in respect of “Int’l Class 6: Common metals and their alloys; transportable buildings of metal; materials of metal for railway tracks; non-electric cables and wires of common metal; metal junctions for pipes, branching pipes of metal, metal pipes and metal fittings therefor, metal tubes, metal flanges, elbows of metal for pipes, irons and steels, alloyed iron, clad steel plates and sheets, steel pipes and tubes, steel plates and sheets, bolts of metal, metal nuts, metal valves not being parts of machines”. Fraudulent imitation or unauthorised use of the said Trade Mark will be dealt with according to law. Win Mu Tin, M.A., H.G.P., D.B.L for COSMOSTEEL HOLDINGS LIMITED P. O. Box 60, Yangon E-mail: makhinkyi.law@mptmail.net.mm Dated: 23 December 2013

Hotels and markets buy into Xmas
’Twas the month before Christmas and all through Yangon, businesses were getting into the holiday spirit with ornaments, flashing lights and special promotions
TIN YADANAR HTUN yandanar.mcm@gmail.com MYANMAR is not a majority Christian country, but you might not know it to look at Yangon’s hotels, restaurants and shopping centres in December. Christmas decorations are catching on as the service industry looks to woo cash from expats and trendy locals alike. Wreathes and bows, trees and lights, Santas and stars are all on display, turning everything around them into potential gifts-to-be, ready to be snapped up in celebration of the festive season. This year Sedona Hotel on Kabar Aye Pagoda Road has chosen fir for its Christmas tree. But the miracle of seeing a real live tree – they’ve opted to avoid plastic this year – is nothing next to the rest of the spectacle. “The most strange and amazing thing we do is the Christmas House,” said Ko Ye Min, Sedona’s food and beverage manager. “In Christmas House, snow is falling down all the time. It is decorated with red and green lighting and many ornaments. “We’ve also decorated the tower of Sedona Hotel with Santa Claus and deer. Outside the hotel and in the lobby we’ve beautified the entrance with amazing lighting. We’ve embellished every restaurant with many ornaments and lights.” Other prominent hotels catering to affluent locals and international visitors are getting into the spirit. Chatrium Hotel on Natmauk Street near Kandawgyi Lake is decorated as last year but put “more emphasis on lighting this year”, said Ko Htet Myint Ko Ko, senior marketing executive. “We’ve decorated with many Christmas trees and lighting on the outside of Chatrium Hotel. We used a ladder to decorate with many balls.” But Traders Hotel, at the corner of Bogyoke Aung San and Sule Pagoda roads, has scaled back its decorations this year after it was rocked by a bomb blast in October. “We had a plan for special decorations for Christmas, but the plan is not being implemented because of the accidents that happened recently in Traders,” said U Htun Htun Lin from the hotel’s housekeeping department. “We did up Traders with simple Christmas decorations. We used beautiful, simple Christmas ornaments in the lobby, dining rooms and the front of the hotel.” Supermarkets are also getting in on the act. “We do Christmas decorations in Ruby Mart every year,” said Daw Thidar Than, a Ruby Mart spokesperson. “We decorate with many Christmas trees, Santa Claus, Christmas stickers and ornaments in the whole mart. We put a Christmas tree on every counter.” Ruby Mart is also running promotions for “Christmas accessories and other things” in commemoration of Christmas and the SEA Games, she added. Capital Hypermarket has decked its halls as well – and is also running special holiday promotions. advertise. Even some small shops that don’t cater to foreign customers decorate during December. “I decorate with some Christmas decorations in my shop,” said U Ko Gyi, owner of Sein Video Store on Sayasan Road in Bahan township. “Moreover, I sell Christmas ornaments in my shop every year. Many people like Christmas decorations. Besides Christians, Buddhists and Muslims like Christmas ornaments and also buy them.” One target audience for all the decorations is younger customers who enjoy places that are brightly decorated.

Photo: Thiri A Christmas house brings joy to guests at Central Hotel in downtown Yangon.

Young IDPs celebrate Christmas in Laiza. Photo: Niels Huby

“We are holding the ‘End of Year Shock Sale’ program as a special Christmas event in Capital Hypermarket,” said Ko Wine Chit, advertising and promotions manager. “It’s being held from December 16 to 31. We promote many Christmas ornaments during these days, and we will also offer up to 70 promotions on fashions during this period.” It’s not just the big businesses that are starting to see Christmas – just like traditional Myanmar holidays like Thingyan or Thadingyut – as a time to

“I like Christmas trees and Santa Claus,” said Mg Htet Aung, a grade 9 student at Multi Language Academy on Wingabar Street in Bahan township. “I go to many places that are decorated with Christmas ornaments.” He added that this year exams have trumped the usual decorating of his school classroom with ornaments. But even these Scrooge-like hardships aren’t holding him back. “I decorated my bedroom with Christmas stickers and stars,” he said.

The fortunes of Christian missions
Missionaries have faced major difficulties in their efforts to bring their religious beliefs to Myanmar, writes Amaury Lorin
CHRISTMAS celebrations this week and the upcoming jubilee of the 500year presence of the Catholic Church in Myanmar (1514-2014) are two worthwhile opportunities to review the tremendous history of Myanmar Christian missions, which have withstood decades of hardship and danger with praiseworthy self-denial and zeal. The somewhat sharp competition between Catholic and Protestant missions, their ambivalent relationship with Buddhism and their close links with the British colonisation (18261948) make this history an amazing epic. The colourful chronicles, correspondences and journals in which a generation of pioneer missionaries carefully consigned the results of their observations allow the reader to travel by the side of these “white men in Burma” and share their hopes and doubts, their trials and successes, and their fervour and fears. These records are a first-rate introduction for anybody interested in this aspect of the fascinating but complex history of Myanmar. Acute Anglo-Dutch and AngloFrench rivalries emerged as Europe gradually became aware of Myanmar. In this context, the first Westerners who appeared in the 16th century in Myanmar were merchants, chiefly Portuguese adventurers, who travelled through Western Asia, Persia and India. Missionaries, often born into clerical families, were not long in following them, providing one more illustration of the classic established association between merchants, missionaries and colonisers. Indeed, Christianity was often used to justify colonisation in the name of so-called civilisation. In this regard, education, the main vehicle to bring civilisation, quickly became the main activity of missionaries in Myanmar. Moreover, as slavery was a widespread practice here, Christians proposed nothing else but the “redemption from slavery to education” – in other words, from darkness to light. This is a well-known moral and humanitarian argument. The efforts In a short time Christian missionaries were fully assimilated with the Myanmar people. But a huge waste of human life (mainly from dysentery and pulmonary trouble) gave Myanmar the reputation of being physically tough and so tended to deter men from coming here. The insalubrious climate, the diet, the austere mode of life – all of these causes contributed to thinning the ranks of the devoted propagators of the Christian religion and to bringing an untimely end to a good number of them. The Christian missions in rural Myanmar enjoyed greater freedom than those in the cities. But a troublesome matter was a tendency to concentrate missionary staff in large centres instead of dispersing them widely through the country. The newcomers were highly reluctant to go into remote places, especially Tanintharyi and Rakhine. Their excuse was the need to first learn the language. The recruitment of missionaries who came for short periods with the intention of soon returning home was avoided: The work of a “true missionary” in Myanmar was envisaged as nothing less than a life’s task. His “sole object on earth” was declared to be the introduction of “the religion of Jesus Christ”. In these conditions, the opportunities for “Christian Burmese service” revealed a constant and desperate need for new missionaries. But the requirements – spiritual, mental and physical – to be met by the candidates were very demanding. Presenting the Gospels against the background of Buddhism was a real cultural challenge. After overcoming many difficulties and privations, missionaries acquired a thorough knowledge of the Myanmar language, which allowed them to translate a considerable part of the New Testament, the product of many years of patient labour. The translation into Myanmar of the scriptures, as well as the production of vernacular versions, followed by the first printing of the catechism in Myanmar in 1776, helped the missionaries and was much appreciated Seminaries were also open for the training of local preachers – the missionaries’ own successors. The first convert in Myanmar, U Naw, was baptised in 1819 with much pride and joy. But principles on which missionary activity ought to be conducted and methods of evangelism in Myanmar remained subjects for sharp discussions. For instance, should medical practice and the establishment of dispensaries be included as a means of evangelism? The arrival in 1821 of the first medical missionary to Myanmar was an attempt to answer this question. Combining the curing of the body with the enlightenment of the mind encouraged teamwork between doctors and preachers. Another debate was the opening of Christian schools in a country where Buddhist monastic schools were dominant: Was it the best means of bringing Myanmar children into the Christian fold? The attitude of pioneer Christian missionaries toward Buddhism wavered. One of them wrote, “Buddhism did not implement a spirit of intolerance in the soul of the Burmese.” On the contrary, “The Burmese believe that every person has a right to follow – without hindrance, proselytism or opposition – the religion of his choice.” But some of these missionaries also condemned all non-Christian beliefs instead of trying to understand them, unable, for example, to approve the Buddhist doctrine that “merit” is earned by good works. Yet they were all fully conscious of the need for a constructive attitude toward Buddhism. MORE ON NEWS 17

An excerpt of the Pater Noster translated into Myanmar language (Montegazza’s edition, 1787). Photo: Supplied

Portrait of Adoniram Judson (1788-1850), the most famous Christian missionary in Myanmar history. Photo: Supplied

of the Christian missionaries to transform a “pagan country” (according to them) into a proper Christian commonwealth were intense in Myanmar, immediately described as “a promising land”. Indeed, the Myanmar population, gifted with “good dispositions”, was right away considered to be prone to look upon the Christian religion favourably and be ready for conversion by Christian fathers.

by Myanmar Christians. At that same time, benefactors were approached to build churches (some of brick, some of timber) where the Gospels could be safely and decently preached. Schools, hospitals, leper asylums, philanthropies, orphanages, convents and novitiates gradually appeared through the country. But the sustainability of the Christian faith in Myanmar was a constant concern:

www.mmtimes.com
ANALYSIS

News 17

South Africa and Myanmar: What we can learn from comparisons
Nelson Mandela, unlike Daw Aung San Suu Kyi, rejected the economic sanctions that proved so ineffective in encouraging change in Myanmar
DEREK TONKIN d.tonkin@btinternet.com IN an interview with the BBC on December 29, 2011, the former president of South Africa, FW de Klerk, observed, “We faced in South Africa the fact that we were on the brink of disaster. If we had clung to power, there would have been a civil war and South Africa, its economy, would have been reduced to ashes.” The inspiration for change in South Africa came from the late Nelson Mandela, but the decision to take the necessary steps to dismantle apartheid came from the ruling Afrikaner-dominated National Party. It was not in the wake of a sudden decision in 1990 to release Nelson Mandela from imprisonment but was the logical outcome of internal party discussions about how change could be brought about. This was apparent during my own time in South Africa from 1983-86, when the heavy hand of apartheid was already succumbing. This recognition of the paramount need for radical change if South Africa was to avoid collapse also lies at the root of the changes we have seen in Myanmar. The process is the result not of a sudden decision by the newly civilianised government that came to power after the November 2010 elections but can be traced back to pronouncements on multi-party democratic elections after the military coup in September 1988 and the declaration in June 2003 by then-Prime Minister Lieutenant General Khin Nyunt, who fell from grace in the following year, of a seven-point Road Map that would lead eventually to the creation of a “modern, developed and democratic nation”. In the process, just as Mandela provided the focus of the aspirations of so many South Africans, so Daw Aung San Suu Kyi has embodied the hopes of so many people in Myanmar. But it has been the leaders of the armed forces, the Tatmadaw, who took the practical decision to go ahead with far-reaching economic and political reform, already apparent some months before the highly symbolic meeting between Daw Aung San Suu Kyi and President U Thein Sein in August 2011 in Nay Pyi Taw. In South Africa, the hopes of ManCONTINUED FROM NEWS 16 The often erudite Christian priests wrote extensively on Myanmar. Their superb drawings of the insects, plants and reptiles of Myanmar are a precious testimony to their passion for the country as well. But anthropological and ethnological works led by the missionary enterprise were often motivated by a contemptuous view of the Myanmar. Its ambition was to “lift the less fortunate peoples of the world” to a “higher level of life” and bring to them “the best of Christian civilisation”. The Karen who were animists rather than Buddhists were especially said by Christian missionaries to have “the most primitive religious ideas and conceptions”. Their supernatural and mythical beings, magical deeds, taboos related to domestic life, divinations and traditions were not something to be studied by Christian missionaries in a scientific manner but to be fought against. The Christian missionaries especially disparaged the Karen traditions of assigning personal attributes
People hold a portrait of Nelson Mandela on December 12 in Pretoria, a week after he passed away at age 95. Photo: AFP

dela and of the South African peoples have yet to be realised. Bishop Desmond Tutu has even accused the South African government of being “worse than apartheid” after the Dalai Lama cancelled a trip to the country when Pretoria was slow to grant him a visa. At the same time, in the early 1990s Bishop Tutu expressed astonishment at the pace of the changes taking place under the leadership of the National Party, even though the leaders knew the changes would lead to their own political eclipse. In the same way, the monolithic Burma Socialist Programme Party in the National Assembly voted unanimously for change from a single party to a multi-party democratic system on September 11, 1988, only a week before the coup which saw the demise of parliament until it was reconvened to every mountain and river, conceiving of every unknown force (beneficent or malevolent) as a more or less distinct personality, appeasing celestial spirits by continual healing offerings, and holding ceremonial feasts and propitiatory sacrifices on sacred mountains. Yet ethnic groups traditionally practicing animism – such as the Karen, the Kachin and the Chin – were considered by Christian missionaries to be more receptive to Christianity than Buddhists. Ironically, the introduction of Christianity was most successful in the distant margins of Myanmar where the Christian missionaries were initially the most reluctant to go. Evangelising the Myanmar required perseverance and tireless work. The position of minority Christian missionaries on a majority Buddhist land, however, remained uncertain and fragile.
Amaury Lorin is a Yangon-based historian, journalist and consultant who recently published Nouvelle histoire des colonisations européennes XIXe-XXe siècles (2013). He is also founder of Myanmar Challenge.

in January 2011. There is an eternal truth that needs to be recognised in the experiences of both South Africa and Myanmar. It is that when change occurs, and especially change for the better, the principal motivating forces are to be found within the country. Change is rarely the result primarily of external pressures, however much the international community may claim to have been influential and to have adopted determining policies. In South Africa, which was subject to trade, arms and sporting boycotts, the economy survived so long as the international banks continued to support the “first-world” economy of the whites, but when financial support came under serious pressure as a result of commercially based decisions by international banks, led by Chase Manhattan, not to provide further financial facilities, the South African government realised that there was no prospect of longer-term economic and financial survival. In Myanmar, the trade, investment and tourist boycotts had little direct effect on the military regime itself as it had full control over the revenue from natural gas sales to Thailand that from early 2000 onward provided monthly earnings initially of some US$100 million, then $200 million and more recently $300 million. It has also been shown that earnings to the military regime from sales of jadeite, precious stones and metals have quadrupled since 2008 in spite of – indeed, precisely because of – the wholly ineffective embargoes by the United States and the European Union. In the case of the US these restrictions still apply, though their practical effect is of no consequence – it is a legacy of US devotion to the concept of “conditionality” that has been so spectacularly unsuccessful in inducing democratic reform in Cuba. Daw Aung San Suu Kyi has said that in her reading of reports issued by the International Monetary Fund (IMF) she found no evidence that Western sanctions were thought to be effective. My own reading is that the IMF recognised that the military regime had no shortage of funds, which helps to

explain why its international reserves have been the delight of international financial institutions (IFIs) and why it has been possible for them to resolve Myanmar’s international indebtedness so painlessly. But the IFIs were operating under serious inhibition until recently and made it clear in their reports that the economy as a whole was slowly deteriorating and that it was the people who were suffering. As early as June 1989 Daw Aung San Suu Kyi had called publicly for economic sanctions and until 2002 continued to seek every opportunity to isolate the regime. More recently she has said that the National League for Democracy (NLD) did not call for sanctions but only supported them. The occasions

call for Western sanctions, but Mandela was later to offer his personal thanks to both Shell and British Petroleum (BP) for staying the course in South Africa and providing training and employment to black South Africans even while the ANC was urging Shell and BP to leave. I believe that Daw Aung San Suu Kyi herself later recognised the contribution of the French oil and gas conglomerate Total in deciding to stay in Myanmar, even though in the mid1990s she was critical of its presence. Mandela is reported to have contacted Suu Kyi at the time that he stepped down from the South African presidency in June 1999 to see whether there was any contribution he might make to achieving a rapprochement between the NLD and the military regime. There was however reportedly no meeting of minds, especially on the issue of sanctions, with Mandela asking whether Daw Aung San Suu Kyi felt that they were not all that helpful (as Bishop Tutu clearly believed they were). But Daw Aung San Suu Kyi remained unconvinced and determined to maintain her rigid policy. Mandela accordingly never ventured into the Myanmar imbroglio, whereas Bishop Tutu did, and zealously so, though I have never understood why blocking development aid, undermining employment in labour-intensive industries like tourism and punishing the people through the stagnation of their economy was thought to be in fulfilment of the will of the Lord. Whenever I am asked what, in my assessment, brought about change in South Africa, I have no hesitation in saying, “Above all, the people.” Let us only recall the contribution of those personalities of international reputation, including – in addition to Nelson Mandela – individuals like Oliver Tambo, Walter Sisulu, Cyril Ramaphosa, Steve Biko, Beyers Naudé, Frank Chicane, Desmond Tutu, Alan Boesak, Breyten Breytenbach, André Brink, Alan Paton, Helen Suzman, Nadine Gordimer, Joe Slovo and Denis Goldberg, to name but a few, as well as countless student, church, civil society, trade union and political organisations. In the case of Myanmar, only Daw

When change occurs, and especially change for the better, the principal motivating forces are to be found within the country. Change is rarely the result primarily of external pressures.
on which she actively sought sanctions prior to 2002 on trade, investment, tourism and even humanitarian aid are too numerous to be swept under the carpet, however. This is no doubt why she found a closer ally in Bishop Desmond Tutu than in Nelson Mandela. The bishop was a firm believer in sanctions but he never sought to analyse the effectiveness of those which it had been possible to apply in Myanmar any more than Daw Aung San Suu Kyi did herself, though the almost unanimous conclusion of sanctions experts is that they were ill-targeted and demonstrably counterproductive. Significantly, no Western government has ever dared issue a report on their effectiveness, while all the time making unsupported and self-serving claims. Mandela himself was ambivalent about sanctions. It was the policy of the African National Congress (ANC) to Aung San Suu Kyi is internationally known, apart perhaps from 88 Generation student leaders like Min Ko Naing and Ko Ko Gyi, who are now venturing on their political careers. Change is taking place but it is far from clear to me to what extent, if at all, Daw Aung San Suu Kyi may claim to have started the process, although she is now part of the political mainstream in the country. Many may feel that, just as Mandela reached the zenith of his contribution in 1994 when he was elected president, so Daw Aung San Suu Kyi may do the same if and when she becomes president in the wake of the 2015 elections, though at this stage this is impossible to predict.
Derek Tonkin is an adviser to Bagan Capital and was deputy head of mission at the British embassy in South Africa from 198386. He is also chairman of the non-profit Network Myanmar.

www.mmtimes.com

News 21 IN BRIEF
Charges laid over fire
A woman from Mandalay has been charged with negligence causing fire after an extension cable in her home overheated, damaging four houses. The fire broke out in Mandalay’s Chan Mya Thar Si township in the early hours on December 17 and quickly spread to two nearby houses. About 175 firemen attended the scene, officials said. - Si Thu Lwin, translation by Thiri Min Htun

Land grabs fuelling rise in opium cultivation
TIM MCLAUGHLIN THOMAS KEAN LAND grabs and restrictions on access are hindering efforts to fight opium cultivation in parts of Shan State, the European Union ambassador to Myanmar said last week after a recent visit to the region, as new data showed the area being used to grow opium has grown for a seventh consecutive year. In spite of increased government eradication efforts, opium poppy cultivation increased 13 percent in 2013 compared to the previous year, Myanmar’s Central Committee for Drug Abuse Control and the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime said in a new report released on December 18. The 13pc increase on 2012, which the UN attributed to poverty and insecurity, means cultivation has now more than doubled since 2006, while production was also up 26pc on last year. EU ambassador Roland Kobia, who visited southern and eastern Shan State on December 2-6 with the United States ambassador and the head of UNODC in Myanmar, said the dispossession of small-scale farmers also appeared to be driving opium cultivation. Mr Kobia said farmers told him they used to have more productive fields in low-lying areas where they could grow crops such as rice but these had been confiscated from them. Instead, they now work fields in hilly terrain, to which opium is suited. “Some of these hills are 45 degrees steep so it is difficult for farmers to find alternatives to poppy,” he told The Myanmar Times last week. “If farmers are not able to cultivate normal crops on good lands because they’ve been taken by some people then it makes the fight against narcotrafficking very difficult. “The local authorities were not only aware of problems of land, they were also concerned about it.” Mr Kobia said there appeared to be a “genuine commitment” from all sides to try and find alternative sources of income to opium. The European 26pc in comparison to 2012. The best estimate for 2013 opium production in Myanmar alone is some 870 tonnes, the highest since assessments by UNODC and the government began,” the report said. Poverty-stricken farmers remain dependent on the crop to make a living, the report said, with money made from poppy cultivation remaining “[an] essential part of family income”. Many farmers find themselves now not only cultivating poppy on their own land but earning extra money by working in the poppy fields of others nearby as casual labourers. Production is highest in Shan State, particularly southern Shan State, which was responsible for about 46pc of the country’s total opium cultivation. Cultivation in the north of the state rose by one-third in 2013, while eastern Shan State saw an increase of roughly 4200 hectares. Another factor fuelling the increased production was a rise in demand both domestically and abroad, particularly in neighbouring China. The UNODC found that usage of three major illicit drugs – opium, heroin and amphetamine-type stimulants, which in their pill form are known in Myanmar as yaba – has risen this year in Myanmar. Additionally, the number of heroin users in China has grown since 2007, it said. The report warned that better infrastructure and fewer trade barriers between Thailand, Myanmar and Laos could potentially facilitate growth in the drug trade. In late August Myanmar and Thailand opened four border crossings, while a bridge linking Tachileik township in eastern Shan State with Laos is scheduled to open next year. “Criminal networks that benefit from the drug trade in Southeast Asia are also positioned to take advantage of this well-intentioned integration process,” the report cautioned, adding that “efforts to address the root causes of cultivation and promote alternative development need to be stepped up”. In 1999 the government launched an ambitious 15-year plan to fully eradicate drug production by 2014. Earlier this year, however, it acknowledged that this deadline could not be met and extended it by five years, to 2019.

ADB, Japan give $12m community support grant

Poppy plants lie on the ground after policemen destroyed a field near the village of Tar-Pu, Shan State, on January 27, 2012. Photo: Reuters/Damir Sagolj

Union, which is the largest supporter of UNODC work in Myanmar, is likely to increase its support to drug eradication efforts in coming years, he said. He acknowledged, however, that government restrictions mean many areas are effectively off limits to programs that could help to tackle the problem. “We pleaded to be given much

the diversification outside poppy cultivation if given the means to access regions, bring aid and run projects.” The ambassador’s comments came as the annual Southeast Asia Opium Survey, which focuses on opium poppy cultivation and production in Myanmar and neighbouring Laos, found that 57,800 hectares (142,766 acres) of land in Myanmar were under

Japan and the Asian Development Bank are to provide a US$12 million grant to Myanmar to help poor rural communities “break free from a vicious cycle of low income poverty and minimal opportunities”, the bank announced last week. The grant, from the Japan Fund for Poverty Reduction, will be administered by the ADB, it said in a December 19 statement. Over the next four years it will target 700,000 people, aiming to help increase incomes by at least 50 percent by 2020. Communities and the government will provide an additional $2 million of in-kind support. “This investment in rural infrastructure and livelihoods services will have a significant multiplier effect on the income and quality of life in these communities,” said Pavit Ramachandran, a senior environment specialist in ADB’s Southeast Asia Department. “Crucially, the villagers themselves will be the ones who will identify project activities, ensuring the full benefits reach the grassroots level.” – Thomas Kean

‘If farmers are not able to cultivate normal crops on good lands because they’ve been taken ... then it makes the fight against narco-trafficking very difficult.’
Roland Kobia European Union ambassador to Myanmar

Committee formed for ASEAN Youth Forum

wider access to these regions, for our implementing partners to be able to work there, otherwise it’s difficult to carry out our development projects and to have any impact,” he said. “The international community could help

cultivation this year, up from 51,000 hectares (125,970 acres) last year. “The combination of an increase in both cultivation and yield of opium poppy in Myanmar in 2013 resulted in a rise in opium production of some

Young people from Myanmar are to take a leading role during the country’s chairmanship of ASEAN for 2014. The National Youth Congress, working with civil society groups, on December 13 organised a committee to engage with the ASEAN Youth Forum. ASEAN Youth Volunteer Network’s Daw Thinzar Shunlei Yi said congress members were “chosen to deal with the youth forum on a range of matters”. The committee comprises more than 90 members and reflects a wide range of religious backgrounds. – Aung Kyaw Min

www.mmtimes.com

News 23

Traffic monitoring, not flyover, for 8 Mile
AYE NYEIN WIN
ayenyeinwin.mcm@gmail.com

PLANS for a flyover at 8 Mile junction have been scrapped because a traffic monitoring system has made it unnecessary, an official says. The system allows traffic police to monitor traffic flows and adjust the lights at the busy Mayangone township junction to clear backed-up traffic. It came online on December 8, said U Htun Aung Thin from the Ministry of Rail Transportation, which is also responsible for road transport. The system was bought and installed by the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) under a traffic management pilot project. “Previously we intended to build a

flyover but after conducting a survey about six months ago JICA recommended this system … We found out it can clear traffic jams quickly,” U Htun Aung Thin said. Sensors have been installed on the traffic lights to monitor vehicles, he said. “The detector can see where vehicles are on the traffic lanes and [give

‘After conducting a survey about six months ago JICA recommended this system.’
U Htun Aung Thin Ministry of Rail Transportation

a green light] to the lanes where many vehicles are waiting. “It can be set to automatic or manual operation. There are four traffic police supervising the junction.” Police Lieutenant Moe Thi Ha Kyaw from the Traffic Police Force said the system was a step forward but would not solve all of the traffic flow problems in the area. More investment is needed to improve efficiency, he said. “We hope to establish a control centre to monitor and resolve traffic jams,” he said. The centre would be able to watch traffic through CCTV cameras and control lights to alleviate congestion. While JICA has offered to train officials to run the centre, it is not clear where the funding for the project would come from. Road users said the new measures have had a noticeable impact on traffic flow at the junction.

Cars pass through 8 Mile junction in Mayangone last week. Photo: Thiri

“I noticed about two days ago that traffic jams were smaller at 8 Mile junction,” said taxi driver U Myo Min from Mingalardon township. “I don’t

know how they did it but I’m pleased whenever the traffic jams are smaller. I hope they can replicate this at other junctions.”

Thai navy sues website over Rohingya report
THAILAND’S navy has launched a criminal defamation lawsuit against a Phuket-based news website, its editor said last week, over a report alleging military involvement in networks smuggling Muslim Rohingya boat people from Myanmar. The complaint relates to an article published in the Phuketwan website in July, quoting an investigation by the Reuters news agency, which claimed some members of the military were involved in trafficking rings that have developed in the region. Editor Alan Morison said he and his colleague Chutima Sidasathian were on December 18 presented with the charges of “bringing the navy into disrepute” as well as an offence under the Computer Crimes Act, which carries a more severe penalty. “We really don’t know the motives or precisely how the defamation action came about,” Mr Morison said. “It clearly has huge ramifications for news agencies and people who publish stories from news agencies.” Human Rights Watch on December 20 warned that the lawsuit threatened media freedom in Thailand. “Unless the government withdraws the case, its impact will be felt far beyond those reporting on abuses against the Rohingya – and could have a choking effect on all investigative reporting in Thailand,” Asia director Brad Adams said in a statement. The Rohingya, who are officially known in Myanmar as Bengalis, have long made the perilous journey from Myanmar by boat. Many head for Malaysia or Indonesia and Thai authorities have faced censure for pushing boats back out to sea. Rights groups have also criticised the detention of hundreds of Rohingya in overcrowded facilities while Thailand waits for a “third country” to offer to take them. Mr Morison said a “huge industry” had evolved over the last five years to smuggle Rohingya, with some being held by traffickers in “secret camps in the jungle” where they are “abused and mistreated” until they pay for their onward passage. He said the lawsuit would not stop the Phuketwan’s acclaimed coverage of the issue. “We feel as though they need someone telling this horrible story,” he said, adding that he hoped the website would be able to reach an agreement with the navy. “We are confident that common sense will prevail, but [we are] preparing for the worst just in case.” The two journalists face a maximum jail term of five years or a fine of up to 100,000 baht (US$3000). – AFP

TRADE MARK CAUTION
Toll Global Express (Singapore) Pte Ltd. of 5 Clementi Loop, Singapore 129816, is the Owner and Sole Proprietor of the following Trade Mark:

Reg.No.IV/3008/2004 Reg.No.IV/6770/2007 Reg.No.IV/6771/2007 & Reg.No.IV/7806/2010 Reg.No.IV/12653/2013 Reg.No.IV/12654/2013 in respect of “Transport; packaging of goods; storage and delivery of goods; courier services; freighting; cargo handling; customs clearance”. Any fraudulent imitation or unauthorized use of the said Trade Mark or other infringements whatsoever will be dealt with according to law. Khine Khine U, Advocate LL.B, D.B.L, LL.M (UK) For Toll Global Express (Singapore) Pte Ltd. #205/5, Thirimingalar Housing, Strand Rd., Yangon. Dated. December 23, 2013

TRADE MARK CAUTION
NOTICE is hereby given that LA ROCHE-POSAY LABORATOIRE PHARMACEUTIQUE a company organized under the laws of France and having its principal office at Avenue René Levayer, 86270 LA ROCHE-POSAY, France, is the Owner and Sole Proprietor of the following trade mark: (Reg: Nos. IV/5816/2010 & IV/8317/2013) In respect of: - “Perfume, toilet water; gels, salts for the bath and the shower; toilet soaps, body deodorants; cosmetics namely creams, milks, lotions, gels and powders for the face, the body and the hands; tanning and after-sun milks, gels and oils; make-up preparations; shampoos; gels, sprays, mousses and balms for the hair styling and hair care; hair lacquers; hair colouring and hair decolorant preparations ; hair permanent waving and curling preparations; essential oils for personal use.” - Class: 3 Any fraudulent imitation or unauthorized use of the said trademark or other infringements whatsoever will be dealt with according to law. U Kyi Win Associates For LA ROCHE-POSAY LABORATOIRE PHARMACEUTIQUE P.O. Box No. 26, Yangon. Phone: 372416 Dated: 23rd December, 2013

24 News

THE MYANMAR TIMES DECEMBER 23 - 29, 2013

LA ROCHE-POSAY

TRADEMARK CAUTION
NOTICE is hereby given that Dong-A ST Co., Ltd a company organized under the laws of the Republic of Korea and having its principal office at 64, Cheonho-Daero, Dongdaemun-Gu, Seoul, Republic of Korea is the owner and sole proprietor of the following trademarks:(Reg: Nos. IV/1234/2001 & IV/12314/2013) in respect of :- “G-CSF pharmaceuticals (anti-cancer medicine)” (Reg: Nos. IV/1233/2001 & IV/12315/2013) in respect of :- “EPO pharmaceuticals (medicine of anemia)” Any fraudulent imitation or unauthorized use of the said trademarks or other infringements whatsoever will be dealt with according to law. U Kyi Win Associates for Dong-A ST Co., Ltd P.O. Box No. 26, Yangon. Phone: 372416 Dated: 23rd December, 2013

Members of parliament attend the opening of the Pyithu Hluttaw in Nay Pyi Taw on July 4, 2012. Photo: AFP

LEUCOSTIM EPORON

Building a stronger parliament ‘critcal’: ICG
THOMAS KEAN
tdkean@gmail.com

TRADE MARK CAUTION
NOTICE is hereby given that Omnicom International Holdings Inc., a company organized under the laws of the United States of America and having its principal office at 720 California Street, San Francisco, California 94108, United States of America is the owner and sole proprietor of the following trademarks:-

MYANMAR needs to begin investing in its parliamentary system to improve the quality of lawmaking and make the process more efficient ahead of the 2015 election, a prominent non-governmental organisation has warned. The Brussels-based International Crisis Group said the parliament – against the expectations of most observers – has been one of the most prominent and powerful institutions in Myanmar’s political landscape following the transition from military to quasi-civilian rule in early 2011. For the most part its activities have been characterised by a surprising degree of bipartisanship among MPs. However, more institutional investment is needed to build on the platform forged over the past three years, particularly in terms of

support capacity for MPs. “This is critical if the institution is to remain vibrant, effective and respected. It is all the more important as Myanmar moves toward elections in two years’ time – potentially the first free-and-fair national polls since the 1950s,” the group said in an update briefing, Not a Rubber Stamp: Myanmar’s Legislature in a Time of Transition. “The consensus-based approach to lawmaking and the relative absence of party politics will change as new political dynamics emerge. The legislatures must ensure that they are equipped to face much higher expectations and far more complex

Number of Pyidaungsu Hluttaw seats allocated to elected MPs

498

demands. The ICG report noted that MPs have no offices or staff, and no policy or research help, while committees are also under-resourced and lack access to input from experts. In these conditions “efficient, effective lawmaking is impossible … It is impressive how much has been achieved.” The briefing examined the lawmaking process for three pieces of legislation – the forthcoming association law and media laws, and the peaceful assembly law passed in 2011 – and concluded that while the process has “flaws” MPs are generally “willing to consult with stakeholders and make use of expert inputs”. “Authoritarian reflexes and concerns” have been “tempered by other considerations, such as public demands for consultation and a desire to meet international standards”, the ICG said. “The shape of media legislation and whether the announced amendments are made to the peaceful assembly law will be the next concrete tests of whether it is the old reflexes that hold sway or the new openness.”

(Reg: No. IV/2150/2013) (Reg: No. IV/2151/2013)

PHD

OMD

(Reg: No. IV/2152/2013) the above three trademarks in respect of: - Media planning and buying services for others; media research and consultation; planning, buying and negotiating advertising and media space and time for others, including for interactive and digital media and direct response media; business management and consulting services in the field of advertising, marketing communications, media planning and buying for advertising; market research and market analysis; advertising services via digital and online mediums; advertising agency services; business marketing consulting services in the fields of sports marketing, branded entertainment, and entertainment content, production and distribution” Int’l Class: 35 Any fraudulent imitation or unauthorized use of the said trademarks or other infringements whatsoever will be dealt with according to law. U Kyi Win Associates for Omnicom International Holdings Inc., P.O. Box No. 26, Yangon. Phone: 372416 Dated: 23rd December, 2013

OMNICOM MEDIA GROUP

www.mmtimes.com

News 25

Administrators told to quit if not committed to reform plans
SI THU LWIN
sithulwin.mmtimes@gmail.com

NLD leader healthy despite operation, says doctor
SHWE YEE SAW MYINT poepwintphyu2011@gmail.com DAW Aung San Suu Kyi will take a break from all political activities and other engagements for more than a week, her family doctor says, following a “minor operation” last week. The “successful” operation to correct a bunion on her large toe took about 90 minutes and was conducted at Yangon’s Asia Royal Hospital on December 16, Dr Tin Myo Win told The Myanmar Times. He rejected media reports that the National League for Democracy leader is not well and said her health is generally good. “Many stories are appearing in the media that her health is bad and that she has secretly been examined regularly at this hospital,” he said. “They are also alleging that I have been trying to cover up her poor health. There is no truth to these rumours. We also did a medical checkup before this operation.” The operation was Daw Aung San Suu Kyi’s second. Following the Depayin attack in 2003, which saw many of her supporters killed, she underwent a major operation for a gynaecological condition.

MINISTER for the President’s Office U Soe Thein has told township administrators in Mandalay that those not committed to bringing about development in their communities “should prepare to leave the job”. He also told the administrators they must be more responsive to the public’s needs and have an in-depth knowledge of what is happening in their community, particularly regarding socio-economic issues. He made the comments to administrators in Mandalay on December 13 during a meeting to discuss the government’s community development plans. The meeting was also attended by community leaders and township development support committees from seven townships in Mandalay district. “As a township administrator, you have to know about the township that you are responsible for,” U Soe Thein said. “You have a duty to take care of elderly people and children … You have to find out why school-age children can’t access education. And then you should have dreams about how can you can create de-

An administrator discusses conditions in his township during a meeting on December 13. Photo: Si Thu Lwin

velopment for your township. If not, you should prepare to leave the job.” A fellow minister for the President’s Office, U Tin Naing Thein, said the government was committed

to understanding the problems and desires of all people, including those in remote areas. “We know there are a lot of things the people need,” he said. “The most obvious problem is land

disputes that often happened when town planning projects were implemented so these need to do carefully managed … Community leaders need to be willing to cooperate with us.” – Translation by Zar Zar Soe

26 THE MYANMAR TIMES DECEMBER 23 - 29, 2013

Business
Dealers put the brakes on car imports
AYE NYEIN WIN ayenyeinwin.mcm@gmail.com AN expected drop in import costs set for January has left thousands of imported vehicles sitting in containers at Yangon Port as dealers fear that bringing them into the market now could result in losses. Officials said that sellers are expected to impose a reduction in transportation and insurance costs to dealers termed Cost, Insurance and Freight (CIF) charges. Dealers, in expecting a better rate for imported cars next month, have opted for the time being to hold out on making purchases. “There were already a lot of cars on the docks before, and then we heard the CIF rate would change. We will leave the cars at the docks until we see what the new rates will be,” said U Soe Htun, chief executive at local dealership Farmer Auto. Rumours of a CIF rate change has driven demand down at car sales centres, which are also chock-full of vehicles. “If we take out the cars now, we’ll have to pay more customs duty. Demand and earnings are down,” said U Soe Tun, explaining the delay. “I didn’t want to take the cars out. We can save from K1.4 million to K1.5 million per car after the CIF rate changes. The new rate should come out soon, so I will take out the cars in January,” said SKK Auto chief executive Ko Chan Kyaw Kyaw. Ships bring imported cars to Bo Aung Kyaw and Sule docks, and to Myanmar International Terminal Thilawa (MITT), which has space for 9000-10,000 units. Myanmar Port Authority (MPA), meanwhile, has allotted room to fit 4000 cars for short-term parking. Six container ships holding imported vehicles arrived at MITT from December 5 to 15, and there are already more than 5200 cars parked there, according to an official at the Myanmar Port Authority.

Prolonging IP law will hurt busine
NYAn LIn AUnG
29.nyanlynnaung@gmail.com

THE government will need to exercise haste in improving outdated intellectual property (IP) laws and developing a framework for enforcing those laws if the country wishes to not drive away possible investors uncertain of losing their products to the black market, experts warn. Current intellectual property law, which dateS back to 1914 with the enactment of the Myanmar Copyright Act, do not recognise copyright from other countries nor does it provide for registering copyright from foreign countries within Myanmar. As a result, bootleggers openly sell DVDs, music and computer software around the country, while illicit cable providers provide unlicensed networks to its subscribers. The process of improving IP laws began in 2001 when Myanmar joined the World Intellectual Property Organisation (WIPO), but delays have occurred in ensuring compliance with international and ASEAN norms. Nearly fifteen years later, that law appears to have become a priority for the government, who promised to deliver a revamped version in 2014. Experts said, however, that despite recent economic gains, international

The World Trade Organisation’s new deadline for Myanmar’s compliance with the international standard agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS)

2012

A man peruses illicitly sold DVDs at one of many vendors located in central Yangon. Photo: Aung Htay Hlaing

firms deciding on whether to invest in the country will not wait forever, while the government rushes to modernise its laws. “Investors don’t [want to] come to countries where their products and technology can be replicated with impunity,” Takahiko Kinoshita, secretary general of the Kyoto Comparative Law Centre, said during a seminar in Yangon earlier this month. “Without

such a law, our small and medium enterprises will lose out and Myanmar will be denied new technology.” The current version of the draft law provides for 10 years’ protection for patents and trade mart, 15 years for industrial design and for copyright, the lifetime of the creator plus 50 years after death, said Daw Hnin Nwe Aye, assistant director of the Ministry of Science and Technology.

The lack of a clear law without provisions for enforcement could drive away investors who fear their products could be pirated, and stifle creatively domestically, she said. “Passing a law is not enough. There have to be enforcement provisions,” she said, adding that Myanmar is the only country in the region without an IP law. Where a revamped IP law would

BUSINESS EditoR: Philip Heijmans | pheijmans13@gmail.com

27

Total chief executive on his firm’s future in Myanmar
BUSINESS 30

Local businesses tackle office supply shortage with innovation
PROPERTY 32

Exchange Rates (December 20 close)
Currency
Euro Malaysia Ringitt Singapore Dollar Thai Baht US Dollar

Buying
K1340 K300 K780 K30.05 K983

Selling
K1350 K305 K785 K31 K986

ness, experts say
law would be beneficial, it would, however, likely not make or break international investment deals as disputes can now be handled under the New York Convention on the Recognition and Enforcement of Foreign Arbitral Awards, which Myanmar acceded to in July. “It is difficult to enforce certain laws in Myanmar and everyone recognises that. But that’s why the New York Convention is so important, because now they can take their disputes abroad to where there are arbitral courts and get a fair ruling,” he said, adding that such decisions could then be brought back to the local courts to be enforced. Despite such progress, the successful enforcement of a foreign arbitral award would depend on the enactment of an efficient domestic IP law as it is unclear whether the local courts will honour rulings made outside the country, experts have said. Myanmar and other least developed countries received an extension from the World Trade Organisation last year to comply with the international standard agreement on TradeRelated Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS). The deadline was extended to 2021 in June from the previous date of July 1, 2013. “IP regulation is essential for Myanmar’s economy,” said Mukai Naoto, an adviser with the industrial development and public policy department of the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA), which has also been working on the project. “An IP law would boost foreign investment and protect locally created products, as well as enhancing their value,” he added. Similar action is also required on laws governing SMEs, domain names, trade secrets, consumer protection and standardisation, preferably in time for Myanmar’s entry into the ASEAN economic community and Free Trade Area in 2015, Mr Kinoshita of the Kyoto Comparative Law Centre said. MORE ON bUSINESS 30

Local banks want partners in order to build capacity
With some foreign banks expected to begin operating in 2014, bankers are increasingly looking to the government and finance organisations to get them up to speed

AYE THIDAR KYAW
ayethidarkyaw@gmail.com

DESPITE continued efforts on the part of local banks to upgrade services ahead of the anticipated inclusion of foreign competition, bankers claim that they will require outside help in order to increase capacity building and training that would keep them competitive. Some local banks are looking to international finance corporations for training and assistance, while the Central Bank is currently considering how to allow foreign banks entry into the Myanmar market, banking sources said. U Sein Maung, chairperson of First Private Bank, said commercial banks had just two years’ exposure to international operations. “Our experience is very recent and our staff is very weak in technical skills,” he said, adding that while foreign banks offer hundreds of services, domestic banks offer very few. Foreign currency trading, debit cards including the MPU card, and automatic teller machines have been available in Myanmar since 2012 for some banks, but those

services are still few and far for most banks, who are awaiting the entrance of foreign players next year that could include MARUHAN Japan Bank, Singapore-based DBS Bank and Malaysia’s CIMB Bank Berhad. Currently, banks are struggling to modernise services as much of the country is still unable to access banking services while trained staffers are still hard to come by.

‘We need to protect ourselves, but we can’t acquire international expertise without cooperating with them.’
U Than Lwin Kanbawza Bank vice president

be important in drawing international firms, it would also help protect local businessmen unable to safeguard their products in the local market. “I think local artists and musicians want to see better IP laws in place to help protect them,” said Jeremy Rathjen, vice president of research at Myanmar-based research and consulting firm Thura Swiss. He said that although a new IP

Number of local commercial banks operating in Myanmar

25

Japan’s Sumitomo Mitsui Banking Corporation and the Myanmar Banks Association signed an agreement to develop professional education programs for domestic bankers starting in January, they announced on December 17. U Thein Tun, a senior member of the MBA and chair of Tun Foundation Bank, said the agreement should lead to further economic cooperation between the two countries, especially in the banking sector. “We are discussing the entry

of foreign banks. It will definitely come one day, but our banks are still young and need to build up their capacity,” he said, adding that even if Myanmar’s 25 commercial banks were to merge, their joint capital would not equal those of a single branch of a major international bank. Kanbawza Bank’s vice president U Than Lwin said commercial banks needed technical assistance and training if local banks are going to survive in the market. “We need to protect ourselves, but we can’t acquire international expertise without cooperating with them,” he said. Some foreign banks are looking for joint ventures with local counterparts, while others want to open their own branches, said U Than Lwin. “We need the cooperation of foreign banks. At the same time, if they want to get involved in retail banking, they also have to rely on us because we have so many branches here.” An official of Myanma Economic Bank said state-owned banks, meanwhile, are finding it hard to rival commercial banks in offering a wide range of services. Some private banks can bring in foreign experts to train their staff and access more capital, but this was not easy for state-owned banks, he said. “In the long run, private banks will probably move ahead faster than us. We will go step by step,” he said. The Central Bank’s training program brings in expertise not just from Japan, but also Thailand and Singapore, he said. “We will acquire more banking knowledge, while preparing for cooperation later,” he said.

ADB to loan $60m to improve energy sector
Bank says that poor infrastructure is resulting in a high level of electricity losses, while upgrades are necessary
AUNG SHIN koshumgtha@gmail.com NEARLY one-fifth of electrical power is lost before it reaches consumers because of ageing infrastructure, said the Asian Development Bank (ADB), which announced last week it will lend Myanmar US$60million to improve the electricity distribution system in Yangon, Mandalay, Sagaing and Magway regions. “Access to electricity is crucial to development. Repairing and strengthening existing electricity infrastructure will help reduce system losses, use resources more efficiently and connect more people to the electricity grid,” said Stephen Groff, vice president of ADB. Losses from the crumbling distribution system were as high as 18.2 percent in 2012, said the ADB announcement. The loan will fund upgrading of power substations, transformers and digital revenue meters, as well as the replacement of bare low-voltage distribution lines with aerialbundled conductor lines, reducing distribution losses by 4pc. ADB is also collaborating with the National Energy Management Committee to improve coordination between ministries responsible for producing energy. The bank is also helping the government prepare energy sector policy, revise the electricity law, draw up a national transmission and distribution code and establish electrical equipment standards. The 20-year long-term energy master plan is also being formulated with ADB help.

28 Business

THE MYANMAR TIMES DECEMBER 23 - 29, 2013

Affluent Myanmar to double by 2020, research finds
Population remains optimistic that they will have a better future even though financial troubles remain
PHIlIP HEIJmANS pheijmans13@gmail.com MYANMAR’S middle and affluent classes are set to nearly double in size to about 15 percent of the population by 2020 if it can continue on the path of economic reform, according to a report released last week by US-based consultancy firm the Boston Consulting Group (BCG). The report, Vietnam and Myanmar: Southeast Asia’s New Growth Frontiers, assessed the middle and affluent class as those with a monthly per-capita income of more than US$120, which currently applies to just 5.3 million of Myanmar’s population of about 60 million people. By 2020, BCG projects that figure to grow to 10.3 million. “Companies have an opportunity to reach, satisfy, and win over these consumers at the first stage of their purchasing power. Caution, however, is in order,” the report states, adding that two-thirds of the nation’s middle- and affluent-class population live in urban areas, while half live in just three regions – Yangon, Mandalay, and Ayeyawady.  The report shows that as a result of growing income levels, the number of poor in Myanmar will subsequently drop from 23.1pc to 15.4pc by 2020, while 27 percent of the population has increased discretionary spending over the past year. about one-quarter go on vacation and fewer than four out of ten frequent restaurants,” the report states. “Consumers in Myanmar frequently buy entertainment products, however, especially VCRs, before they buy consumer durables. This is understandable. The

‘Companies have an opportunity to reach, satisfy, and win over these consumers at the first stage of their purchasing power. Caution, however, is in order’
Boston Consulting Group Vietnam and Myanmar: Southeast Asia’s New Growth Frontiers

A policeman keeps watch over boxes filled with wine at Premium Distribution’s warehouse in Yangon on December 12. Photo: Zarni Phyo

Booze prices spike as stocks near depletion
AYE THIDAR kYAW ayethidarkyaw@gmail.com A DWINDLING supply of imported alcohol in Yangon has forced what sellers remain to increase the price of booze as much as 50 percent, while the country’s largest shops continue to remain free of quality alcohol ahead of the holiday peak season. Over the past two months, a government taskforce has confiscated tens of thousands of bottles of alcohol from the country’s largest distributors in several raids, while company officials could face criminal charges for allegedly importing alcohol without a licence. The raids, on wine and luxury food importers Quarto Products and Premium Distribution, have unnerved the hotel and restaurant industry, and led to the large-scale withdrawal of imported wines and spirits from supermarkets. Some small vendors do remain in Myaynigone and Botahtaung townships, but stocks are shrinking and prices are growing, sellers said. “The government mobile team is confiscating alcohol from the main distributors, but these shops get the products from people who buy supplies from duty-free shops,” said a liquor retail shop owner in Bogyoke Aung San Road, who asked not to be named for fear of persecution by the government. “An aircrew can bring three bottles per day, each,” he added. He said that demand is greatest for imported whisky, with the most popular brand, Johnny Walker Red Label, now K30,000 for a 1-litre bottle, up from K16,000 to K18,000 just two months ago. The price of a 1-litre bottle of Johnny Walker’s Black Label, meanwhile, has grown from K28,000 to K39,000, while Ballantine’s whisky now costs K13,000, K5000 more than before. A director in the Customs Department, who is not authorised to speak to the media, said agents had also discovered that the price of alcohol was about 50 percent up for almost all imported brands since the raids. The Ministry of Commerce and the Internal Revenue Department have promised to reform import regulations that would put an end to the short supply of alcohol as quickly as this month. In doing so, they have pledged not to raise the tax or duty rates, said Ministry of Commerce spokesperson U Win Myint. “Boosting rates could encourage smuggling,” he said, adding that rates were unlikely to change as they have already been set in line with the World Customs Organisation. “Reducing the tax rate is not the most important thing,” he said. Customs duty for alcohol is about 40pc, while cigarettes are taxed at 30pc. A separate tax imposed by the Internal Revenue Department, however, charges 50pc for the retail value and customs duty for alcohol and 100pc for cigarettes. People entering the country are allowed two litres of alcohol and a carton of cigarettes duty-free, U Win Myint said. “[If these levels are exceeded] we cannot seize them all,” he said, citing staff shortages.

15.4%
Population of Myanmar expected to be living in poverty in 2020 “When Myanmar consumers do shop, they tend to buy basic goods and services. Fewer than half of urban residents buy chocolate, ice cream, or fresh milk. Only

uncertainty of electrical service discourages the use of expensive appliances.” Nevertheless, the report shows that more than 80pc of urban consumers are still financially insecure, far more than the 30pc of those surveyed in Vietnam who attested to the same problem. “Myanmar consumers also continue to rely predominantly on traditional rather than modern formats for shopping,” the report continues. “Only 19pc of consumers use supermarkets regularly. Consumers are drawn to the quality and brand selection that these stores offer, but too few of them are available.” While consumers may be financially insecure, 95pc of those surveyed feel as though they will have a better future than their parents did while 96pc believe their children will have a better life than they did.

K30,000
Current price for a 1 litre bottle of Johnny Walker Red Label at the local shops that still carry it.

www.mmtimes.com

Business 29 The Fine Print
Legal & tax insight

Trade volumes likely to On the use of tax fall short of $25b goal stamps in Myanmar
But bilateral trade is growing across the board as new trade partners around the globe are taking more interest in doing business with Myanmar
NYAN lYNN AUNG 29.nyanlynnaung@gmail.com MYANMAR has only managed to meet 63 percent of its annual bilateral trade target of US$25 billion through the first months of the 2013-14 fiscal year, drawing doubts for the first time whether the figure can be met, officials said. Total trade between April and December reached $15.8 billion, a marked improvement of 24.4pc from the same period last year, according to data released last week by the Ministry of Commerce. Nevertheless, bilateral trade is not on pace with the year-onyear target of 36.61 percent set by the government for this fiscal year. “It’s not certain that we will hit the target,” U Soe Win, deputy director general of the department of commerce and consumer affairs at the Ministry of Commerce told The Myanmar Times. He said that with four months to go, Myanmar has to make up the sizable difference of near $10 billion, a task that would require unprecedented growth in Myanmar’s trading sector. “It is possible though as the next four months are the peak season for trading. We will be able to estimate more precisely in January,” he said, adding that he expects continued import growth from countries like China and Thailand and the EU in the next month. U Myint Soe, chairperson of the Garment Association, agreed that despite growth in trading across the board, it was unlikely that Myanmar would be able to make up the difference in the next four months. “I don’t think that they will hit the $25 billion target in the coming months. It is easy to see that,” he said. According to government data, total imports reached $8.68 million from April through November, an increase of 38.65pc from the $6.26 billion generated during the same period last year. Exports meanwhile, reached $7.17 billion at the end of November, an increase of 17.92pc year-onyear. According to U Soe Win, rice, beans, rubber and fishery products are among the most exported goods, while trade with European Union countries and the US has continued to climb. Exports have increased by about $3.2 billion annually since the civilian government took office three years ago. SEbASTIAN PAWlITA AND THINZAR KHINE sebastian@pwplegal.com thinzar@pwplegal.com INVENTED in 17th-century Europe, the duty stamp is alive and well in Myanmar. Though the tax has been abolished in many countries, Myanmar’s 1899 Stamp Act is still in force, and covers nearly all business dealings. Stamp duty arises if a business instrument is signed or received here, or relates to property or transactions located in the country. Non-payment of stamp duty is a criminal offence punishable by a fine of up to K500,000. A document that does not bear a stamp to show that duty has been paid is not admissible as evidence in a contract dispute. The court will not even read an unstamped contract unless a party to the dispute pays the court the arrears, plus up to 10 times the amount of duty. The tax office may, at its discretion, later refund all or part of the penalty in excess of K500. Stamp duty is either a fixed amount (K600, irrespective of the value of the contract), a capped ad valorem amount (duty for a jointventure contract is 1 percent of the value, to a limit of K150,000) or an uncapped ad valorem amount (duty for a lease agreement in excess of three years is 5pc of the average annual rent). The difference can be highly significant. While the fixed amounts apply to instruments irrespective of the currency used in them, the ad valorem amounts apply only to instruments in kyat. Stamp duty based on the value of a contract denominated in foreign currency is always 1pc of the total worth of the contract. So for a joint-venture contract worth US$8 million, stamp duty is $80,000 (1pc of $8 million). But if the parties agree that the total contribution shall be “an amount in kyat equivalent to $8 million”, stamp duty is only K150,000.
Sebastian Pawlita and Thinzar Khine are consultants at Polastri Wint & Partners Legal & Tax Advisors.

BILLION

$7.17
Total exports out of Myanmar from April through November

Yoma and Somitomo partner up
BRIDGET DI CERTO bridget.dicerto@gmail.com YOMA Strategic Holdings has entered into a proposed joint venture with Japan’s Sumitomo Corporation to distribute Hino trucks in Myanmar. Hino, a Toyota group company, manufactures medium- and heavy-duty trucks and buses, and is a marketleader in Japan. Andrew Rickards, Yoma Strategic’s chief executive, said the proposed joint venture would benefit both the logistics and tourism sectors. “We are extremely confident in the prospects of our partnership with Sumitomo Corporation to distribute and service Hino trucks and buses in Myanmar. We have seen demand for robust trucks with good load capacity grow in tandem with the economy and with the continued improvements to infrastructure, and we expect this momentum to continue,” Mr Rickards was quoted in a press release. “Also, demand for long-distance coach services is likely to increase, particularly for travel between major cities, as urbanisation continues and tourism flourishes further.”

IN BRIEF
Australian telecoms giant Telstra last week announced the sale of its Hong Kong-based mobile business CSL to HKT Limited for US$2.42 billion. Telstra expects to receive around AUS$2 billion ($1.77 billion) for its 76 percent stake – a profit of $600 million – with minority shareholder New World Development netting the rest. Chief executive David Thodey said Telstra had enjoyed considerable success in Hong Kong, but the time was right to sell. – AFP

Sydney Telstra sells Hong Kong mobile business CSL for $2.4b

Vacancy Announcement - Administrative Officer for DFAT and DFID Joint Liaison Office in Nay Pyi Taw
The Australian Government Aid Program, DFAT and the UK’s Department for International Development (DFID) are looking for highly motivated applicants for the position below: • Administrative Officer – Nay Pyi Taw (OB-4 Level) • Salary range: US$ 850 to US$ 987 per month Selection Criteria and Job Descriptions can be obtained from the Australian Embassy, 88 Strand Road, or from http://www. myanmar.embassy.gov.au Application with the documents mentioned in selection criteria should be submitted to The Recruiter – The Australian Aid Program, the Australian Embassy, Yangon or by e-mail to: dfataap.recruitment.yangon@dfat.gov.au. Please clearly identify the position which you apply for in the e-mail subject line or on the envelope. The DFAT and DFID do not discriminate in regard to race, ethnicity, gender and age. Closing date: 4:00pm Friday, 03 January 2014.

30 Business
EXCLUSIVE

THE MYANMAR TIMES DECEMBER 23 - 29, 2013

Total likely to explore new blocks in Myanmar: exec
AUnG SHIn
koshumgtha@gmail.com Christophe de Margerie, chief executive officer and chairman of Total. Photo: Boothee

Job Vacancy
The British Embassy in Rangoon is currently looking to recruit a highly motivated and energetic individual to join our team as a Vice Consul. For more information and details on how to apply, please visit the link below: https://www.gov.uk/government/world/organisations/british-embassy-rangoon/about/recruitment Deadline for submission of applications will be on 13 January 2014.

Job Vacancy
The Department for International Development (DFID) is currently looking to recruit a highly motivated and energetic individual to join our team as a Finance Manager. DFID is based at the British Embassy, Yangon. For more information and details on how to apply, please visit the link below: https://www.gov.uk/government/world/organisations/ british-embassyrangoon/ about/recruitment Deadline for submission of applications will be on 5 January 2014.

FRENCH energy giant Total would consider developing new offshore blocks as economic reform continues to take hold in the country, an executive from the firm said. Total is currently awaiting the results of its bid for off-shore blocks submitted in two proposals that would see exploration of deepwater blocks. The results for the widely anticipated tender for 30 blocks, which includes several international firms, are expected early next year. “Since 2011, Myanmar has turned a new page. We believe that these profound changes are essential for both the people and the economy of this country,” Christophe de Margerie, chief executive officer and chair of Total, told The Myanmar Times during his visit to Yangon on December 6. “Before, we were the only large foreign company represented here. I regard the competition we now face here as good news,” he said, adding that his firm has been active in Myanmar since 1993. With economic sanctions now lifted, Myanmar has the opportunity to increase its exploration capacity, he said. The country will need to apply new scientific and technological tools to make up for lost time.

“The challenge will be to bring energy to the country for its economic development. This requires huge investment. A good balance between production for local increasing needs and exports has to be reached, maximising revenue to the state. Local companies will play a significant part,” he continued. Mr de Margerie also urged the government to continue the reform process and to develop better transparency in the energy sector, applauding Myanmar’s application to join the Extractive Industries Transparency

Initiative, which would do just that. On top of developing off-shore blocks, Total is also looking into lubricants and solar production in Myanmar, though Mr de Margerie said it is too early to say what the scale of such an investment would be or when it could happen. “That should be part of the second wave of investment from Total. We would like to deliver the message that we will continue in the country with potential for development of new activities.”

cONTINUED fROm bUSINESS 27 “The Union of Myanmar Federation of Chambers of Commerce and Industry [UMFCCI] is cooperating with the ministry to establish a [new IP] law to put an end to such issues,” said U Aye Lwin, joint secretary of UMFCCI. “We hope to see it adopted soon,” U Aye Lwin said. “It’s needed to protect international brands produced by investors coming here, as well as our own brands. We want to establish a Myanmar Intellectual Property Association as fast as we can.” Daw Tin Ohmar Tun, chair of the ASEAN Intellectual Property Organisation, who has been participating in government-level discussions of the law, told The Myanmar Times last month that it was possible the final draft of the IP could be in front of parliament as soon as next month. “We already finished the final draft specifying crimes and penalties, and reported to the attorney-general’s office earlier this month. We are now dealing with enforcement,” she said at the time. To further help with the issue, the government is planning to establish a technology and innovation support centre (TISC) in cooperation with the World Intellectual Property Organisation (WIPO), a Ministry of Science and Technology official told The Myanmar Times last week. Daw Hnin Nwe Aye of the Ministry

UNOCHA MYANMAR VACANCY ANNOUNCEMENT (UNOCHA/YGN/2013/016) The United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (UNOCHA) is seeking the applications from dynamic and highly motivated Myanmar nationals for the following vacancy. Detailed terms of reference/ requirements for vacancy can be requested at the UNOCHA Office. The position below is Fixed Term Appointment for 1 year with possibility of extension, for multiple duty stations (initial duty station is Sittwe, Rakhine State). Field Coordination Officer (NOA, 1 position) Requirements • Master’s Degree or equivalent in Economics, Social Sciences, International Relations, Political Sciences or related field. • Minimum 2 years of progressively responsible professional experience in the field of humanitarian/ recovery affairs, knowledge on global policies and guidelines related to humanitarian/recovery affairs and humanitarian reform. • Ability to write clearly and concisely in English and local language(s). Strong computer skills. Proven high-level representation skills, such as speaking at meetings and providing situational analysis. Proven capacity to work effectively in small teams. • Experience working in implementation and delivery of humanitarian/recovery projects at the field level is a must. • Experience working in a complex settings that requires sound judgment, and operational flexibility. • Previous experience in a similar capacity with humanitarian agencies, in particular the UN, preferred. • Fluency in English and Myanmar language. Knowledge in any other local languages will be an asset. Candidates should clearly indicate the Vacancy Number and Post Title in their applications, and should submit them together with complete duly filled UN-P11 form, biodata stating personal details, academic qualification and work experience, copy of master degree certificate, and a recent passport sized photograph. Applications should be addressed to: Admin and HR Unit, UNOCHA Myanmar Room (211), No (5), Kanbawza Street, Shwe Taung Kyar (2) Ward, Bahan Township, Yangon, Myanmar (In front of Pearl Condo) Closing Date: 3 January 2014 (COB) Only short-listed candidates will be notified. Interviews will be competency based.

A customer pays for an illicit DVD at a street vendor in Yangon. Photo: Aung Htay Hlaing

of Science and Technology said the plan aimed to help innovators and researchers from least-developed countries promote the creation and sharing of information technology and protect intellectual property rights, but implementation details were unclear.

“We have a plan to establish the centre, but we’ll have to sign an agreement with WIPO,” she said, adding the idea came out of a meeting of international experts in information technology held in Nay Pi Taw on December 15. – Additional reporting by Philip Heijmans

IN BRIEF
The United Nations Office for Project Services (UNOPS) in Myanmar is inviting qualified candidates to apply for the following positions: Sr. Title and level Duty Station Position Deadline 1. Programme Associate (LICA 4) Yangon National 8 Jan 14 2. Contracts Assistant (LICA 3) Yangon National 8 Jan 14 3. Senior Policy Officer (LICA 8) Yangon National 8 Jan 14 4. Communication Assistant (LICA 3) Website Management-(Vacancy Extension) Yangon National 8 Jan 14 The benefit package for the above positions includes an attractive remuneration, 30 days annual leave and 10 holidays per year, medical insurance, learning and development opportunities and a challenging working environment with 250 national and international colleagues. All applications must be made through the UNOPS E-recruitment System (https://gprs.unops.org) and click on the post you are interested in applying for.
If you have further queries, please contact 95 1 657 281-7 Ext: 149

New Zealand economy finally rebounds after drought

New Zealand’s economy grew 1.4 percent in the July-September quarter, led by a surge in agricultural production following a drought, official data showed last week. It was the biggest quarterly expansion in gross domestic product since December 2009 and took annual economic growth to 2.6pc, Statistics New Zealand said. – AFP

www.mmtimes.com
SHANGHAI SYDNEY

Business 31

Bitcoin value slumps after bank measures
BITCOINS were trading on December 18 at less than half their value at the end of last month after Chinese authorities took steps to rein in transactions in virtual currency, which had soared in recent months. Prices on BTCChina, the country’s biggest Bitcoin trading platform, stood at 3060 yuan (US$504) each, down almost 60 percent from their high of 7588 yuan ($1250) in November. Bitcoin, invented in the wake of the global financial crisis, is a form of cryptography-based e-money that offers a largely anonymous payment system. Chinese speculators have poured money into it this year, driving the BTCChina price up 9122pc from January 1 to November 30 and making the country at times the world’s biggest Bitcoin market. But two weeks ago China’s central bank ordered financial institutions not to provide Bitcoin-related services and products and cautioned against its potential use in moneylaundering. On Monday, it banned domestic third-party payment companies from providing clearing services for virtual currency trading platforms, according to a report in the China Business News.

Australia’s Tony Abbott stands firm against ‘corporate welfare’
AUSTRALIAN Prime Minister Tony Abbott warned struggling Australian companies last week to get their house in order, refusing to indulge in “corporate welfare” subsidies despite car giant Holden’s decision to shut local plants. The manufacturing sector has battled rising costs and a strong Australian dollar, with General Motors subsidiary Holden saying last week it would stop making cars in Australia by 2017, seven months after Ford announced its exit. Mr Abbott said Australia had a strong manufacturing sector and there would be no handouts, as he announced an AUS$100 million (US$89 million) fund to support those regions hurt by the Holden wind-down. “No country has ever subsidised its way to prosperity,” Mr Abbott said, making clear his administration would be loathe to do for companies in trouble “the sorts of things they ought to be doing for themselves”. Mr Abbott said he would say the same thing to any Australian company, be they food processing company Ardmona or the national airline Qantas which has complained about foreign ownership restrictions. “You’ve got to get your house in order. Government support cannot substitute for strong management. And strong management in a company under pressure starts with getting your costs down,” he said. Mr Abbott said the government would attempt to get the basics for corporations right through lower taxes, less regulation, higher productivity and an overall environment of steady, reliable and competent government.

Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott speaks during a press conference in Sydney on December 16. Photo: AFP

Drop in Bitcoin prices since November

60%

But he added, “We don’t want to see corporate welfare. What we want to see is a country that has got the economic fundamentals right. “We’re not here to sort of build a field of dreams. We are here to make sensible, economically responsible decisions, we are here to exercise very careful stewardship over taxpayers money.” The prime minister said he would chair a taskforce aimed at helping create jobs as the decade-

long mineral and resources boom slows. “Transitioning from heavy industrial manufacturing to higher value-added production calls for a national, strategic response rather than a piecemeal one based on handouts and subsidies,” Mr Abbott said. The AUS$100 million fund would support business and research and development as well as Holden workers affected by the closure of the iconic carmaker. – AFP

TOkYO

Trade deficit expands 35% on-year in Japan
JAPAN posted a record November trade deficit, data showed last week, underscoring how soaring energy bills have weighed on the country’s trade balance despite a jump in exports. Government figures showed a 35.1 percent on-year rise to a 1.29 trillion yen (US$12.6 billion) deficit, the worst result for November and the 17th straight month of shortfall – the longest stretch since comparable data began more than three decades ago. Japan’s energy imports surged after the 2011 Fukushima crisis forced the shutdown of the country’s nuclear reactors, which once supplied a third of the nation’s power. A sharp decline in the yen, which is good for exporters’ profitability, has also forced up the cost of importing pricey fossil fuels to plug the country’s energy gap. The yen has been under pressure since Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, who took office late last year, launched a policy blitz that meshed government spending with a central bank monetary-easing plan unveiled in April. The policy drive, dubbed Abenomics, is aimed at rebooting the world’s third-largest economy, which has suffered from growth-sapping deflation for years. The trade figures come on the back of slowing GDP growth after a sizzling expansion that saw Japan outpace other G7 nations in the first half of the year. Japan’s third-quarter economic growth came in at a final reading of 0.3pc, down from an initial figure of 0.5pc – and a sharp slowdown from 0.9pc growth in the previous quarter. But firms appear to be taking the slowdown in their stride. Last week, a Bank of Japan survey that polls more than 10,000 companies showed business confidence has soared to a sixyear high. Part of the reason is the sharp weakening of the yen over the past year, which has seen Japanese exporters such as Sony and Toyota booking rosy profits as the cheaper unit made them more competitive overseas while inflating repatriated earnings. That benefit showed up in the trade data as exports last month rose 18.4pc to 5.90 trillion yen ($5.73 billion), backed by robust shipments of automobiles. – AFP

Citing an unnamed source, it said the instruction was issued at a closed-door meeting. A notice posted last week on BTCChina’s website to its “valued customers” said, “Due to new government regulations, BTCChina will temporarily suspend CNY [yuan] deposits.” It added, “Rest assured that BTCChina will continue to operate normally. We deeply apologise for any inconvenience.” Both BTCChina and another major Chinese exchange, OKCoin, have resumed charging investors transaction fees, according to notices on their respective websites, which said the move was intended to prevent speculation and price manipulation. – AFP

Japan’s trade deficit for November

$2.6

BILLION

32 THE MYANMAR TIMES DECEMBER 23 - 29, 2013

Property
BEIJING

BUSINESS EditoR: Philip Heijmans | pheijmans13@gmail.com

Two new Antarctic bases for China
Asia’s powerhouse joins a growing list of countries with bases in the frozen continent
CHINESE workers are on their way to build the country’s fourth Antarctic research base and a fifth is being planned, state-run media said last week as the country expands its imprint on the icy continent. Construction on the main building of the fourth camp, named Taishan, will be completed next year, the state-run China Daily reported. It will be used during the summer season for research into “geology, glaciers, geomagnetism and atmospheric science”, the report said, adding that its main building will be shaped “like a Chinese lantern”.

Countries estimated to have permanent research stations in Antarctica

30

Office space alternatives surge in face of soaring rental market
Local businesses have begun offering shared office suites to deal with the shortage of supply in Yangon
Current clients include representative offices of foreign companies and smaller local companies and the business centre expects to see interest from foreign non-commercial organisations and businesses entering the market or expanding their operations. The influx of foreign demand has greatly contributed to driving up both office and residential rental prices,” Ma Zin Myo Naing, an agent from Shwe Yi San, told The Myanmar Times. “A two-storey shop house of 1200 square feet in Tarmwe township is been rented out for K20 million [about $2000] per month this year, but the same place was rented out for K2.5 million [about $250] for one month in the last three years,” she said. The lack of supply of quality office space is driving businesses to seek creative alternatives to expensive and hard-to-come-by serviced office tower leases, she added. “People in need of office space might rent a condo, apartment or house instead. Among them, people like condos more than others, but the condo price too is growing,” Ma Zin Myo Naing said, citing an average 200pc increase year-on-year for condo rental prices. Another newly opened executive business centre, My Yangon Office, has also experienced a rush of interest in flexible renting terms for office space, manager Wai Me Han said.  “Office alternatives are popular as the supply of quality of office space is so limited – you have to make do with what you have,” she said. “We have noticed the prices [in Yangon] are generally very high compared to what you get relative to other markets around the world.” The draw card to business centres for corporations looking for initial, temporary or even expanding office space is the flexible lease terms offered, Wai Me Han said. “[It is] a comprehensive full service option for clients that need to rent temporarily or require more assistance than can be obtained from a regular office set-up,” she added. Extending this advantage of a business community atmosphere with increased assistance for start-ups, Project Hub director Allison Morris said networking opportunities were a plus in shared work environments. “We don’t have a typical member profile. We’ve got small teams that are starting non-profit organisations, freelance consultants working on peace-building in Myanmar, tech start-ups, journalists and private sector consultants … [It] suits them because it’s the most affordable option in town and we provide them networking opportunities and other events that help them get connected in Yangon,” Ms Morris said, of the $150-amonth shared office space at Project Hub. Flexible rental term business centres like Hintha, My Yangon Office and Project Hub have already seen a spike in demand for their services from clients unwilling to commit to paying up to $90 per square foot or shoulder the burden of completely renovating a residential apartment or condo. Ko Min Min Soe of Mya Pan Thakhin real estate agency said that traditionally popular office towers like Sakura and Sule Centerpoint were charging rental fees equivalent to those in major global business hubs like Manhattan. “These places are very famous for renting and most of the people want to get space there to open an office. But there is no more space because of the high rental demand,” he said. “Last year the rental fee in Sakura tower was $60 for one square foot per month and it was increased to $90 this year,” Ko Min Min Soe said. “We said that it could not be $90 because this was the same as the rent fee in Singapore.” mYAT NYEIN AYE bRIDGET DI cERTO

Clients at My Yangon Office use flexible work space available for daily, weekly or monthly rental. Photo: Aung Htay Hlaing

Pictures showed a Chinese icebreaker heading through sheets of broken ice toward the frozen continent, carrying a reported 256-strong crew. The expedition will also carry out site inspections for another research station, the report continued. The report came a month after Russia and China blocked proposals for two vast ocean sanctuaries in Antarctica to protect its pristine wilderness. Environmentalists slammed the “stubborn self-interest” of nations opposing the plan, saying that an ocean wilderness, home to 16,000 known species including whales, seals and penguins. was at stake. China is a relative latecomer to Antarctic exploration. It first sent a small exploration team to the remote continent in 1984 and only established its first research base there a year later. Approximately 30 nations operate permanent research stations in Antarctica including the US, China, Russia, Australia, Britain, France and Argentina. Argentina, one of the closest countries to Antarctica, has 13 facilities on the continent, more than any other country, according to 2012 data from the Council of Managers of National Antarctic Programs (COMNAP). The United States maintains six facilities, while Russia has 12 and Japan five, according to COMNAP. – AFP

OFFICE space rental prices have surged as high as 1000 percent in some Yangon townships, fuelling demand for office space alternatives in the commercial capital. Growing foreign demand and a burgeoning start-up scene have increased demand for rental property by about 15pc year-on-year, creating an unyielding economy of scale of exorbitant rental prices and conditions. To meet this demand, a number of executive serviced business centres offering flexible rental terms and more affordable rents have blossomed in the city. Catherine Smith, director of the recently opened Hintha Business Centre in downtown Yangon, said that such centres were a common part of a modern city business environment. “Yangon has less than 60,000 square metres [about 645,800 sq ft] of Grade A office space suitable for international firms,” Ms Smith said. “Average monthly rentals are about US$80 per square metre, higher than in Singapore and other ASEAN countries. “It’s not just high rents that create a barrier to entry – the requirement to pay 12 months’ rent in advance is also prohibitive to many companies,” she added. Hintha Business Centre offers a range of flexible renting options to fill the void in office space availability and affordability. From monthly to weekly or even daily rental, the centre has offices, hot desks, meeting/conference rooms and virtual office space rental for as little as $100 a month. The centre provides a one-stop shop for business needs from reception to internet and telephone connectivity and modern office furnishings and equipment including desks, chairs, filing and mailing systems as well as cleaners, security and receptionists.

‘Office alternatives are popular as the supply of quality of office space is so limited – you have to make do with what you have,’
Wai Me Han Manager ot My Yangon Office

QuOte Of the WeeK

33

‘It’s not just high rents that create a barrier to entry – the requirement to pay 12 months rent in advance is also prohibitive’ — Catherine Smith, director of Hintha Business Centre

Turkey PM brands graft probe ‘ugly’ plot
WORlD 38

Yangon office for Savills
mYAT NYEIN AYE myatnyeinaye11092@gmail.com HONG Kong-based Savills real estate firm opened an office in Yangon on December 16 to join in the continuing boom in land and property prices here. Richard Emerson, country manager of Savills Myanmar, said, “Our team in Yangon has already taken instructions across a variety of brokerage disciplines, including office and retail leasing, development feasibilities, market research, valuations and investment brokerage.” Office rents in Yangon have risen by 80 percent during the past year, while five-star hotel room rates increased by 70pc, according to data by Savills. Serviced apartment rents, meanwhile, have risen by 50pc and quality retail rents by 10pc, according to the same data. Neil MacGregor, managing director of Savills Vietnam, said Myanmar real estate was a hot topic among investors and developers from Hong Kong, Japan and Taiwan, and would remain so for years to come.

Insein and Shwe Pyi Thar offer a cheaper alternative to downtown
mYAT NYEIN AYE myatnyeinaye11092@gmail.com mYAT NOE OO myantnoe.mcm@gmail.com THE residential property market in outlying Yangon townships Insein and Shwe Pyithar is often overlooked but offers more spacious and affordable housing than downtown condos, real estate experts said. Frequently shunned by renters wanting to be closer to the hectic downtown grid, the northern townships of Insein and Shwe Pyithar boast landed property available for purchase or rent from as low as K500,000 a month. “Property prices were soaring in Yangon, but rising only gradually in Insein and Shwe Pyi Thar. The demand there is less than in other townships,” said Ko Htun Htun, speculator at Phoenix real estate agency. The low demand in these two townships is from a failure by prospective property owners and tenants to see the investment potential of the leafy area, he added. Land is valued at about K130,000 per square foot in the townships, with some land going for as little as K110,000 for one square foot. The average price of a landed house in Insein township is K60 million for 2013. “In Shwe Pyi Thar, people are not buying land or houses. But it is an industrial zone so the rental market is good,” Ko Htun Htun added. “While Yangon property prices are rising, the Shwe Pyi Thar market is stable.” Neighbouring Insein township has seen rising property and rental prices in the last year, he highlighted. Last year, the purchase price of house and land plots located on lanes used to be about K3 million but prices rose over 2013 to about K5 million. House and land packages fronting main roads are selling for between K100 million and K300 million for 15,000-square-foot blocks in 2013. Rentals range from K500,000 to K1million for a house and land property in Insein. The property market remains fairly stable compared to the skyrocketing prices seen in other townships closer to downtown, with prices generally being driven by foreign demand.  “If you have K500,000 or K1 million you can rent a good house in Insein. But foreigners never rent in here because they like downtown,” U Aung Soe Moe from Asia Land Real Estate told The Myanmar Times.

The street view of Lower Mingalardon Street in Insein. Photo: Aung Htay Hlaing

Local Myanmar renters are capitalising on the cheap rents, although the outlying locations coupled with the lack of effective transport infrastructure in Yangon make it difficult for residents of the Insein and Shwe Pyithar townships to conduct regular business in the downtown grid, real estate agent Daw Zin Myo Naing said. But, for renters or prospective property buyers looking for big hous-

es with gardens at affordable prices, the two townships are a perfect option “Even though the property market is slow in Insein township, some places such as Japan Road, Lower Mingaladon Road and Baho Road are starting to see increasing demand for good properties,” Daw Zin Myo Naing said. “These places exist along the main road and near the Yangon airport so the property market there is good.”

34 Business Property
MADRID ATHENS

THE MYANMAR TIMES DECEMBER 23 - 29, 2013

Las Vegas Sands drops ‘Eurovegas’ project
US casino operator Las Vegas Sands said earlier this month it has dropped plans to invest over US$30 billion in a mega-resort scheme that promised 260,000 direct and indirect jobs for Spain, where one in four people are unemployed. The company, owned by US billionaire Sheldon Adelson, said it would “continue aggressive pursuit of opportunities in Asia” where it already operates properties in Singapore and Macao. In a statement, Mr Adelson said the company “did not see a path in which the criteria needed to move forward with this large-scale development can be reached. As a result we will no longer be pursuing this opportunity.” “Developing integrated resorts in Europe has been a vision of mine for years, but there is a time and place for everything,” he added. “Right now our focus is on encouraging Asian countries, like Japan and Korea, to dramatically enhance their tourism offering through the development of integrated resorts there,” he added. Las Vegas Sands, the world’s biggest casino company by market value, said in February it had chosen Alcorcon, a suburb of Madrid, as the site for what would have been Europe’s largest resort. It chose Madrid over Barcelona for the project after months of talks with the two competing cities. The “Eurovegas” project called for the construction of four casino complexes with 12 hotels providing 36,000 rooms, nine theatres, three golf courses, and convention centres over a period of 10-15 years. The project was welcomed by Spain’s centre-right government in a country grappling with a jobless rate of 26 percent. But opponents, which included the Roman Catholic Church and members of Spain’s “indignant” movement against social equality, complained that the casinos would spawn prostitution and crime. They also argued it would mark a return to the excesses of Spain’s property bubble, which imploded in 2008 triggering a double-dip recession. Mr Adelson had been pressuring the government to exempt the project from the country’s anti-tobacco law, one of the strictest in Europe, but this had been fiercely opposed by anti-smoking campaigners. The government was considering bending the tobacco law to allow punters to light up inside the Madrid megacasino project. – AFP

Realtors in Greece warn new tax will hit prices
GREECE’s real estate agent association Omase warned last week against a possible collapse of the sector in big cities because of new property taxes in a controversial law submitted to parliament. “In view of recession and taxes, this law leads to the collapse of the market instead of reducing the excessive taxation which has already stalled transactions,” said head of Omase Ioannis Revithis during a press conference. Real estate prices have already dropped between 30 and 50 percent in recent years. The law, which should be approved by parliament by the end of the week, includes a tax for all properties and an additional tax for properties worth more than 300,000 euros (US$414,000). For the first time, agricultural plots will also be taxed. Until 2011, only owners of large properties were taxed. But the crisis-hit country, under pressure from its international creditors to increase state income, needed to introduce a more comprehensive property tax. “Over-taxation causes property devaluation, which works to the advantage of foreign investors who want to buy at very low prices,” said Omase member Michalis Georgiou. “In 2014, which will be a crucial year for real estate, prices will further

People walk in front of the Greek parliament in Athens on December 11. A new property tax could affect prices, experts say. Photo: AFP

BILLION

US$30
Withdrawn investment from Spanish mega-casino resort scheme

drop by up to 20 percent,” he added. Investing in property is a tradition in Greece, as it is considered a fallback against shortages in state welfare. Greece has one of the highest property owner rates in Europe, at more than 70pc. The association further calls for tax exemptions for residential properties and workplaces currently with-

out a tenant because of the crisis. Omase also asks for an extension on a moratorium on home foreclosures, which protects the principal residence of debtors from outright seizure. The moratorium is one of the stumbling points in the ongoing negotiations between Greece and its creditors. – AFP

www.mmtimes.com
BEIJING

Science & Technology 37

In China, moon voyage is something greater
IN a darkened auditorium some 250 young Chinese sat spellbound in a projector’s otherworldly blue glow, listening to the father of China’s lunar program chart their country’s once and future voyages in the final frontier. While the US retreats from manned space exploration China is seeking to establish itself as an ascending superpower, in the same way that the US and the Soviet Union did when they alone dominated global politics. Colourful maps of interplanetary flight paths and photos of the moon’s craggy surface taken by China’s two previous rover missions, Chang’e-1 and Chang’e-2, illuminated the screen in Beijing. Then pictures of China’s latest rover, which made its soft-landing last earlier this month, and finally, another image, this time a mock-up: an astronaut standing on the moon, proudly planting a red Chinese flag in the lunar soil. “We will send a Chinese astronaut to the moon,” Ouyang Ziyuan told the rapt audience at the event, organised by China’s popular science website Guokr. “The Communist Party Central Committee strongly encourages us to go even beyond the moon, and China is already capable of deep space exploration,” said the 78-yearold former chief scientist of the lunar program. “We will explore the whole solar system.” Ouyang’s impassioned presentation, and the pride and wonderment with which the 20-something crowd greeted it, underscored the significance of the program. For many in China, while their country’s steady progress into space is a technical achievement, it also signifies something much greater. China’s boom of the last 30 years has made it the world’s second-largest economy, and it is increasingly seeking geopolitical heft of a similar stature. The military-run space program fits into that effort, specialists say. “For China, it represents two things,” said Maurizio Falanga, executive director of the International Space Science Institute Beijing and one of a growing number of Western space scientists seeking to strengthen collaboration with China. “One, they’re able to do it by themselves; they have the technology and they know how to do it,” he said. “It’s also to be proud of the nation, to be proud to be Chinese, that ‘we are on the same level with the US now, or the Russians ... and start to become a world power’.” China first sent a human into space 10 years ago, and its ambitious future plans include a permanent orbiting space station to be completed by 2020. “in fits and starts”, noted Joan Johnson-Freese, professor of national security affairs at the US Naval War College in Newport, Rhode Island. “They’re [China] trying to set up a program that’s long-duration, as opposed to the United States where we went to the moon, we did it very quickly, we said, ‘Been there, done that,’” she said. Ken Pounds, a professor emeritus at the University of Leicester icans as the first way to go,” said Mr Pounds. “I think the situation is now different. I don’t think there’s any particular preference on who to work with, and in fact there are very significant collaborations with China,” he said. Saturday’s successful soft-landing of the Chang’e-3 probe and Jade Rabbit rover represented a feat that both the US and former Soviet Union had accomplished decades earlier. Yet for those within the Chinese space programme, the mission held particular import after the intentional crash-landing of their first moon probe, Chang’e-1, in 2009. Such “hard landings” are routine in international space exploration, and it had already snapped enough photos to piece together China’s first full map of the lunar surface. “When Chang’e-1 crash-landed, we were really heartbroken,” Mr Ouyang said. “It was the crystallisation of the collective labour of a billion people. In order to complete its final mission, it died the cruellest death. It died as a martyr.” – AFP

‘When Chang’e-1 crash-landed, we were really heartbroken.’
Quyang Ziyuan

Around the same time, the International Space Station operated by the US, Russia, Japan, Canada and Europe will go out of service. The US has retired its remaining space shuttles without a replacement, and scaled back NASA funding. Its activities have proceeded only

who has spearheaded British space research, said China’s progress in space represented an “absolute transformation” in its stature over the last 40 years. “When I was young, the US program dominated everything, and we in the UK and in Europe tended to look at collaboration with the Amer-

SAN FRANcIScO

New Google Glass eyewear lets winking motion snap the pictures
The new glassware allows the user to record and share videos as well as take photos
GOOGLE Glass last week announced updates to the software in its internet-linked eyewear to allow users to snap pictures by winking. The new feature, which promises to escalate privacy concerns already being voiced about the high-tech gadget, came as one of an array of improvements. “We’ve got a new setting that lets you quickly and easily capture the moments you care about with a simple wink of the eye,” Google Glass posted on its Google+ social network page. “We’re starting with pictures, but just think about what else is possible,” the message continued. Notions put forth included Glass wearers someday paying for cab rides by winking at meters or buying something in a shop with a blink. Updates included letting owners lock eyewear so it can’t be used unless a person knows the right “handshake” of swipes and taps. The “Glassware” code powering the eyewear was also modified to upload video directly to Google-owned video-sharing venue YouTube. “Glass is about helping you look up and experience the world around you without getting bogged down by technology,” Google said. The high-tech accouterment lets wearers take pictures, record video, send messages or perform other tasks with touch controls or by speaking commands. It connects to the internet using Wi-Fi hot spots or being wirelessly tethered to mobile phones. Facebook, Twitter and major news organizations have already tailored applications for Google Glass, which has only been made available to developers and a limited selection of “explorers” who paid US$1500 each for the eyewear. – AFP

‘We’re starting with pictures, but just think about what else is possible.’
Google Glass

When it comes to technology, 2013 was one for the ages. Here is a look into what happened. Photo: AFP

38 THE MYANMAR TIMES DECEMBER 23 - 29, 2013

World
ANKARA
TURKISH Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan charged on December 18 that the detention of dozens of people in a high-profile graft probe was an “ugly” operation against his government. Several dozen police chiefs have been sacked in the wake of the dawn raids on December 17 which led to the detention of 51 people including the sons of three ministers and several top business leaders, sending shockwaves through Turkey’s political establishment. The operation has exposed deep fractures in Mr Erdogan’s traditional support base, particularly a bitter feud between his government and an influential Muslim cleric who wields considerable clout in the police and the judiciary. Political tensions are running high in Turkey ahead of a series of elections starting next year that will pose a key test for Mr Erdogan after the anti-government unrest in June. Mr Erdogan branded the graft probe an “ugly operation” against the government. “We will not allow political plotting,” he told reporters in Ankara. “Nobody has the right to darken the future of this country.” Mr Erdogan said police chiefs had been removed from their posts because they were using their positions for abusing power and warned that more could follow in other cities. At least 16 police chiefs in Istanbul and 18 in Ankara had been sacked, local media reported. Those detained are suspected of numerous offences including accepting and facilitating bribes for development projects and securing construction permits for protected areas in exchange for money, as well as gold smuggling and money laundering, according to press reports. Police also seized US$4.5 million in cash hidden in shoe boxes in one of the arrested’s home, the Dogan News Agency reported. “We believe our ministers are

WORLd EdITOR: Bridget Di Certo | bridget.dicerto@gmail.com

Turkey PM brands graft probe ‘ugly’ anti-government plot
innocent,” Deputy Prime Minister Bulent Arinc said, adding however that the government was ready to dismiss them if necessary. For his part, Mr Erdogan pledged the government would take “necessary steps when needed”. According to press reports, one probe centres on Azerbaijani businessman Reza Zarrab who is suspected of bribery to disguise illegal gold sales to Iran via Halkbank. Mr Arinc branded the police operation a “psychological war” against Mr Erdogan’s Justice and Development Party (AKP) but he did not specify who was behind the “very planned” campaign. The government has vowed to root out corruption, a chronic problem in Turkey particularly in the booming construction industry. But there is speculation it is linked to a very public dispute between Mr Erdogan’s government and a former ally, the influential Muslim cleric Fethullah Gulen. A lawyer for Mr Gulen denied that he was involved in the probe. “The honourable Fethullah Gulen doesn’t have anything to do with and has no information about the investigations or the public officials leading them,” Orhan Erdemli said. Mr Gulen lives in exile in the United States, but his organisation wields considerable influence in several arms of Turkey’s state apparatus, including the police, secret services and the judiciary, and also runs a network of private schools. Mr Erdogan and the AKP face key tests in local polls in March, a presidential ballot in August and legislative elections in 2015. – AFP

TRADE MARK CAUTION
VOX AMPLIFICATION LIMITED, a United Kingdom company of 1 Harrison Close, Knowlhill, Milton Keynes, MK5 8PA, United Kingdom, is the Owner of the following Trade Mark:-

Reg. No. 12017/2013 in respect of “Class 09: Amplifiers; amplifiers for use with musical apparatus; amplifiers for use in cars for entertainment purposes; audio and digital amplifiers; electric sound amplifiers; electric cords for musical amplifiers; electronic and electric acoustic amplifiers; guitar amplifiers; headphone amplifiers; integrated audio amplifiers; keyboard amplifiers; power and power output amplifiers; power supply units for amplifiers; stereophonic amplifiers; transportable guitar amplifiers; amplifiers; sound; answering machines, telephone; dictating machines; DVD players, loudspeakers; phonographs; receivers, stereo; record players, recorders, tapes not including educational contents; recorders, videos not including educational contents; sound amplifiers; speakers, audio; stereo receivers, tuners, amplifiers, speakers; tape players, audio and video; tape recorders, audio and video; telephone answering machines; tuners, stereo; turntables; video cassette recorders; video disc players; video recorders; effect pedals, volume pedals; wahwah pedals; footswitches; car leads and cables; and parts and fittings for all of the aforesaid goods. Class 15: Guitars; electric guitars, electrical connector cables for amplified guitars; dust covers for guitars and parts and fittings for guitars. Class 25: Tee shirts, sweatshirts, caps. Class 37: Maintenance and servicing of electrical and electronic equipment; maintenance and servicing of musical instruments; maintenance and servicing of amplifiers, loudspeakers, effect pedals, volume pedals, wahwah pedals and foot switches”. Fraudulent imitation or unauthorised use of the said Trade Mark will be dealt with according to law. Win Mu Tin, M.A., H.G.P., D.B.L for VOX AMPLIFICATION LIMITED P. O. Box 60, Yangon E-mail: makhinkyi.law@mptmail.net.mm Dated: 23 December 2013

VOX

IN PICTURES

A supporter of the opposition Cambodia Nat 17, 2013. Thousands of Cambodian opposition disputed July election win, calling for a new

TOKYO

Japan robot astronaut talks Santa in first outer space conversation
THE world’s first robot astronaut has begun chatting to the Japanese commander of the International Space Station, in what was being billed as the first conversation of its kind. Kirobo, a pint-sized android equipped with artificial intelligence and capable of learning how to respond appropriately to humans, even put a marker down for Christmas, telling Koichi Wakata he expected a visit from a certain man bearing gifts. “Santa Claus will come to space,” Kirobo, wearing a Santa hat, told Mr Wakata as they drifted in zero gravity hundreds of miles above the Earth. “What will you ask for from Santa Claus, Kirobo?” asked the Japanese astronaut. “I want a toy rocket ... Let’s ask Santa Claus.” The unscripted conversation, in Japanese, was held on December 6, with footage unveiled on December 20. It is part of a longer-term project to see how a robot can act as a companion for isolated people, particularly to see if it can develop conversational skills. The wide-eyed and bootie-wearing Kirobo – roughly the size of a chihuahua – left Earth on a cargo-carrying rocket and reached the space station on August 10. Kirobo and his interlocutor managed several minutes of spontaneous conversation aboard the ISS, which included the robot giving very general opinions. “How was it when the rocket launched?” Mr Wakata asked the machine. “It was exciting!” Kirobo replied. Kirobo and twin android Mirata, which stayed on Earth were created jointly by advertising firm Dentsu, the University of Tokyo, robot developer Robo Garage and Toyota. – AFP

Japanese robot creator and associate professor of the University of Tokyo, Tomotaka Takahashi chats to a humanoid robot. Photo: AFP

39

Deadly year for journalists
worLD 45

The year that was and the year that will be
worLD 46 - 47

Sombath crisis has implications for all ASEAN countries
WorLD 42

BANGKOK

Thai election body suggests postponing voter polls
THAILAND’S Election Commission on December 19 warned of potential unrest at upcoming polls, suggesting a postponement as thousands of anti-government protesters marched through the capital. The independent body called for talks between the administration of embattled Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra and demonstrators, who have vowed to disrupt the February 2 vote. Ms Yingluck called the snap election last week to try to defuse a weekslong political crisis, which has seen opposition protesters massing on the streets of Bangkok. But the protesters say it would only usher in another government backed by controversial former leader Thaksin Shinawatra, Ms Yingluck’s brother. They accuse the ousted leader of controlling her behind the scenes and call for a reforming “people’s council”. “The EC expects the election on February 2 will cause unrest, so holding the poll on that date is not appropriate,” said EC commissioner Somchai Srisutthiyakorn, adding that officials would organise the vote if parties “insist” on going ahead. Thousands of people marched through the capital on Thursday in a noisy procession of whistle-blowing, flag-waving protesters. One faction briefly gathered outside the US embassy, facing off against lines of riot police and voicing anger at Washington’s support for the democratic process. “If you use Thai soil to trade with Yingluck’s government ... I will campaign for Thais across the country to oust you and your embassy from Thailand,” he added, in comments aimed at the US ambassador. – AFP

TRADE MARK CAUTION
Mr. Oliver Quast (ID No. 2011577058 D), a German citizen with address at Upper Borg 75 a, 28357 Bremen, Germany, is the Owner of the following Trade Mark:-

tional Rescue Party (CNRP) shouts slogans during a demonstration in Phnom Penh on December n supporters on December 17 held further demonstrations against Prime Minister Hun Sen’s hotly poll to settle allegations of vote-rigging. Photo: AFP

Russia amnesty for Pussy Riot, Greenpeace
RUSSIAN lawmakers on December 18 approved a Kremlin-backed amnesty bill that is set to free the two jailed members of the punk band Pussy Riot while also ending the prosecution of 30 Greenpeace crew members. Russia’s Duma lower house of parliament voted 446 in favour to none against for the amnesty, which commemorates 20 years since Russia ratified its current constitution. The bill, branded as a mere token gesture by rights activists, went into effect later on December 18 and should also see several anti-Vladimir Putin protesters, jailed after a May 2012 rally, walk out of prison. The amnesty affects a range of categories like mothers with dependents, minors and the elderly. However it also specifically mentions the charge of hooliganism as well as the charge of participating in mass riots. The jailed members of punk band Pussy Riot, Nadezhda Tolokonnikova and Maria Alyokhina, who are serving two-year sentences on charges of hooliganism for staging an anti-Putin “punk prayer” protest in a cathedral, could be released imminently, Ms Tolokonnikova’s husband said. The officials in Krasnoyarsk and Nizhny Novgorod, where the two women are currently held, have promised to free them “right away and without bureaucratic delay, probably tomorrow,” Pyotr Verzilov wrote on his Twitter blog. The duo’s sentences run out in early March of next year. The initial bill listed hooliganism and mass riot charges, but said that only convicts can seek amnesty. The parliament then passed amendments stipulating that cases on those charges be closed even before reaching trial or verdict. The amendments effectively meant that prosecution of the entire Greenpeace crew arrested after a protest in the Barents Sea and charged with hooliganism would end and the foreigners now staying in Saint Petersburg could finally go home. The 26 foreign crew from the Greenpeace Arctic Sunrise ship will then request to leave, and still hope to be home by Christmas, said spokesman Ben Stewart. “There is certainly a chance, but until they actually leave Russia, everything is speculation,” he said. Last month the entire crew was released on bail, but Greenpeace said the foreigners are still not being allowed out of the country, with Russian investigators not giving migration officials a green light to issue exit visas. The amnesty of mass rioting will also affect Russian protesters prosecuted under a probe after a rally on May 6, 2012, held in Moscow one day before Mr Putin’s inauguration for a third Kremlin term. Three protesters who are under pre-trial arrest on charges of participation in mass riots will be freed. One will be freed from house arrest. However most of those arrested under the probe will remain in jail due to additional charges of hitting policemen. The ruling United Russia party hailed the amnesty as proof that Putin listens to the opposition and human rights activists. United Russia party deputy Pavel Krasheninnikov, who presented the amnesty to the floor, told the Echo of Moscow radio that the amnesty will affect a total of about 15,000 people, and up to 3500 people will be freed from jail. – AFP

MOSCOW

Reg. No. 12015/2013 in respect of “Class 32: Beers; beer-based mixed drinks; Mineral and aerated waters and other non-alcoholic beverages; Fruit beverages and fruit juices; Syrups and other preparations for making beverages. Mineral and aerated waters and other nonalcoholic beverages; Fruit beverages and fruit juices; Syrups and other preparations for making beverages; Non-alcoholic fruit extracts; Non-alcoholic fruit drinks; Non alcoholic drinks; Non alcoholic honey based beverages; Non-alcoholic aperitifs; Apple juice; Beer wort; Powders for effervescing beverages; Pastilles for effervescing beverages; Non-alcoholic cocktails; Peanut milk (non-alcoholic); Preparations for making mineral water; Preparations for making aerated water; Essences for making beverages; Fruit drinks; Nectars (fruit-) [non-alcoholic]; Fruit juices; Vegetable juices [beverages]; Extracts of hops for making beer; Ginger beer; Isotonic beverages; Aerated waters; Kvass (non-alcoholic beverages); Lemonades; Syrups for lemonade; Lithia water; Malt beer; Malt wort; Milk of almonds (beverage); Orgeat; Mineral water (beverages); Whey beverages; Must; Products for making beverages; Preparations for making liqueurs; Sarsaparilla (soft drink): Seltzer water; Syrups for beverages; Soda water; Sherbets (beverages); Table waters; Tomato juice (beverage); Unfermented grape must; Waters [beverages]; none of the aforesaid goods containing the additives taurine or caffeine or being mixed with beverages containing the additives taurine or caffeine or being mixed with beverages containing taurine or caffeine”. Fraudulent imitation or unauthorised use of the said Trade Mark will be dealt with according to law. Win Mu Tin, M.A., H.G.P., D.B.L for Mr. Oliver Quast P. O. Box 60, Yangon E-mail: makhinkyi.law@mptmail.net.mm Dated: 23 December 2013

40 World International
TACLOBAN BEIJING

THE MYANMAR TIMES DECEMBER 23 - 29, 2013

Catholics end 40-day mourning for dead
SURVIVORS of Super Typhoon Haiyan gathered to pray while a priest sprinkled holy water on their ruined homes on December 17 in a ceremony marking the end of a 40-day mourning period for the thousands killed. The memorial took place in Tacloban on the island of Leyte, which bore the brunt of the Philippines’ deadliest typhoon, accounting for more than 5000 of the 6069 confirmed deaths. “The people here have accepted that their loved ones will not be coming back,” Reverand Amadeo Alvero, of the Santo Nino parish in Tacloban, told AFP after celebrating an open-air mass attended by about 100 survivors. “However, they are having difficulty getting back on their feet because they still do not have proper homes, electricity is still down, and many have also lost their jobs. City officials have yet to find a relocation place for them.” The Philippines is a predominantly Catholic country where it is traditional to mourn the dead for 40 days. Residents of the parish are families of fisherers, fish vendors and informal settlers. They have all been told by the city government that they will not be allowed to rebuild because their old homes were too close to the shore and dangerous, the priest added. Haiyan slashed across the central Philippines on November 8, unleashing ferocious winds of up to 315 kilometres (195 miles) an hour on an area the size of Portugal, destroying more than a million homes and leaving four million people homeless. The authorities said most of the deaths were caused by tsunami-like giant storm surges that swept through Tacloban and other cities and towns of Leyte and Samar islands. Apart from the dead, 1779 people remain missing, according to the latest government tally. The priest walked through debrisfilled ruins of homes in the coastal neighbourhood sprinkling holy water on places where bodies of at least 30 of the victims had earlier been recovered. “In my homily, I told them that death did not end their relationship with their relatives. I said we need to continue to pray to God to intercede for us,” Reverand Alvero added. Elsewhere in the city, relatives have organised a mass candle-lighting ceremony to mark the end of the mourning period for their dead, the priest added. President Benigno Aquino has said the government will need nearly US$3 billion to rebuild these areas, while the United Nations on Monday launched an $791 million international aid appeal to finance the survivors’ needs over the next 12 months. “The humanitarian community’s response plan sets out priority activities to ensure that vulnerable families have access to critical food assistance, clean water, and sustainable and dignified shelter,” said UN resident and humanitarian coordinator for the Philippines Luiza Carvalho. The plan also seeks to help the survivors restore lost livelihoods, she said in a statement. – AFP

Chinese man’s leg proves handy solution
Doctors rushed to save man’s amputated hand and, unable to operate immediately, grafted it on to his ankle to keep it alive for later transplant
DOCTORS in China kept a man’s severed hand alive for a month by attaching it to his leg, before restoring it to its usual position, a report said on December 17. The 25-year-old, identified by his nickname Xiao Wei, had his right hand accidentally sawn off by a drilling machine at work last month in Changde, in the central province of Hunan, the Xiaoxiang Morning Herald said. The damage was too severe to re-attach the hand immediately, so surgeons in the provincial capital Changsha grafted it onto his lower leg, just above his Achilles tendon, to keep it alive while the healing process began. Severed limbs can be saved if their blood supply is restored within several hours of their amputation, depending on the circumstances. Earlier this month, doctors removed the hand and successfully reattached it to Xiao Wei’s arm in a nine-hour operation, said the newspaper. He will have to go through several further operations and rehabilitation therapy to restore the limb’s function, it added. “It’s just like building a house,”

Xie Wei’s hand is grafted to his ankle in a hospital in Changsha, central China’s Hunan province. Photo: AFP

the paper quoted Xiao Wei’s primary doctor, Tang Juyu, as saying. “Currently the main body is

established. There will have to be interior decorations in the future.” – AFP

SYDNEY

Australia’s asylum camps to cost $2 bn
AUSTRALIA’S policy of sending asylum-seekers offshore to camps in Papua New Guinea and Nauru will weigh on the budget and cost AUS$2 billion (US$1.79 billion) over four years, officials said Tuesday. In releasing a mid-year economic outlook, Treasurer Joe Hockey said there were several issues left over by the previous Labor administration, including an AUS$1.2 billion shortfall in funding for offshore processing. Canberra began sending asylumseekers who arrived by boat to PNG’s Manus Island and Nauru in late 2012, and in July hardened the policy to ensure that all arrivals would not only be processed but resettled offshore. Conservative Prime Minister Tony Abbott’s new government has kept the policy but revealed on December 17 it was facing at least four more years of budget deficit as the economy struggles with the end of a long boom in mining investment. The government said it would save AUS$964.5 million over four years by cutting the humanitarian refugee intake from 20,000 to 13,750 places. It also costed a range of measures designed to crack down on the peoplesmuggling trade which brings wouldbe refugees to Australia by boat, often on unseaworthy wooden vessels which embark from Indonesia. Some AUS$40.9 million will be spent over three years to help regional countries to detect and disrupt asylum-seeker boats, while AUS$81.2 million will go toward increasing the Australian Customs and Border Protection Service’s operations in response to people-smuggling. – AFP

TRADE MARK CAUTION
NOTICE is hereby given that HEAD Technology GmbH a company organized under the laws of Austria and having its principal office at Wuhrokopfweg 1, A-6921 Kennelbach, Austria is the owner and sole proprietor of the following trademark:-

42 World International
ANALYSIS

THE MYANMAR TIMES DECEMBER 23 - 29, 2013

PENN
(Reg: Nos. IV/5813/2000 & IV/136/2010) in respect of :- “Racquet sports equipment” Any fraudulent imitation or unauthorized use of the said trademark or other infringements whatsoever will be dealt with according to law. U Kyi Win Associates for HEAD Technology GmbH P.O. Box No. 26, Yangon. Phone: 372416 Dated: 23rd December, 2013

Asean’s Sombath crisis
M Rajaretnam IT READS like fiction straight from a Colin Cotterill novel. The setting is Vientiane, capital city of the People’s Democratic Republic of Laos. Sombath Somphone is a gentle and unassuming man aged 63. Married to a Singaporean, Dr Ng Shui Meng, a former senior Unicef official, Mr Sombath was conferred the prestigious Magsaysay Award for Community Development – the region’s equivalent of the Nobel Peace Prize – in 2005. He spent the majority of his career in Laos, his native home, working with farmers and youths to promote a form of development that was mindful of the country’s values. On December 15, 2012, Mr Sombath disappeared into thin air. Alone in his jeep, he was driving to his home in Vientiane. His family were in the car in front of him. Mr Sombath was stopped at a police checkpoint. Shortly afterward, he was escorted away in another vehicle. Then his jeep was driven away. The events were captured on a grainy CCTV video but poor picture quality makes it difficult to ascertain exactly who was filmed. Mr Sombath’s “offence” has been neither revealed nor acknowledged, yet he has not been seen since. All his family wants to know is whether he is alive. There is some evidence of the regime’s involvement in the abduction. Five days after Mr Sombath was escorted away from the police stop, an official from the Lao foreign ministry confirmed to an Asean diplomatic mission that Mr Sombath would be “released soon”, only to retract his statement days later. That same week a police source told the family that Mr Sombath had been seen in a police holding centre. Two days later, the family was told by another police contact that Mr Sombath had been moved to a military camp outside Vientiane. However, since that first week, Lao government officials have denied any knowledge of Mr Sombath’s where­ abouts. On the surface, the deafening silence and denials of the leaders and the apparatchiks of the system seem inexplicable. The regime’s abuse of Mr Sombath’s rights strikes fear into the people, yet its apparatchiks routinely observe a golden silence and are rewarded for it. Mr Sombath’s relatives have been warned by officials to keep their distance. Is this surprising? Laotians live in a nightmarish Kafkaesque world where intrigues and byzantine conspiracies lurk in secretive labyrinths. The Marxist-Leninist Lao People’s Revolutionary Party (LPRP) has governed Laos since 1975, and has a standing ban on opposition parties. There is competition for power between the LPRP, the Ministry of National Defence and the Ministry of Public Security. During its December 2012 session, the National Assembly was critical of the government, pointing out that better efforts to combat corruption were needed, and calling for more say in the passage of bills. Economic growth has been healthy, hovering around 8 percent GDP growth per annum for the past five years. But the government is still reliant on foreign aid, which makes up almost a fifth of its annual revenue. Balancing the interests of private investors and aid agencies has become more difficult – and a source of conflict within the government. One example is the controversial Xayaburi dam project. In November 2012, after a meeting between the government and various aid agencies, the Unfortunately, the regime’s continued denials have also legitimised the criticism of the ASEAN member states insincerity towards the commitments expressed in their newly established institutions on human rights and social development. ASEAN has not issued any statement on the issue. Since his disappearance, several countries, including individual ASEAN member states, have expressed their concern over the issue. Singapore Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong, as well as several of his ministers and officials, also discussed the matter with their Laotian counterparts who have repeatedly insisted that they have no knowledge of the matter. Asian, Australian, European and American civil society organisations and media have also made their representations to the Lao authorities. Recently, the chair of the ASEAN delegation in the European Parliament, Werner Langen, on a visit to Vientiane said the Sombath issue will “not be forgotten” and warned that Laos could become isolated over the affair. Indeed, as one of the poorest states in the world Laos cannot afford any suspension, or threat of suspension, of assistance from its development partners over the Sombath crisis. Already, the government faces the risk of social instability for its failure to pay salaries to its civil servants for the last four months. Falls in rubber prices, arbitrary breaking of contracts and land-grabbing for foreign companies have further fuelled discontent among the people. These internal challenges undermine the party leadership’s efforts to shed the country’s least developing country (LDC) status and its aspirations to sit on the executive boards of international organisations such as the United Nations Commission for Human Rights (UNCHR), the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) and the United Nations Family Planning Association (UNFPA). Laos has the sovereign right to punish its citizens according to its laws but international norms dictate that ASEAN member states must meet the standards in the international and regional protocols on human rights and social development they adopted. ASEAN also has an obligation to preserve its credibility and ensure that Laos does not become the next pariah state. The particular persistence of the European Union over this last year has finally extracted some response from the More on worLD 43

TRADE MARK CAUTION
PFIZER ENTERPRISES SARL, of Rond du Pont du Kirchberg, 51 Avenue JF Kennedy, L-1855, Luxembourg, is the Owner and Sole Proprietor of the following Trademark:-

Reg. Nos. 2535/2001, 3181/2004 in respect of “All goods in International Class 5.”

XALACOM

Any fraudulent imitation or unauthorized use of the said Trademark will be dealt with according to law. U Nyunt Tin Associates International Limited Intellectual Property Devision P.O. Box 952, Yangon, Myanmar. Tel: 959 4500 59 247, 951 375754, Email: info@untlaw.com For PFIZER ENTERPRISES SARL Dated: 23 December, 2013.

‘The regime’s abuse of Mr Sombath’s rights strikes fear into the people.’
M Rajaretnam Former ASEAN Special Advisor

TRADE MARK CAUTION
SOLUXURY HMC, a company organized and existing under the laws of France,and having its principal place of business at 110 Avenue de France, 75013 Paris, France, is the Owner and Sole Proprietor of the following Trademark:-

SOFITEL
Reg. No. 4/2545/1994, 4/1515/2010, 4/5053/2010, 4667/2013 in respect of “Hotels, restaurants, drugstores, cafeterias, cafes-restaurant.” Any fraudulent imitation or unauthorized use of the said Trademark will be dealt with according to law. U Nyunt Tin Associates International Limited Intellectual Property Division P.O. Box No. 952, Yangon, Myanmar. Tel: 959 4500 59 247, 951 375754, Fax: Email: info@untlaw.com For SOLUXURY HMC Dated: 23 December, 2013.

Lao media reported that aid agencies asked the government to consider the rights of the people affected by these types of projects, but later expelled the director of a foreign aid agency for writing a letter that was critical of the government. Mr Sombath had never spoken out against the dam. The organisation he founded in 1996, the Participatory Development Training Centre (PADETC), worked in a participatory way with communities to improve their livelihoods, promoting sustainable development, education and understanding of land rights. Ironically, Mr Sombath was detained not long after he helped convene a highly successful international meeting between Asian and European civil society organisations in Vientiane with the blessings of the Lao government. Laos, a member of ASEAN, has unwittingly turned the Sombath disappearance into a kind of cause celebre.

TRADE MARK CAUTION
NOTICE is hereby given that Rhythm Watch Co., Ltd a company incorporated in Japan and having its principal office at 299-12, Kitabukurocho, 1-Chome, Omiya-ku, Saitama-shi, Saitama, Japan is the Owner and Sole Proprietor of the following trademark: (Reg: Nos. IV/1642/1994, IV/5378/2001, IV/2298/2008 & IV/9230/2013) in respect of : - “Precious metals and their alloys and goods in precious metals or coated therewith, not included in other classes; jewelry, precious stones; horological and chronometric instruments (especially wrist watches, wall clocks, table clocks, alarm clocks and all other clocks, parts and accessories thereof” Int’l Class: 14 Any fraudulent imitation or unauthorized use of the said trademark or other infringements whatsoever will be dealt with according to law. U Kyi Win Associates for Rhythm Watch Co., Ltd P.O. Box No. 26, Yangon. Phone: 372416

RHYTHM

Dated: 23rd December, 2013

www.mmtimes.com
BRUSSELS

International World 43

TRADE MARK CAUTION
Preparados Alimenticios, S.A., of Plaza Europa, 41 planta 16, 08908 L’Hospitalet de Llobregat (Barcelona), Spain, is the Owner and Sole Proprietor of the following Trademarks:-

Serbia to start ‘historic’ EU entry talks in 2014
SERBIA on December 17 won the European Union’s long-sought blessing to kick off talks on joining the bloc in January, in recognition of its efforts in normalising ties with Kosovo. European affairs ministers set the January 21 date after having “acknowledged reform and normalisation efforts” by the Balkan nation, the bloc’s Enlargement Commissioner Stefan Fuele said. Serbia hopes to become the 29th member of the bloc, following in the footsteps of neighbour Croatia, the newest EU member who joined in July. Also among the six nations once part of the former Yugoslavia, Slovenia joined the EU in 2004. “This is an historic event for Serbia, a day that many generations of citizens and numerous governments have awaited,” Prime Minister Ivica Dacid said. “I am proud that this government reached it,” he added. The former pariah state long sought to prise open the EU door but European leaders were insistent that Belgrade patch up ties with breakaway Kosovo, which unilaterally declared independence in 2008. Serbia, along with five EU states, does not recognise Kosovo’s independence, but under an EU-brokered Belgrade-Pristina deal in April, agreed on ways of easing the tension. “The two sides have implemented substantially all the elements in the April Agreement,” EU foreign policy

Reg: No. 1414/2004 Reg: No. 1415/2004 in respect of:- “Soups and broths and preparations for making soups and broths and bouillon preparations in Class 29.” Any fraudulent imitation or unauthorized use of the said Trademarks will be dealt with according to laws. U Nyunt Tin Associates International Limited Intellectual Property Division Tel: 959 4500 59 247, 951 375754, Email: info@untlaw.com For Preparados Alimenticios, S.A. Dated: 23 December, 2013.
A child walks in a Roma camp in the Serb-majority town of Leposavic in northern Kosovo on December 16. Photo: AFP

TRADE MARK CAUTION
NOTICE is hereby given that Millennium & Copthorne International Limited a company organized under the laws of Singapore and having its principal office at 36 Robinson Road #04-01 City House, Singapore 068877 is the owner and sole proprietor of the following trademark:-

chief Catherine Ashton said in a letter to EU nations this week. Opening EU entry talks with Serbia next month and continuing work to seal an EU accord with Kosovo “will provide the two sides with the necessary encouragement to continue on the path towards full normalisation,” Ms Ashton said in the document. The ministers on December 17 also recognised “significant progress” by Albania’s government in seeking to meet EU standards on rights and democracy and said a bid by Tirana to win EU candidate status – the first step towards membership talks – would be considered in June. The latest hurdle overcome

by Serbia in its drive to join the EU was a local November ballot in northern Kosovo, a longtime trouble-spot due to a Serb majority living in that region. The poll had to be re-run in early December due to tension. About 120,000 ethnic Serbs live in Kosovo, whose 1.8-million-strong population is mainly Albanian. But 40,000 ethnic Serbs, who have recognised neither Kosovo’s independence nor the authorities in Pristina since the end of the 1998-1999 war, inhabit the north. Serbia applied for EU membership in 2009, in the throes of the financial crisis and amid worries that the EU had expanded too far and too fast in its 2004 “big bang” enlargement. – AFP

MILLENNIUM HOTELS AND RESORTS
(Reg: No. IV/9230/2012) in respect of: “Business management of hotels and resorts/motels and other temporary accommodation including serviced apartments and apartment hotels; public relations services in relation to temporary accommodation, including hotels and motels, serviced apartments and apartment hotels; marketing of temporary accommodation including hotels and motels, serviced apartments and apartment hotels including the advertising of the aforementioned services via the Internet and other global computer networks.” - Class: 35 “Temporary accommodation services, accommodation (rental of temporary), catering (food and drink), rental of meeting rooms, restaurants, cafés, reservations of temporary accommodation; providing temporary housing accommodation; providing serviced apartments; hotel services.” Class: 43 Any fraudulent imitation or unauthorized use of the said trademark or other infringements whatsoever will be dealt with according to law. U Kyi Win Associates for Millennium & Copthorne International Limited P.O. Box No. 26, Yangon. Phone: 372416 Dated: 23rd December, 2013

continueD From worLD 42 regime. At the High Level Roundtable of several states (including ASEAN) and international organisations in Vientiane on November 19, European states raised the Sombath issue. For the first time there was a surprising shift in the tone of the regime from denial to one of assurance: “... [Laos] is more concerned than they are and had provided the family access to the police and other authorities and had taken all necessary steps to

continue the investigation and to bring the perpetrators to justice”. After a year of silence, the disclosure should be treated as an opportunity to seek redress for Mr Sombath. If Sombath Somphone can disappear in broad daylight, it can happen to anyone. Asean governments and their stakeholders, in the name of human decency, have the right to clear answers from the Lao leadership. They should take the following actions urgently: ASEAN should consult with the Lao government on

the Sombath situation and seek his immediate release; parliamentarian Daw Aung San Suu Kyi, the conscience of our times, should visit Vientiane to seek justice for Mr Sombath and his family; and the international community and international agencies should continue to seek the release of Mr Sombath.
M Rajaretnam is a former special adviser on community building and outreach to Dr Surin Pitsuwan, Asean secretarygeneral from 2008 to 2013.

www.mmtimes.com

International World 45
NEW DELHI

Second worst year for journalists in jail
THE number of journalists killed and imprisoned fell in 2013 but it was still the second-worst year on record for reporters in prison, a US-based watchdog said December 18. So far this year, 52 journalists have been killed as a direct result of their work, down from 73 last year, according to the Committee to Protect Journalists (CPJ), based in New York. For the second consecutive year, Turkey was the world’s leading jailer of journalists, followed closely by Iran and China. Those countries accounted for more than half of the 211 journalists imprisoned around the world in 2013. “Jailing journalists for their work is the hallmark of an intolerant, repressive society,” said CPJ executive director Joel Simon. In Vietnam, the number of journalists behind bars rose from 14 in 2012 to 18 after what CPJ called an intensified crackdown on bloggers. “It is disturbing to see the number of jailed journalists rise in countries like Vietnam and Egypt,” said Mr Simon. “But it is frankly shocking that Turkey would be the world’s worst jailer of journalists for the second year in a row.” CPJ said it was the second-worst year since records began in 1990 in terms of journalists behind bars. In 2012, there were 232. The civil war in Syria, which has
Turkish photographer Bunyamin Aygun has disappeared in neighbouring Syria while covering the civil war there, his newspaper Milliyet said on December 17. Photo: AFP

NEW YORK

India vows to bring back arrested diplomat ‘at any cost’
INDIA vowed on December 17 to bring home a female diplomat who was arrested and stripsearched in New York last week “at any cost” amid rising anger against the United States over her treatment. “It is my duty to bring the lady back and we have to restore her dignity and I will do it at any cost,” Foreign Minister Salman Khurshid told India’s parliament. Mr Khurshid also confirmed a string of diplomatic reprisals against the US for the incident, including ordering the return of identity cards and airport passes that speed up travel in India for US consular officials. Other measures include halting clearance for the US embassy of imported goods including alcohol and sales of items within India such as cars. India will also demand employment contract and bank account details of Indian nationals employed by US consular officials around the country. “I don’t think this has ever been done in this country in the past,” Mr Khurshid said. “Today, our paramount concern, interest and determination is to be able to intervene effectively and specifically to ensure the dignity of our officer is absolutely preserved,” he added. The comments came after Devyani Khobragade, the deputy consul general in New York, described how she endured “repeated handcuffing, stripping and cavity searches” after her arrest last Thursday. Ms Khobragade, 39, was arrested as she dropped her children at school for allegedly underpaying her Indian domestic helper, and

‘[The diplomat endured] “handcuffing, stripping and cavity searches.”’
Devyani Khobragade US Indian ambassador

killed more than 126,000 people and created 2.4 million refugees, represented the deadliest country for journalists for a second year running. CPJ said 21 reporters were killed in Syria, six in Egypt, five in Pakistan, four in Somalia, three in Brazil and another three in Iraq. In Mali and Russia, two were killed. One journalist was killed each in

Turkey, Bangladesh, Colombia, Philippines, India and Libya. The number of journalists imprisoned by the Syrian government fell from 15 in 2012 to 13, but dozens of others have been abducted and are believed to be held by armed opposition groups. About 30 journalists are missing in Syria. – AFP

for lying on the helper’s visa application form. Rattled by the scale of the anger in India, the US State Department sought to calm tensions and said the arrest should not be allowed to damage bilateral relations. – AFP

46 World Asia-Pacific
PARIS

THE MYANMAR TIMES DECEMBER 23 - 29, 2013

Major events for the year ahead in 2014
JANUARY 01– LATVIA: Joins the eurozone. 05-18– ARGENTINA: Dakar auto rally, with a departure from Rosario, Argentina and the finish in Valparaiso, Chile. 22– SWITZERLAND: Geneva to host an international conference to bring peace to Syria. FEBRUARY 06– GERMANY: Berlin hosts the 64th Berlinale film festival until February 16. 07-23– RUSSIA: Sochi hosts the XXII Winter Olympics. FEBRUARY OR MARCH EGYPT: to hold parliamentary elections, two months after voting on a new constitution. MARCH 03-20– SOUTH AFRICA: Murder trial of Paralympic champion Oscar Pistorius. APRIL 05– AFGHANISTAN: Presidential election. 23-24– BRAZIL: Sao Paolo hosts global conference on internet governance. 27– VATICAN: Canonisation of popes John XXIII and John Paul II. 30– IRAQ: Legislative elections. ALGERIA: Presidential election. SOUTH AFRICA: General elections. MAY 22– EUROPE: European Parliament elections. 24– PORTUGAL: Lisbon hosts the Champions League final football match. INDIA: To hold legislative elections sometime in the second quarter of 2014. JUNE 04-05– RUSSIA: Group of Eight (G8) summit in Sochi. 06– FRANCE: 70th anniversary of the Allied landings in Normandy. 12– BRAZIL: FIFA football World Cup opens in Sao Paolo, runs until final on July 13 in Rio de Janeiro. 28– BOSNIA: Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra to play on the 100th anniversary of the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand, as part of commemorations of the start of World War I. JULY 05– BRITAIN: Start of Tour de France cycling race in Leeds, England. 09– INDONESIA: Presidential election. 11– BOSNIA: 19th anniversary of the SEPTEMBER 01– GERMANY: 75th anniversary of the start of World War II, when German troops invaded Poland. 04-05– BRITAIN: NATO summit in Newport, Wales. 18– BRITAIN: Scottish referendum on independence from Great Britain. NEW YORK: UN climate summit. GUANTANAMO: Trial of Saudi Abd al-Rahim al-Nashiri, accused mastermind of 2000 attack on the US destroyer USS Cole that killed 17 sailors. Al-Nashiri could face the death penalty if convicted. OCTOBER 05– BRAZIL: General elections. NOVEMBER 04– UNITED STATES: Mid-term legislative elections (Congress and state governors). 09– GERMANY: 25th anniversary of the Berlin Wall’s opening. 14-15– AUSTRALIA: Group of 20 (G20) summit in Brisbane. DECEMBER 03-14– PERU: Lima hosts 195 countries for a summit on climate change. 31– AFGHANISTAN: Deadline for withdrawal of NATO forces. – AFP

Olympic torchbearers “kiss” their torches to pass the Olympic flame in Russia’s industrial Urals city of Yekaterinburg. Photo: AFP

Srebrenica massacre, when Serb forces killed almost 8000 Bosnian Muslims. AUGUST 01– EUROPE: 100th anniversary of the start of World War I.

TURKEY: Presidential election. RUSSIA: Expected release from prison of Mikhail Khodorkovsky, former oil oligarch and Kremlin critic, after around 11 years behind bars.

TRADE MARK CAUTION
ACCOR, a company organized and existing under the laws of France, and having its principal place of business at 110 Avenue de France, 75013 Paris, France, is the Owner and Sole Proprietor of the following Trademarks:-

retirement home and holiday home services, reservation of rooms for travellers, health clinic services; convalescent home services.”
Reg. Nos. 4/6350/2007, 4/7966/2010, 4/4674/2013 in respect of “ Class 16: Paper and cardboard (either raw or semi-manufactured or for stationery or printing); paper pads (stationery); signboards of paper or cardboard; cardboard, paper, wrapping bags, or plastics for wrapping. Printed matter and printed matter for advertising purposes; paper guides; catalogues; writing paper; prints; postcards; business cards; greeting cards; musical greeting cards; posters and advertising posters, advertising board of paper or cardboard; flags of paper; folders for paper and documents; forms and printed forms; prospectuses, pamphlets, magazines, printed publications, newspapers and periodicals; books, notebooks, albums and calendars; school supplies (stationery); writing and drawing materials; printing blocks; photographs; printing type; coasters of paper; bookmarks; orders to pay in the form of tickets or paper coupons, Class 36: Insurance, financial and monetary affairs, issuing of traveler’s cheques and of tokens of value, credit card services, issuing, distributing of tickets, coupons or any other means of payment or exchange; financial, fiscal and insurance information and consultation for others; information related to financial products, notably stock options or convertible bonds plans, employee savings plans; realestate information and consultation for others and Class 43: Hotel services and services for providing food and drink; temporary accommodation; motels, restaurants, cafeterias, tea rooms, bars (with the exception of clubs); hotel room reservation for travelers; consultations and consultancy (not related to business affairs) in the fields of hotels and restaurants businesses, hotel services, notably providing hygiene and cosmetic articles, hairdryer, bath and bed linen, clothing articles such as bathrobes and slippers, shoe polish, day-nurseries for children, rental of rooms for receptions, conferences, seminars, exhibitions and meetings, rental of chairs, tables, table linen and glassware.”

Reg. Nos. 4/1480/2002, 4/2071/2007, 4/2038/2010, 4/4672/2013 in respect of “Hotels and restaurants; temporary accommodations; motels, cafeterias, tea rooms, bars (except for clubs); reservation of hotel rooms for travellers.”

ACCOR

Reg. Nos. 4/3616/2003, 4/4194/2008, 4/7406/2011, 4/4675/2013 in respect of “Hotels and restaurants; temporary accommodation; motels, restaurants, cafeterias, tea rooms, bars (except for clubs); convalescent homes; tourist homes; rest homes; thalassotherapy establishments; escorting in society; chaperoning; beauty salons or hairdressing salons; hotel reservation for travellers; rental of clothes, of bed linen and beds, of vending machines; printing.”

Reg. Nos. 4/6351/2007, 4/7967/2010, 4/4673/2013 in respect of “Class 16: Paper and cardboard (either raw or semi-manufactured or for stationery or printing); printed matters; paper pads (stationery); signboards of paper or cardboard; cardboards, paper, wrapping bags, or plastics for wrapping. Printed matters and printed matters for advertising purposes; paper guides; catalogues; writing paper; images; printings; postcards; business cards; greeting cards; musical greeting cards. Posters and advertising posters, advertising board of paper or cardboard; flags of paper; folders for paper and documents; forms and printed forms; prospectuses, pamphlets, magazines (periodicals), printed publications, newspapers and periodicals; books, notebooks, albums and calendars; school supplies (stationery); writing and drawing materials; printing blocks; photographs; printing type; coasters of paper; bookmarkers. Orders to pay in the form of tickets or paper coupons and Class 43: Hotel services and services for providing food and drink; temporary accommodation; motels, restaurants, cafeterias, tea rooms, bars (with the exception of clubs); hotel room reservation for travellers. Consultations and consultancy (not related with business affairs) in the fields of hotels and restaurants businesses. Hotel services, notably providing hygiene and cosmetic articles, hairdryer, bath and bed linen, clothing articles such as bathrobes and slippers, shoe polish. Daynurseries for children. Rental of rooms for reception, conference, seminars, exhibitions and meetings. Rental of chairs, tables, table linen and glassware.”

Reg. Nos. 4/4085/1995, 4/4027/2000, 4/4359/2005, 4/4168/2010, 4/4676/2013 in respect of “Restauration (food); temporary accommodation; medical, hygiene and beauty care; legal services; programmation for computers; rest and convalescent homes; nurseries; hiring of argicultural implements, clothes, bedding , dispensing apparatus; printing; hiring of access time to a centre serving as data bases; services of reporters; photographic reporting; filming on video tapes; management of exhibition sites; services of hotel management; exploitation of hotels, restaurants; cafeterias, tea-rooms, bars (except for clubs); service of escort agencies; service of reservation of hotel rooms, matrimonial agencies.” Any fraudulent imitation or unauthorized use of the said Trademarks will be dealt with according to law. U Nyunt Tin Associates International Limited Intellectual Property Division P.O. Box No. 952, Yangon, Myanmar. Tel: 959 4500 59 247-8, 951 375754, Fax: 951 254321 Email: info@untlaw.com For ACCOR Dated: 23 December, 2013.

Reg. Nos. 4/4080/1995, 4/4026/2000, 4/4358/2005, 4/4169/2010, 4/4666/2013 in respect of “Hotel, restaurant, cafeteria, public house, motel, wine bar, catering services, holiday camp, beauty salon, beauty and health farm,

NOVOTEL

www.mmtimes.com
Key EVents

International World 47

TRADE MARK CAUTION
NOTICE is hereby given that Revlon (Suisse) S.A. a company organized under the laws of Switzerland and having its principal office at Badenerstrasse 116, 8952 Schlieren Switzerland is the Owner and Sole Proprietor of the following trademarks:BOTAFIRM (Reg: Nos. IV/4079/2004, IV/1389/2009 & IV/3374/2012) in respect of: - “Bleaching preparations and other substances for laundry use; cleaning, polishing, scouring and abrasive preparations; soaps; perfumery, essential oils, cosmetics, hair lotions; dentifrices”- Class: 3

REVLON COLORSTAY
(Reg: Nos. IV/1581/2006, IV/1397/2009 & IV/3384/2012) in respect of:- “Cosmetics and hair coloring preparations”

COLORSILK
(Reg: Nos. IV/1575/2006, IV/1392/2009 & IV/3377/2012) in respect of:- “Hair care products”
Survivors of Super Typhoon Haiyan march during a religious procession in Tolosa on the eastern Philippine island of Leyte on November 18, six days after the storm. Photo AFP

MIRACLE IN A TUBE
(Reg: Nos. IV/10127/2009 & IV/3376/2012) in respect of:- “Hair care preparations; bleaching preparations and other substances for laundry use; cleaning, polishing, scouring and abrasive preparations; soaps; perfumery, essential oils, cosmetics, hair lotions, lotions, dentifrices”

2013 as it happened
JANUARY 11– MALI: President Francois Hollande sends French forces to Mali to support that country’s army and rout Islamists who are pushing south toward the capital Bamako. 16– ALGERIA: Islamists take hundreds of Algerian and foreign workers hostage at a gas site in Algeria’s remote southeastern desert. Algerian special forces storm the gas complex. Thirtyseven foreign hostages die. 17– US: Cyclist Lance Armstrong, reversing years of denials, admits his seven Tour de France titles were fuelled by an array of drugs. MARCH 13– VATICAN: Jorge Mario Bergoglio, an Argentinian Jesuit, becomes the first pope from Latin America, choosing the name of Francis. His election follows the resignation of pope Benedict XVI, the first papal resignation in modern times. 14– CHINA: Chinese lawmakers name Xi Jinping as president fourmonths after he takes charge of the Communist Party. APRIL 15– US: Two blasts near the finish line of the Boston Marathon kill three people and wound more than 100. They are believed to have been the work of two brothers of Chechen origin, Dzhokhar and Tamerlan Tsarnaev. Tamerlan dies later in a shootout with police, and Dzhokhar is arrested. 24– BANGLADESH: The collapse of the Rana Plaza garment factory complex in the Dhaka suburbs kills 1129 people and injures thousands, focusing attention on conditions in the industry. JUNE 15– IRAN: With 50.68 percent of the vote, moderate cleric Hassan Rouhani is elected president of Iran, ending eight years in power by hardliner Mahmoud Ahmadinejad marked by strong tensions with the West. 23– RUSSIA: Rogue US intelligence technician Edward Snowden, who leaked information on spying by the United States, arrives in Moscow from Hong Kong, and is given temporary asylum. JULY 3– EGYPT: The army ousts Islamist president Mohamed Morsi, Egypt’s first democratically-elected president, amid a wave of mass protests. A political crisis ensues, marked on August 14 by an assault on Morsi supporters in which several hundred are killed. 22– BRITAIN: Prince William’s wife Kate gives birth to a baby boy, providing the world’s most famous royal family with a future king, George. 24– SPAIN: An eight-carriage highspeed train flies off the tracks near the northwestern city of Santiago de Compostela, killing 79 people. AUGUST 21– SYRIA: 30 months into a civil war which has killed 120,000 people, Syrian troops are accused of chemical weapons strikes. On September 14 the US and Russia agree on a plan to eliminate Syria’s chemical weapons, averting the threat of a US military strike. SEPTEMBER 21– KENYA: A four-day siege of the Nairobi Westgate shopping mall by Somalian al-Qaeda-linked militants leaves at least 67 people dead and around 20 missing. OCTOBER 1– UNITED STATES: The government shuts down for the first time in 17 years and 800,000 federal workers stay home amid a budget impasse in the US Congress. The shutdown lasts 16 days. 3– ITALY: 366 African asylum seekers die off the Italian island of Lampedusa in a migrant boat disaster as they seek to reach Europe. NOVEMBER 12– PHILIPPINES: Super Typhoon Haiyan, one of the strongest storms on record, sweeps through the Philippines’ central islands, leaving more than 6069 dead, and 1600 missing. 24– SWITZERLAND: World powers reach what is hailed as an historic agreement with Iran to limit its controversial nuclear program. 27– ITALY: Former Italian premier Silvio Berlusconi is stripped of his mandate as senator after being sentenced to a one-year prison term for tax fraud. DECEMBER 05– SOUTH AFRICA: Nelson Mandela, icon of the anti-apartheid struggle in South Africa and a towering political figure of the 20th century, dies in Johannesburg at the age of 95. 09– UKRAINE: More than 100,000 pro-European demonstrators press demands that President Viktor Yanukovych resign after he refused to sign an association agreement with the European Union. It is the biggest mobilisation since the Orange Revolution in 2004. 09– THAILAND: Premier Yingluck Shinawatra calls a snap election to try to defuse the kingdom’s political crisis, but protesters vow to keep up their “people’s revolution” from late October after a bill was drafted to allow Shinawatra’s brother Thaksin to return from exile. – AFP

PARIS

FLEX
(Reg: Nos. IV/1759/2006, IV/1393/2009 & IV/3380/2012) in respect of:- “Hair care and styling products, talc and body wash” NEW COMPLEXION (Reg: Nos. IV/1583/2006, IV/1395/2009 & IV/3375/2012) in respect of:- “Cosmetics”

CHARLIE
(Reg: Nos. IV/621/2001, IV/993/2009 & IV/3383/2012) in respect of:- “Fragrances, scented dusting powder, skin creams and skin lotions”

(Reg: Nos. IV/1574/2006, IV/1391/2009 & IV/3378/2012) in respect of:- “Fragrances, scented dusting power, skin creams and skin lotions”

MITCHUM
(Reg: Nos. IV/1576/2006, IV/1394/2009 & IV/3385/2012) in respect of:- “Antiperspirants and deodorants”

REVLON
(Reg: Nos. IV/1580/2006, IV/1398/2009 & IV/3386/2012) in respect of:- “Manicure implements; utility scissors; tweezers; eyelash curlers; blackhead removers; electric razors, razors, razor blades”

REVLON
(Reg: Nos. IV/1573/2006, IV/1399/2009 & IV/3382/2012) in respect of:- “Medicated powder, lotions and creams for the skin; medicated creams and lotions for the hair, medicated hair shampoo; vitamin and mineral supplements” Any fraudulent imitation or unauthorized use of the said trademarks or other infringements whatsoever will be dealt with according to law.

Russell E. Train Education for Nature Program (EFN)
WWF is offering the best and brightest future conservation leaders from Myanmar the opportunity to pursue graduate-level study (Master’s and PhD’s) and short-term training in conservation anywhere in the world. Fellowships: Priority will be given to candidates working on integrated spatial planning and management; species such as Asian elephants and Irrawaddy dolphins; reducing wildlife crime; sustainable forestry; integrated river basin management; protected area management, and green economy principles. EFN supports up to two years of studies for a maximum of $30,000 per year. Eligibility Criteria • You must be a citizen and legal permanent resident of Myanmar. • You must have at least two years of work experience in conservation (paid or unpaid) and a demonstrated commitment to working in Myanmar. • Your research should be focused on one of the topics listed above. • You must be enrolled in, admitted to, or have applied to a master’s or PhD program. • You must plan to begin your studies no later than January 2015. • You must commit to working for at least two years in your home country after the completion of your degree. Applicants can access the online application at: www.worldwildlife.org/efn. And may email questions to efn@wwfus.org. Application deadline for fellowships: February 28, 2014. Applications submitted after this date will not be considered. Professional development grants are open all year around.

U Kyi Win Associates for Revlon (Suisse) S.A P.O. Box No. 26, Yangon. Phone: 372416

Dated: 23rd December, 2013

U
GE T

R

GERS O FIN N

THE PULSE EDITOR: WHITNEY LIGHT light.whitney@gmail.com

THE MYANMAR TIMES DECEMBER 23 - 29, 2013

IT

NOT LOST IN TRANSLATION
SECOND IRRAWADDY LITERARY FESTIVAL STRIVES TO CONNECT MYANMAR

B

efore she participated in the first Irrawaddy Literary Festival in Yangon earlier this year, Sudha Shah was mostly unknown to Myanmar writers and readers. The subject of her work, however, should be well known to both. The Indian author wrote The King in Exile, a biography of Thibaw, the last king of Myanmar. In her presentation at the festival last February, Shah arrested the audience’s attention with her telling of the grievous story of how British soldiers forcibly took King Thibaw to Yadanagiri. As a result, her book is in the process of translation into Myanmar language, and it is due for release in time for the second festival, in February 2014. That’s just one example of how the first festival highlighted Myanmar readers’ lack of connection to Englishlanguage authors. The majority of attendees weren’t familiar with the participating authors, who included

YO

ZON PANN PWINT
zonpann08@gmail.com

William Dalrymple and Fergal Keane, since their books had not been translated into Myanmar. The festival was a first introduction, demonstrating just how much work is still to be done to widen the scope of local book culture. “[The festival] is a way to promote the audience’s reading efforts. It opens their eyes to works of international authors,” said Thant Thaw Kaung, a festival partner. “At the last event, Jung Chang talked about her 1991 novel, Wild Swan. The book was already translated into Myanmar language a year before her visit, but local readers were unaware of it,” he said. Some of the books that were featured, especially historical and

political ones, also had been unavailable for import to Myanmar for many years. At the last event, previously banned books, such as the biographies of Nelson Mandela and the Dalai Lama, and Daw Aung San Suu Kyi’s books Freedom from Fear and Letters from Burma, were on display for sale. This year, the Myanmar Book Center will exhibit and sell works of participating authors including Wendy Law-Yone’s Golden Parasol: A Daughter’s Memoir of Burma. The book tells the story of the author’s father, Edward Law-Yone, an editor of the English-language newspaper The Nation, founded in 1948. After General Ne Win seized power in a military coup in 1962, he shut down the newspaper and sent Law-Yone to prison. Such books would not have been published in Myanmar while the government imposed strict censorship on the press. The second literary festival, set for February 14-16, 2014, will take place in

an auspicious location. At Kuthodaw Pagoda compound on Mandalay Hill lie the world’s largest books: 729 marble slabs engraved with the Buddhist canon. The author conversations and discussions will take place in airconditioned tents pitched on the site, which recently was added to the list of the UNESCO Memory of the World Register, a roster of heritage sites of world significance and value. And not only might the event lead to more book translations, but local authors also will have a chance to interact with international writers, exchange ideas and meet with publishers from abroad. Approximately 60 Mandalay-based authors and 30 writers, poets and librarians from Yangon are expected to take part in conversations on a wide range of literary topics. The event will also feature about 26 international authors who are known both in Myanmar and abroad. Amitav Ghosh, author of The Glass Palace, will attend, as will several

‘It is an occasion for talking about literature that we all long for’
Nay Win Myint Author

www.mmtimes.com
Readers gather at the Irrawaddy Literary Festival in Yangon in February 2013. Photo: Aung Htay Hlaing

the pulse 49

FOR LOVE OF THE FIGHT
Rakhine State Day wrestling tournament draws crowds in Yangon
NANDAR AUNG nandaraung.mcm@gmail.com TWO Rakhine wrestlers of great strength rolled up their longyis to their thighs and folded the extra fabric tightly around their waist. Their bodies covered in sand and sweat, they entered into the fight ring and began a round of kyin, a traditional Rakhine wrestling game, to the sound of drums. As both men sought to take the other down to the ground, the audience members watched with excitement and held their breath. The kyin tournament is one of the most fascinating sports for the Rakhine people, and it’s played every year during Rakhine State Day events and celebrations in that region. This fair-weather Sunday, however, was the first time the state day – now in its 39th year – was held in Yangon, at the National Ethnic Groups Village. And although it was likely a new spectacle for many, Myanmar audiences seemed to be just as enthusiastic toward the sport. That came as something of a surprise, given the current antagonism between Myanmar and Rakhine people in the Rakhine region. “This is a kind of game you hardly ever see in Yangon. I became so proud of this event as a Rakhine person when I saw that this tournament can be held in Yangon unitedly and with so many spectators,” said a member of the crowd. “I always feel heartened when I hear the sound of the royal drum while I’m in the ring. I couldn’t stay cool while I heard that sound,” said Ko Kyaw Swe, a 25-year old Rakhine wrestler of tall and powerful build. He lives in Rakhine State and works as a high school teacher. Today he laughed heartily as he waited for his next rival in the ring. “I used to play the game ... to get a healthy body and powerful build when I was 16,” he said. “Also, I got first prize when I played in the Silver Gong level last year. Now I am in the Gold Gong level. I go and compete whenever there’s a game taking place.” The sport demands both the physical and mental competencies of the players. Kyin is mainly the skill of wrestling and making your rival fall onto the ground using your hands and legs while being wary of his clever tactics to do the same. The players need to be patient and wait for a good opportunity, then use that chance to make their rival fall. The sport rewards movements that are practised and smooth. Rakhine wrestling is not as aggressive and dangerous as boxing, judo, or karate-do. It is a mild fighting sport. Punching and kicking above the knee are not allowed. First, as a show of welcome to the audience, the wrestlers dance and jump and perform special movements around the ring. After the introduction process, the two wrestlers have to play three rounds. One is defined as the attacker and the other as the defender. After finishing three rounds, the attacker and defender switch roles. The attacker who can make the back of the defender hit the ground wins the playing round. The first prize winner will be awarded a Gold Gong, and the second-prize winner is awarded a Silver Gong. In the presence of hundreds of people in the crowd on Sunday, the competition continued through the clapping, laughing and shouting of the audience, and traditional drum music until the end. Honorary cash awards went to the winners. The wrestlers shouldn’t win by hurting each other, said U San Hla Maung, a member of the Rakhine State Day organising committee. “Long ago, Rakhine village men raised the wrestlers [also called kyin khan] to recognize kyin as a tradition. They let them compete in the celebration days in Rakhine State and each player would boast of their village,” he said. Kyin has been practiced and used as a kind of martial art in the armed forces during the days of Rakhine kingdoms, said San Hla Kyaw, another organiser. “Rakhine kingdoms used kyin to select soldiers for their army. Since that time, we have relayed kyin from generation to generation. There is proof in the carvings in the Chittaung Pagoda in Mrauk U, an ancient city of the Arakan kingdom in Sittwe District,” he said. Nowadays, kyin is one of the main events in Rakhine celebration days such as Rakhine State Day, the funeral ceremonies of Buddhist monks and others.

READERS WITH THE WORLD
other celebrated journalists, poets and writers who have written about Myanmar. There will be returning guests from last year’s event, too, including Jung Chang, Sudha Shah, Fergal Keane, Thant Myint-U and Pascal Khoo Thwe. Mandalay-based writers include National Literary Award-winner Nay Win Myint, who translated The Glass Palace and brought Ghosh fame inside the country, prolific writer Daw Khin Khin Htoo, Daw Win Win Myint and artist Sein Myint. “The festival is very welcome. It should have been done in Myanmar while such festivals were annually practised in different countries,” Nay Win Myint said. He missed the first festival, having read about it only after it was over. “It is an occasion for talking about literature that we all long for. We want to hear [the international authors’] literary knowledge and ideas. They might want to hear our experience, too.” He said he is looking forward to seeing Ghosh for the second time at the festival since their first meeting in Mandalay in 2012, which was organised by the Indian Embassy. Nay Win Myint’s translation of The Glass Palace was published serially in Shwe Amutay magazine over the course of three years beginning in 2007. Ghosh was invited on late notice to the 2013 literary festival, but he was already too busy to attend. The festival is the brainchild of Jane Heyn, wife of the British Ambassador to Myanmar. Her vision was helped to reality by the encouragement of Daw Aung San Suu Kyi, who is also expected to attend on February 15. To ensure the festival’s accessibility to a broad audience, translation of talks and discussions by both Myanmar and English authors will be provided for the audience. “It is a chance to listen to their thoughts, imaginations and attitudes toward literature,” said Aung Myint, a member of the festival organising committee.

Rakhine men play kyin, a traditional form of wrestling, at the Rakhine State Day in Yangon on December 15. Photo: Thiri Lu

50 the pulse
KUALA LUMPUR

THE MYANMAR TIMES DECEMBER 23 - 29, 2013

Singapore firm launches travel site for Muslims
A NEW website for Muslim travellers that includes a global directory of halal restaurants and dedicated city guides launched Wednesday in a bid to capitalise on the growing number of Islamic tourists. Specialist Singapore-based firm Crescentrating said the site, which is called HalalTrip.com, offers a wide range of features for tourists wishing to travel in accordance with the rules of Islam. “It is the world’s first fully-featured travel booking website for Muslim travellers,” Crescentrating chief executive Fazal Bahardeen said, adding that the industry had been lacking a dedicated travel booking site catering to the needs of Islamic tourists. Spending by Muslim travellers is estimated to reach US$200 billion by 2020, up from $126 billion in 2011, according to the company’s chief operating officer Dany Bolduc. Crescentrating acquired HalalTrip. com from its Austrian owner in June and has re-launched it with new features including booking facilities for nearly 400,000 hotels, as well as airlines and tour packages. The site previously only allowed bookings for 1000 hotels. Tourists can now search flights and hotels on the English-language site thanks to partnerships with online reservation firm Booking.com, and travel search engine Wego.com. It also offers a global directory of halal restaurants, mosques and amenities useful to the Muslim tourist. There are dedicated travel and city guides to places such as Istanbul, Beijing and Kuala Lumpur, highlighting places of interest for Islamic visitors. Other features will be added progressively, including Arabic and other language interfaces, the company said. Crescentrating already runs a website which rates hotels, restaurants, airports and other establishments using such criteria as having halal restaurants and prayer rooms. This year it launched a service that allows Muslim travellers to determine their prayer times and the direction to which they should pray even while they are in mid-flight and across different time zones. – AFP

Stylist Azmina Burhan cuts the hair of a homeless person in downtown Kuala Lumpur on November 13. Photo: AFP

The kindest cut
JULIA ZAPPEI HOMELESS Kuala Lumpur resident Indera Abha struggles to eke out a meagre existence by selling salvaged recyclables, so personal-appearance concerns understandably take a back seat. But a Malaysian charity that offers free haircuts along with meals helps him to salvage some pride as well. “I like to get my hair cut. I feel good, and it is free,” Indera, 49, said with a smile that’s missing several teeth. Strands of his thin black hair floated to the ground around him. Stylist Azmina Burhan wielded the scissors. She runs her own salon but volunteers with the Pertiwi Soup Kitchen to provide for an oftenoverlooked homeless need. “To me, how people look is very important. You want to look good every day when you wake up, no matter how rich you are, how poor you are,” said the bubbly 26-year-old. Burhan joined the charity shortly after its establishment in 2010, helping to give out food and water several times a week. But after encountering hundreds of homeless who couldn’t afford proper cuts, she started bringing along her scissors, apron and a small stool about once every other month. Now, each time she gives up to 30 haircuts, and the number is growing. “After you finish getting a haircut you look good, you feel good, and you have that self-confidence in you,” she said, adding that a cleaned-up appearance could help people to secure jobs. For Burhan, the task can mean handling dirty, matted hair. The worst, she said, was a man who slept on the streets and hadn’t washed his hair for months, leaving her hands blackened with dust. But she has never turned anyone away. The image of smelly, liceinfested homeless is false, she said. It’s the sort of stereotype that her haircuts are aimed at eliminating. In fact, some of her clients are quite trendy, especially younger ones, and common requests include cuts that look like British football star David Beckham’s hairstyles or fringes like those worn by Korean and Japanese pop icons. Malaysian living standards have vaulted steadily upward thanks to decades of strong economic growth, but Southeast Asia’s third-largest economy is not immune to privation, and income disparity has widened. Pertiwi says Kuala Lumpur and its outskirts have an estimated 1800 homeless. Government officials did not respond to a request for figures. Pertiwi feeds up to 700 people four

Malaysian charity styles the homeless
times a week, delivering food by van in three of Kuala Lumpur’s poorer areas. Volunteer medics also provide check-ups and medicine. “I didn’t realise it was going to be this big,” said Munirah Hamid, head of Pertiwi. Burhan is now looking to enlist another volunteer hairdresser to meet the demands of homeless people like Paul Chin. He’s lived on the street since he lost his job at a car wash several months ago. “It’s very annoying,” Chin said shyly of the overgrown shock of greying hair crowning his head as he settled onto Burhan’s stool. But by the time her scissors stopped snipping, someone waiting in line shouted out, “He’s a new man!” “Now I feel good,” Chin said, running his hands over his trimmed top before disappearing into the crowd. –AFP

www.mmtimes.com

the pulse 51

Observe and report
A new artist-run gallery aims to foster Myanmar documentary arts

T

GREG HOLLAND greg.c.holland@gmail.com HE much hyped 7 Days in Myanmar photography exhibition opened December 14 at Witness Yangon Documentary Arts Space, and the gallery brimmed with people eager to take a look at a selection of large prints from the series of the same name, presented as a coffeetable book. Each of the 30 photographers involved in the exhibit had submitted 350 photos, which were edited down to a total of 300 for the book. With so many talented photographers representing 11 different countries taking part in the project, there were many stunning images that didn’t make the cut. Some of those images are featured on the gallery walls, and some prints will be up for sale as oneoffs at a “meet the photographers”

event, which will take place at the gallery on December 28. The Witness Yangon Documentary Arts Space opened its doors to the public in September by Myanmar Deitta, an organisation headed by documentary photographer and gallery owner Matt Grace. Its aim is to develop resources for documentary photographers and filmmakers in Myanmar. 7 Days is the fruit of its first efforts. Not just an exhibition space, the gallery hosts the monthly meetings of the recently formed Yangon Photo Club. And next year, when final touches are complete on its audiovisual set-up, the space will be hired out for documentary and short-film screenings. A weekly program will also be launched for filmmakers to present their work and discuss and develop ideas. With an emphasis on education, Dietta is starting a scholarship

Visitors peruse photographs from the 7 Days exhibition, on December 14. Photo: Supplied

program in collaboration with Oslo and Akershus University College in Norway for six Myanmar photographers. The first round will run from February to April 2014. “The idea of the organisation is to focus on exhibition, education and project support,” said Grace. The six successful applicants will travel to Dhaka, Bangladesh, to study at Pathshala, South Asia’s premier

institute of photography. Grace returned to Yangon in January 2013 after taking time away to set up a similar space in Chiang Mai, for an organisation called Documentary Arts Asia. He arrived back at a time when media reform in Myanmar was really starting to take off. “Despite the progress being made here, there is still a distinct lack of resources and facilities for education

in photography and filmmaking,” said Grace. Currently, Witness Yangon is the only permanent arts space dedicated to documentary photography, filmmaking and education in Yangon, and with the next exhibition featuring the work of six Myanmar photographers already booked for January, the space is proving to be a successful tool for building artist networks and support.

Surprises, snubs in Oscars foreign film shortlist
MICHAEL THURSTON NINE movies including Palestinian, Danish and Hong Kong productions have been shortlisted for the best foreign language film Oscar, organisers announced Friday, offering surprises and some unexpected snubs. Films left out included Saudi Arabia’s first-ever candidate and Pakistan’s first entry in five decades, while an Oscarwinning Iranian director also failed to make the cut. Films by Belgian, Bosnian, Cambodian, German, Hungarian and Italian directors are on the shortlist, which did not include any women filmmakers. The Hunt by Dane Thomas Vinterberg, The Grandmaster from Hong Kong’s Wong Karwai and The Great Beauty by Italian Paolo Sorrentino could be among the frontrunners. But Iranian entry The Past – by director Asghar Farhadi, who won the best foreign film Oscar in 2012 for A Separation – was not on Friday’s list, despite forecasts that it would be among the leading nominees. The films were whittled down from a long list of 76 movies announced in October by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, which organises Hollywood’s biggest annual awards fest. They will be reduced to five nominees next month, before nods in all Oscar categories are announced on January 16. The 86th Academy Awards will be held on March 2. Industry journal Variety said the most surprising snubs were for Chilean Sebastian Lelio’s Gloria, Poland’s Walesa: Man of Hope, by Andrzej Wajda, as well as the Iranian and Saudi entries. The Saudi long-list candidate, Wadjda, by Haifaa al-Mansour, is an avowedly feminist movie about a young girl’s quest to own a bicycle in the ultra-conservative Muslim kingdom where women are deprived of many rights, among them driving. Directed by Saudi Arabia’s first female filmmaker and shot entirely in the Gulf state, the film won the best Arabic feature award at the Dubai Film Festival last year and picked up an award in Cannes in March. For Pakistan, Zinda Bhaag (Flee Alive) was the first Oscar entry for over 50 years. It is a comedy-thriller about three young men trying to escape the drudgery of their everyday lives through unconventional means. Other high-profile titles not on the shortlist include Chinese director Feng Xiaogang’s Back to 1942, Winter of Discontent by Egypt’s Ibrahim El Batout and Israel’s Bethlehem, by director Yuval Adler, Variety said. – AFP The nine shortlisted foreign language films are: - The Broken Circle Breakdown, Belgium, director Felix van Groeningen - An Episode in the Life of an Iron Picker, Bosnia and Herzegovina, director Danis Tanovic - The Missing Picture, Cambodia, director Rithy Panh - The Hunt, Denmark, director Thomas Vinterberg - Two Lives, Germany, director Georg Maas - The Grandmaster, Hong Kong, director Wong Kar-wai - The Notebook, Hungary, director Janos Szasz - The Great Beauty, Italy, director Paolo Sorrentino - Omar, Palestine, director Hany Abu-Assad

www.mmtimes.com

the pulse 53

Monstrous inspiration
DARIO THUBURN GRIFFINS, sirens and minotaurs went on display in Rome on Thursday for an exhibition about monsters of antiquity, with Hollywood special effects experts serving as artistic consultants. The show brought together 100 works including statues, frescoes and vases from museums around the world depicting fantastical creatures, arranged in a web of passages intended to resemble the minotaur’s labyrinth. “Monsters are part of the myths of every culture, every civilisation,” said Elisabetta Setari, co-curator of the exhibition with Rita Paris, director of the National Roman Museum, which is hosting the show. “They have characterised our civilisation from the dawn of time until now,” she said. The exhibits range from the Bronze Age to ancient Rome with sphinxes, gorgons, centaurs, sea dragons, hydras and a bronze chimera from the 6th century BC used on a Greek soldier’s shield. The works are on loan from 40 museums in Italy and internationally, including the J. Paul Getty Museum and the Metropolitan Museum of Art. There is a fine Greek vase with a multi-headed hydra from the 6th century BC from an Italian collection, as well as two 17thcentury paintings of a medusa and Pegasus to show the endurance of monstrous images through the centuries.

Lessons from Hollywood
Emerging artists make short films with American screenwriter
CHIT SU WAI suwai.chit@gmail.com WITH few international experiences and little financial support, wouldbe Myanmar filmmakers don’t have much of a way into the practice, said Ko Yee Nan Thike, an emerging filmmaker in Yangon. “In Myanmar, we can see short films in competitions and at shortfilm festivals. And also we don’t have the opportunity to meet and discuss famous international filmmakers too much,” he said. But that changed for Ko Yee Nan Thike last week. As one of 20 students selected to participate in a seven-day filmmaking workshop, the aspiring artist got Hollywood pro tips from Mary Sweeney, a film professor at the University of Southern California whose credits include work on David Lynch’s Blue Velvet and Mulholland Drive. “I like her and am so impressed by her,” student Cho Wutt Yee Lwin said. Invited to Myanmar by the American Embassy and the Fulbright program for specialists, Sweeney taught scriptwriting, shooting and film editing at the American Center starting on December 11. The participants broke into groups to write and film three short films, which were then screened to the public on December 17. The final day of screening was also an opportunity for the new filmmakers to discuss their creations. The week had been a learning experience not only for the participants but for Sweeney as well. “I’ve watched Myanmar films and documentaries before. I didn’t like it. But when I arrived here and they [the workshop filmmakers] showed me some music videos and some documentaries, I saw the development in making films, and I liked some of them so much,” Sweeney said, who was visiting Myanmar for the first time. “I am so satisfied about this workshop. Myanmar filmmakers are creative and willing.” she said. Facebook Nightmare is a 10-minute film about a Myanmar girl who accepts an unknown “friend request” and ends up with a cyber bully. It’s an educational film as well as a drama. Fortune Teller, in contrast, is a humorous 7-minute film about the experiences of a fortune teller as he meets people over the course of one day. Snap starts with a mystery scene. It is about a man who has a psychological problem – he thinks he has supernatural powers. In the beginning, the filmmaker cleverly makes the audience believe the powers are for real. By the end, we know they are not. All of the films were based on imagination, showing there are some new voices in filmmaking interested in fictional entertainment rather than documentary. The participants, who are at the beginning of their careers in short film, said that they all want to see a strong Myanmar film industry and will try their best to develop it.

Photo: AFP A woman looks at a sculpture in the exhibition Monsters: Fantastic Creatures of the Fear and the Myth at the Museo Nazionale Romano on December 19.

“Monsters are aggressive creatures. They are part animal, so they have an animalistic force. Monsters in antiquity were above all protectors, for example, of tombs where they appear on gravestones,” she said. Hollywood heavyweights have been involved in the exhibition, which is being accompanied by a series of lectures on the influence of classical mythology on hi-tech special effects and fantasy films today. “If we look at Hollywood and the monsters that have inspired us we can trace them all back to classical monsters,” said Scott Ross, a former business partner of George Lucas and James Cameron, who has worked on blockbusters like

Terminator 2 and Titanic. “It’s sort of like the concept of music where there are only 12 notes. It’s how you combine them together that makes a symphony,” said Ross. “Sea dragons used to warn sailors about the dangers of the sea. Monsters today are like robots. They are warning us about post-human humans,” he said. Ross said the representation of monsters in films had transformed since the first Frankenstein by Edison Studios in 1910 when only make-up was used for effects. “Nowadays it’s computergenerated imagery to the point that you can create anything,” he said, although he added that modern monsters were still “very simple”. – AFP

54 the pulse tea break
Universal Crossword
Edited by Timothy E. Parker

THE MYANMAR TIMES DECEMBER 23 - 29, 2013

SUDOKU PACIFIC

JUST TESTING By Arthur Goodwill
ACROSS 1 Bayou snapper 6 Previously owned 10 Verifiable statement 14 Play area 15 Wind-icator? 16 Asian housemaid 17 Office worker 18 Plead for 19 Popular belief 20 Time waster for firefighters 22 Drink slowly 23 Underwire garment 24 Like a Stephen King story 25 Tuxedo accessory 29 Devour, slangily (with “down”) 32 Shout “Heads up!” 33 Traveler’s route 37 A Bridges brother 38 Clumsy 39 Alto woodwind 40 Oxen pulling a wagon, say 42 “Family Feud” teammate, often 43 It fits into a mortise 44 Crosses the threshold 45 Like some overly long sentences 48 Caress 49 Common royal name in Norway 50 Lauper hit 57 Control + Z 58 Show optimism 59 Like the Annapolis Academy 60 Depilatory maker 61 In a frenzied fashion 62 Maternal relative 63 Combining form meaning “skin” 64 Cash-register stack 65 Vegetable course, often DOWN 1 Fisherman’s handled hook 2 Operatic performance 3 Apple targeter 4 ___, tens, hundreds 5 Cheesy Welsh dish 6 It vibrates during snoring 7 Lee of desserts 8 An MIT grad. 9 Consider 10 Outward show 11 Stevie Wonder’s “My Cherie ___” 12 Bones affected by typing 13 The ones right here 21 “We” may precede it 24 Literary “before” 25 Pampered one? 26 Toast topper 27 Watered-down 28 Behaving as expected 29 Jan ___, Dutch painter 30 Little drinks 31 Industrious insect 33 “Out of the frying pan, ___ ...” 34 Up to the challenge 35 Leonine sound 36 Evergreens 38 “At Seventeen” singer Janis 41 Males 42 Chants 44 Common Market inits., once 45 Like a ball 46 Half of the forearm bones 47 Very depths 48 Sneaks a look 50 “Oh, no! Not ___!” 51 It wasn’t built in a day 52 “Once ___ a time ...” 53 Turner of movies 54 Cameo shape 55 Pro ___ 56 Malamute’s tow

DILBERT

BY SCOTT ADAMS

PEANUTS

BY CHARLES SCHULZ

CALVIN AND HOBBES

BY BILL WATTERSON

PUZZLE SOLUTIONS

Laugh all the way to the bank when you rent this space.
The tea break page is being re-formatted in readiness for our move to a daily cycle. It may look something like this in the future. Our market research shows that a page like this attracts a large number of readers, who loyally read it every day. Ring Marketing Department to book this space permanently and laugh all the way to the bank with the extra business coming in your door.

Telephone us now on +951 392 928

www.mmtimes.com

the pulse food and drink 55

Sweet, salty, cool
Watermelon salads cut the heat of spicy mains

PHYO’S COOKING ADVENTURE

I

phyocooking@gmail.com

N Myanmar, watermelon typically is eaten as a snack or for dessert. There’s no effort to dress it up. But after seeing some nice juicy watermelons at the market, I wanted to make some refreshing fruit salads. Watermelon is really a match with spicy barbecued meat or fish, and it would be perfect for a Christmas Day brunch. I also found organic flat roquette, cress and feta cheese at Sharky’s, which inspired a few different versions of a fresh and healthy watermelon salad. Watermelons pair well with feta cheese or hard cheese, and they also need a bit of tangy flavour, such as lime. The combination brings out the sweetness of the fruit, and it will clean spicy or smoky flavours from your tongue. When buying watermelon, it’s best to choose ones that are still firm. Overripe melons will wilt the salad.

WATERMELON AND ROQUETTE SALAD SERVES 6 Half a small watermelon (700-800g) 125g marinated feta cheese 6 handfuls organic flat roquette 3 tablespoons olive oil 1 ½ teaspoons lime juice Cut the watermelon into 3 cm cubes and discard the seeds. Lay the roquette on a plate, and arrange the watermelon on top. Then, crumble the feta cheese and sprinkle it on top. Pour over the olive oil and lime juice and toss gently. Add salt and black pepper to taste.

WATERMELON AND CRESS SALAD SERVES 6 Half a small water melon (700-800g) 6 handfuls organic cress 3 tablespoons olive oil 1 ½ teaspoons lime zest Follow the directions for the roquette salad, but use cress and lime zest, and omit the cheese. Add salt and black pepper to taste.

WATERMELON AND ROQUETTE SALAD WITH SNOW PEAS SERVES 6 Half a small watermelon (700800g) 125g marinated feta cheese 150g snow peas 3 tablespoons olive oil 1 ½ teaspoons lime juice Cut the watermelon into 3cm cubes and discard the seeds.

Snip the tops off the snow peas and wash them well. Blanch the peas in boiling water for 3-4 minutes, and cool immediately in ice water. Drain well and pat dry. Lay the roquette and snow peas on a big plate. Crumble and sprinkle the feta cheese on top. Pour over olive oil and lime juice and toss gently. Add salt and pepper to taste. FOODIE QUOTE “The belly rules the mind.” –Spanish proverb

Watermelon and organic roquette salad. Photo: Phyo

Watermelon and cress salad. Photo: Phyo

Where choice is always the special
WHITNEY LIGHT light.whitney@gmail.com SOME restaurants want to be everything to everyone. Zawgyi House Café is one of them. A fixture of the downtown dining scene, Zawgyi offers a menu like a catalogue: There is breakfast, both continental and Asian; pages of broadly defined Asian dishes and house specials; Thai curries; Italian pastas; American burgers and sandwiches; French specialties; and, among the desserts, a Danish chocolate ice-cream concoction. But although it’s generally an accurate rule of thumb to assume that quality is inversely proportional to the number of items on a menu, a diner could do much worse than lunch here. The selection evidently speaks to the cafe’s presumed clientele. Located in a renovated house between Bogyoke Market and Grand Mee Ya Hta Hotel, the restaurant is a popular and obvious destination for tourists and shoppers. The large covered patio, somewhat removed from the bustle of the street and furnished with comfortable wrought iron and wicker chairs and tables, is spacious and comfortable. The quiet, elegant interior has equal appeal. Given the cool weather, this diner opted to lunch outside and then attempted a course as eclectic as the

Zawgyi’s special noodles are tasty if not-so-special. Photo: Virtual Tourist

The patio at Zawgyi is spacious and comfortable. Photo: Virtual Tourist

menu. First, smiling and attentive staff delivered a mojito, expertly mixed and with a generous handful of fresh mint leaves. Although the noon-hour rush had definitely subsided by this time, making for an easy test, the appetiser and main course arrived promptly within 15 minutes after ordering. Garlic toast consisted of tiny ovals of sliced house-made bread delicately brushed with a piquant and not-toooily sauce. The bread was indeed fresh and a reasonable facsimile of a French baguette, if somewhat lacking

airiness and chew. The plating of Zawgyi’s special fried noodles left something to be desired (a sticky mound that appeared inverted from a bowl, with a laser-thin slice of tomato and cucumber for garnish) but was tasty and large enough to satisfy most appetites. Out of a choice of pork, beef or chicken balls, I opted for the first to good results. The pork balls were flavourful and succulent and the best part of the dish. The noodles, mixed with fried greens, carried a

nondescript soya-sauce-flavoured gravy but were addictive, leaving the lips a touch oily. “Crazy tropical” ice cream made for a refreshing ending. Light and icy rather than rich and creamy, each fruit ice in the quartet – coconut, mango, pineapple, passion fruit – burst with flavour. True, the dessert cost more than the main course (K4200 versus K3700), but location and atmosphere are the draw here, not value. Overall, the endurance of Zawgyi House, for the most part, is well deserved.

Zawgyi House Café
372 Bogyoke Aung San Road, Yangon Food 7 Beverage 9 Atmosphere 7 X-factor 8 Service 8 Value for money 6 Total Score:

7.5/10

56 the pulse socialite
Huawei Service Center grand opening Human rights dinner

THE MYANMAR TIMES DECEMBER 23-29, 2013

Staff member

Ko Sau Baung

Mr. Tony Chu and Ms.Tracy Guo

Mr Joe Fisher, Guest and Mr Andrew Patrick

L’Occitane product launch

Ko Phyo Thet Lin and staffs

Ma Su Hla Han

Daw Aye Aye Than

Mr. Matthew Hedges

Mr. Tom Lambert and Ko Aung Aung Shein

Aqulanch cosmetics launch

Nyo Min Lwin and his wife

Ma Ei Sabal Phyu and Ma Wah Wah Soe

OM Furniture launch

Mr. Roland Tob, Khin Thanda That, Zaw Tun Oo and Mr. Lim Wei Chiang

Zaw Tun Oo and staffs

Ju Juu K

www.mmtimes.com
3K Battery “lucky draw” event

the pulse socialite 57
Ma Thuzar Tun

nyeineieihtwe23@gmail.com

MOST events took place in the last days of the week, as has become the custom this winter in Yangon. Cosmetic launches delighted and won over attendees. Socialite attended the KMA cosmetic launch at Junction Square on December 12. On the following day, she dropped by the Aqulanch cosmetic launch at Chatrium Hotel. She witnessed an exciting moment for customers of 3K Battery during the company’s “lucky draw” event at Yuzana Tower on December 14. The next day, she attended the grand opening of the Huawei authorised service centre and the L’Occitane boutique launch at Pearl Condominium.

Ms. Srisuvam Korphaibool and Mr. Chanchi

HCG car showroom opening

Ma Khine Lwin Tun and Ma Nwe Ni Aung Guests

Mr. Wang and attendees

Thin Zar, Yadana and Khine Zin

Ko Min Thant Win Shwin

Cherry Mobile press conference

Sai Sai Kham Leng and Bunny Phyo

Models

KMA new cosmetics launch

NYEIn EI EI HTWE

58 the pulse travel

THE MYANMAR TIMES DECEMBER 23 - 29, 2013

DOMESTIC FLIGHT SCHEDULES
YANGON TO NAy PyI TAW Flight FMI A1 Y5 777 FMI A1 FMI B1 FMI A1 FMI C1 YH -SPL Days 1,2,3,4,5 1,2,3,4,6 6 1,2,3,4,5 7 1,2,3,4,5 1,4,6 Dep 7:30 7:45 8:00 11:30 15:30 16:30 18:00 Arr 8:30 8:25 9:00 12:30 16:30 17:30 19:10 MANDALAy TO YANGON Flight YJ 901 YH 910 Y5 233 YH 918 YJ 891 6T 402 K7 223 W9 201 NAy PyI TAW TO YANGON Flight FMI A2 FMI A2 FMI B2 FMI A2 Y5 778 FMI C2 YH -SPL Days 1,2,3,4,5 6 1,2,3,4,5 7 1,2,3,4,6 1,2,3,4,5 1,4,6 Dep 8:50 10:00 13:00 17:00 17:30 18:00 19:10 Arr 9:50 11:00 14:00 18:00 18:10 19:00 20:05 W9 144 Y5 132 YJ 001 K7 227 K7 627 YH 834 YH 832 K7 845 6T 808 6T 808 Arr 7:25 8:20 8:15 7:30 7:55 8:25 8:40 8:10 8:10 8:40 8:40 9:20 8:55 10:10 11:55 11:55 11:55 12:55 12:25 12:55 13:10 14:00 13:10 12:40 15:10 12:55 13:25 15:40 15:10 16:35 16:55 17:10 17:30 16:55 YJ 602 YJ 202 YJ 212 YH 732 YH 728 YJ 762 W9 120 K7 225 W9 129 YH 738 W9 211 K7 625 8M 6604 YH 730 6T 502 YJ 752/W9 7752 YH 922 Days Daily 1,2,3,4,5,7 Daily Daily Daily Daily Daily Daily Daily 3,5,6,7 1,2,3,4,5 2,4 1,5 2 4,6 2,4,7 7 1 6 1,2,3,4 5,7 4 1 1,2,4,6 1,3,6 Daily Daily 3,5,7 Daily Daily 2,4,7 2,4 Daily 3,5,7 5,6 Dep 7:40 7:55 8:10 8:20 8:30 8:45 8:55 9:10 9:20 9:30 9:50 10:35 10:55 11:30 11:30 12:50 13:15 13:45 15:10 15:30 15:30 15:40 16:30 16:35 16:30 16:50 17:10 17:10 17:10 17:10 17:20 17:45 17:50 17:50 18:00 Arr 9:45 10:00 9:25 10:15 10:25 10:45 11:00 11:05 10:45 10:30 10:45 12:00 12:20 12:55 12:55 16:00 15:15 15:45 16:35 16:55 17:35 18:40 17:55 18:00 17:55 19:00 18:35 18:35 19:15 18:35 18:30 19:10 19:55 19:15 19:25 YANGON TO MyITKyINA Flight Days Dep YH 833 2 7:00 YH 833 4,6 7:00 K7 844 2,4,7 7:30 K7 624 Daily 10:30 YJ 211 5,7 10:30 YJ 201 1,2,3,4 11:00 W9 251 2,5 11:15 MyITKyINA TO YANGON Flight Days Dep YH 834 2 10:05 YH 832 4,6 10:05 YJ 211 7 13:35 YJ 211 5 13:35 YJ 202 1,2,3,4 14:05 K7 625 Daily 15:40 W9 252 2,5 16:05 YANGON TO HEhO Flight Days Dep YH 917 Daily 6:00 YJ 891 Daily 6:10 W9 141 Daily 6:15 6T 401 Daily 6:20 K7 222 Daily 6:30 6T 351 1,2,3,4,6,7 6:30 W9 201 Daily 7:30 K7 828 1,3,5 7:30 YH 505 2,3,4,6,7 10:30 YJ 751/W9 7751 3,5,7 11:00 YJ 761 1,2,4,6 11:00 YH 737 3,5,7 11:00 W9 203 Daily 11:00 YH 727 1 11:00 W9 119 1,3,6 11:15 6T 807 7 11:30 K7 826 2,6 11:45 6T 807 1 12:00 YH 731 4 13:30 K7 224 Daily 14:30 W9 129 Daily 15:00 Arr 10:05 10:05 11:05 13:25 13:20 13:50 14:10 NyAUNG U TO YANGON Flight Days Dep YH 917 Daily 7:35 YJ 891 Daily 7:45 W9 141 Daily 7:50 K7 222 Daily 8:05 YJ 901 1,2,3,4,5,6 8:25 YH 910 Daily 8:40 W9 144 Daily 8:50 6T 351 5 10:50 YH 732 4 17:20 K7 225 Daily 17:45 W9 211 Daily 17:55 YH 732 1,2,3,5,6,7 17:55 6T 502 Daily 18:35 Arr 10:15 10:25 10:40 11:00 9:45 10:00 10:10 13:55 18:40 19:00 19:15 19:15 19:55 YH 731 6T 501 1,2,3,5,6,7 Daily 15:00 15:30 16:25 16:40 HEhO TO YANGON Days Dep Daily 8:35 Daily 9:00 Daily 9:05 Daily 9:15 Daily 9:35 Daily 9:45 Daily 9:55 2,3,4,6,7 11:55 Daily 12:25 1,3,5 13:50 7 14:05 1 14:35 1,3,6 15:45 1 15:45 1,2,4,6 15:50 Daily 16:00 3,5,7 16:25 Daily 16:25 1,2,3,5,6,7 16:25 4 16:25 Daily 16:55 2,6 17:25 YH 505 YH 511 W9307 W9 309 2,3,4,6,7 1,5 2,4 1,3,5,6,7 10:30 10:30 11:30 11:30 13:10 11:35 13:50 13:50

YANGON TO MANDALAy Flight YJ 901 YH 917 YJ 891 Y5 234 YH 909 6T 401 K7 222 K7 626 K7 226 YH 833 YH 831 YJ 001 W9 201 8M 6603 K7 624 YJ 211 YJ 601 YJ 761 YJ 201 YJ 751/W9 7751 YH 737 YH 729 YH 727 W9 251 YH 921 6T 807 6T 807 YH 731 YH 921 K7 224 W9 129 YH 731 6T 501 W9 211 Days Daily Daily Daily Daily 1,2,3,4,5,7 Daily Daily 1,5 2,4 2 4,6 1,2,3,4,5 Daily 2,4,7 Daily 5,7 1 1,2,4,6 1,2,3,4 3,5,7 3,5,7 2,4 1 2,5 5 7 1 4 6 Daily Daily 1,2,3,5,6,7 Daily Daily Dep 6:00 6:00 6:10 6:15 6:15 6:20 6:30 6:45 6:45 7:00 7:00 7:30 7:30 9:00 10:30 10:30 10:30 11:00 11:00 11:00 11:00 11:00 11:00 11:15 11:30 11:30 12:00 13:30 13:30 14:30 15:00 15:00 15:30 15:30

Flight W9 141 6T 352 YH 918 YJ 891 6T 402 K7 223 W9 201 YH 506 W9 204 K7 829 6T 808 6T 808 W9 120 YH 728 YJ 762 K7 224 YH 738 W9 129 YH 731 YH 732 6T 501 K7 827

Arr 10:40 11:10 10:15 10:25 10:45 11:00 11:05 14:00 13:35 15:05 15:15 15:45 17:55 17:55 18:00 19:00 18:35 18:35 19:15 18:40 19:55 18:40

ThANDWE TO YANGON Flight Days Dep W9 141 Daily 9:50 6T 632 1,2,3,4,6,7 10:15 6T 605 Dailys 12:25 6T 632 5 13:00 YH 511 1,5 11:35 YH 506 2,3,4,6,7 13:10 W9 307 2,4 14:05 W9 309 1,3,5,6,7 14:05

Arr 10:40 11:10 15:00 13:55 13:55 14:00 14:55 14:55

Domestic Airlines
Air Bagan Ltd. (W9) Air KBZ (K7)
Tel : 513322, 513422, 504888, Fax : 515102 Tel: 372977~80, 533030~39 (Airport), Fax: 372983

Air Mandalay (6T)

Tel : (Head Office) 501520, 525488, Fax: 525937. Airport: 533222~3, 09-73152853. Fax: 533223.

Arr 12:55 12:55 16:55 17:35 16:55 18:35 19:00

YANGON TO SIT T WE Flight Days Dep 6T 605 Daily 11:15 6T 611 4,6 14:30 W9 309 1,3,5,6,7 11:30 YH 511 1,5 10:30 K7 426 Daily 12:30 SIT T WE TO yANGON Flight Days Dep YH 512 1,5 12:35 6T 606 Daily 13:35 K7 427 Daily 14:05 6T 612 4,6 16:15 YANGON TO MyEIK Flight Days Dep K7 319 Daily 7:00 YH 633 1,3,5,7 7:00 MyEIK TO YANGON Days Dep Daily 11:30 1,3,7 11:25 5 9:15

Asian Wings (YJ)
Arr 13:15 15:55 12:55 12:35 13:50

Tel: 951 516654, 532253, 09-731-35991~3. Fax: 951 532333

Golden Myanmar Airlines (Y5)
Tel: 95 9 400446999, 95 9 400447999, Fax: 01 860 4051

Yangon Airways(YH)

Tel: (+95-1) 383 100, 383 107, 700 264, Fax: 652 533.

YANGON TO NyAUNG U Flight YH 917 YJ 901 YJ 891 W9 141 YH 909 6T 401 6T 351 K7 222 YH 909 W9 143 YH 731 K7 224 W9 211 YH 731 6T 501 Days Daily Daily Daily Daily 1,2,3,4,5,7 Daily 1,2,3,4,6,7 Daily 6 Daily 4 Daily Daily 1,2,3,5,6,7 Daily Dep 6:00 6:00 6:10 6:15 6:15 6:20 6:30 6:30 7:00 7:15 13:30 14:30 15:30 15:00 15:30 Arr 7:35 8:10 7:30 7:35 8:40 7:40 7:50 7:50 8:40 8:35 17:20 17:25 17:40 17:55 18:20

Arr 9:05 9:00 8:20 9:20 9:30 8:45 9:40 8:45 11:55 12:10 12:10 12:25 12:10 12:25 12:25 13:50 13:00 14:20 14:55 15:45 16:10

Arr 13:55 15:00 15:25 17:40

FMI Air Charter - Sales & Reservations

Tel: (95-1) 240363, 240373 / (+95-9) 421146545

Domestic
6T = Air Mandalay W9 = Air Bagan YJ = Asian Wings K7 = AIR KBZ YH = Yangon Airways FMI = FMI AIR Charter

Arr 9:05 9:15

Flight K7 320 YH 634 YH 634

Arr 13:35 13:25 12:55

Y5 = Golden Myanmar Airlines

Subject to change without notice
Day 1 = Monday 2 = Tuesday 3 = Wednesday 4 = Thursday 5 = Friday 6 = Saturday 7 = Sunday

YANGON TO ThANDWE Flight Days Dep W9 141 Daily 6:15 6T 351 1,2,3,4,6,7 6:30 6T 605 Daily 11:15

Arr 9:35 10:00 12:10

www.mmtimes.com

the pulse travel 59

INteRNatioNal FLIGHT SCHEDULES
Flights PG 706 8M 335 TG 304 PG 702 TG 302 PG 708 8M 331 PG 704 Y5 237 TG 306

YANGON TO BANGKOK Days Dep Daily 7:15 Daily 8:40 Daily 9:50 Daily 10:30 Daily 14:55 Daily 15:20 Daily 16:30 Daily 18:20 Daily 18:05 Daily 19:45

Arr 9:30 10:25 11:45 12:25 16:50 17:15 18:15 20:15 19:50 21:40 Arr 9:45 10:20 14:40 19:25 22:50 Arr 5:00 12:25 18:25 14:40 14:45 16:20 21:15 19:35 21:35 00:10+1 Arr 15:30 12:50 16:30 20:15 23:10 Arr 21:55 Arr 13:15 15:50 22:15 Arr 8:50 8:05 Arr 16:15 17:20 Arr 18:35 18:00 17:35 Arr 16:10 Arr 21:30 Arr 17:10 Arr 11:15 11:15 Arr 12:30 Arr 8:50 07:45+1 Arr 05:35 Arr 06:45+1 Arr 10:45 Arr 10:20 Arr 20:45 Arr 11:45 21:45 16:40 Arr 15:15 Arr 17:20 Arr 22:45

Flights 8M 336 TG 303 PG 701 TG 301 PG 707 PG 703 TG 305 8M 332 PG 705 Y5 238

BANGKOK TO YANGON Days Dep Daily 11:55 Daily 8:00 Daily 8:50 Daily 13:00 Daily 13:40 Daily 16:45 Daily 17:50 Daily 19:20 Daily 20:00 Daily 21:10

Arr 12:40 8:45 9:40 13:45 14:30 17:35 18:45 20:05 21:15 21:55 Arr 7:15 8:00 12:20 17:05 20:25 Arr 9:20 10:25 10:40 10:40 14:50 14:30 15:45 16:30 17:05 18:50 20:50 23:35 Arr 13:15 Arr 8:00 11:15 15:00 17:30 18:25 Arr 10:30 16:35 15:50 Arr 9:55 10:35 Arr 22:15 23:40 Arr 11:30 13:15 13:55 Arr 18:10 Arr 18:10 Arr 13:25 Arr 06:29+1 6:29 Arr 14:30 Arr 14:55 Arr 22:30 23:40 Arr 17:15 Arr 23:45 Arr 18:30 Arr 8:45 18:45 13:25 Arr 12:20 Arr 13:50 Arr 19:15

International Airlines
Air Asia (FD)
Tel: 251 885, 251 886.

Air Bagan Ltd.(W9) Air China (CA) Air India

Tel : 513322, 513422, 504888, Fax : 515102

YANGON TO DON MUENG Flights Days Dep DD 4231 1,3,5,7 8:00 FD 2752 Daily 8:30 FD 2756 Daily 12:50 FD 2754 Daily 17:35 FD 2758 1,2,3,4 20:55 YANGON TO SINGAPORE Flights Days Dep MI 509/SQ 5019 1,2,6,7 0:25 8M 231 Daily 8:00 8M 233 5,6,7 14:00 Y5 233 Daily 10:10 SQ 997/MI 5871 Daily 10:25 3K 586 Daily 11:40 MI 517/SQ 5017 Daily 16:40 TR 2827 1,6,7 15:10 TR 2827 2,3,4,5 17:10 3K 588 2,3,5 19:30 YANGON TO KUALA LUMPUR Flights Days Dep 8M 501 1,2,3,5,6 11:30 AK 1427 Daily 8:30 MH 741 Daily 12:15 MH 743 Daily 16:00 AK 1421 Daily 18:50
Flights CA 906 Flights 8M 711 CZ 3056 CZ 3056

DON MUENG TO YANGON Flights Days Dep DD 4230 1,3,5,7 6:30 FD 2751 Daily 7:15 FD 2755 Daily 11:35 FD 2753 Daily 16:20 FD 2757 1,2,3,4 19:35 SINGAPORE TO YANGON Flights Days Dep SQ 998/MI 5872 Daily 7:55 8M 6231/3K 585 2,4,7 8:55 3K 585 Daily 9:10 8M 6231/3K 585 1,3,5,6 9:10 8M 232 Daily 13:25 TR 2826 1,6,7 13:10 MI 518/MI 5018 Daily 14:20 TR 2826 2,3,4,5 15:00 Y5 234 Daily 15:35 3K 587 2,3,5 17:20 8M 234 5,6,7 19:25 MI 520/SQ 5020 1,5,6,7 22:10
Flights CA 905

Tel : 666112, 655882.

Unrest deals blow to Bangkok tourism industry

THAILAND

Tel : 253597~98, 254758. Fax: 248175

Bangkok Airways (PG) Condor (DE)

Tel: 255122, 255 265, Fax: 255119

Tel: + 95 1 -370836 up to 39 (ext : 810)

Dragonair (KA)

Tel: 95-1-255320, 255321, Fax : 255329

F

CAT BARTON

Golden Myanmar Airlines (Y5)
Tel: 95 9 400446999, 95 9 400447999, Fax: 01 860 4051

BEIJING TO YANGON Days Dep 2,3,4,6,7 8:05

YANGON TO BEIJING Days Dep 2,3,4,6,7 14:15 YANGON TO GAUNGZHOU Days Dep 2,4,7 8:40 3,6 11:35 1,5 17:40

KAULA LUMPUR TO YANGON Flights Days Dep AK 1426 Daily 6:55 MH 740 Daily 10:05 MH742 Daily 13:50 8M 502 1,2,3,5,6 16:30 AK 1420 Daily 17:20
Flights CZ 3055 CZ 3055 8M 712 Flights CI 7915 BR 287

Malaysia Airlines (MH)

Tel : 387648, 241007 ext : 120, 121, 122 Fax : 241124

Myanmar Airways International(8M)
Tel : 255260, Fax: 255305

YANGON TO INCHEON Flights Days Dep 8M 7502 Daily 0:50 8M 7702 Daily 23:45
Flights CI 7916 QR 288

GUANGZHOU TO YANGON Days Dep 3,6 8:40 1,5 14:45 2,4,7 14:15 TAIPEI TO YANGON Days Dep 1,2,3,5,6 7:00 2,5,6 7:45

Silk Air(MI)

Tel: 255 287~9, Fax: 255 290

Thai Airways (TG)

Tel : 255491~6, Fax : 255223

YANGON TO TAIPEI Days Dep 1,2,3,5,6 10:50 2,5,6 11:35

Vietnam Airlines (VN)

Fax : 255086. Tel 255066/ 255088/ 255068.

YANGON TO KUNMING Flights Days Dep MU 2012 1,3 12:20 MU 2032 Daily 14:40 CA 906 2,3,4,6,7 14:15
Flights W9 9607 Flights VN 956

INCHEON TO YANGON Flights Days Dep 8M 7701 Daily 18:40 8M 7501 Daily 19:30
Flights MU 2011 CA 905 MU 2031 Flights W9 9608 Flights VN 957

Qatar Airways (Temporary Office)
Tel: 01-250388, (ext: 8142, 8210) Tel: 371867~68, Fax: 371869.

YANGON TO CHIANG MAI Days Dep 4,7 14:20 YANGON TO HANOI Days Dep 1,3,5,6,7 19:10

KUNMING TO YANGON Days Dep 1,3 8:20 2,3,4,6,7 13:00 Daily 13:30 CHIANG MAI TO YANGON Days Dep 4,7 17:20 HANOI TO YANGON Days Dep 1,3,5,6,7 16:35

Biman Bangladesh Airlines (BG)

International
FD & AK = Air Asia TG = Thai Airways 8M = Myanmar Airways International Y5 = Golden Myanmar Airlines PG = Bangkok Airways MI = Silk Air VN = Vietnam Airline MH = Malaysia Airlines CZ = China Southern CI = China Airlines CA = Air China KA = Dragonair Y5 = Golden Myanmar Airlines IC = Indian Airlines Limited W9 = Air Bagan 3K = Jet Star AI = Air India QR = Qatar Airways KE = Korea Airlines NH = All Nippon Airways SQ = Singapore Airways DE = Condor Airlines MU=China Eastern Airlines BR = Eva Airlines DE = Condor AI = Air India BG = Biman Bangladesh Airlines

YANGON TO HO CHI MINH CITY Flights Days Dep VN 942 2,4,7 14:25
Flights QR 619 QR 919 Flights 8M 403 Flights 0Z 770 KE 472 Flights KA 251 Flights NH 914 Flights 8M 401 Flights 8M 601 Flights BG 061

YANGON TO DOHA Days Dep Daily 7:30 Daily 7:30 YANGON TO PHNOM PENH Days Dep 1,3,6 8:35 YANGON TO SEOUL Days Dep 4,7 0:50 Daily 23:35 YANGON TO HONG KONG Days Dep 1,2,4,6 01:10 YANGON TO TOKYO Days Dep Daily 22:10 YANGON TO SIEM REAP Days Dep 1,3,6 8:35 YANGON TO GAYA Days Dep 1,3,5,6 9:00 YANGON TO DHAKA Days Dep 1,4 19:30

HO CHI MINH CITY TO YANGON Flights Days Dep VN 943 2,4,7 11:40
Flights QR 618 QR 918 Flights 8M 602

DOHA TO YANGON Days Dep Daily 21:15 Daily 21:15 GAYA TO YANGON Days Dep 1,3,5,6 11:20

PHNOM PENH TO YANGON Flights Days Dep 8M 404 1,3,6 13:30
Flights KE 471 0Z 769 Flights NH 913 Flights KA 250 Flights BG 060

SEOUL TO YANGON Days Dep Daily 18:30 3,6 19:30 TOKYO TO YANGON Days Dep Daily 11:40 HONG KONG TO YANGON Days Dep 1,3,5,7 21:50 DHAKA TO YANGON Days Dep 1,4 16:15

ROM backpacker districts to high-end hotels, more than a month of opposition protests in the Thai capital are taking their toll on the kingdom’s tourism sector, with hundreds of thousands of travellers staying away. Dozens of countries have issued travel warnings related to the mass street demonstrations against Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra, mostly advising people to exercise caution near the main rally sites. The political situation reduced the influx of tourists in the month to mid-December by an estimated 300,000 people, or about 8 percent of the number expected, said Yutthachai Soonthronrattanavate, president of the Association of Domestic Travel. The protests, which are aimed at toppling Yingluck and curbing the influence of her older brother, ousted premier Thaksin Shinawatra, have left five dead and more than 200 wounded in street violence, although tensions have abated in recent days. The political conflict broadly pits a Bangkok-based middle class and a royalist elite backed by the military against rural and working-class voters loyal to Thaksin, who was ousted in a military coup in 2006 and lives in self-imposed exile. Risk-averse Asian holidaymakers are among those choosing to stay away due to the unrest. The local business association for the Khao San Road backpacker district said in early December that more than 50pc of bookings for November and December had been cancelled as low-end tourists abandoned their Thailand trip or went elsewhere in the country. High-end hotel chains, including the Mandarin Oriental and the Accor group, said they had experienced cancellations. Yet many travelers, particularly those from Europe and North

America, are unfazed by – or unaware of – the crisis. “I didn’t know about it. Friends at home saw the news and warned me. When I arrived there were riots going on. I was quite naive,” said Alex Young, 23, as she ordered a cocktail at a bar on Khao San Road, while protesters gathered at the nearby Democracy Monument. Her travelling companion, Hannah Steenson, 24, hails from Northern Ireland and was unruffled. “We’re used to bomb scares there,” she said, but added that Khao San Road was quieter than when she visited last year. “Last year, every weekend was party day. Now even Friday and Saturday are quiet. Every business is the same – no customers,” said Noom Manachai, manager of the Hippie De Bar restaurant on Khao San Road. Asia-wide, tourist industry recoveries from high-profile shocks – such as SARS outbreaks, the Japanese tsunami and the Philippine typhoon – are speeding up, experts say. “While events can quickly displace business, the bounce-back time is shortening,” said Bill Barnett, managing director of tourism consultancy firm C9 Hotelworks. “What’s hard for Thailand at present is the shroud of uncertainty that hangs over Brand Bangkok.” The current protest is the latest in a series of setbacks to the kingdom’s tourist-friendly image as the “Land of Smiles” in recent years. Visitors have been deterred by devastating floods, deadly bus and boat accidents, and growing concerns about crimes against foreigners. Yet the kingdom attracted a record 22 million tourists last year. “Thailand is fundamentally a very strong tourist destination,” said Patrick Basset, senior vice president of Accor in Southeast Asia. “Unfortunately, the main drawback so far these past few years has been the political instability.” – AFP

MANDALAY TO BANGKOK Flights Days Dep TG 2982 2,4,6 9:30 TG 2984 5,7 19:35 PG 710 Daily 14:15 MANDALAY TO DON MUENG Flights Days Dep FD 2761 Daily 12:50
Flights MU 2030 Flights PG 722

BANGKOK TO MANDALAY Flights Days Dep TG 2981 2,4,6 7:30 TG 2983 5,7 17:30 PG 709 Daily 12:05 DON MUEANG TO MANDALAY Flights Days Dep FD 2760 Daily 10:55
Flights MU 2029 Flights PG 721

Subject to change without notice
Day 1 = Monday 2 = Tuesday 3 = Wednesday 4 = Thursday 5 = Friday 6 = Saturday 7 = Sunday

MANDALAY TO KUNMING Days Dep Daily 14:40 NAYPYIDAW TO BANGKOK Days Dep Daily 19:45

KUNMING TO MANDALAY Days Dep Daily 13:55 BANGKOK TO NAYPYIDAW Days Dep Daily 17:15

Two tourists walk past the Democracy Monument occupied by anti-government demonstrators in Bangkok, on December 13. Photo: AFP

60 the pulse international
WELLINGTON

THE MYANMAR TIMES DECEMBER 23 - 29, 2013

dECEMBER 23 - 29, 2013
AQUARIUS | Jan 20 - Feb 18

WEEKLY PReDIcTIONS
LeO | Jul 23 - Aug 22 Light up your mental passion, and clearly choose to enjoy lovemaking. Never regard love as the problem of finding the one who loves you. Instead, aim to be loving of your capacity to love. Believe that social support doesn’t depend on the number of people you know but rather on the quality of your relationship. You should learn more about yourself in order to make a habit of sharing life’s opportunities. VIRGO | Aug 23 - Sep 22 Life is made up of small pleasures. Happiness is made up of tiny successes. The big ones come too infrequently. The tiny successes are not to be collected, and the big ones don’t really mean anything. “Pain is inevitable and suffering is optional,” said M. Kathleen Casey; an American sociologist. Become aware of your own typical reaction to life’s events. Try taking a simple self-test about your social and emotional habits. LIbRA | Sep 23 - Oct 22 Take a different look at things. Your creativity can solve almost any problem, and social challenges may disappear gradually due to exposure to the cosmic power generated by Saturn. Increase your mental energy and alertness to create more genuine inner peace and happiness. Know that all advances in life come through the power of choice. Never let your senses lead your heart. ScORPIO | Oct 23 - Nov 21 Reduce your cynical mistrust of the motives of others. Turn to your friends whenever you need support or help, and give support and help to others whenever you can. Stress originates from the Old French word estrece, meaning “narrowness”. It is a constriction or limiting of your power. Never perceive yourself as the victim of circumstances. Release emotional tension. SAGITTARIUS | Nov 22 - Dec 21 There is something about the human spirit that allows it to soar above all the misery below. Your challenge is to make the most of it. Life is mostly unrelenting and tough but not to be given up on. Both optimistic and pessimistic attitudes sound persuasive at different times in your life, and you sympathise with both outlooks, revealing just how equivocal you are. Be active in order to act accordingly rather than reactive. CAPRIcORN | Dec 22 - Jan 19 Great and best results come not from your largest efforts but from simple, highly specific actions. “Anything less than a conscious commitment to the important is an unconscious commitment to the unimportant,” said Stephen Covey, a renowned businessman and author of self-help books. Your spiritual and emotional powers are needed to draw your life into greater balance and to make the right decisions in your social and financial affairs, as well as in matters of the heart.

The appreciation of complexity is a sign of intellectual sensitivity. Try never to feel confused about moral or political issues, relationships or even how to view your own life. People with integrity share similar values. Make sure to discard those values that are out of alignment with your true self. Challenge yourself to discover your true values and also to question the events of life. PISceS | Feb 19 - March 20 Your life isn’t a straight line. It isn’t for anyone. The twists and turns got you to where you are now and there will be many more zigs and zags to come. View your life as an expedition rather than a series of aimless meanderings. You can amplify or reduce the significance of anything that happens to you by altering your attitude toward it. Be sure to love yourself in order to be loved. ARIeS | Mar 21 - Apr 19 An important element of lifelong well-being is a sense of meaning and purpose, which you find in your spiritual belief or faith. Each time you apply your empathy, your ability to empathise will grow stronger and, increasingly, you will find yourself able to bypass cynical beliefs that generate needless anger, frustration and hostility. Look ahead to the renewal of your soul and your heart. TAURUS | Apr 20 - May 20 Allow other people to be different from you because of their different virtues, social statuses and natures. Every time you succeed in doing this, you help defuse anger and will feel less threatened or stressed. Your actions almost always will be more effective. Moreover, you can focus your attention, money and time on the matters that are most important to you. GeMINI | May 21 - June 20 Be specific, honest and constructive. Remember that we live in a difficult world, and few people truly want to be around a perpetual optimist. Engaging in a silent dialogue with yourself helps give you a better sense of perspective when you happen to be in a down mood. Whenever possible, step back and lighten your judgment of yourself, and always reflect on what others may be thinking and feeling about love and life. CANceR | Jun 21 - Jul 22 Build your optimism in one life area at a time. What you’ll probably discover in short order is that when you stop resisting unwanted thoughts, they lose their power and soon diminish or fade away, and you will quickly regain mental control. You should know that sometimes nothing will change until you change. Be ready to adjust to new ways and accept them in accordance with the truth.

Director James Cameron (centre) and Suzy Amis speak to the media upon their arrival at the world film premiere of The Hobbit in Courtenay Place in Wellington on November 28, 2012. Photo: AFP

Cameron to film Avatar sequels in New Zealand

D

NeIL SANDS

IRECTOR James Cameron announced December 16 he will film three sequels to the record-breaking sci-fi blockbuster Avatar in New Zealand, having struck a deal with the government for increased production subsidies. Cameron said the movies, with a combined minimum budget of at least NZ$500 million (US$415 million), will be shot back-to-back with each sequel released every 12 months from late 2016. “It’s quite a thrill to officially say that we’ll be bringing the Avatar films to New Zealand,” Cameron said. The original Avatar was partially shot in New Zealand and its Oscarwinning special effects were created by Wellington’s Weta Digital, best known for its work on Kiwi director Peter Jackson’s The Lord of the Rings and The Hobbit trilogies. Aside from a boosted subsidy that will account for up to 25 percent of the films’ budget, Cameron said New

Zealand offered skilled production crews and the special effects expertise needed to bring his Avatar vision to life. “I’ve worked with crews all over the world, quite a bit in the US and Canada, and you don’t have that same spark [there],” he said. The first Avatar was released in 2009 and tells the story of a blueskinned indigenous species fighting to stop miners from exploiting their planet, Pandora. It earned $2.78 billion worldwide and remains the highest-grossing movie of all time, according to industry website boxofficemojo.com. “It’s a great pleasure for us to recreate that winning combination,” said Cameron, who agreed as part of the production deal to advise the government on how to maintain a sustainable film industry. Prime Minister John Key said securing the sequels was a coup that “will scream out to the world that New Zealand is a great place to make movies”. There were fears late last year that New Zealand would lose the

deal because the government was reluctant to lift its screen-production rebate from 15 to 25pc to match the sweeteners available in countries such as England and Australia. Key faced criticism in 2010 when he changed New Zealand’s industrial relations laws to ensure The Hobbit trilogy stayed in the country, a move he said had created about 5500 jobs. He denied the Avatar deal was another example of Hollywood forcing concessions out of his government. “There will always be people who want to look at this as a glass-halfempty situation,” he said. For all the technical skills available in New Zealand, Cameron said he and 20th Century Fox would have had to look elsewhere if the government had not offered increased subsidies. “Business sense would have had to prevail, and I’m glad that it never came to that,” he said. Cameron refused to reveal how much he thought the three films would cost to make but said he hoped it would be less than $1 billion. – AFP

HAVANA

Cubans fall in love with South Korean soaps
RIGObeRTO DIAZ FOR the past three decades, Brazilian telenovelas have helped Cubans forget their litany of woes for an hour a day. But today, dozens of South Korean soap operas are earning wide audiences. Following in the footsteps of South Korean films and K-pop, doramas – South Korean soaps dubbed into Spanish – first appeared on Cuban televisions earlier this year. Queen of Housewives, My Fair Lady, Dream High and, for the past month, Secret Garden are all winning fans on the communist-run island. Dozens of other South Korean shows are being passed around in digital form on USB flash drives, a common way for Cubans to spread information because of the lack of widespread internet access. “South Korean shows are selling the best lately. They are easy to follow and very funny,” said Yosmely Batista, a 21-year-old who runs a film and TV series stall out of his apartment in Havana’s Centro neighbourhood. “Why are they so successful, given all the cultural differences between South Koreans and Cubans? I suppose because it’s so foreign – they hardly ever kiss on South Korean shows!” he said. On offer at his home shop are about 60 TV shows, half of them from South America (Brazil, Colombia and Mexico) and the other half from Seoul. Laura, a 13-year-old schoolgirl, said she has downloaded 24 Korean shows onto her computer but has only watched nine of them so far. Boys Over Flowers is the most popular among her classmates, she said. “I just love them. They are short and really different,” the teen explained. South Korean soaps, which echo the melodrama of Latin American telenovelas, have allowed Cubans to see a totally foreign world: Officially, Havana only has diplomatic relations with North Korea. “Koreans and Cubans have a lot in common,” South Korean singer Yoon Sang-Hyun, better known in Cuba for his leading role on My Fair Lady, said during a recent trip to Cuba. “A bit of comedy, a bit of drama, some romance, but never anything very serious,” he said, explaining South Korean soaps. But Brazilian telenovelas have not lost their fan base just yet. “The Brazilian shows are the best, and Brazil Avenue keeps me glued to the screen,” admitted 64-year-old housewife Susana Suarez, who said she has never missed an episode since Malu and Slave Isaura were first shown in the 1980s. Four shows are currently vying for the top spot among Cuban viewers: Secret Garden, Brazil Avenue, Argentina’s Stolen Lives and Cuba’s own Lands of Fire. Like many Cubans, Suarez – who lives on a pension of US$8 a month – said soap operas are her daily two hours of “therapy”. “You can stop worrying about all your problems. You forget everything, at least for a little while,” she said. Yaima Rosaen, a 32-year-old book editor, echoed that sentiment. “Among neighbours, we’d rather talk about TV shows than talk about real life.” – AFP

AUNG MYIN KYAW 4th Floor, 113, Thamain Bayan Road, Tarmwe township, Yangon. Tel: 09-731-35632, Email: williameaste@gmail.com

The Essentials
EMBASSIES Australia 88, Strand Road, Yangon. Tel : 251810, 251797, 251798. Bangladesh 11-B, Than Lwin Road, Yangon. Tel: 515275, 526144, email: bdootygn@ mptmail.net.mm Brazil 56, Pyay Road, 6th mile, Hlaing Tsp, Yangon. Tel: 507225, 507251. email: Administ. yangon@itamaraty.gov.br. Brunei 17, Kanbawza Avenue, Golden Velly (1), Bahan Tsp, Yangon. Tel: 566985, 503978. email: bruneiemb@ bruneiemb.com.mm Cambodia 25 (3B/4B), New University Avenue Road, Bahan Tsp, Yangon. Tel: 549609, 540964. email: RECYANGON @ mptmail.net.mm China 1, Pyidaungsu Yeiktha Road, Yangon. Tel: 221280, 221281. Danmark, No.7, Pyi Thu St, Pyay Rd, 7 Miles, Mayangone Tsp, Yangon. Tel: 01 – 9669520 - 17. Egypt 81, Pyidaungsu Yeiktha Road, Yangon. Tel: 222886, 222887, Egyptembassy86@ gmail.com France 102, Pyidaungsu Yeiktha Road, Yangon. Tel: 212178, 212520, email: ambaf rance. rangoun@ diplomatie.fr Germany 9, Bogyoke Aung San Museum Road, Bahan Tsp, Yangon. Tel: 548951, 548952, email: info@rangun. diplo.de India 545-547, Merchant St, Yangon. Tel: 391219, 388412, email: indiaembassy @ mptmail.net.mm Indonesia 100, Pyidaungsu Yeiktha Rd, Yangon. Tel: 254465, 254469, 229750, fax: 254468, email: kukygn @ indonesia.com.mm Israel 15, Khabaung Street, Hlaing Tsp, Yangon. Tel: 515115, fax: 515116, email: info@ yangon.mfa.gov.il Italy 3, Inya Myaing Road, Golden Valley, Yangon. Tel: 527100, 527101, fax: 514565, email: ambyang. mail@ esteri.it Japan 100, Natmauk Rd, Yangon. Tel: 549644-8, 540399, 540400, 540411, 545988, fax: 549643 Embassy of the State of Kuwait Chatrium Hotel, Rm: 416, 418, 420, 422, 40 Natmauk Rd, Tarmwe Tsp, Tel: 544500. North Korea 77C, Shin Saw Pu Rd, Sanchaung Tsp, Yangon. Tel: 512642, 510205 South Korea 97 University Avenue, Bahan Tsp, Yangon. Tel: 5271424, 515190, fax: 513286, email: myanmar@mofat. go.kr Lao A-1, Diplomatic Quarters, Tawwin Road, Dagon Tsp, Yangon. Tel: 222482, fax: 227446, email: Laoembcab@ mptmail. net.mm Malaysia 82, Pyidaungsu Yeiktha Road, Yangon. Tel: 220248, 220249, email: mwkyangon@ mptmail.net.mm Nepal 16, Natmauk Yeiktha, Yangon. Tel: 545880, 557168, fax: 549803, email: nepemb @mptmail.net.mm Norway, No.7, Pyi Thu St, Pyay Rd, 7 Miles, Mayangone Tsp,Yangon. Tel: 01 – 9669520 - 17 Fax – 01- 9669516 New Zealand No. 43/C, Inya Myaing Rd, Bahan Tsp, Yangon. Tel : 01-2305805 Netherlands Diplomatic Mission No. 43/C, Inya Myaing Rd, Bahan Tsp, Yangon. Tel : 01-2305805 Pakistan A-4, diplomatic Quarters, Pyay Rd, Yangon. Tel: 222881 (Chancery Exchange) Philippines 50, Sayasan Rd, Bahan Tsp, Yangon. Tel: 558149-151,Email: p.e. yangon@gmail.com Russian 38, Sagawa Rd, Yangon. Tel: 241955, 254161, Royal Embassy of Saudi Arabia No.287/289, U Wisara Rd, Sanchaung. Tel : 01-536153, 516952. Serbia No. 114-A, Inya Rd, P.O.Box No. 943, Yangon. Tel: 515282, 515283, email: serbemb @ yangon.net.mm Singapore 238, Dhamazedi Road, Bahan Tsp, Yangon. Tel: 559001, email: singemb_ ygn@_ sgmfa. gov.sg Sri Lanka 34 Taw Win Road, Yangon. Tel: 222812, The Embassy of Switzerland No 11, Kabaung Lane, 5 ½ mile, Pyay Rd, Hlaing Tsp, Yangon. Tel: 534754, 512873, 507089. Fax: 534754, Ext: 110 Thailand 94 Pyay Rd, Dagon Tsp, Yangon. Tel: 226721, 226728, 226824 Turkish Embassy 19AB, Kan Yeik Thar St, Mayangone Tsp,Yangon. Tel : 662992, Fax : 661365 United Kingdom 80 Strand Rd, Yangon. Tel: 370867, 380322, 371852, 371853, 256438, United States of America 110, University Avenue, Kamayut Tsp, Yangon. Tel: 536509, 535756, Fax: 650306 Vietnam Bldg-72, Thanlwin Rd, Bahan Tsp, Yangon. Tel: 511305 UNITED NATIONS ILO Liaison 1-A, Kanbae (Thitsar Rd), Yankin Tsp, Yangon, Myanmar. Tel : 01-566538, 566539 IOM 12th Flr, Traders Hotel, 223, Tel: 252560 ext. 5002 UNAIDS 137/1, Thaw Wun Rd, Kamayut Tsp. Tel : 534498, 504832 UNDCP 11-A, Malikha St, Mayangone tsp. Tel: 666903, 664539. UNDP 6, Natmauk Rd, Bahan tel: 542910-19. fax: 292739. UNFPA 6, Natmauk Rd, Bahan tsp. tel: 546029. UNHCR 287, Pyay Rd, Sanchaung tsp. Tel: 524022, 524024. UNIAP Rm: 1202, 12 Fl, Traders Hotel. Tel: 254852, 254853. UNIC 6, Natmauk St., Bahan, tel: 52910~19 UNICEF 14~15 Flr, Traders Hotel. P.O. Box 1435, Kyauktada. Tel: 375527~32, Email: unicef.yangon@unicef. org, www.unicef.org/myanmar. UNODC 11-A, Malikha Rd., Ward 7, Mayangone. tel: 01-9666903, 9660556, 9660538, 9660398. email: fo.myanmar@unodc.org UNOPS Inya Lake Hotel, 3rd floor, 37, Kaba Aye Pagoda Rd, Mayangone Tsp. Tel: 951657281~7. Fax: 657279. UNRC 6, Natmauk Rd, P.O. Box 650, TMWE Tel: 542911~19, 292637 (Resident Coordinator), WFP 3rd-flr, Inya Lake Hotel, 37, Kabar Aye Pagoda Rd. Tel: 657011~6 (6-lines) Ext: 2000. WHO No. 2, Pyay Rd, 7 Mile, Mayangone Tsp, Tel : 6504056, 650416, 654386-90. ASEAN Coordinating Of. for the ASEAN Humanitarian Task Force, 79, Taw Win st, Dagon Tsp. Tel: 225258. FAO Myanma Agriculture Service Insein Rd, Insein. tel: 641672, 641673. fax: 641561.

General Listing
ACCOMMODATIONHOTELS
Hotel Yangon 91/93, 8th Mile Junction, Tel : 01-667708, 667688. Inya Lake Resort Hotel 37 Kabar Aye Pagoda Rd. tel: 662866. fax: 665537. Golden Hill Towers 24-26, Kabar Aye Pagoda Rd, Bahan Tsp. tel: 558556. ghtower@ mptmail.net.mm. Marina Residence 8, Kabar Aye Pagoda Rd, Mayangone Tsp. tel: 6506 51~4. fax: 650630.

YANGON No. 277, Bogyoke Aung San Road, Corner of 38th Street, Kyauktada Township, Yangon, Myanmar. Tel : (951) 391070, 391071. Reservation@391070 (Ext) 1910, 106. Fax : (951) 391375. Email : hotelasiaplaza@gmail.com

Asia Plaza Hotel
No. 205, Corner of Wadan Street & Min Ye Kyaw Swa Road, Lanmadaw Tsp, Yangon. Myanmar. Tel: (95-1) 212850 ~ 3, 229358 ~ 61, Fax: (95-1) 212854. info@myanmarpandahotel .com http://www. myanmarpandahotel.com ParkroYal Yangon, Myanmar 33, Alan Pya Pagoda Rd, Dagon tsp. tel: 250388. fax: 252478. email: enquiry.prygn@ parkroyalhotels.com parkroyalhotels. com.

Avenue 64 Hotel No. 64 (G), Kyitewine Pagoda Rd, Mayangone Tsp, Yangon. Tel : 09-8631392, 01 656913-9 Chatrium Hotel 40 Natmauk Rd, Tarmwe. tel: 544500. fax: 544400.

17, Kabar Aye Pagoda Rd, Yankin Tsp. Tel: 650933. Fax: 650960. Email : micprm@ myanmar.com.mmwww. myanmar micasahotel.com

ACCOMMODATIONHOTELS (Nay Pyi Taw)
(Nay Pyi Taw)

No.7A, Wingabar Road, Bahan Tsp, Yangon. Tel : (951) 546313, 430245. 09-731-77781~4. Fax : (01) 546313. www.cloverhotel.asia. info@cloverhotel.asia Clover Hotel City Center No. 217, 32nd Street (Upper Block), Pabedan Tsp, Yangon, Myanmar. Tel : 377720, Fax : 377722 www.clovercitycenter.asia Clover Hotel City Center Plus No. 229, 32nd Street (Upper Block), Pabedan Tsp, Yangon, Myanmar. Tel : 377975, Fax : 377974
www.clovercitycenterplus.asia

Royal White Elephant Hotel No-11, Kan Street, Hlaing Tsp. Yangon, Myanmar. (+95-1) 500822, 503986. www.rwehotel.com MGM Hotel No (160), Warden Street, Lanmadaw Tsp, Yangon, Myanmar. +95-1-212454~9. www. hotel-mgm.com Savoy Hotel 129, Damazedi Rd, Kamayut tsp. tel: 526289, 526298, Sedona Hotel Kabar Aye Pagoda Rd, Yankin. tel: 666900. Strand Hotel 92 Strand Rd. tel: 243377. fax: 289880. Summit Parkview Hotel 350, Ahlone Rd, Dagon Tsp. tel: 211888, 211966. Traders Hotel 223 Sule Pagoda Rd. tel: 242828. fax: 242838. Winner Inn 42, Than Lwin Rd, Bahan Tsp. Tel: 503734, 524387. email: reservation@winner innmyanmar.com Windsor Hotel No.31, Shin Saw Pu Street, Sanchaung. Yangon, Myanmar. Ph: 95-1-511216~8, www. hotelwindsoryangon.com Yuzana Hotel 130, Shwegondaing Rd, Bahan Tsp, tel : 01-549600 Yuzana Garden Hotel 44, Alanpya Pagoda Rd, Mingalar Taung Nyunt Tsp, tel : 01-248944

Reservation Office (Yangon) 123, Alanpya Pagoda Rd, Dagon Township Tel : 951- 255 819~838 Royal Kumudra Hotel, (Nay Pyi Taw) Tel : 067- 414 177, 067- 4141 88 E-Mail: reservation@ maxhotelsgroup.com

resorts

Confort Inn 4, Shweli Rd, Bet: Inya Rd & U Wisara Rd, Kamaryut, tel: 525781, 526872

Reservation Office (Yangon) 123, Alanpya Pagoda Rd, Dagon Township. Tel : 951-255 819-838 Hotel Max (Chaung Tha Beach) Tel : 042-423 46-9, 042-421 33. Email : maxhotelsreservation@ gmail.com

AIR CONDITION

For more information about these listings, Please Contact - classified@myanmartimes.com.mm

Emergency Numbers
Ambulance tel: 295133. Fire tel: 191, 252011, 252022. Police emergency tel: 199. Police headquarters tel: 282541, 284764. Red Cross tel:682600, 682368 Traffic Control Branch tel:298651 Department of Post & Telecommunication tel: 591384, 591387. Immigration tel: 286434. Ministry of Education tel:545500m 562390 Ministry of Sports tel: 370604, 370605 Ministry of Communications tel: 067-407037. Myanma Post & Telecommunication (MPT) tel: 067407007. Myanma Post & Tele-communication (Accountant Dept) tel: 254563, 370768. Ministry of Foreign Affairs tel: 067-412009, 067-412344. Ministry of Health tel: 067-411358-9. Yangon City Development Committee tel: 248112. HOSPITALS Central Women’s Hospital tel: 221013, 222811. Children Hospital tel: 221421, 222807 Ear, Nose & Throat Hospital tel: 543888. Naypyitaw Hospital (emergency) tel: 420096. Worker’s Hospital tel: 554444, 554455, 554811. Yangon Children Hospital tel: 222807, 222808, 222809. Yangon General Hospital (East) tel: 292835, 292836, 292837. Yangon General Hospital (New) tel: 384493, 384494, 384495, 379109. Yangon General Hospital (West) tel: 222860, 222861, 220416. Yangon General Hospital (YGH) tel: 256112, 256123, 281443, 256131. ELECTRICITY Power Station tel:414235 POST OFFICE General Post Office 39, Bo Aung Kyaw St. (near British Council Library). tel: 285499. INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT Yangon International Airport tel: 662811. YANGON PORT Shipping (Coastal vessels) tel: 382722 RAILWAYS Railways information tel: 274027, 202175-8.

No. (356/366), Kyaikkasan Rd, Tamwe Township, Yangon, Myanmar. Ph: 542826, Fax: 545650 Email: reservation@ edenpalacehotel.com

M-22, Shwe Htee Housing, Thamine Station St., Near the Bayint Naung Point, Mayangone Tsp., Yangon Tel : 522763, 522744, 667557. Fax : (95-1) 652174 E-mail : grandpalace@ myanmar.com.mm

ACCOMMODATION Long Term

The First Air conditioning systems designed to keep you fresh all day Zeya & Associates Co., Ltd. No.437 (A), Pyay Road, Kamayut. P., O 11041 Yangon, Tel: +(95-1) 502016-18, Mandalay- Tel: 02-60933. Nay Pyi Taw- Tel: 067-420778, E-mail : sales.ac@freshaircon. com. URL: http://www. freshaircon.com

No. 12, Pho Sein Road, Tamwe Township, Yangon Tel : (95-1) 209299, 209300, 209343, 209345, 209346 Fax : (95-1) 209344 E-mail : greenhill@ myanmar.com.mm

Happy Homes
REAL ESTATE & PrOpErTY MANAGEmENT

Air Con Sales & Service No. 2/1, Than Thu Mar Rd, Thuwunna Junction. Tel : 09-4224-64130

Tel: 09-7349-4483, 09-4200-56994. E-mail: aahappyhomes@ gmail.com, http://www. happyhomesyangon.com

BARS
50th Street 9/13, 50th street-lower, Botataung Tsp. Tel-397160.

THE MYANMAR TIMES dECEMBER 23 - 29, 2013 CONSULTING CONSTRUCTION FITNESS CENTRE Gems & Jewelleries HEALTH SERVICES

Green Garden Beer Gallery Mini Zoo, Karaweik Oo-Yin Kabar.

Marina Residence, Yangon Ph: 650651~4, Ext: 109 Beauty Plan, Corner of 77th St & 31st St, Mandalay Ph: 02 72506

Myanmar Research | Consulting | Technology

Shwe Hinthar B 307, 6 1/2 Miles, Pyay Rd., Yangon. Tel: +95 (0)1 654 730 info@thuraswiss.com www.thuraswiss.com

car rental
Lobby Bar Parkroyal Yangon, Myanmar. 33, Alan Pya Phaya Road, Dagon Tsp. tel: 250388. Lemon Day Spa No. 96 F, Inya Road, Kamaryut Tsp, Yangon. Tel: 514848, 09-732-08476. E.mail: lemondayspa.2011 @gmail.com
MYANMAR EXECUTIVE LIMOUSINE SERVICE

Zamil Steel No-5, Pyay Road, 7½ miles, Mayangone Tsp, Yangon. Tel: (95-1) 652502~04. Fax: (95-1) 650306. Email: zamilsteel@ zamilsteel.com.mm

Balance Fitnesss No 64 (G), Kyitewine Pagoda Road, Mayangone Township. Yangon 01-656916, 09 8631392 Email - info@ balancefitnessyangon.com

• •

Strand Bar 92, Strand Rd, Yangon, Myanmar. tel: 243377.fax: 243393, sales@thestrand.com.mm www.ghmhotels.com

• •

Advertising
WE STARTED THE ADVERTISING INDUSTRY IN MYANMAR SINCE 1991

No. 52, Royal Yaw Min Gyi Condo, Room F, Yaw Min Gyi Rd, Dagon Township, Yangon, Myanmar. Tel: 09-425-307-717

HOT LINE: 09 - 402 510 003 01-646 330 First Class VIP Limousine Car Rental. Professional English Speaking Drivers. Full Insurance for your Safety and comfortable journey Call us Now for your best choice www.mmels.com

Duty free

Get the Best Pure Natural Gemstones and Jewellery No. 44, Inya Road, Yangon, Myanmar. Tel : 01-2305811, 2305812. email : info@bestjewels myanmar.com, Bestjewelsmyanmar.com

98(A), Kaba Aye Pagoda Road, Bahan Township, Yangon. Tel: 553783, 549152, 09-732-16940, 09-730-56079. Fax: 542979 Email: asiapacific. myanmar@gmail.com.

Duty Free Shops Yangon International Airport, Arrival/Departure Tel: 533030 (Ext: 206/155) Office: 17, 2nd street, Hlaing Yadanarmon Housing, Hlaing Township, Yangon. Tel: 500143, 500144, 500145.

Life Fitness Bldg A1, Rm No. 001, Shwekabar Housing, Mindhamma Rd, Mayangone Tsp. Yangon. Ph: 01-656511, Fax: 01-656522, Hot line: 0973194684, natraysports@gmail.com

ENTERTAINMENT
Car Rental Service No. 56, Bo Ywe St, Latha Tsp, Yangon. Tel : 01-246551, 375283, 09-2132778, 09-31119195. Gmail:nyanmyintthu1983@ gmail.com,
Dance Club & Bar No.94, Ground Floor, Bogalay Zay Street, Botataung Tsp, Yangon.Tel: 392625, 09-500-3591 Email : danceclub. hola@gmail.com
(Except Sunday)

sales@manawmaya.com.mm www.manawmayagems.com

Ruby & Rare Gems of Myanamar No. 527, New University Ave., Bahan Tsp. Yangon.

One Stop ENT Center No. (68), Tawwin Street, 9 Mile, Mayangone Tsp, Yangon, Myanmar. Tel : (951) 9 666141 Fax : (951) 9 666135 Email : info@witoriyahospital.com Website : www.witoriyahosptial.com

Tel: 549612, Fax : 545770.

M A R K E T I N G & C O mm U N I C A T I O N S

A D V E R T I S I N G

SAIL Marketing & Communications Suite 403, Danathiha Center 790, Corner of Bogyoke Rd & Wadan Rd, Lanmadaw Township, Yangon, Myanmar. Tel: (951) 211870, 224820, 2301195. Email: admin@ advertising-myanmar.com www.advertising-myanmar. com

Spa Paragon Condo B#Rm-106, Shwe Hinthar Condo, Corner of Pyay Rd & Shwe Hinthar St, 6½Mile, Yangon. Tel: 01-507344 Ext: 112, 09-680-8488, 09-526-1642.

coffee machine

www.realfitnessmyanmar.com

No. 20, Ground Floor, Pearl Street, Golden Valley Ward, Bahan Township, Yangon. Tel : 09-509 7057, 01220881, 549478 (Ext : 103) Email : realfitnessmyanmar @gmail.com

FLORAL SERVICES

BOOK STORES

BEAUTY & MASSAGE

illy, Francis Francis, VBM, Brasilia, Rossi, De Longhi Nwe Ta Pin Trading Co., Ltd. Shop C, Building 459 B New University Avenue 01- 555-879, 09-4210-81705 nwetapintrading@gmail.com

Engineering
Floral Service & Gift Shop No. 449, New University Avenue, Bahan Tsp. YGN. Tel: 541217, 559011, 09-860-2292. Market Place By City Mart Tel: 523840~43, 523845~46, Ext: 205. Junction Nay Pyi Taw Tel: 067-421617~18 422012~15, Ext: 235. Res: 067-414813, 09-49209039. Email : eternal@ mptmail.net.mm

Yangon La Source Beauty Spa 80-A, Inya Rd, Kamayut Tsp. Tel: 512380, 511252 Beauty Bar by La Source Room (1004), Sedona Hotel, Tel : 666 900 Ext : (7167) LS Salon Junction Square, 3rd Floor. Tel : 95-1-527242, Ext : 4001 Mandalay La Source Beauty Spa No. 13/13, Mya Sandar St, Chanaye Tharzan Tsp. Tel : 09-4440-24496. www.lasourcebeautyspa.com

• 150 Dhamazedi Rd., Bahan Tsp, Yangon. Tel: 536306, 537805. Email : yangon@ monument-books.com • 15(B), Departure Lounge, Yangon Int’l Airport. • #87/2, Crn of 26th & 27th St, 77th St,Chan Aye Thar Zan Tsp, Mandalay. Tel : (02) 24880. MYANMAR BOOK CENTRE Nandawun Compound, No. 55, Baho Road, Corner of Baho Road and Ahlone Road, (near Eugenia Restaurant), Ahlone Township. tel: 212 409, 221 271. 214708 fax: 524580. email: info@ myanmarbook.com

co working space

No. (6), Lane 2 Botahtaung Pagoda St, Yangon. 01-9010003, 291897. info@venturaoffice.com, www.venturaoffice.com

One-stop Solution for Sub-station, M&E Work Design, Supply and Install (Hotel, High Rise Building Factory) 193/197, Shu Khin Thar Street, North Okkalapa Industrial Zone, Yangon. Tel: 951-691843~5, 9519690297, Fax: 951-691700 Email: supermega97@ gmail.com. www.supermega-engg.com

The Lady Gems & Jewellery No. 7, Inya Rd, Kamayut Tsp, Yangon, Myanmar. Tel : 01-2305800, 09-8315555 The Lady Gems & Silk Co operative Business Centre, Room No (32/41), New University Avenue Rd, Bahan Tsp, Yangon. Tel : 09-5200726 theladygems@gmail.com www.thelady-gems.com Your Most Reliable Jeweller

24 hours Cancer centre No. (68), Tawwin Street, 9 Mile, Mayangone Township, Yangon. Tel : (951) 9 666141 Fax : (951) 9 666135

24 hours Laboratory & X-ray No. (68), Tawwin Street, 9 Mile, Mayangone Tsp, Yangon, Myanmar. Tel : (951) 9 666141 Fax : (951) 9 666135

FASHION & TAILOR

courier Service
DTDC Courier and Cargo Service (Since 1991) Yangon. Tel : 01-374457 Mandalay. Tel : 09-43134095. www.DTDC.COM, dtdcyangon@gmail.com Door to Door Delivery!!! Sein Shwe Tailor, 797 (003-A), Bogyoke Aung San Rd, MAC Tower 2, Lanmadaw Tsp, Yangon, Ph: 01-225310, 212943~4 Ext: 146, 147, E-mail: uthetlwin@gmail.com Floral Service & Gift Centre 102(A), Dhamazaydi Rd, Yangon.tel: 500142 Summit Parkview Hotel, tel: 211888, 211966 ext. 173 fax: 535376.email: sandy@ sandymyanmar.com.mm.

The Natural Gems of Myanmar & Fine Jewellery. No. 30(A), Pyay Road, (7 mile), Mayangone Tsp, Yangon, Myanmar. Tel : 01-660397, 354398-9 E-mail : spgmes.myanmar @gmail.com

GIFT PRODUCT

24 Hour International Medical Centre @ Victoria Hospital No. 68, Tawwin Rd, 9 Mile, Mayangon Township, Yangon, Myanmar Tel: + 951 651 238, + 959 495 85 955 Fax: + 959 651 398 24/7 on duty doctor: + 959 492 18 410 Website: www.leo.com.mm “ One Stop Solution for Quality Health Care “

Foam spray Insulation
Sole Distributor of Red Ginseng from Korea Ginseng Corporation

Foam Spray Insulation No-410, Ground Fl,Lower Pazuntaung Rd, Pazun taung Tsp, Yangon.Telefax : 01-203743, 09-5007681. Hot Line-09-730-30825.

Tel: 01-374851, 394360 Stores:Coreana @ Junction Square / Mawtin, UNIQHAN@U Wisara Rd; MBIC No.16, 87th street.

No. (68), Tawwin Street, 9 Mile, Mayangone Tsp, Yangon, Myanmar. Tel : (951) 9 666141 Fax : (951) 9 666135 Email : info@witoriyahospital.com Website : www.witoriyahosptial.com

GENERATORS

Home Furnishing

GAS COOKER & Cooker Hoods

World’s leader in Kitchen Hoods & Hobs Same as Ariston Water Heater. Tel: 251033, 379671, 256622, 647813

No. 589-592, Bo Aung Kyaw St, Yangon-Pathein highway Road. Hlaing Tharyar tsp. Tel: 951645178-182, 685199, Fax: 951-645211, 545278. e-mail: mkt-mti@ winstrategic.com.mm

22, Pyay Rd, 9 mile, Mayangone Tsp. tel: 660769, 664363.

GLASS

Bldg-D, Rm (G-12), Pearl Condo, Ground Flr, Kabaraye Pagoda Rd, Bahan Tsp. Tel: 557448. Ext 814, 09-730-98872.

Yangon : A-3, Aung San Stadium (North East Wing), Mingalartaungnyunt Tsp. Tel : 245543, 09-73903736, 09-73037772. Mandalay : No.(4) 73rd St, Btw 30th & 31st St, Chan Aye Thar Zan Tsp. Tel : 096803505, 09-449004631.

International Construction Material Co., Ltd. S.B. FURNITURE No. 60, Sint-Oh-Dan St, Lower Block, Latha Tsp, Yangon, Myanmar. Tel : 01-2410292, 243551, 09-431-83689, 09-448033905.

S.B. FURNITURE

No-001-002, Dagon Tower, Ground Flr, Cor of Kabaraye Pagoda Rd & Shwe Gon Dine Rd, Bahan Tsp. Tel: 544480, 09-730-98872.

dECEMBER 23 - 29, 2013 THE MYANMAR TIMES Office Furniture
Singapore Cuisine Super One Super Market, Kyaikkasan Branch, No. 65, Lay Daung Kan Rd, Man Aung Qtr, Tamwe Tsp, Yangon. Tel : 01-542371, 09-501-9128 Pre School and Primary years (Ages 2 to 10) No. 695, Mahabandola Road, (Between 19th & Sint Oh Dan Street), Latha Township, Yangon. Tel :01-382213, 395816 www.imecedu.com

Water Heaters

European Quality & Designs Indoor/ Outdoor Furniture, Hotel Furniture & All kinds of woodworks No. 422, FJVC Centre, Ground Floor, Room No. 4, Strand Road, Botahtaung Tsp, Yangon, Myanmar. Tel: 01-202063-4, 09 509-1673 E-mail: contact@ smartdesignstrading.com www.royalbotania.com, www.alexander-rose.co.uk

Open Daily (9am to 6pm) No. 797, MAC Tower II, Rm -4, Ground Flr, Bogyoke Aung San Rd, Lamadaw Tsp, Yangon. Tel: (951) 212944 Ext: 303 sales.centuremyanmar@ gmail.com www.centure.in.th

Sai Khung Noung Real Estate Co., Ltd. Tel : 541501, 551197, 400781, 09-73176988 Email : saikhungnoung 1995@gmail.com. www.saikhungnoung.com

a drink from paradise... available on Earth @Yangon International Hotel, No.330, Ahlone Rd, Dagon Tsp, Yangon. Tel: 09-421040512

The Global leader in Water Heaters A/1, Aung San Stadium East Wing, Upper Pansodan Road. Tel: 01-256705, 399464, 394409, 647812.

For House-Seekers

Marine Communication & Navigation

with Expert Services In all kinds of Estate Fields yomaestatemm@gmail.com

Bld-A2, Gr-Fl, Shwe Gabar Housing, Mindama Rd, Mayangone Tsp, Yangon. email: eko-nr@ myanmar.com.mm Ph: 652391, 09-73108896

Tel : 09-332 87270 09-2541 26615 (Fees Free)

No.430(A), Corner of Dhamazedi Rd & Golden Valley Rd, Building(2) Market Place (City Mart), Bahan Tsp, Yangon. Tel : 01-523840(Ext-309), 09-73208079.

Monsoon Restaurant & Bar 85/87, Thein Byu Road, Botahtaung Tsp. Tel: 295224, 09-501 5653.

REMOVALISTS
Quality Chinese Dishes with Resonable Price @Marketplace by City Mart. Tel: 01-523840 Ext.109 Ocean Center (North Point), Ground Floor, Tel : 09-731-83900 01-8600056

Yangon Int’l School Fully Accredited K-12 International Curriculum with ESL support No.117,Thumingalar Housing, Thingangyun, Tel: 578171, 573149, 687701, 687702.

Made in Japan Same as Rinnai Gas Cooker and Cooker Hood Showroom Address

Water Heater

WATER PROOFING

service office
International Construction Material Co., Ltd. No. 60, Sint-Oh-Dan St, Lower Block, Latha Tsp, Yangon, Myanmar. Tel : 01-2410292, 243551, 09-431-83689, 09-448033905.

Top Marine Show Room No-385, Ground Floor, Lower Pazundaung Road, Pazundaung Tsp, Yangon. Ph: 01-202782, 09-851-5597

MEDIA & ADVERTISING

Bldg-A2, G-Flr, Shwe Gabar Housing, Mindama Rd, Mayangone Tsp, Yangon. email: eko-nr@ myanmar.com.mm Ph: 652391, 09-73108896

LEGAL SERVICE
Media & Advertising All the way from Australia. Design for advertisement is not easy, reaching to target audience is even harder? We are equipped with great ideas and partners in Myanmar to create corporate logo, business photography, stationery design, mobile advertisement on public transport and billboard/ magazine ads. Talk to us: (01) 430-897, (0) 942-0004554. www.medialane. com.au U Min Sein, BSc, RA, CPA.,RL Advocate of the Supreme Court 83/14 Pansodan St, Yangon. tel: 253 273. uminsein@mptmail.net.mm

Legendary Myanmar Int’l Shipping & Logistics Co., Ltd. No-9, Rm (A-4), 3rd Flr, Kyaung St, Myaynigone, Sanchaung Tsp, Yangon. Tel: 516827, 523653, 516795. Mobile. 09-512-3049. Email: legandarymyr@ mptmail.net .mm www.LMSL-shipping.com

Executive Serviced Offices
www.hinthabusinesscentres.com

Tel : 01-4413410 Delicious Hong Kong Style Food Restaurant G-09, City Mart (Myay Ni Gone Center). Tel: 01-508467-70 Ext: 114

Water solution

No.290-B,U Wisarya Road,10 Ward, Kamaryut Township,Yangon. TEL:(09)259040853 Open daily 11:00~23:00 Produce by Sagittarius Myanmar

Easy access to CBD Fully furnished facility Company setup for $1,000 Office available from $360 only

Company Limited

Aekar

Water Treatement Solution Block (A), Room (G-12), Pearl Condo, Kabar Aye Pagoda Rd, Bahan Tsp. Hot Line : 09-4500-59000

PLEASURE CRUISES

Paint
World’s No.1 Paints & Coatings Company

Moby Dick Tours Co., Ltd. Islands Safari in the Mergui Archipelago 5 Days, 7 Days, 9 Days Trips Tel: 95 1 202063, 202064 E-mail: info@islandsafari mergui.com. Website: www. islandsafarimergui.com

Relocation Specialist Rm 504, M.M.G Tower, #44/56, Kannar Rd, Botahtaung Tsp. Tel: 250290, 252313. Mail : info@asiantigersmyanmar.com

Heaven Pizza 38/40, Bo Yar Nyunt St. Yaw Min Gyi Quarter, Dagon Township. Tel: 09-855-1383

1. WASABI : No.20-B, Kaba Aye Pagoda Rd, Yankin Tsp,(Near MiCasa), Tel; 09-4250-20667, 09-503-9139 Myaynigone (City Mart) Yankin Center (City Mart) UnionBarAndGrill 42 Strand Road, Botahtaung, Yangon. Tel: 95 9420 180 214, 95 9420 101 854 www.unionyangon.com, info@unionyangon.com

Tel: + 95 1 374851 Email : info@jkmyanmar.com www.jkmyanmar.com (ENG) www.3ec.jp/mbic/ (JPN)

Water Treatment

Sole Distributor For the Union of Myanmar Since 1995 Myanmar Golden Rock International Co.,Ltd. #06-01, Bldg (8), Myanmar ICT Park, University Hlaing Campus, Hlaing Tsp, Yangon. Tel: 654810~17.

Road to Mandalay Myanmar Hotels & Cruises Ltd. Governor’s Residence 39C, Taw Win Rd, Dagon Tsp, Yangon. Tel: (951) 229860 fax: (951) 217361. email: RTMYGN@mptmail.net.mm www.orient-express.com

Crown Worldwide Movers Ltd 790, Rm 702, 7th Flr Danathiha Centre, Bogyoke Aung San Rd, Lanmadaw. Tel: 223288, 210 670, 227650. ext: 702. Fax: 229212. email: crown worldwide@mptmail.net.mm

World famous Kobe Beef Near Thuka Kabar Hospital on Pyay Rd, Marlar st, Hlaing Tsp. Tel: +95-1-535072

No. (6), Lane 2 Botahtaung Pagoda St, Yangon. 01-9010003, 291897. info@venturaoffice.com, www.venturaoffice.com

Commercial scale water treatment (Since 1997) Tel: 01-218437~38. H/P: 09-5161431, 09-43126571. 39-B, Thazin Lane, Ahlone.

WEB SERVICE

TRAVEL AGENTS
Web Services All the way from Australia. World-class websites, come with usability and responsiveness. Our works include website, web apps, e-commerce, forum, email campaign and online advertisement. Plus, we’re the authorised reseller for local and international domain names. So, put your worries aside and let us create the awesomeness you deserved online. (01) 430-897, (0) 942-0004554. www.medialane. com.au

REAL ESTATE
Your Most Reliable & Friendly Real Estate Agency Tel : 09-7308848 01-242370, 394053

Schenker (Thai) Ltd. Yangon 59 A, U Lun Maung Street. 7 Mile Pyay Road, MYGN. tel: 667686, 666646.fax: 651250. email: sche nker@mptmail.net.mm.

Enchanting and Romantic, a Bliss on the Lake 62 D, U Tun Nyein Road, Mayangon Tsp, Yangon Tel. 01 665 516, 660976 Mob. 09-730-30755 operayangon@gmail.com www.operayangon.com

No. 5, U Tun Nyein Street, Mayangone T/S, Yangon. Tel : 01-660 612, 011 22 1014, 09 50 89 441 Email : lalchimiste. restaurant@gmail.com

Asian Trails Tour Ltd 73 Pyay Rd, Dagon tsp. tel: 211212, 223262. fax: 211670. email: res@ asiantrails.com.mm Shan Yoma Tours Co.,Ltd www.exploremyanmar.com

SUPERMARKETS
22, Kaba Aye Pagoda Rd, Bahan Tsp. tel 541997. email: leplanteur@ mptmail.net.mm. http://leplanteur.net Capital Hyper Mart 14(E), Min Nandar Road, Dawbon Tsp. Ph: 553136. City Mart (Aung San Branch) tel: 253022, 294765. City Mart (47th St Branch) tel: 200026, 298746. City Mart (Junction 8) tel: 650778. City Mart (FMI City Branch) tel: 682323. City Mart (Yankin Center Branch) tel: 400284. City Mart (Myaynigone Branch) tel: 510697. City Mart (Zawana Branch) tel:564532.

TOP MARINE PAINT No-410, Ground Floor, Lower Pazundaung Road, Pazundaung Tsp, Yangon. Ph: 09-851-5202 Real Estate Agent Agent fees is unnecessary Tel : 09 2050107, 09 448026156 robinsawnaing@gmail.com

Bo Sun Pat Tower, Bldg 608, Rm 6(B), Cor of Merchant Rd & Bo Sun Pat St, PBDN Tsp. Tel: 377263, 250582, 250032, 09-511-7876, 09-862-4563.

No. 372, Bogyoke Aung San Rd, Pabedan T/S, Yangon. Tel : 01-380 398, 01-256 355 (Ext : 3027) Email : zawgyihouse@ myanmar.com.mm

VISA & IMMIGRATION

RESTAURANTS

SCHOOLS
G-01, City Mart (Myay Ni Gone Center). Tel: 01-508467-70 Ext: 106 Horizon Int’l School 25, Po Sein Road, Bahan Tsp, tel : 541085, 551795, 551796, 450396~7. fax : 543926, email : contact@horizonmyanmar. com, www.horizon.com

International Construction Material Co., Ltd. No. 60, Sint-Oh-Dan St, Lower Block, Latha Tsp, Yangon, Myanmar. Tel : 01-2410292, 243551, 09-431-83689, 09-448033905.

Real Estate Agency
Email : realwin2012@ gmail.com Tel : 09-732-02480, 09-501-8250

Good taste & resonable price @Thamada Hotel Tel: 01-243047, 243639-41 Ext: 32

G-05, Marketplace by City Mart. Tel: 01-523840 Ext: 105

Get your Visa online for Business and Tourist No need to come to Embassy. #165. 35th Street, Kyauktada Tsp, Yangon. Tel: +951 381200, 204020 travel.evisa@gmail.com

HOW TO GET A FREE AD

FREE
General
Education
Township, Yangon . Contact - Ph: 094500- 45 916, gmail: thewindyhills@gmail. com. FOR PRIMARY Student : English, Maths, Myanmar, Geography, History, Science, Social, English Language. If you need to coach your child. Please do contact at Teacher Caroline : caroline.zita@gamil. com WANT TO LEARN English? Learn English with native speaker! -4 skills, Business English, IELTS graduation, IELTS foundation, Custom Program. We are going to open our new intake at 2nd December and offer 20,000 kyats Discount. Contact our Friendly Customer Service Officers for complete information. Ph: 09-73162586, 09-4211-19895, 01-230-5699, 01-2305822. Email: info@ edulinkaustralia.com . Add : Bldg 6, Junction Square, Kamaryut, Yangon. HOME Tution & Guide : For pre - KG, Primary & secondary level. Specialized in Maths & Biology. Tr. Daw Khin Swe Win (B.E.H.S Thuwunna) Rtd. Ph: 09-730-99679, Teaching English : English for young learners and adults. English for oversea travel, study, workplace or social purpose. Business English, Basic English, Everyday English, Communicative English. Taught by experienced and qualified teacher. Taught in abroad for a few years. Effective lessons, International Learning materials, Refresh, develop and practise English. Ms Si Si - Ph: 09-4207-85157 info@v2m.jp, http:// www.v2m.jp E nglish Corresponding Service, Email: Reading and Replying. Fax : Reading and Replying. Letter writing for companies. Albert Than - 09-4310-5909. Real Estate : We have Lands for sale suitable for making Industrial buildings in large area. Buyers can Contact Us on 094500-59037. (There is no pay for Agents & Third party ... Warmly welcome the buyers ) Aung Professional T r a n s l a t i o n P r o f e s s i o n a l Translation from Myanmar to English & English to Myanmar. For legal Translation, Te c h n o l o g i c a l , Diploma tic, Contract, Advertising, Movie, Literature, etc. With Various Services on paper, electronic file, recording & other relevant matters. both regular and express with expert service. No139, 2nd Flr, Bargayar Rd, Sanchaung, Yangon. Ph: 097 3 2 - 11 9 0 7 , a u n g . translation@gmail. com revealing Myanmar Culture, Beliefs and Superstitions in sector by sector together with photos. Available at Book Stores & MCM Ltd. Ph: 253642, 3922928, 392910. Email: distmgr@ myanmartimes.com. mm SHWE KYIN Slipper shop, Yangon. Ph: 01240966 ext 333, 09515-7156.

By FAX : 01-254158 By EMAIL : classified@myanmartimes.com.mm, advertising@myanmartimes.com.mm By MAIL : 379/383, Bo Aung Kyaw St, Kyauktada Township, Yangon.

HOW TO GET MORE BUSINESS FROM AS LITTLE AS K.5,000.
BUy spaCE ON THESE PAGES CALL: Khin Mon Mon Yi - 01-392676, 392928

Property
(01) 291679, 09-250136695. FOR FOREIGNERS Want to learn Myanmar speaking at your home? Contact : 09-517-9125, 09-861-1052 English for Young learners : Build confidence in commu nicating in English. Build strong foundation in English for further education. Introducing reading with variety of books. Using Int'l syllabuses such as Oxford, Collins & Cambridge ,etc. Lesson will be conducted in English. Taught by qualified & internationally experience teacher. English for Adults Speak fluently in various situations. Improve your pronunciation and increase your vocabulary. C o m m u n i c a t e effectively in everyday situations. English for social, study, overseas travel and work purposes. Teacher Yamin - Ph:291679, 09-250-136695 Ks. Add: No.8, 6th Flr (Right), Chan Thar St, Sanchaung(Near Shan Lan Bus-Stop) Ph:09-537-0230, 09730-02705 Decent Myanmar Training School Personal Management & Business Management Trainings Basic English Grammar IELTS preparation English for Specific Purpose-ESP. (1) Spoken English (2) Business Writing (3) Business English (4) English for Marketing (5) English for HRM (6) English for Media (7) English for IT (8) English for Law (9) English for Marine Engineering (10) English for Medicine 29/ B, Rm 7, Myay Nu St, Myaynigone. Ph:01-512-467, 09722-32047.

Rent/ Sale
Car For Rent (Toyota Vitz / 2008 / AC) - Short and longer distances. Driver is fluent in English. - Try us for Compitative rates. Mr. Benjamin, Ph : 09-2590-65766, 09-73039218. KAMAYUT , Innya Myaing Rd, 80' x 80' land, 2RC, 4 MBR, Fully furnished, New (7) Aircons, Generator, Lawn, Ph Line, US$ 6500 per month. (2) Innya Rd, 80' x 90' land, 2RC, 4 Master bedroom, Ph Line, US$ 6000 per month. Ph: 09-507-4241 PABEDAN, New Condo, Downtown Near Sule Pagoda, 3000 Sqft, 3 MBR, 1 Single bedroom 5 Aircons, Bathtub, Teak floor, nice view, US$ 3500 per month. Ph: 09-507-4241. THINGANGYUN, On Thu Min Ga La Main Rd, NearYangon International School (YIS), ILBC Apartment - First Flr (1,200 Sqft) One Master Bed Room attached bath room & toilet, Two Single Rooms Extra Bath Room & Toilet, Kitchen Room,Dining Room, Sitting Room Near KBZ Bank, City Mart, Market, Schools, Circular Train Station car parking space, Opposite of YIS Teachers' apartments Nice, Peace Location: Ph-09-5148138, 01573881.

LCCI , Level I,II &III, MYOB. Ph : 09-5200974. EDUCATION Guiding Primary Student for primary level English, Maths, Science, Geogra phy, History, English Language. gmail: caroline.zita@gmail. com For IGCSE (Edexcel & Campridge) & Secondary level Regular tuition classes Home tuition Exam preparation classes All subjects available Contact: 09-508-8683. Teachers who have got Teaching experience in Singapore, Intl School (primary & seconday levels) AEIS, PSLE, GCSE, SAT , IELTS, TOEFL, EnglishMyamar Speaking Class for company , Sayar Bryan (ME) 09-4200-7 0692 "Scholar Teaching Organization" founded with ME, BE and Master Degree holder with 12 years experience in teaching field.Role & Responsibility: Making the students develop problem solving skills, critical thinking skills and I.Q & E.Q enriching skills, Int'l School (ILBC, Total, MISY, ISY, PISM, Horizon, ISM, network, MIS, MLA, ES4E, DSY, IISY, RV). All grades, All Subjects Singapore MOE Exams (AEIS, S-AEIS exam, IGCSE, IELTS, TOFEL. Tr.Daniel Caulin : 092150-75 Tr.Bryan :094200-70692. Special IGCSE for Scholarships, English, Physics, Chemistry, Math, IELTS; SAT 1 & 2; Teacher Solomon + 3 experts. Ph:09-5417781. “English Classes” For both young learners & adult, Good foundation in Grammar, Good foundation in English, General English-4 skills, Business English-4 skills, Vocabulary enrichment course. Intensive classes only & no home visit . Ba Yint Naung Tower – 1, Ground Floor, Room C&D, Kamaryut

Language
Within 24 hours can make you confidient in Myanmar language speaking and scripts! Teacher Phyu Phyu Khin 09-4930-8926, phyuporcupine@ gmail.com, No.56 I, Thiri Marlar Lane, 7.5 mile, Pyay Road, Yangon. english Grammar for all classes. Ph: 09-5413847. chinese for all grades. Ph: 09-541-3847. give your child the best possible start to life at Int'l Montessori Myanmar (English Education Center) Accredited by IMC Bangkok (Since 1991), Our Montessori curriculum includes: Practical Life Exercises, Sensorial Training, Language D e v e l o p m e n t , Mathematics, Cultural Studies, Botany & Zoology, History, Creative Art, Music and Movement, Cooking Physical Development, Social & Emotional Development, Learning through play, 55(B), Po Sein Rd, Bahan, Yangon, Myanmar, Ph: 546097, 546761, Email: imm.myn@ gmail.com myanmar for Foreigners, Ph: 092501-50791. WITHIN 24 hours can make you confidient in Myanmar Language speaking and scripts! Teacher Phyu Phyu Khin : 09-4930-8926, phyuporcupine@ gmail.com, 56 I, Thiri Marlar Lane, 7.5 mile, Pyay Rd, Yangon. English for Adults &Young Learners 100 % face to face classroom based lessons, Small classroom sized, limited seats, Variety of learning resources E x p e r i e n c e d , internationally qualified teacher who get the best out of you, whatever your level. Offer courses that build your confidence for practical situations and improve important areas such as Speaking and Listening in English. English for young learners : Teacher Yamin - Ph:

Travel
New November Travel & Tour - Our Services: Package Tours/ Fit & Group Tours; Special Tours / Incentive Tours, Business Tours, Business Matching & Meeting, Seminar - Exhibition Service, Guide Services / Hotel Reservation, Car Rental Service / Boat/ Cruise Tickets. "Yours Satisfaction is our reward" Ph-09-49277415, 01-378531, 094480-01 612. Email : new.november2012@ gmail.com, www. newnovembertravel. com Yangon Office :260, Ground Flr, 40th St, 9 Qtr, Kyauktadar,Yangon. Virgin Land Tours Visa Services : Worldwide Air Ticketing, Worldwide Hotel Reservation, All Kind Transportation Rental, Inbound & Outbound Tour Operator, Tour Guide Services. Ph. 01-8610252, 09-512-3793, 09-520-2643. BELTA CAR Rental Rate with Professional English Speaking Tour Car Driver*600000 Ks/ month (exclude fuel OCTANE) contact: Mr.Sonny: 09-4200-48040 & Ms. MyaMyaAung (Tourist Guide): 09-4015-43732 NYAN MYINT THU Car Rental Service : Ko Nyan Myint Win Kyi (MD) - 56, Bo Ywe St, Latha, Yangon, Myanmar. Ph : 01246551, 01-375284. ph:09-2132778. email: nyanmyintthu1983@ gmail.com, nmt@nyan myintthucarrental. com, colwinkyi@ gmail. com. Web:www. nyanmyintthucarrental. com

Public Notice
HR Module -1, Recruitment & Selection Certificate Course Trainer (1) Daw Soe Soe Kyi , HR Practitioner MPA , B.Sc (Chemistry), Executive Diploma in Human Resources Management Trainer (2) Daw Swe Swe Aung, HR Practitioner B.Agr. Sc Executive Diploma in Human Resources M a n a g e m e n t Fees Ks-120,000. Schedule,Start date : 14th December, 2013. Complete date - 29th December, 2013 , Sat: & Sun: (3-weeks) Time - From 02:00 pm to 05:00 pm , total 6- hrs. Address : Ba Yint Naung Tower -1 , Ground Flr, Rm C&D, Kamaryut Yangon. Contacts : 09 4500 45916 emails : thewindyhills@gmail. com , maytwonine.tg@ gmail.com

For Sale
MISUBISHI Canda 10' (hydrolic door) 2007 Engine Power 4900CC Pw, Ac, Ps front butterfly, Lay type 3 Tan, 1 G (190 Lakhs, Pls contact : Ma Thanzin : 09-73101896 MISUBISHI Canntar box 10' (2006) Engine power 3000 CC, Pw, Ac, Ps front butterfly, Lay type 2 Tan, 1 G,Price :195 Lakhs, Pls contact : Ma Thanzin : 09-731-01896 MACBOOK Pro to sell (99% good condition) 13" Intel Core 2 Duo Ram 4GB H.D.D 750GB Mac OS 10.8.5 + Window. Price: 650,000 MMK. For personal user only to contact, Ph: 09-423716686 Macbook Pro 13" Retina Display Intel Core i5 Ram 8GB S.S.D 128GB Mac OS 10.9 Price : 1380000. Ph : 09-4200-50651 99% New Samsung Series 5 Ultra Book Intel Core i5 Ram 8GB H.D.D + SSD Display 13.3 1 Year 6 Month International Warranty Price : 580000. Ph : 09-501-6694

HousingforRent
Mayangone, 8th Mile Primrose Condo 3F Living Room, 1MBR, 2SBR, 1 Maid Room, Fully Furnish, Own Parking, Two Elevator, Card security System. Ph: 09-511-1485, 45L MYA YA MON Water Front Villa, 3 storey building with full facilities. Ph: 01-241756, 370334, 09-510-3207. T hingangyun , Kyipwaryay (North) Drive 25 minutes to Down Town, 40' x 60', 2 RC, 3 MBR, 2 SR, 3 Aircons, 1 Ph. US$ (1000) per 1 Month. Only 1 year contract. Contact :09-508-0880. m2k20066@gmail.com HLAING THAR YAR, FMI City, 80' x 60', 2 Story building, 2 living room, 4 MBR, 2 SR, with Ph, Aircon, Hot, cool water, nice to live. Ph : 09-73181377. (1). Near Bogyoke Market, 2500 sqft, 2 MBR, 1 SR , fully furnish, 3000 USD. (2).Near Park Royal hotel, 1250 Sqft, 2 MBR, 1 SR, fully furnish, 2500 USD. (3). Near Park Royal hotel, 2500 Sqft, 3 MBR, fully furnish, 4000 USD. Ph: 09-4921-4276. (1) THUWUNNA, Duplex for Sale, 2 storeys

building, 40 x 70 ft, Thuwunna VIP-1, Main Rd (2) North Oakklapa, Main Rd (Wai Pon La Rd) Near Medical School Shop House, 1200 Sqft, Hall type, . (3) Yankin, Shwe Ohn Pin Housing, 900 Sqft. 3 rooms, fully furnished, Near Sedona Hotel. Ph:09-732-41848, 098601-042. BAHAN, Golden velly, (1) near ISY school, 2RC, 2400 sqft, 2 MBR, 2 SR, fully furnish, 4500 USD (2).near City Mark, 2 RC, 5600 sqft , 6 MBR, fully furnish (10000 USD) (3). 3 RC, 5000 sqft, 3 MBR, good for office, 4500 USD. Ph: Ph: 094921-4276. (1)Kyee Myin Dine, Pan Hlaing housing, Pan Hlaing St, first flr, 25' x 37', 2BR, 3 Aircon, 1Ph, 1heater, pressure pump, 2 exhaust fans, highly decoration, 750 Lakhs, Negotiable, (2)Pazun Daung, Mahabandoola Rd, 8th flr, 25'x60', 3BR, 1 Aircon, 800 Lakhs, Negotiable, Ph-09-401604409. CENTRAL CITY Residence near Park Royal, marble/ hardwood premium fittings, modern design. 4 rooms 3 bathroom (2 master w/ attached bath) 1955sqft $4850/month. jasonwongjp@gmail. com, 09-4211-02223. PRIME OFFICE, Pansodan Rd, 2500 sqft, office layout w/ boardroom & manager's office. Clean open design, foreign quality fittings. Full building generator. $6250/month. jasonwongjp@gmail. com, 09-4211-02223.

HousingforSale
Land & Building for Sales by owner:- 40' x 60' area land & Wood Building Water, Electricity OK & ready for staying No.294, South Dagon18(B) Aung Min Ga La St (Concrete Rd) Ph:01 573881, 09-514-8138 We have Lands for sale suitable for making Industrial buildings in large area. Buyers can Contact Us on 09-450059037. (There is no pay for Agents & Third party ... Warmly welcome the buyers )

Expert Services
Service Office you can trust. Business Service for foreign investors . 905, 9F, Panchan Tower, Corner of Dhamazedi Rd & Bagayar Rd, Sanchaung Tsp, Yangon. Tel: 01503895, Email :yangon_

Training
Wisdom Management Centre : Abnormal Psychology Program. Level: Certificate. Program Outlines : 1. What is Normal and Abnormal? Assessing & Diagnosing A b n o r m a l i t y. 3.Anxiety Disorders 4.Somatoform & Dissociative Disorders. 5.Mood Disorders 6. Suicide 7.Schizophrenia Duration : 12-Week Day: Tuesday (6:30 ~ 8:00 PM) Starting Date: December 17, 2013. Fees: New Participant : 50,000 Ks. Regular Participant: 45,000

The Embassy of the Republic of Turkey Vacancy Notice
Post Title : 1) Staff 1 post (Female) • University Graduate • Minimum 3 year’s experience in Administrative field • Age between 25-40. • English and Myanmar Speaking • Good computer skills • Can work overtime and able to travel 2) • • • • • • • Staff 1 post (Male) Civil engineer or construction work experience Minimum 3 year’s work experience Age between 25-44. English and Myanmar Speaking Good computer skills Should work overtime and travel Will do mostly office work which sometimes requires technical experience

Want to Rent
Apartment/House - Wanted Couple from Singapore seeks a clean and comfortable house or apartment in quiet neighbourhood not more than 9 miles from city - for long term stay (minimum 1 year) commencing January/ February 2014. Rental USD 2,500 per month. Email to yadana@ victorymyanmar.com or call 094-5005-3669

General
if you are thinking to give a book-gift to your loved ones. Meiji Soe's "Culture & Beyond - Myanmar" is a unique of its king

Qualified and interested candidates should submit CV & copies of educational certificate to 19(AB), Kan Yeik Thar Street, Mayangone Tsp. Yangon before December 26, 2013. Tel : 01-662992

THE MYANMAR TIMES dECEMBER 23 - 29, 2013

FREE
Employment
Myanmar National. Bachelor degree in physiotherapy. 3 years experiences in a similar field. Red Cross Volunteers are preferable. Pls send application letter, CV & related documents to Myanmar Red Cross Society Head Office, Yazathingaha Rd, Dekkhinathiri,NayPyiTaw. Or mrchsrrecruitment@ gmail.com myanmar Red Cross Society is seeking Medical Doctor 1 post in Sittwe: Myanmar Nationality. Medical degree with Valid license & official registration. 1 year experience with other INGO/ local NGO in moblie clinic. Effective command of English, both written and spoken. Good computer skills (Microsoft Office Package), preferable. Red Cross Volunteers are preferable. Pls send application letter, CV & related documents to Myanmar Red Cross Society Head Office, Yazathingaha Rd, Dekkhinathiri,NayPyiTaw. Or mrcshrrecruitment@ gmail.com myanmar Red Cross Society is seeking Bench Worker 3 posts in HpaAn, Kayin State: Myanmar National. High school level. Basic knowledge in English. Red Cross Volunteers are preferable. Pls send application letter, CV & related documents to Myanmar Red Cross Society Head Office, Yazathingaha Rd, Dekkhinathiri,NayPyiTaw. Or mrcshrrecruitment@ gmail.com medecins du Monde (MDM) is seeking Project Manager 1 post in Pyapon: Completed University Degree in any of following specialties. Public Health, Medical Science, Social Work, Public Administration, Program Management. 3 years experience in NGO;s, possibly in Health programs, out of which 2 years in senior management position. Interested and qualified applicants should submit their CV and a cover letter to MDM Country Coordination Office, Yangon, No.47, Po Sein St, Bahan, Yangon. Ph: 542830, 09-73171002, Email: office. mdmmyanmar@gmail. com world Vision Int'l - Myanmar is seeking Community Development Facilitator (CMCB Project) in Thayetchaung - Coastal Zone: University Degree. Working experience in community development. Compe tent in used of Microsoft Word, Excel & Power Point. Good command of Myanmar and English. Pls submit resume (clearly identify the post you apply) by post to HR Department, World Vision Int'l - Myanmar or in person to application drop-box at (18), Shin Saw Pu Rd; Ahlone, Sanchaung PO or send to myajobapps@wvi.org Closing date : December 16, 2013 medecins Sans Frontieres Switzerland (MSFCH) is looking for Head of Mission Assistant 1 post in Yangon : Proven experience in the field or humanitarian areas of humanitarian aid, with other non-government organisations: experience working with authorities at anationalandinternational level. English & Myanmar required. French is an asset. Preferably a medical or paramedical qualification & universitylevel studies. Pls submit application (motivation letter, updated CV & copy of prefessional diplomas) to : HR Manager, MSFCH, Switzerland, No.101, Dhamazedi Rd, Kamayut, Yangon, Ph: 502509, 503548, Email: msfchrangoon-web@geneva. msf.org solidarites Int'l is seeking Administrative Manager 1 post in Bhamo, Kachin State: University level or equivalent in Accounting/ M a n a g e m e n t / Administration. 3 years experience in a similar position with NGOs. Excellent knowledge of Word, Excel, PowerPoint presentation. Fluent in English and Myanmar. Pls submit application (CV, cover letter, references) by email : recruitment@ solidarites-myanmar.org myanmar Red Cross Society is seeking (1) Emergency Operation Center (EOC) Officer 1 post in Nay Pyi Taw : 2 years of relevant experience in Disaster Management. Proficiency with Microsoft Office applications. Proficiency with GIS (geographic information systems) helpful. Good communication & IT knowledge skills. (2) Monitoring & Reporting Officer 1 post in Nay Pyi Taw : 3 years relevant experience in monitoring and reporting field. Effective English language skills & computer knowledge. Red Cross Volunteers are preferable. Pls send application letter, CV & related documents to Myanmar Red Cross Society Head Office, Yazathingaha Rd, Dekkhinathiri,NayPyiTaw. Or mrcshrrecruitment@ gmail.com a genuine interest in joining a professional travel company for long-term commitment need apply.) Interested candidates are invited to send a detailed resume with recent photo and other relevant documents to HR Manager at No.147, Shwe Gone Dine St, West Shwe Gone Dine Ward, Bahan, Yangon, Email: memecho@exotissimo. com Bagan Capital is a Hong Kong based investment and advisory firm focused solely on Myanmar investment opportunities. We are looking for a talented researcher to provide the necessary support to our operations. The researcher’s key tasks would include: Performing quantitative and qualitative market, competitor and company research as needed on a project by project basis. Preparing an English language summary of daily news from comprehensive Myanmar and English sources. Keeping up to date with the latest public tender developments. Supporting the team with any necessary project tasks as requested, including bilingual translations and business travel. The researcher would ideally have the following qualifications: Bachelor’s degree in a numerate subject, preferably from an international institution. Experience in a foreign environment, gained through education or work in an English speaking environment abroad, or in a foreign company in Myanmar. 3 years of working experience in relevant field. Fully bilingual in English and Myanmar. Ability to type rapidly in both languages, using Zawgyi font in Myanmar. Hard working, highly determined and resilient.Successful candidates will work in an exciting work environment with competitive remune ration & benefits. Pls email CV to recruitment@ bcfmyanmar.com to apply, stating clearly in the subject of your email that you are “Applying for the post of BC researcher” Jhpiego is seeking Finance & Administration Officer 1 post in Yangon: Relevant University Degree with qualification of LCCI or qualified accountant with CPA, ACCA, CAT and/ or CIMA qualification is an advantage. Ability to manage and prioritize multiple tasks, take initiative, work well in a team. 3 years experience as a relevant position with an international organization. Advanced skills in Excel & experience in Quick Books is preferable. Demonstrated proficiency in IT particularly in computer assisted audit techniques. Excellent analytical, report-writing skills in English. Pls submit the applications with cover letter to Finance & Administration Manager, Emails: to: kay.khine@jhpiego.org, CC: Mandy.Hovland@ jhpeigo.org Closing date : 30 December 2013 Jhpiego is seeking Country Director Myanmar in Yangon. Required Qualifications: Graduate degree in public health or related field. Fluency in English. Past experience working with Jhpiego and/or a thorough understanding of Jhpiego programming approaches. Pls apply at www.jobs-jhpiego.icims. com Savoy Hotel, Yangon is urgently looking for (1) Human Resources Assistant - 1 ~ 2 years experience, good English & good personality (2) Bar Supervisor - 2 ~ 3 years experience, good English and good personality (3) Driver - 3 years experience (4) Security - 2 years experience. Application letter by email to humanresources@ savoyhotel-yangon.com or 129, Dhammazedi Rd, Yangon. Tel: (951) 526298, 526289. Pls mention the desire position on the application letter. We are seeking Mathematics, Account ing, Physics, Biology & Chemistry Teachers for a secondary school in Yangon, Myanmar : Relevant university degree. Strong English skills a requirement. Classroom teaching experience an asset. 2 years teaching experience. History of working or studying abroad an asset. For a full job description, please contact admin@albaedu. com. Pls send application with updated CV or Personal History form, educational credentials and references to Asia Language & Business Academy : 66, Shweda gon Pagoda Rd, Dagon Township. Centure Myanmar, a leading office furniture provider in Myanmar, is seeking - Sales manager (1 post) - Sales Executive (2 posts) - Marketing Executive (1 post) Showroom manager (1 post) - Showroom Sales (2 posts) - Sales Trainee (2 posts) - Secretary/ Assistance (1 post) Driver (2 posts). We offer a young and international working atmosphere and search for competent and dedicated employees to grow with our expanding business. Be part of the team and send your application letter and CV to mailhrdepartment@ gmail.com (1)MOTORS.COM .MM, Myanmar’s leading online vehicle marketplace is looking for a Sales Manager (2)HOUSE. COM.MM, Myanmar's biggest online Real Estate platform is looking for a Sales Manager. Responsibilities : fully responsible for the entire sales process, conducting sales meetings, training, planning & after-sales: Fully fluent in English & Myanmar; Over 5 years experience in sales; experience in automotive industry preferred; knowledge of Excel, Word & Power Point; Contact : 01-230-5627, thaeei. phyu@work.com.mm ROCKET INTERNET Myanmar Classifieds, part of the world's, leading online venture builder Rocket Internet is looking for an HR manager : You will be in charge of defining, structuring & developing continuously appropriate recruiting channels & processes: Fully fluent in English & Myanmar; Over 5 years experience in HR Management field; experience in creating contracts, payroll process, social security taxes; handbook creating; Contact: 01-2305627, thaeei.phyu@work.com. mm A ccountants , General Clerks, Marketing & Sales Persons (M/F) - Age above 30 years - Urgent Need US$ 1,000/Month, Free Accommodation, Food, Transport Yearly bonus, Local Allowances, Festival allowances, To work in Nigeria, Lagos. 25 Myanmar are working there. No agent fees, Air Ticket Free, During Vacation with pay CPA or ACCA or M.Ba or B.Com or D.Ma or LCCI or any Accounting Academic. Good for English speaking, Computer skill & MYOB. Ph : 01-573881, 09-514-8138 MYANMAR POLESTAR Travels & Tours, Yangon, is urgently looking for a Director of Marketing & Sales to be in charge of the European market. Required 3 to 5 years experience in the hospitality or tour operations, great communication & organizational skills. Competent salary package will be offered according to experience and skills. Pls submit CV and cover letter to dom@ myanmarpolestar.com SAIL Group of Companies Ltd is servicing international clients in media planning and creative production for advertising . We need candidates for the following positions: graphic designer, media planner, video editor, accountant. Please send resume to the following advertising. myanmar@gmail.com. 790, Bogyoke Rd and Wadan Rd Junction, Suite 603, Danathiha Center, Lanmadaw, Yangon. Ph:211870, 224820 We are seeking (1). Senior Accountant - F 1 Post : must be draw Final Account in Microsoft Excel. (2).Mechanical Engineer - M 1 Post : BE or AGTI (Mechanical) or equivalent. (3). Electrical Engineer M 1 Post : BE or AGTI (Electrical) or equivalent. (4). Sale and Marketing Staff - M/F 1 Post : Familar with electrical goods marketing. (5). Receptionist - F 1 Post. All position must be able to communication in English, able to use Computer Microsoft Office & working experience 5 years. Pls submit CV with the recent photo copy of NRC, Labor card and qualification certificates to the Managing Director of Myat Kan Moe Enterprise Ltd: (002), Bldg (A-8), Ground Flr, Mindama Rd, Shwe Gabar Housing, Mayangone, Yangon, Ph:663656, 09-73194828. Email: gei.ygn3@ gmail.com Closing date : 10 Jan 2014. Smart Choice Co.,Ltd is seeking : For Business Development Department, (1) Secretary - M/F 1 post, (2)Manager - M/F 1 post. For IT Department : (1) Manager- M 1 post, (2) Assistant For Procurement Department : (1)Deputy Manager - M / F 2 posts. (2)Assistant ManagerM/F 2 posts. Export & Import Department: (1) Manager - M 2 posts. (2) Assistant Manager - M 2 posts. For Administration Department: (1) Receptionist - F 2 posts. For EP Department :(1)Asst: Engineer - M 5 Post :B.E [EP], A.G.T.I [EP], B.Tech [EP], Age 35 ~ 40. Above 5 years of experiences. Computer literate. (2) Sub Asst: Engineer - M 5 posts (3)Junior Engineer - M 5 posts (4) Technician- M 5 posts. For Civil Department : (1) Asst: Engineer - M 5 posts (2)Sub Assistant Engineer - M 5 posts (3) Junior Engineer - M 5 posts. (4) Site Supervisor - M 5 posts. (5)Tower - M 15 posts .For Administration Department: (1)Driver (For Crane Care) & (Office Car) No.47, Myaung Mya St, Sanchaung, Yangon. Ph: 01 -536-078, 092503-11027. Parkway Cancer Centre is seeking Medical Doctor - F 1 post : M.B,B.S Graduate with SA MA registration, 2 years experience in medical field, Good communication in English, Must be able to use computer, internet and Microsoft application with excellent skills, We welcome the candidates who are trust worthy, selfmotivated with positive working attitude. Pls submit: CV with relevant certificates, documents, recommendation letter attach and documents, and expected salary to Rm(G-07), Ground Flr, Diamond Center, Pyay Rd, Kamayut. Tel : 532 438, 532 447, 09 513 6584, Email : yangon@ canhope.org KELVINCHIAYangonLtdis a foreign legal consultancy firm. We invite motivated & committed indivi duals to join us as: Administrative Executive : Good written & spoken communication skills in English. Mature & capable of supervising & directing subordinates. Must be well-organized, meticulous, have initiative & execute instructions promptly. Some accounting back ground & experience preferred. Interested applicants are invited to send their full resume stating their current and expected salaries, together with a recent photograph to chw@kcyangon.com. We regret that only shortlisted candidates will be notified. MiTA Myanmar @ ISBC Company is urgently looking for Myanmar nationals for the following positions: (1). Maintenance Engineer (2 positions) - Packaging Industry (2). Sales Engineer (2 positions) – Packaging Industry. Work Location: Yangon, Myanmar; Training in Bangkok, Thailand. To know more about above positions & other vacant positions and sending CV, please visit: https:// mitaservices.com.sg/ jobs-career/myanmar/

UN Positions
the Int'l Organization for Migration (IOM) office in Yangon is seeking (1) National Health Coordinator - SRHR & Maternal, Newborn and Child Health 1 post in Yangon. (2) Driver 1 post in Bogalay Township. (3) Microscopist - Malaria 1 post in Myawaddy. Interested candidates are invited to submit an application letter and an updated CV with a maximum length of 3 pages including names and contact details of 3 referees (copies of certificates and further documents are not required at this stage) to Int'l Organization for Migration (IOM), Mission in Myanmar Yangon Office, 318-A, Ahlone Rd, Dagon tsp, Yangon. Closing date: 27, December 2013. UNICEF Myanmar is seeking Fixed-term Appointment Health Officer - UCI (NOB), based in Yangon : University degree in Social Sciences, Public Health or other relevant disciplines, preferably MBBS; MPH/MBA or equivalent would be an asset. 2 years experience in Public Health programme design, administration & monitoring & evaluation or related field; Analy tical & conceptual ability; documentation & communication skills; Planning & monitoring skills & ability to organize work & projects; Skill in computer applications; Fluency in English and Myanmar. Working knowledge of another UN language is an asset. Pls send application with updated CV or Personal History form, educational credentials and references to jobs. yangon@unicef.org by 24 December 2013. unesco Myanmar Project Office is seeking Administrative Assistant: University degree at Bachelor or higher level in public of business administration or a related field. Excellent in English. 5 years experience in handling administrative & secretarial tasks. Computer literacy. Excellent typing skills in Myanmar language. Pls submit a cover letter (referencing the job Announcement No. JA 36-13) accompanied by full resume stating details of educational qualifications & working experience, present income, home & office telephone numbers. Email:kk.lwin@unesco. org; with copy to: adm.bgk@unesco. org, UNESCO Yangon Project Office, UN Bldg 6, Natmauk Rd, Tamwe, Yangon,

Ingo Positions
medecins Sans Frontieres - Switzerland (MSF) is seeking Medical Doctor 1 post in Dawei, Tanintharyi Region: Recognized medical doctor diploma/ degree with valid SAMA. Previous working experience with HIV/ TB control activities would be an asset. 1 year clinical experience essential. Fluent in English & Myanmar. Pls submit application (motivation letter, updated CV and copy of professional diplomas) to HR Manager Medecins sans Frontieres Switzerland (MSF-CH) 101, Dhamazedi Rd, Kamaryut, Yangon. Email: msfch-rangoonweb@geneva.msf. org. Closing date: 26.12.2013. myanmar Red Cross Society is seeking(1) Programme Manager 1 post in Maungdaw, Rakhine State: University

degree or equivalent. Medical related degree holders or persons with 5 years experiences in Medical field especially in Reproductive Health are more preferable. Computer literacy. Proficiency in English. (2) Prosthetic Foot Worker - 2 post in Hpa-An, Kayin State: Myanmar National. High School & professional education. Effective knowledge in English Language. Red Cross Volunteers are preferable. Pls send application letter, CV & related documents to Myanmar Red Cross Society Head Office, Yazathingaha Rd, Dekkhinathiri, Nay Pyi Taw. Or mrcshrrecruitment@ gmail.com, Closing date : 26.12.2013. world Vision Int'l - Myanmar is seeking (1) Cashier cum Bookkeeper in Pyapon, Ayeyarwaddy Region: University Degree in accounting/ finance or related subject. 2 years experience as Cashier or in the field of finance and administration. Working knowledge of Microsoft Word and Excel. (2) Community Develop ment Facilitator (Myanmar Education Consortium) in Hlegu, Yangon: University Degree in any discipline. Competent in used of Microsoft Word, Excel and Power Point. Good command of Myanmar & English. (3) Community Development Facilitator (Livestock Project) in Bogale & Pyapon, Ayeyarwady Region: University Degree in any discipline, Community Health/ Diploma in Nursing is preferable. Competent in used of Microsoft Word, Excel and Power Point. Good command of Myanmar and English. (4) Project Manager (Livestock Project) based in Bogale & Pyapon, Ayeyarwady Region: University Degree in Veterinary Science is essential & Master degree desirable. 3 years experience in the field of project management preferably in livelihood sector. Good knowledge of Microsoft Word, Excel & Power Point. Good command report writing & communication skill in English. (5) Driver cum Logistics Assistant in Palaw,TanintharyiRegion: A High school graduate. 3 years experiences in relevant job and holding valid license. Must have basic knowledge of auto mechanic. Must provide a clean criminal background. Pls submit resume (clearly identify the post you apply) by post to HR Department, World Vision Int'l - Myanmar or in person to application drop-box at No (18), Shin Saw Pu Rd; Ahlone, Sanchaung PO or send to myajobapps@wvi.org Closing date : January 2, 2014. world Vision Int'l - Myanmar is seeing Community Development Facilitator in Pyapon, Hmawbi Tsp &Hlaing Bwe Tsp: University Degree in any discipline, Community Health/ Diploma in Nursing is preferable. Competent in used of Microsoft Word, Excel & Power Point. Good command of Myanmar & English. Must provide a clean criminal background. Pls submit resume (clearly identify the post you apply) by post to HR Department, World Vision Int'l - Myanmar or in person to application drop-box at No (18), Shin Saw Pu Rd; Ahlone, Sanchaung PO or send to myajobapps@wvi.org not later than January 2, 2014. myanmar Red Cross Society is seeking Physiotherapist 1 post in Hpa-An, Kayin State:

Local Positions
With 20 years of operations in the region, Exotissimo is one of the longest established destination management companies in Asia and one of the best known. Currently, Exotissimo Travel Myanmar has following vacancies to help handle our expanding business. (1) Travel Consultant/ Tour Operator - 5 Posts : 2 years experience in Tourism industry with same position, Pro-active, team spirit, good organisational & problem solving skill, Strong sales & customer service focus, Possess computer proficiency : MS office, Ability to work under pressure & timeline, Excellent command of written and spoken in English or French (2)HR Executive - 1 post : Preferably minimum Diploma in HRM and above, 1 year of relevant experience, Strong interpersonal and communication skills, Excellent organizational & time management skill. (Only those with

66 Sport

THE MYANMAR TIMES DECEMBER 23 - 29, 2013

Chinese cricket on sticky wicket
WHITE-CLAD Chinese cricketers roared as a homegrown bowler sent the bails flying in Beijing – to the unfamiliar clatter of leather on plastic. The national universities’ tournament, the country’s top competition, was held on an astroturf baseball field in the capital, where the pitcher’s mound had been removed, the stumps were made of plastic and the boundary marked out by orange discs. It was a sign of the lack of government support for the non-Olympic sport in China, where only around two dozen homegrown teams play regular competitive matches and a few foreigners are trying to drive it forward. Across the Himalayas, cricketobsessed India are top of the world rankings in one-day internationals. But despite an even larger population, China are listed last but two in Asia, ahead of only Myanmar and tiny Brunei. “When I got here, everyone was holding the bat like it was baseball,” said Rashid Khan, the former Pakistani international who now coaches China’s national team, one of the few spectators at the university event. “Now they can play good cricket,” he added, as players hooked balls toward the baseball netting. “The bowlers at least are bowling with a decent action.” The first recorded cricket match in China was played in 1858 between a team of officers from the British navy’s HMS Highflyer and a side from Shanghai. But while the British Empire spread the game to Australia, South Asia and the Caribbean amongst others -- its former territory Hong Kong recently qualified for next year’s World Twenty20 in Bangladesh -mainland China resisted complete colonisation and the sport never caught on. Now a wave of sports governing bodies from American football to rugby are pushing their wares in China, hoping to secure a slice of its vast market after basketball and soccer won tens of millions of fans in recent decades. The Malaysian-based Asian Cricket Council funds the national team, and Briton Matt Smith, who coaches at a university in the northeastern rustbelt city of Shenyang, said, “We’ve begun to build a cricket culture.” There are expatriate sides in China’s major cities, but according to the state-backed Chinese Cricket Association (CCA) the vast country has only 68 homegrown teams, in schools and universities. Smith has carried balls and bats

BEIJING

Li Jian of China is clean bowled off by Pakistani ball during the men’s cricket quarter-final at the 16th Asian Games in Guangzhou in 2010. Photo: AFP

-- not easily found in China -- back from Britain but one of his toughest tasks has been translating cricket’s unique lexicon into Chinese. He rendered “googly” – a type of

TRADE MARK CAUTION
LEO Pharma A/S, a company organized under the laws of Denmark, of Industriparken 55, DK-2750 Ballerup, Denmark, is the Owner of the following Trade Marks:-

ABOLESE
Reg. No. 8515/2010

ERALESE
Reg. No. 8516/2010 Reg. No. 8517/2010 in respect of “Class 5: Pharmaceutical preparations”.

LORSIMA PEPLIN

Reg. No. 8518/2010 in respect of “ Class 5: Vaccines, pharmaceuticals, medical preparations, diagnostic preparations and therapeutic agents for the treatment, prevention and diagnosis of diabetes, dermatological, respiratory and/or inflammatory conditions, namely, acne, angina, arthritis, aspiration pneumonia, emphysema, gastroenteritis, intestinal flu, necrotizing enterocolitis, pelvic inflammatory disease, pharyngitis, PID, pleurisy, raw throat, redness, rubor, sore throat, stomach flu and urinary tract infections, chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy; Vaccines, pharmaceuticals, medical preparations, diagnostic preparations and therapeutic agents for the treatment of cancers, namely, tumors, sarcomas, carcinomas and melanomas including tumors of the colon, breast, neck, throat, bladder, brain, liver, pancreas, adrenal glands, lymph, testicles, uterus, ovaries, lung as well as solid and blood borne tumors such as ABL1 protooncogene, AIDS related cancers, acoustic neuroma, acute lymphocyte leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia, adenocystic carcinoma, adrenocortical cancer, agnogenic myeloid metaplasia, alopecia, alveolar soft-part sarcoma, anal cancer, angio-sarcoma, aplastic anemia, astrocytoma, ataxia-telangiectasia, basal cell carcinoma, bladder cancer, bone cancers, bowel cancer, brain stem glioma, brain and CNS tumors, breast cancer, CNS tumors, carcinoid tumors, cervical cancer, childhood brain tumors, childhood cancer, childhood leukemia, childhood soft tissue sarcoma, chondrosarcoma, choriocarcinoma, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, chronic myeloid leukemia, colorectal cancers, cutaneous T-cell lymphoma, dermatofibrosarcoma-protuberans, desmoplastic-

small-round-cell-tumor, ductal carcinoma, endocrine cancers, endometrial cancer, ependymoma, esophageal cancer, Ewing’s sarcoma, extra-hepatic bile duct cancer, eye cancer, fallopian tube cancer, fanconi anemia, fibrosarcoma, gall bladder cancer, gastric cancer, gastrointestinal cancers, gastrointestinal-carcinoid-tumor, genitourinary cancers, germ cell tumors, gestational-trophoblasticdisease, glioma, gynecological cancers, hematological malignancies, hairy cell leukemia, head and neck cancer, hepatocellular cancer, hereditary breast cancer, histiocytosis, Hodgkin’s disease, human papillomavirus, hydatidiform mole, hypercalcemia, hypopharynx cancer, intraocular melanoma, islet cell cancer, Kaposi’s sarcoma, kidney cancer, Langerhan’s-cell-histiocytosis, laryngeal cancer, leiomyosarcoma, leukemia, Li-Fraumeni syndrome, lip cancer, liposarcoma, liver cancer, lung cancer, lymphedema, lymphoma, Hodgkin’s lymphoma, non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, male breast cancer, malignant-rhabdoid-tumor-of-kidney, medulloblastoma, melanoma, Merkel cell cancer, mestothelioma, metastic cancer, mouth cancer, multiple endocrine neoplasia, mycosis fungoides, myelodysplastic syndromes, myeloma, myelo-prolifeative disorders, nasal cancer, nasopharyngeal cancer, nephroblastoma, neuroblastoma, neurofibromatosis, Nijmegen breakage syndrome, non-melanoma skin cancer, non-small-cell-lung-cancer, ocular cancers, oesophageal cancer, oral cavity cancer, oropharynx cancer, osteosarcoma, ostomy ovarian cancer, pancreas cancer, paranasal cancer, parathyroid cancer, parotid gland cancer, penile cancer, peripheral-neuroectodermaltumors, pituitrary cancer, polycythemia vera, prostate cancer, rare-cancers-and-associated-disorders, renal cell carcinoma, retinoblastoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, Rothmund- Thomson syndrome, salivary gland cancer, schwannoma, Sezary syndrome, skin cancer, small cell lung cancer, small intestine cancer, soft tissue sarcoma, spinal cord tumors, squamous cell carcinoma, stomach cancer, synovial sarcoma, testicular cancer, thymus cancer, thyroid cancer, transitional-cell-cancer of the bladder, transitional-cell-cancer of the renal, pelvis and ureter, trophoblastic cancer, urethral cancer, urinary system cancer, uroplakins, uterine sarcoma, uterus cancer, vaginal cancer, vulva cancer, Waldenstrom’s-macroglobulinemia and Wilms’ tumor; pharmaceutical preparations namely, alimentary tract and metabolism, antineoplastic and immunomodulating agents, antiinfectives for systemic use; dermatological preparations”. Fraudulent imitation or unauthorised use of the said Trade Marks will be dealt with according to law. Win Mu Tin, M.A., H.G.P., D.B.L for LEO Pharma A/S P. O. Box 60, Yangon E-mail: makhinkyi.law@mptmail.net.mm Dated: 23 December 2013

delivery bowled by a right arm leg spinner – as a “cross-eyed ball”, and bowlers send down “bright spin” rather than “off spin”. The spin delivery known as a “Chinaman” has been bowled in the country but remains untranslated, although the cricketers’ cry of “Howzat!” is apparently universal. Smith brokered a deal to send Shenyang-based batsman Jiang Shuyao to the English North Sea resort of Cleethorpes for local matches last year -- the first time a Chinese cricketer had played in a foreign league. “If we want to get better we need to study abroad, there are not enough high level matches here in China,” said Jiang, a floppy white hat framing his face. “If cricket is to be successful here, it needs to become an Olympic sport,” he added. Chinese sport remains government-dominated, with vast sums ploughed into training athletes for events which can bring Olympic glory and other disciplines disregarded, experts say. The country’s only cricket stadium was built for the 2010 Asian Games in Guangzhou, where there is no adult Chinese team to use it. China’s men’s side meet mostly crushing defeats in international matches, but its women cricketers have occasionally fared better, notching victories against Malaysia and Thailand in the 2010 tournament, before being on the wrong end of a 128-run thrashing from Pakistan. Nonetheless they are still ranked joint-bottom in Asia. Terry Zhang, of the CCA, admitted that there were “no funds from the central government”. But that has not prevented China from investing in the game abroad – it reportedly funded US$132 million worth of cricket facilities in the West Indies in recent years, including a $30 million loan to Jamaica for a 25,000 seat stadium. The loans were dubbed “cricket diplomacy” by Caribbean media, as Beijing seeks to win friends in a region where several island countries still have diplomatic ties with Taiwan. Back on the mainland, one of its own top players, Zhang Yufei, described as the first Chinese cricketer to score a century in a competitive match – against an expatriate side – is on the verge of retirement at just 21. Zhang says his professional career may be over before it has even begun, and he is preparing to start work at an engineering firm run by his father. “There is no chance to make a living from cricket,” he laments. – AFP

TRADE MARK CAUTION
NOTICE is hereby given that Sunny Herbs International Beverage Co. Ltd a company organized under the laws of Thailand and having its principal office at 57 Nonthaburi 1 Road, Nonthaburi 11000 Thailand is the Owner and Sole Proprietor of the following trademark: -

68 Sport

THE MYANMAR TIMES DECEMBER 23 - 29, 2013

A Bluffer’s Diary – a weekend
27 TH SeA GAMeS MyanMaR 2013

(Reg. Nos. IV/3027/1994 & IV/3626/2009 & IV/10017/2013) in respect of:- “Mineral and aerated waters and other non-alcoholic drinks; fruit drinks and fruit juices; syrups and other preparations for making beverages.” Any fraudulent imitation or unauthorized use of the said trademark or other infringements whatsoever will be dealt with according to law. U Kyi Win Associates for Sunny Herbs International Beverage Co. Ltd P.O. Box No. 26, Yangon. Phone: 372416 Dated: 23rd December, 2013

BIRELEY’S

SEA GAMeS
Where to go? Saturday 9:30am Looking for local flavour, the first event I sought out was sepak takraw, held in the main park at the Wunna Theidki Indoor Stadium in Nay Pyi Taw. The first match scheduled was the local derby between Myanmar and Thailand, and to ensure we made it in time for the kick-off one of my compatriots had printed a map from the SEA Games’ website. Unfortunately, the map linked to sepak takraw actually displayed the basketball venue instead, 40 minutes away at the Zayar Thiri venue. In the park Saturday 10am (-ish) Realising the error and redirecting our travel through Nay Pyi Taw’s still near-empty roads, we arrived at the park only to be confronted with a long queue. Luckily for us, this queue was for accreditation, and having bought ours in advance we walked straight in, to be met with a simple tabletop stall of souvenirs. In order to demonstrate my split British-Myanmar loyalties, I procured a bowler hat decorated in the Myanmar tricolour. Entrance A was still an unfortunately long and surprisingly solitary walk away from the indoor stadium. But it did give us chance to appreciate the scale of the park, which is still a predominantly empty wasteland, next to what appears to be an abandoned workers’ village. We began to bet on attendance numbers for the 5000-seat stadium; estimates, fearfully, were in the low hundreds. Kicking back with the locals Saturday 11am As we entered the arena that, from the detailing, will provide an impressive basketball venue, Myanmar held a slender first-set lead. As we settled in our seats, that lead quickly eroded, and was later followed by a capitulation in the second set. Luckily none of the 3000-strong crowd seemed to blame us for the change in fortune. Our support was further encouraged by crowd members who provided us with several sets of inflatable noisemakers, even after I continued to accidentally burst them. Amongst the high-energy backflips and overhead kicks, the only disappointment in the game was the lack of many long rallies. Following the

Matt RoEBUcK
matt.d.roebuck@googlemail.com

TRADE MARK CAUTION
NOTICE is hereby given that L’OREAL a company organized under the laws of France and having its principal office at 14, rue Royale, F-75008 PARIS, France, is the Owner and Sole Proprietor of the following trade mark: (Reg: Nos. IV/5818/2010 & IV/8316/2013) In respect of: - “Perfume, toilet water; gels, salts for the bath and the shower; toilet soaps, body deodorants; cosmetics namely creams, milks, lotions, gels and powders for the face, the body and the hands; tanning and after-sun milks, gels and oils; make-up preparations; shampoos; gels, sprays, mousses and balms for the hair styling and hair care; hair lacquers; hair colouring and hair decolorant preparations ; hair permanent waving and curling preparations; essential oils for personal use.” - Class: 3 Any fraudulent imitation or unauthorized use of the said trademark or other infringements whatsoever will be dealt with according to law. U Kyi Win Associates For L’OREAL P.O. Box No. 26, Yangon. Phone: 372416 Dated: 23rd December, 2013

By Friday night the centrepiece weekend of the 27th SEA Games approached with Myanmar riding high atop the medal table. A weekend of international sport across two cities lay ahead of me, but would I have the opportunity to witness home team gold?

Myanmar defeat we decided an early lunch should be followed by the Myanmar ladies’ group game against Laos. A lack of capacity Saturday afternoon Lunch options in the park were limited to the one man selling tepid sushi and deep-fried sausage doughnuts, so we exited and later returned through the more conveniently located Entrance B. Access at this entrance was slower: For some reason, in addition to electronically scanning your accreditation card, the police manually entered your name and accreditation card details in a handwritten ledger. While the men’s game of sepak takraw displayed great power and speed, the women’s game showed an equal level of gymnastic ability but, with less power, points lasted for longer. We, and the notably over-capacity crowd, appreciated the exciting display of sporting prowess. Seated on the stairs, standing in the aisles and viewing platforms above, the crowd was electric. Both sides played highly competitively, but with smiling faces. Every point, win or lose, they joined hands and swung their arms as if playing a schoolyard game with friends. As we had joined the game with Myanmar holding the lead after a tight 21-17 opening set, when the local side began slipping behind our sporting superstitions led us to believe we were once again the delivers of bad omens. When the women then regained their composure to fight back and secure the second set, and the game, with another 21-17 score line, it was time to take our newfound confidence elsewhere. Karate was next on the list. The

VICHY

leaflet we had picked up at the entrance told us we could find the event next door, in Indoor Stadium C. Entering the neighbouring hall we were confronted with a quiet venue hosting the badminton finals: a doubles match featuring Indonesia playing Indonesia. Already knowing who would win, we left and continued on in our hunt for martial arts. A quick search of the SEA Games’ website enabled by the free and comparatively high-speed Wi-Fi available at all Games’ venues, we found the karate was actually being held in Indoor Stadium A. The program suggested we should be just in time for a repacharge event. We were not: Nothing was happening. Clearly a change of tack and a change of venue were in order. A lack of signposts, except strangely for the main stadiums, led to a journey to the strangely named Indoor Boxing Stadium. Far worse was its peculiar proportions that required those entering and exiting the arena to pass through the same space, wide enough for only one person at a time. There were seats remaining in the corner of a long rectangular shed with a balcony seating area that masqueraded as a sports venue, but no one could reach them for the crush of spectators stand-

TRADE MARK CAUTION
NOTICE is hereby given that GREE ELECTRIC APPLIANCES, INC. OF ZHUHAI a company organized under the laws of China and having its principal office at Jinji West Road, Qianshan Zhuhai, Guangdong, China is the owner and sole proprietor of the following trademark:-

(Reg: Nos. IV/9176/2010) in respect of :- “air conditioning installations; ventilation[airconditioning] installations and apparatus; air reheaters; radiators, electric; heat accumulators; laundry dryers, electric; fans[airconditioning]; air dehumidifiers; air purifying apparatus and machines; cooking apparatus and installations; extractor hoods for kitchen use; coal gas water heaters; electric water heaters; electromagnetic oven; cooking utensils, electric; electric drinking water dispensers; electric kettles; air humidifiers; pressure cookers [autoclaves],electric; air conditioners for vehicles; fans(parts of air conditioning installations); filters for air conditioning; heaters for vehicles; air dryers; air sterilizers; electric hair dryers; evaporators; Sterilizers; electric sterilizing cupboards; heat exchangers[not parts of machines]; exhaust fans; solar energy water heaters; electric iron pans; heaters for baths; gas burners; air refreshers; Refrigerators; microwave ovens [cooking apparatus]; water purification installations; electric dish washers for household use; electric egg boilers; electric appliances for making yogurt; Steam facial apparatus [saunas]; bread toasters; electric coffee machines; electric foot washers; bakers’ ovens; electric slow-cookers; electric humidifiers for air heaters; electric kettles with filters.” Any fraudulent imitation or unauthorized use of the said trademark or other infringements whatsoever will be dealt with according to law. U Kyi Win Associates for GREE ELECTRIC APPLIANCES, INC. OF ZHUHAI P.O. Box No. 26, Yangon. Phone: 372416 Dated: 23rd December, 2013

Min Zaw Oo flexs during the SEA Games body

www.mmtimes.com

Sport 69

at the SEA Games
ing in the aisles. This was all much to the annoyance of anyone sitting in the first four rows. I had particularly looked forward to these boxing finals but could not stand to be in that cramped, overheated environment for more than one round. Since we were in the area, we visited both the Indoor Billiards Stadium and the “Indoor Futsal Stadium” – the latter having no seats from which you could watch with a full view of the pitch. These venues were the lowlight of the weekend. As we left we walked against the crowd leaving the seemingly new yet unused Indoor Tennis Stadium and heading for boxing after the conclusion of the events in the main indoor arena. It was already dangerously over-crowded: peculiar that no-one imagined how popular the boxing and muay events would be. The live events for the evening concluded in another well-designed arena. The swimming pool provided a perfect view unless you were hoping for Myanmar success. Hopes of witnessing a Myanmar gold on the first day were drowned as every local athlete finished a distant last. All that was left was to find a restaurant where we could watch the Myanmar-Thailand organisers from the local Number 3 and Number 4 Business Education High Schools. Each child was wearing a white T-shirt, many with the flag of Myanmar across their chests, but also a great number representing all nations at these SEA Games. A local volunteer explained to me that this was to “warmly welcome the ASEAN countries”. Although there were five entrants in the women’s event, even before the competition as the participants’ starting weights were announced it was clear this would be a straight fight for gold between the Filipino and Thai athletes. The former, as the heavier, would have to out-lift her opponent to win. While in the end both set Games records, the extra kilos proved too much and victory went to Thailand. Gold was also claimed by Thailand in the Men’s event, where Pitaya Tibnoke, the current Games recordholder, faced no real competition in breaking his own record. The hockey game held next door was just as one-sided. Half the invited children cheered on Malaysia, while the other half sitting on the side Vietnam were attacking chanted for that nation. The latter did so in vain, as never once did the Vietnamese team enter their opposition’s half with the ball under their control. Tension builds Sunday evening Sunday’s events had thus far been rather one-sided; my hopes were now resting on Myanmar’s bodybuilders achieving the kind of dominance they had predicted in their pre-Games interviews. For a final time the Games’ website led me astray: I arrived at 2:30pm expecting a 3pm start to the 55kg competition. In fact I would wait with the (again over-capacity) crowd in the aisles until the 4pm start to the 80kg event. The crowd was encouraged to sing and the invited schoolchildren delivered as Aung Swe Naung, the 90kg entrant, arrived and toured the crowd shaking hands. Considering Aung Swe Naung was about to take to the stage to flex his muscles in nothing but a thong, he looked surprisingly sheepish at all the attention before demonstrating his natural showmanship by ascending the stairs and flexing his muscles “Rocky style”. Aung Swe Naung undoubtedly took the title of fan favourite; while other competitors delivered moonwalks and running man dance moves in their solo shows, he topped them all, as the Myanmar entrant with his golden dyed hair, golden glossed body and gold thong as he successfully landed a backflip before flexing his muscles without missing a beat. Although Aung Swe Naung could only achieve silver the two highlights of the evening were yet to come. First Aung Swe Naung and his fellow competitors performed a group “freestyle” routine, a peculiar mixture of artistic cooperation between fellow athletes and occasional one-upmanship, all set, presumably tongue in cheek, to Shakira’s “Hips Don’t Lie”. Finally, Min Zaw Oo, Myanmar’s entrant in the 80kg classification, was able to buck the trend of the weekend and deliver both gold and the national anthem. The weekend had delivered highs and lows; the magnificence of some venues and enthusiasm of the crowds was tempered by occasional misinformation and disappointment at some of the minor venues. However, the weekend was undeniably enjoyable: a real success for a nation holding their first such event in 44 years. By the end of the weekend Myanmar had been replaced at the top of the table by Thailand, but I had seen gold.
Matt Roebuck is a sports writer and sports development consultant based in Yangon. He is the author of the book The Other Olympics, published in 2012.

IN PICTURES

Heartbreaker in Mandalay: Members of the Myanmar women’s football team cry after losing to Thailand on penalty kicks during the Southeast Asian Games on December 18. Photo: Si Thu Lwin

Rodman hopes N Korea basketball match will ‘engage’ United States
FORMER NBA star Dennis Rodman said December 19 he is hoping a basketball game he is organising in North Korea could “engage” the American people and US President Barack Obama. “Sport is so important to people around the world so I hope this is going to engage the American people, especially Obama,” the eccentric former Chicago Bulls star told reporters at Beijing airport, on his way to Pyongyang. Rodman is organising an exhibition game between North Korea and a team of mainly ex-NBA players on January 8, to mark the birthday of reclusive leader Kim Jong-Un. The young ruler, who was educated in Switzerland, is reported to be a keen basketball fan and especially of the Chicago Bulls, for whom Rodman played a key role in winning three NBA titles alongside Michael Jordan in the 1990s. The Bulls give Kim and Obama one of the few things they can agree on. Obama, a keen basketball player, is also known to be a diehard fan of the team, who are based in the city where the US president forged his early political career. The heavily tattooed Rodman has developed an unlikely relationship with the North Korean leader since making his first trip there in March, when he declared Kim a “friend for life”. Last week Kim had his uncle and former mentor Jang Song-Thaek executed in a shock move, but Rodman distanced himself from political events in the country. “I have got nothing to do with that,” he said. The ex-NBA team is expected to be announced during Rodman’s visit to the reclusive state, his third of the year. Rodman brushed aside official warnings by the US government to its citizens not to travel to North Korea, saying “there is nothing I can do about that” and adding that “if something happens it is beyond my control”. He also said he would have “a good conversation” with Kim “to help the world”, without elaborating. Accompanying Rodman to Pyongyang were Irish bookmakers and trip sponsors Paddy Power – which has said the match schedule had not been affected by political events – as well as a television documentary crew. Paddy Power spokesperson Rory Scott said Rodman was not being paid for his involvement in the exhibition match - which he billed “The Big Bang in Pyongyang”. “Dennis is just doing this. We never discuss that [payment] but we are not paying him for this,” he said. China’s official Xinhua news agency later reported Rodman’s arrival in Pyongyang. It quoted a sports ministry source as saying the ministry would make a detailed plan for the exhibition game. Pyongyang is holding a US citizen, Kenneth Bae, who was sentenced to 15 years in jail on charges of trying to topple the North Korean regime. But US officials said earlier this week that they had not been in touch with Rodman over the visit and he did not represent the US government. Rodman is one of the few Westerners to have met Kim, who took over following the death of his father, former supremo Kim Jong-Il. On December 17 massed ranks of military and party leaders pledged loyalty to Kim on the second anniversary of his father’s death. – AFP

BEIJING

building compeition. Photo: Boothee

football game live from Yangon – the city in which I would continue my quest the next day. A shot in the dark Sunday 9am The SEA Games’ website suggested I could start the day with the Women’s 50m prone rifle-shooting competition. However, 24 hours of travel and spectating that ended in the early hours meant attempting to get to the North Dagon Shooting Range was going to be a challenge. It was just as well: Checking the results later in the day I realised this event had been held on the previous Thursday, and seen Thu Thu Kyaw of Myanmar take gold. The long wait continues Sunday afternoon Arriving at Thein Phyu Stadium I was disheartened to realise that the time for me to cheer on local gold had still not come. There were no local competitors slated to appear in the Women’s 58kg or the Men’s 85kg weightlifting events. As a stadium that regularly holds lethwei events, it would have been perfect for the previous day’s boxing events. That disappointment aside, despite the lack of local entrants there was a real atmosphere created by the large numbers of children invited by

Former US NBA basketball player Dennis Rodman speaks to members of the media as he makes his way through Beijing’s international airport on December 19. Photo: AFP

70 Sport

THE MYANMAR TIMES DECEMBER 23 - 29, 2013

T

Myanmar’s women boxers land blows for equality
OUGH, stocky and packing a withering left hook, Myanmar’s gold medal-winning boxer Nwe Ni Oo cuts a surprising image in a conservative nation where women are expected to be demure rather than combative. But the 19-year-old won hearts with a teary-eyed podium celebration at the Southeast Asian Games in Nay Pyi Taw, after a bruising points victory over her Philippine rival in the 57 kilogram class. “It’s very exciting because I have never fought foreigners before ... I’m happy to fight in front of Myanmar fans too,” she said after her December 14 win. Nwe Ni Oo is also blazing a trail for women, who have boxed for Myanmar at the regional showpiece event since 2001 but failed to win gold, cramped by poor funding during the corrupt junta era and a lack of wider support. Emerging from the shadow of decades of military rule, the country is proud of its reputation for relative gender equality in a region where violence against women is widespread. The nation’s most famous daughter is Nobel Prize-winner Daw Aung San Suu Kyi, and women are given equal rights under the law, enjoying a higher social status than their counterparts in India and China. Yet they continue to face significant challenges in the impoverished country. The International Monetary Fund says two-thirds of Myanmar’s women are stuck in unskilled labour with low wages, while only 18 percent of
Myanmar’s Nwe Ni Oo fights Nesthey Petecio of the Philippines during their women’s 57kg bout at the Wunna Theikdi boxing training centre during the 2013 SEA Games in Nay Pyi Taw. Photo: AFP

NAY PYI TAW

adult women have attended secondary school or higher, impeding their economic prospects. It is also a deeply traditional culture requiring women to dress modestly – more so in the countryside – and follow well-trodden cultural pathways in the devoutly Buddhist society. So much so that organisers of the

games even cut gymnastics and beach volleyball from the line-up of events, reportedly convinced the outfits worn by athletes would be too scandalous. But in the sports they have competed in, women athletes have flourished, winning plaudits and prestige in everything from local cane-ball game chinlone to football.

The women’s boxing team has earned special praise after claiming a gold, a silver and two bronzes – helping their country to the upper echelons of the medals table in the regional showpiece competition, which is seen as a “coming-out” party for the former pariah nation. As humble outside the ring as she is pugnacious within it, Nwe Ni Oo – the eldest of six siblings – said she is fighting for a better future for her family, who come from the hard-scrabble southern delta region. “My family support me ... my father in particular wants me to be a great boxer,” the diminutive teenager told AFP, a beige smear of traditional thanaka make-up barely concealing a bruised cheek. Her victory is all the more remarkable given that she only put on gloves three years ago and came in 2kg underweight for her category at the SEA Games. To observers, women’s sporting victories are bringing more than just medals. “Sport can improve the role of women in this country,” said May Sabe Phyu, a gender equality activist. “When women claim medals, it shows we are as capable as men,” she said, adding she also wanted to see a greater gender balance in the heart of government. Her comments were echoed in a recent briefing note by the UN’s development agency which said there remains “much to be done to make gender equality a practical reality” – including boosting women’s representation in public life and addressing some restrictive cultural norms. Speaking at a women’s forum in Yangon in December, Suu Kyi said the burden of keeping families together during the repressive junta era had often fallen on women. But as the country opens, women are determined to help shape the future, she said. “We want to make our rightful contribution to our society ... We want to take a meaningful role,” she added. For the home athletes, the SEA Games is a chance for both personal glory and to play a part in that opening – which has been formalised in political and economic change, but also wider social liberalisation. As the competition, which runs until December 22, breaks new ground for women boxers, supporters hope their success will open the pipeline of talent across the nation. “Myanmar women are traditional ... Most women can’t box,” said Aung San Oo, a former boxer who has spent months training Nwe Ni Oo ahead of the event. “I feel very honoured to help now that women can box and compete in other sports”. – AFP

Sport
72 THE MYANMAR TIMES DECEMBER 23 - 29, 2013

SPORT EDITOR: Tim McLaughlin | timothy.mclaughlin3@gmail.com

Myanmar’s women boxers shine in the ring
SPORT 70

Sore losers
Football fans riot over SEA Games loss, coach sacked

E

NOe NOe AUNG

NANDAR AUNG

XPECTATIONS were high on December 17 as Myanmar football fans began descending on Thuwunna National Stadium in Yangon. Following a 1-1 draw with Thailand, Myanmar’s mens team was facing a crucial match in the group stage of Southeast Asian Games. Fans around the country had become enraptured with the resurgent team’s play and were making the best of a SEA Games home field advantage that had been 44 years in the making. Thousands of spectators, many wearing white and red shirts adorned with stickers of the national flag, gathered outside the stadium where the match was broadcast on large screens. But as the match kicked off, fans

Kyaw Min Oo reacts after losing to Indonesia. Photo: Boothee

were questioning the tactics of manager Park Sung-Hwa, particularly his decision to sit Kyaw Ko Ko, who had been the squad’s standout through the tournament. Kyaw Ko Ko’s fellow Yangon United star Kyi Lin also found himself on the bench, after suffering a leg injury in the team’s previous match. After 35 minutes of uninspired play from Myanmar, Indonesia was able to capitalise on a penalty putting the visitors up 1-0. After failing to equalise Myanmar began to grow desperate in the final minutes of regular time, sending long balls into the box in a futile attempt to tie the match. The team’s frustration boiled over in the 88th minute when Ye Lin was sent off after delivering an elbow to the head of an Indonesian player. The growing sense of desperation on the field began to resonate among the 30,000 fans that had packed into the stadium as stoppage began. Frustration soon turned to anger. Fans started throwing bags of water and sandals onto the pitch. Others broke the stadium’s plastic chairs and tossed them over the protective fence that lines the field. Two fans breached security and ran onto the field. When the final whistle sounded stunned team members collapsed on the grass. On the sideline others wept. At the east entrance to the stadium firefighters scrambled to extinguish a fire lit by fans. Other spectators continued to tear seats from the stadium. Angry fans that had earlier been waving Myanmar flag’s with pride set fire to them outside of the stadium’s main entrance. The fires grew as fans began to toss their jerseys into the flames with police looking on. The crowd continued to swell and fans turned to the numerous SEA Games billboards that had been erected outside the stadium, tearing them

A football fan throws a rock at police in Yangon following Myanmar’s loss to Indonesia on December 17. Photo: Zaryni Phyo

down and torching them. Vendors who were expecting a boom in business from the post-match crowd fled in fear. With smoke filling the air police and fireman struggled to break up the crown and extinguish the fires. A group of riot police was called in but as they stood in formation they became an easy target. Stones, pieces of brick and cement torn from the street rained down on them. Defiant fans stood in place as police began to close in. Firefighters turned their hoses from the blazes to fans in an effort to get them to disperse. By the end of the night nine rioters had been arrested by Yangon police, but they were quickly released after an

appeal that night by business tycoon U Zaw Zaw, chairman of the Myanmar Football Federation. Inside the stadium Park Sung Hwa was attempting to explain his team’s poor performance and made the shocking admission that he had misunderstood the tournament rules. Park said that he believed Myanmar’s goal difference would be enough to carry the team through to the next round of play. Myanmar and Indonesia were both tied for second place with Myanmar having the edge in goal difference. However, the head-to-head rule at the tournament meant that with a win over Myanmar, Indonesia advanced. “I didn’t know the rules for this match exactly,” Park told the media

following the match. “I only learned that this match was decided with the head-to-head system when Myanmar players were crying and Indonesia players were happy end of the match.” Park, who served as coach of the national and U23 teams, was subsequently sacked. The outburst of fan violence is not an isolated incident. In 2011 a World Cup qualifying match between Myanmar and Oman was halted after fans began tossing bottles on the field after Myanmar quickly fell behind 2-0. In August 2013, at a match between Nay Pyi Taw FC and Yangon United, fans ripped seats from the newly completed Wunna Theikdi Stadium in Nay Pyi Taw.

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful