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Dec.  

 

 

2013  

 
Human  Expression  through  Arts:  
a  Resident  Development  Program  
 

Adrian  Anderson  ‘14,  Bridget  Cafaro  ‘15,    
Karamvir  Bhatti  ‘14,  Elizabeth  Levine  ‘14,  Moriah  Petty  ’14  
 

G r a n t   P r o p o s a l  

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Table of Contents
Internal Documents
 

HEARD  Program:  Organization  Analysis  ……………………………………………………………………..……   5  
Literature  Review  …………………………………………………………………………………………………………   9  
Project  Funding  Plan    
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
I.  Mission  Statement  ………………………………………………………………………………………....   16  
II.  Assessment  of  Need  ………………………………………………………………………………….……   17  
III.  Funding  Goals  and  Objectives  ….…………………………………………..………………………….    18  
IV.  Plan  of  Action  …………………………………………………………………………………..…………..   19  
V.  Steps  to  Monitor  and  Evaluate  Objectives  …………………………..……………….……………..  20  
Project  Funding  Search  …………………………………………………………………………………………………  21  
 

External Documents
 

Letter  of  Inquiry  …………………………………………………………………………………………………………..    33  
Cover  Letter  ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..  35    
 

Executive  Summary  ……………………………………………………………………………………………………..  36    
Organizational  History  ………………………………………………………………………………………………….  37  
Proposed  Initiative  Statement  ……………………………………………………………………………………….  39  
Statement  of  Need  ………………………………………………………………………………………………………  40  
Program  Description    
Goals  and  Objectives………………….…………………………………………………………………….…    43  
Methods:  Service  Learning  Creative  Arts  Outreach  Course    
I.  Curriculum  Framework  ……………………………………………………………………………  46  
II.  Timeline  ………………………………………………………………………………………………  49  
III.  Diversity/Nondiscrimination  Policy  Statement  ………………………………………….   51  
IV.  Management  &  Key  Personnel  ……………………………………………………………….   51  
Impact  Statement  ………………………………………………………………………………………………………..  53  
Evaluation  Plan  ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………  54  
Dissemination  Plan  ………………………………………………………………………………………………………    55  
Future  Funding  Statement  ………………………………………………………………………………………….…    57  
Conclusion  …………………………………………………………………………………………………………….……  58    
 

Budget  Summary  …………………………………………………………………………………………………………  59  
Budget  Narrative  …………………………………………………………………………………………………………  61    
 
 
Addendum Material
A.
B.
C.
D.

Steering  Committee  Members  ………………………………………………………………………….…    65  
Faculty  Guest  Lecturers  ………………………………………………………………………………………    67  
Letter  of  Support  ……………………………………………………………………………………………….  68    
Materials  from  Pilot  Course  ……..………………………………………………………………………....   69  

 
 

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Internal Documents

 

 
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HEARD Program: Organization Analysis
Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats

Strengths
Established  Connection  Within  Ithaca  College  
The  HEARD  Program  is  an  emerging  initiative  with  enthusiastic  supporters  within  the  Ithaca  
College  Community.  Through  both  the  extracurricular  club  and  three  previous  Proposal  &  Grant  
Writing  student  teams,  HEARD  has  garnered  support  from  many  dedicated  creative  arts  faculty  
members  and  students,  as  well  as  administrators  within  the  Provost’s  Office  and  the  School  of  
Music.  With  the  development  of  IC  20/20,  Ithaca  College  embraced  a  renewed  goal  for  interactive  
and  immersive  service  learning  for  its  students.  The  HEARD  program’s  mission  aligns  closely  with  
IC  20/20  and  its  current  funding  initiatives.  
 
Unique  Focus  on  Expression  through  Creative  Arts  
While  bearing  similarities  to  many  social  justice  nonprofit  programs,  the  HEARD  program  
possesses  a  unique  and  specific  focus  on  the  transformative  power  of  expression  through  creative  
arts.  Through  this  lens,  the  voluntary  structure  of  the  program  allows  for  authentic  participation  
from  the  MacCormick  residents.  This  focus  on  creative  arts  expression  also  has  the  ability  to  be  
used  as  a  means  for  rehabilitation  through  the  arts,  a  proven  mechanism  to  supplement  therapy  
or  counseling.  The  program  is  centered  on  the  residents’  specific  needs  and  interests.  
 
Hands  on  Learning  Experience  for  Student/Teachers      
A  major  asset  of  the  program  is  the  opportunity  for  Ithaca  College  students  to  teach  at  the  
MacCormick  Center.  Education  majors  and  creative  arts-­‐inclined  students  will  have  the  hands-­‐on  
opportunity  to  practice  their  teaching  techniques  in  a  challenging  and  unique  environment,  and  
are  then  able  to  take  those  experiences  into  account  when  moving  onto  the  next  stage  of  their  
teaching  careers.  This  structure  provides  a  platform  for  mutual  growth—for  the  MacCormick  
residents  through  their  exposure  to  the  creative  arts  and  for  IC  student-­‐teachers  through  the  
experience  of  working  with  young  adults  from  very  different  educational  and  socio-­‐political  
backgrounds.  
 
 
 
 
 

 
 

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Weaknesses
 
Lack  of  Funding  and  Coordination  
HEARD’s  initial  funding  was  used  as  seed  money,  which  provided  the  salary  of  pilot  course  
professor  Baruch  Whitehead  and  an  archive  of  musical  instruments  for  the  facility.  In  order  to  
expand  programming  and  provide  enough  support  to  keep  the  initiative  sustainable,  more  
support  is  needed.    The  lack  of  ongoing  funding  has  also  lessened  the  focus  on  broad-­‐based  
creative  arts  outreach.  The  program  initially  focused  on  music,  and  required  the  purchase  of  
instruments  which  must  be  maintained  and  repaired.  A  lack  of  funding  also  contributes  to  a  lack  of  
effective  program  development.  Moreover,  while  the  project  presents  the  opportunity  for  
effective  collaboration  between  college  students  and  incarcerated  youth,  without  an  
administrative  director  or  directing  group,  logistical  coordination  may  be  difficult.  
 
Stigmas  Surrounding  Incarceration  
Fueled  by  media  distortion  and  a  public  lack  of  information,  there  exists  many  stigmas  concerning  
education  in  prisons.  If  public  opinion  does  not  foster  a  belief  that  inmates  deserve  an  education  
or  rehabilitation,  it  can  be  difficult  to  expand  the  HEARD  program  and  receive  funding  and  
volunteers.  Moreover,  the  race  and  gender  of  the  inmates  is  a  crucial  factor.  This  obstacle  could  
apply  to  capturing  the  attention  of  both  potential  funders  and  student  volunteers.      
 
Limited  On-­‐Campus  Resources  
From  the  side  of  curriculum  development,  there  are  several  obstacles  in  creating  a  sustainable  and  
effective  creative  arts  outreach  program.  Without  Ithaca  College’s  proposed  curricular  
involvement,  HEARD  is  not  guaranteed  to  receive  funding  every  year.  Many  students  may  lack  the  
appropriate  skills  or  time  to  dedicate  to  expanding  and  participating  actively  in  the  program.  A  lot  
of  energy  and  resources  must  be  invested  in  re-­‐training  people,  recruiting  new  participants,  and  
advertising  and  raising  awareness  and  interest.  IC  participants  would  also  need  to  be  comfortable  
submitting  to  the  security  clearance  procedure  necessary  to  gain  access  to  the  MacCormick  
Center.  In  addition,  MacCormick  is  a  25  minute  drive  away  from  the  school,  which  means  students  
would  need  their  own  car  or  means  of  transportation  to  the  facility  in  Brooktondale.  
 
 

Opportunities
 
Volunteer  and  Educational  Possibilities  for  IC  
The  HEARD  program  has  the  potential  to  give  Ithaca  College  volunteers  a  first  hand  teaching  
experience  in  a  prison,  a  rare  privilege.  Interacting  with  MacCormick  residents  affords  students  a  

 

 
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unique  opportunity  to  form  relationships  across  deep  social  divides.  The  program  has  the  ability  to  
transform  prospective  teachers  into  culturally  humble,  sensitive  and  competent  professionals  who  
are  better  able  to  interact  with  and  help  individuals  with  different  backgrounds  from  their  own.  
 
Formalized  Ithaca  College  Curriculum  
The  IC  faculty  with  a  long-­‐term  commitment  to  the  program  can  serve  as  students’  mentors  and  
arts  instructors  for  multiple  semesters.  Professors  on  campus  have  a  wealth  of  untapped  
knowledge  and  experience  in  this  area;  these  professors  include:  Cynthia  Henderson,  who  
previously  worked  in  arts  outreach  at  MacCormick,  Dr.  Jessica  Barros  and  Dr.  Tom  Kerr  who  have  
worked  closely  with  incarcerated  individuals  in  the  past,  and  Dr.  Paula  Ioanide  who  teaches  the  
course  Punishment,  Prisons  &  Democracy.  After  establishing  a  permanent  IC  affiliate,  HEARD  can  
expand  to  collaborate  with  students  arts  organizations  such  as  Spit  That,  Pulse,  Rock  Hard,  A  
Cappella  singers,  and  Artists  United  or  organizations  in  the  town  of  Ithaca  such  as  Crossing  
Borders  LIVE.  
 
Benefits  to  MacCormick  Residents  
The  residents  who  choose  to  participate  in  the  creative  arts  outreach  classes  will  develop  both  
emotional  and  physical  skills  that  better  prepare  them  for  life  inside  and  outside  the  facility.  If  
these  young  men  are  released  with  coping  mechanisms  that  help  them  manage  emotions  and  
raise  their  self-­‐confidence,  they  may  be  less  likely  to  commit  crimes  in  the  future.  Creative  
expression  can  be  used  as  a  tool  among  men  whose  most  basic  freedoms  are  heavily  restricted.  
The  residents  can  also  go  on  to  create  connections  between  themselves  and  the  institution,  as  
well  as  the  community.  While  HEARD  is  primarily  designed  as  a  coping  mechanism  for  inmates,  
dedicated  participants  may  choose  to  pursue  these  activities  further.  
                   
 

Threats
 
Possibility  of  Disinterest  from  MacCormick  Residents  
The  MacCormick  Center  houses  39  residents,  primarily  African-­‐American  males,  between  the  ages  
of  14  and  20.  In  the  past,  they  have  been  receptive  to  HEARD  programing,  but  based  on  the  
backgrounds  of  the  residents,  many  may  be  uninterested  in  any  type  of  educational  curriculum,  
let  alone  arts  programming.  The  young  men  may  resist  therapeutic  recreation  from  instructors  
they  don’t  know  based  on  lack  of  exposure.  The  40  residents  are  split  into  several  groups  that  
spent  almost  all  of  their  time  together,  and  they  may  also  show  resistance  to  any  collaborative  
projects  that  include  participation  from  any  particular  residents  with  whom  they  don’t  get  along.  
 

 
 

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Resistance  to  Intervention  
In  order  to  engage  and  connect  with  HEARD  participants  at  MacCormick,  student  volunteers  must  
be  wary  in  representing  themselves  as  “philanthropists”  when  interacting  directly  with  the  
residents.  The  majority  of  students  and  faculty  members  at  Ithaca  College  come  from  different  
races,  geographic  locations,  and  educational  backgrounds  than  the  current  residents.  For  both  the  
residents  and  Ithaca  College  students  to  truly  benefit  from  the  HEARD  program,  the  volunteers  
must  cautiously  navigate  the  interaction  and  relationship  between  themselves  and  the  residents.  
 
Evaluation  of  Program  Impact  
The  MacCormick  Center  currently  does  not  formally  track  progress  or  gather  feedback  from  any  
of  its  past  residents.  This  is  also  true  of  participants  of  the  HEARD  program.  This  lack  of  
information  makes  altering  curriculum  difficult  and  presents  an  obstacle  to  publicizing  participant  
testimonials.  In  addition,  under  prison  confidentiality  agreements,  the  names  or  faces  of  
individuals  in  juvenile  detention  centers  cannot  be  published  in  any  print  or  online  media.  
 
 

 

 
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Literature Review
Theory Behind the Practice

The United States Prison System
 
Cumulative  Disadvantages  for  People  of  Color  
Young  males,  particularly  of  African  American  descent,  continue  to  account  for  the  vast  majority  
of  arrests  in  the  juvenile  justice  system.  Over  recent  decades,  the  number  of  children  presented  in  
court  systems  has  increased  exponentially.  In  2003,  young  males  represented  85%  of  juvenile  
offenders  in  residential  placement  custody  (Stimson).  People  of  color  account  for  a  significantly  
disproportionate  amount  of  the  prison  population.  African  Americans  and  Latinos  made  up  26  
percent  of  U.S.  citizens,  yet  comprised  63  percent  of  inmates  in  2003.  The  group  with  the  highest  
incarceration  rate  are  Black  men  between  25  and  39  years  of  age  (9,262  per  100,000)  (Belk).  
 
Incarceration  statistics  correlate  with  similar  behavior  beginning  in  childhood.  Researchers  have  
identified  risk  factors  for  child  delinquency.  These  include:  poor  academic  performance,  early  
childhood  aggression,  poverty  and  lack  of  resources,  and  the  absence  of  parental  involvement  
(Corriero).    Boys  may  be  more  likely  to  become  delinquent  if  they  are  mistreated  at  home,  have  
delinquent  friends,  drop  out  of  school,  use  drugs,  or  face  community  violence  (Stimson).  
 
A  2006  study  commissioned  by  the  Joint  Center  for  Political  and  Economic  Studies  in  Washington  
D.C.  labeled  these  external  factors  as  “cumulative  disadvantages.”  According  to  the  study,  only  56  
percent  of  African  Americans  and  52  percent  of  Latinos  finished  high  school  with  a  regular  
diploma,  compared  to  78  percent  of  whites;  only  23  percent  of  Black  high  school  students  and  20  
percent  of  Latinos  were  eligible  to  pursue  a  college  education.  Employment  statistics  reveal  
similar  proportions.  The  unemployment  rate  for  black  males  ages  16  to  19  was  35.6  in  2004  
compared  to  16.3  percent  for  whites  (Belk).  
 
Young  black  males  are  the  precise  demographic  of  the  majority  of  MacCormick  residents  who  
benefit  from  the  HEARD  program.  Their  lives  have  been  shaped  by  the  cumulative  disadvantages  
that  largely  contributed  to  their  current  circumstances  (Belk).  The  stigma  surrounding  the  
provision  of  services  for  convicted  criminals  challenges  the  program,  yet  this  research  
demonstrates  that  systemic  limitations  of  opportunities  for  people  of  color  in  the  U.S.  is  a  root  
cause  of  juvenile  delinquency  and,  therefore,  often  exists  outside  the  control  of  the  individual.  
 

 
 

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The  Prison  Industrial  Complex  
The  United  States  is  the  world  leader  in  imprisonment,  with  a  prison  population  rate  of  730  per  
100,000  residents.  This  number  is  far  beyond  other  Western  industrialized  nations  and  even  
outranks  countries  known  for  unjust  incarcerations  such  as  Iran  (226  per  100,000),  China  (117  per  
100,000),  and  Syria  (93  per  100,000)  (Belk).  This  is  a  rather  recent  phenomenon  directly  
corresponding  to  a  shift  in  federal  policy.  The  U.S.  had  a  stable  and  average  incarcerated  
population  for  most  of  the  20th  century  until  it  began  to  rise  in  the  mid-­‐1970’s  and  skyrocketed  
over  the  course  of  the  next  four  decades.  
 
In  his  book  Race  to  Incarcerate,  Sociologist  and  leading  sentencing  expert  Marc  Mauer  indicates  a  
partnership  between  expanding  law  enforcement  and  harsher  sentences  as  the  major  factor  in  the  
rise  of  juvenile  incarceration  (Jones).  Young  offenders  are  efficiently  enrolled  in  the  system,  but,  
once  incarcerated,  they  do  not  receive  the  rehabilitation  services  they  need  and  suffer  from  the  
estrangement  from  their  families  and  communities,  resulting  in  an  increased  likelihood  of  
recidivism  (Jones,  Corriero).  Michelle  Alexander  goes  as  far  as  to  compare  the  mass  incarceration  
of  African  American  men  today  to  Jim  Crow  laws.  Much  like  pre-­‐civil  rights  era,  African  American  
men  in  prisons  are  denied  basic  human  rights,  such  as  voting,  right  to  employment,  housing,  and  
education.  
 
Since  the  introduction  of  private  corrections  firms  in  the  mid-­‐1980’s,  prisons  have  grown  into  the  
centerpiece  of  a  multi-­‐billion  dollar  industry,  with  strategic  businesses  positioning  themselves  to  
turn  a  large  profit  from  the  growth  of  crime  and  incarceration.  Some  cities  entice  private  
corrections  firms  “based  on  the  belief  that  prisons  offer  an  environmentally  clean  industry  that  
can  bring  “recession-­‐proof  ”  jobs,  development,  and  even  federal  funds  based  on  U.S.  Census  
counts”  (Belk,  v).  The  private  firms  equally  entice  politicians  in  targeted  regions  that  make  greater  
use  of  private  prisons.  In  1998,  they  paid  a  total  of  $862,822  in  campaign  contributions  in  elections  
across  43  states  (Belk,  vii).  
 
An  imminent  duality  exists  within  the  modern  juvenile  justice  system  where  incarcerated  youth  
are  both  perpetrators  of  crimes  and  the  victims  of  institutional  racism  and  the  prison  industrial  
complex.  Moreover,  the  justice  system  has  been  increasingly  influenced  by  politics  and  big  
business  due  to  the  rise  in  private  corrections  firms.  Understanding  and  contextualizing  these  
sociological  and  political  dimensions  of  juvenile  delinquency  is  a  key  learning  objective  of  the  
Ithaca  College  service  learning  course.  
 
 

 

 
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Art Rehabilitation
 
Benefits  to  the  Correctional  Institution  
In  their  study  on  art  therapy  among  incarcerated  women,  educators  Bonnie  J.  Erickson  and  Mark  
E.  Young  note  that  this  type  of  enrichment  programming  directly  benefits  the  individual  
participant  while  indirect  benefits  are  evident  for  the  correctional  institution  as  a  whole.  This  
article  presents  a  study  of  prison  education,  where  participants  are  “creative,  intelligent,  and  
capable,”  but  also  “manipulative  and  dishonest”  (41):  
 

Gibbons  (1997)  found  that  inmates  who  were  able  to  engage  in  creative  endeavors  
showed  improvement  in  their  mental  health,  attitudes,  and  behaviors.  Similarly,  
Gussak  (2005)  concluded  that  the  use  of  art  therapy  with  inmates  led  to  a  decrease  
in  depressive  symptoms  and  an  improvement  in  mood.  Gussak  also  found  that  the  
art  therapy  participants'  attitudes  improved,  their  acceptance  of  one  another  and  
the  environment  increased,  and  the  interaction  between  staff  and  peers  was  better.  
There  was  also  evidence  of  better  compliance  with  directives  and  an  improvement  
in  behavior.  (Erickson  and  Young,  38)  
 

Success  in  prison  education  depends  on  sustaining  participant  motivation,  a  function  served  by  
arts-­‐based  programs  that  do  not  carry  the  same  negative  prior  associations  as  traditional  
academics.  Meanwhile,  other  research  indicates  that  while  art  classes  have  the  potential  to  reach  
all  prisoners,  those  with  a  higher  level  of  education  are  typically  pre-­‐disposed  to  benefit  the  most  
over  time  (Halperin  et  al.).  
 
Benefits  to  the  Individual  
Erickson  and  Young  study  discussed  “art  therapy,”  where  a  trained  therapist  is  present  in  each  
class,  while  the  HEARD  program  provides  “art  rehabilitation”  which  focuses  on  creative  expression  
through  the  arts  without  the  element  of  formal  counseling.  However,  the  natural  therapeutic  
effects  of  art-­‐making  produce  similar  results  through  increasing  self-­‐awareness,  enhancing  
cognitive  abilities,  lowering  stress,  and  offering  a  coping  mechanism  to  manage  trauma  and  avoid  
conflict.  It  teaches  work  ethic  and  improves  self-­‐confidence.  Participants  regain  a  sense  of  
freedom  and  control  that  is  often  lost  through  the  dehumanization  of  incarceration  and,  in  this  
way,  art  can  help  reconnect  the  prisoners  with  their  own  voice  (Venable,  50).  Art  rehabilitation  is  
particularly  effective  amongst  70-­‐87  percent  of  incarcerated  juveniles  with  learning  or  emotional  
disabilities  who  often  struggle  to  express  themselves  through  reading  and  writing  (Venable,  49).  
 
 
 

 
 

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Model Programs
 
Indiana  State  Art  Education  Service  Learning  
Students  majoring  in  Art  Education  at  Indiana  State  University  engaged  in  a  joint  mural  painting  
project  with  residents  of  a  juvenile  correctional  institution.  The  journals  of  the  undergraduate  
participants  illuminate  some  of  the  challenges  Ithaca  College  service  learning  students  may  
experience,  such  as  their  evolving  relationships  and  receding  discomfort  working  with  the  juvenile  
delinquents.  The  journals  describe  the  reaction  of  the  prison  staff,  who  were  initially  skeptical  of  
the  program  and  viewed  arts  outreach  as  coddling  people  who  are  there  to  be  punished.  Once  the  
positive  effects  of  the  enrichment  became  evident,  they  reported  acceptance  and  even  positive  
reactions  from  the  staff  (Venable,  51).  This  is  favorable  evidence  for  HEARD,  as  we  identified  the  
stigma  regarding  prison  rehabilitation  programs  as  a  threat  to  the  program’s  support  base  in  the  
community.    
 
Phoenix  Zululand:  A  Restorative  Justice  Program  
Phoenix  Zululand  is  a  restorative  justice  program  in  place  within  ten  prisons  in  Zululand,  which  is  
located  on  the  east  coast  of  South  Africa  in  the  Province  of  KwaZulu-­‐Natal.  The  mythology  of  the  
phoenix  tells  of  “a  bird  that  dies  by  its  own  act  in  a  fire  and  then  rises  again  from  the  ashes”  
(University  of  KwaZulu-­‐Natal).  This  spirit  of  rebirth  drives  the  program  to  employ  visual  art,  
drama,  and  music  to  aid  in  the  rehabilitation  of  prisoners  and  their  family  members.  This  symbol  is  
a  recurring  theme  within  the  artwork  made  by  the  prisoners,  as  can  be  seen  on  Phoenix  Zululand’s  
blog  that  posts  artwork  and  summaries  of  related  discussions  it  has  inspired.  Although  this  
organization  operates  independently  from  a  college  or  university,  it  addresses  the  flaws  of  
incarceration  by  introducing  arts  through  similar  programming  to  the  HEARD  arts  outreach  
design.  
 
The  Alabama  Prison  +  Arts  Education  Project,  Auburn  University  
Conducted  through  Auburn  University  in  Alabama,  professors  and  students  work  with  
incarcerated  youth  and  adults  in  a  creative  project  facilitated  through  the  Alabama  Prison  +  Arts  
Education  Project.  Since  2002,  APAEP  has  grown  from  one  lecturer  to  a  base  of  over  100  
volunteer  teachers.  Much  like  Ithaca  College's  relationship  with  the  MacCormick  Center,  the  
APAEP  has  become  an  official  outreach  group  from  Auburn  University's  College  of  Human  
Sciences.  The  organization  strives  to  bring  educational  programming  to  prisoners  in  Alabama  and  
develop  other  program  initiatives  that  will  further  impact  the  lives  of  prisoners  and  their  families.  
They  offer  a  broad  base  of  classes  such  as  Creative  Writing,  Southern  Literature,  Art  and  the  Mind,  
Hunger  Studies,  and  Introduction  to  Engineering.  The  initial  funding  came  from  the  National  
Endowment  for  the  Arts,  and  the  program  since  has  received  donations  from  regional,  state,  and  

 

 
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private  councils  and  foundations.  Their  success  in  growing  the  program  to  its  current  size  makes  it  
an  excellent  model  for  HEARD.  
 
Prison  Performing  Arts  
Prison  Performing  Arts  based  out  of  St.  Louis,  Missouri  brings  drama  therapy  programming  to  
incarcerated  youth  and  adults.  The  objective  is  to  prepare  participants  for  life  after  their  sentence  
is  completed.  Performing  artists,  volunteers,  and  prison  staff  work  with  inmates  to  provide  life  
and  job  skills,  develop  creative  expression  and  literacy,  and  practice  collaboration  through  myriad  
programs  such  as  Arts  Alive!,  Learning  Through  the  Arts,  The  Hip  Hop  Poetry  Project,  Theatre  on  
Hogan  Street,  Spoken  Word  Poetry,  and  Going  Home.  The  adult  program  additionally  allows  
participants  to  earn  college  credit  through  Fontbonne  University  in  St.  Louis.  The  project’s  funders  
include  regional  and  state  councils  and  private  foundations.  This  model  is  useful  for  pushing  
HEARD  course  curriculum  to  extend  beyond  traditional  mediums  to  feature  relevant  content  that  
interests  the  participants  involved.  
 

Service Learning
 
Student-­‐Driven  Curriculum  
Over  the  past  several  decades,  higher  education  has  seen  service  learning  grow  exponentially  as  
an  accepted  and  highly  valued  component  of  a  student’s  curriculum.  Although  the  service  learning  
model  overlaps  with  many  tenants  of  student  volunteer  work,  it  possesses  a  unique  blend  of  
service  and  learning  which  “adds  value  to  each  and  transforms  both”  (Honnet  and  Poulsen  qtd.  in  
Eyler  and  Giles,  1).  In  Where’s  the  Learning  in  Service  Learning?,  authors  Janet  Eyler  and  Dwight  E.  
Giles  Jr.  explore  the  myriad  benefits  possible  within  a  service  learning  curriculum  for  both  the  
students  and  the  higher  education  system  as  a  whole.  In  one  testimonial,  a  student  writes:  
 

I  can  honestly  say  that  I’ve  learned  more  in  this  last  year  in  [service  learning]  than  I  
probably  have  in  four  years  of  college…You’re  not  just  studying  to  take  a  test  and  
forget  about  it.  You’re  learning,  and  the  experiences  we  have  are  staying  with  
us…We  learn  about  these  theories  in  school  and  ideas,  but  until  we  really  apply  
them  or  see  them  in  action,  they’re  not  real.  (Eyler  and  Giles,  1)  
 

This  testimonial  illustrates  the  lasting  power  that  a  service  learning  project  can  have  on  a  
student’s  educational  life.  The  connection  between  the  theories  and  case  studies  they  learn  within  
the  classroom  and  the  outside  world  can  forge  a  lifelong  passion  and  understanding  of  a  once  only  
two-­‐dimensional  subject.  When  studying  the  brain  in  relation  to  a  student’s  learning  capabilities,  
cognitive  scientists  have  recognized  that  this  “knowledge  in  use”  has  extremely  positive  effects  on  

 
 

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the  student’s  brain.  This  is  because  they  are  actively  creating  and  participating  in  their  knowledge  
development.  
 
Active  and  Engaged  Partners  in  Learning  
Paulo  Friere  in  his  seminal  work,  Pedagogy  of  the  Oppressed,  compares  the  service  learning  model  
to  the  traditional  educational  structure  known  as  the  “Banking”  model.  In  the  Banking  model,  
education  is  merely  a  cycle  with  students  “receiving,  filing,  and  storing  the  deposits”  (Friere,  72).  
They  are  passive  recipients  of  knowledge,  rather  than  active  seekers  of  it.  Service  learning,  and  by  
extension  the  HEARD  program,  desires  to  imbue  students  with  their  own  agency  and  urgency  to  
learn  and  to  help  others  do  the  same.  Friere  maintains  that  “knowledge  emerges  only  through  
invention  and  re-­‐invention,  through  the  restless,  impatient,  continuing,  hopeful  inquiry  human  
beings  pursue  in  the  world,  with  the  world,  and  with  each  other”  (72).  In  this  mutual  exchange,  
learning  occurs  for  both  the  teacher  and  the  student,  acting  as  partners  in  learning,  rather  than  
functioning  in  separated  roles.  
 
High  Impact  on  Student’s  Educational  Experience  
Eyler  and  Giles  reaffirm  Friere’s  call  for  mutual  learning  and  implore  higher  education  institutions  
to  recognize  the  necessity  for  collaborative  curriculum.  They  explore  the  many  different  ways  in  
which  a  student’s  learning  experience  can  be  impacted  as  a  result  of  a  service  learning  program.  
Such  models  challenge  previous  assumptions  of  the  world  students  might  have,  forcing  them  out  
of  their  comfort  zone,  and  to  apply  theory-­‐based  solutions  on  real-­‐world  problems  (Eyler  and  Giles  
17).  They  are  instructed  to  take  an  active  role  in  their  teaching  and,  therefore,  develop  the  
leadership  skills  essential  to  fostering  a  positive  learning  environment  and  gaining  respect  from  all  
participants.  
 
Due  to  the  interactive  nature  of  such  programming,  service  learning  accommodates  many  
different  types  of  learners—especially  those  for  whom  the  “banking”  model  has  failed  (15).  
Moreover,  the  post-­‐service  or  “reflection”  component  of  most  service  learning  curricula  
encourages  the  student  to  actively  critique  their  involvement  in  the  program,  which  can  both  
bolster  self-­‐confidence  in  teaching  abilities  and  self-­‐awareness  of  their  learning  and  teaching  
styles.  Above  all,  and  the  reason  why  higher  education  institutions  must  consider  seriously  the  
inclusion  of  such  programs  in  their  curriculum,  is  that  these  programs  are  geared  towards  the  
formation  of  conscious  citizens—the  kind  of  students  who  will  take  with  them  all  that  they  have  
learned  and  apply  it  in  positive  and  constructive  ways  to  the  world  around  them  (18).  

 

 
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Works Cited:
 
Alexander,  M.  “The  New  Jim  Crow.”  Mass  Incarceration  in  the  Age  of  Colorblindness.  New  
 
Press,  2012.  Print.  1  Oct.  2013.  
 
Belk,  Jr.,  Adolphus  G.  A  New  Generation  of  Native  Sons:  Men  of  Color  and  the  Prison-­‐  
 
Industrial  Complex.  Washington,  D.C.:  Joint  Center  for  Political  and  Economic  Studies  
 
Health  Policy  Institute,  2006.  Print.  
 
Corriero,  Michael.  "The  Criminal  Responsibility  of  Juveniles."  Judging  Children  as  Children:  
A  Proposal  for  a  Juvenile  Justice  System.  Philadelphia:  Temple  UP,  2006.  35-­‐36.  Web.  2  
Oct.  2013.  
 
Erickson,  Bonnie  J.,  and  Mark  E.  Young.  "Group  Art  Therapy  With  Incarcerated  Women."  
Journal  of  Addictions  &  Offender  Counseling  31.October  (2010):  38-­‐51.  Print.  
 
Eyler,  Janet,  and  Dwight  Giles.  Where's  the  learning  in  service  learning?  San  Francisco:  Jossey-­‐Bass,  
 
1999.  Print.    
 
Halperin,  Ronnie,  Suzanne  Kessler,  and  Dana  Braunschweiger.  "Rehabilitation  Through  the  
Arts:  Impact  on  Participants'  Engagement  in  Educational  Programs."  The  Journal  of  
Correctional  Education  63(1).  April  (2012):  6-­‐23.  
 
Freire,  Paulo.  Pedagogy  of  the  Oppressed.  New  York:  Continuum,  2000.  Print.  
Jones,  Sabrina,  and  Marc  Mauer.  Race  to  incarcerate:  a  graphic  retelling.  New  York:  The  
New  Press,  2013.  Print.  
 
"Prison  Performing  Arts"  Prison  Performing  Arts.  Web.  2013.  <http://prisonartsstl.org/>.  
 
"Restorative  Justice  Programme."  Phoenix  Zululand.  N.p.,  n.d.  Web.  7  Oct.  2013.  
 
<http://www.phoenix-­‐zululand.org.za>.  
 
Stinson,  A.  “A  Review  of  Cultural  Art  Programs  and  Outcomes  for  At-­‐Risk  Youths.”  Best  
 
Practices  in  Mental  Health,  2009.  10-­‐25.  Web  2  Oct.  2013.  
 
“The  Alabama  Prison  Arts  +  Education  Project”  Auburn  University.  Web.  
 
<http://www.cla.auburn.edu/apaep/>.  
 
Venable,  Bradford  B.  "At-­‐Risk  and  In-­‐Need:  Reaching  Juvenile  Offenders  Through  Art."  Art  
 
Education  July  (2005):  48-­‐53.  Print.

 
 

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Project Funding Plan  
Needs, Goals and Objectives for Meeting the Mission  

I. Project Mission Statement
HEARD  recognizes  that  the  students  of  Ithaca  College  and  residents  of  the  MacCormick  Secure  
Center  are  bound  together  not  simply  by  geographical  contiguity  but  by  a  shared  need  to  
express  themselves  through  music,  dance  and  the  arts.  The  HEARD  program  rests  on  the  belief  
in  the  transformative  power  of  a  communal  space  for  both  students  and  residents  to  learn  and  
grow  in  tandem.  The  creators  of  HEARD  envisioned  the  program  to  grow  into  a  deeply  
embedded  component  of  Ithaca  College  and  the  community  beyond.  In  order  to  establish  those  
roots  and  ensure  longevity,  HEARD  seeks  to  be  incorporated  into  the  Ithaca  College  course  
catalogue  and  funded  by  internal  revenue  streams.  To  truly  maximize  HEARD’s  potential  impact,  
the  program  must  expand  from  the  pilot  course  into  a  sustainable  semester-­‐long  course  offering.  
A  blended  academic  and  practicum  course  offers  students  the  opportunity  to  participate  in  
interdisciplinary  coursework  and  field-­‐based  service  learning  aimed  at  supporting  incarcerated  
underserved  youth  through  creative  arts  instruction.  
 
The  proposed  budget  will  project  the  necessary  costs  for  the  re-­‐envisioned  course  and  
instructional  resources  as  well  as  the  mechanisms  for  promoting  HEARD’s  mission  and  sharing  
the  results  with  the  greater  Ithaca  College  and  Tompkins  County  communities.  By  expanding  
campus  and  community  awareness  through  successful  programming  and  publicity,  HEARD  
foresees  the  course  becoming  an  integral  and  impactful  part  of  the  fabric  of  an  Ithaca  College  
student’s  education.    
 

 

 
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II. Assessment of Project Funding Need  
 

The  HEARD  program  seeks  to  establish  itself  as  an  integral  resource  for  civic  engagement  at  
Ithaca  College  to  effectively  create  social  reform  through  creative  arts  education  in  detention  
facilities.  The  2011-­‐2012  pilot  course  achieved  positive  initial  success  in  delivering  creative  arts  
education  to  MacCormick  residents.  The  proposed  Service  learning  Creative  Arts  Outreach  course  
expands  the  faculty  base  and  captures  increased  student  interest,  to  ensure  that  HEARD  will  grow  
into  a  self-­‐sustaining  program  perpetuated  by  the  productivity  and  awareness  of  the  Ithaca  
College  community.  The  course’s  links  to  current  campus-­‐wide  initiatives  such  as  IC  20/20  and  the  
focus  on  students’  civic  engagement  further  ensure  positive  outcomes  regarding  learning  
objectives.  
 

During  the  Fall  2011-­‐Spring  2012  Creative  Arts  Outreach  course,  initial  funding  was  provided  by  the  
Office  of  the  Provost  (using  integrative  curriculum  funds)  and  supplemented  by  the  Ithaca  College  
School  of  Music.  Since  this  interdisciplinary  approach  is  critical  for  meeting  the  core  learning  
objectives,  the  Service  Learning  course  can  no  longer  be  housed  or  supported  by  a  single  school.  
As  the  program  develops,  in  parallel  with  the  IC  20/20  Initiatives,  college-­‐level  funding  becomes  a  
more  appropriate  source  of  support.    
 

The  key  feature  in  the  expansion  of  the  program  is  the  development  of  an  interdisciplinary  Service  
Learning  Creative  Arts  Outreach  course,  to  be  covered  by  a  $4,000  course  development  stipend  for  
two  instructors.  A  further  component  is  the  part-­‐time  Program  Coordinator  position  to  be  
compensated  at  $2,240  for  the  upcoming  2014-­‐2015  academic  year.  Furthermore,  Ithaca  College  
professors  are  paid  $1,300  for  each  credit  taught,  requiring  $15,600  for  the  teaching  of  both  the  
fall  and  spring  three-­‐credit  Creative  Arts  Outreach  course.  In  addition  to  costs  to  cover  instructor  
salaries,  stipends  for  guest  lecturers  to  deliver  pre-­‐service  curriculum  to  participating  IC  students  
will  require  $400.  In-­‐kind  donations  cover  the  time  for  the  MacCormick  liaison,  whose  work  is  
valued  at  $2,100  per  academic  year,  and  a  faculty  steering  committee,  whose  work  is  valued  at  
$5,600.  
 

Basic  operational  costs  in  small  sums  are  required  to  efficiently  deliver  HEARD  programming.    
Ithaca  College  provides  vans  for  transportation  at  a  rate  of  $60  per  day;  thus,  over  the  course  of  
the  academic  year  the  HEARD  program  will  require  $1,200  to  transport  students  to  the  
MacCormick  Center  in  Brooktondale.  Instruments  will  be  provided  from  the  inventory  of  
MacCormick  Center’s  inventory  and  from  the  Ithaca  College  School  of  Music,  so  the  request  for  
additional  teaching  supplies  is  only  $1,320.  Bringing  guest  performances  to  the  center  twice  a  
semester  will  cost  $240.  
 
 

HEARD  

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III. Project Funding Goals and Objectives
Goal  1:  To  secure  internal  funding  from  Ithaca  College  to  support  the  creation  and  
implementation  of  the  HEARD  Creative  Arts  Outreach  course  at  MacCormick  for  the  2014-­‐15  
Academic  Year.  These  funds  will  be  utilized  to  hire  a  part-­‐time  Program  Coordinator,  cover  the  
cost  of  the  course  development,  and  pay  the  salaries  of  the  associated  professors.  
Projected  Cost:  $25,000  
Objective  1:  To  secure  $2,240  for  one  year  of  the  HEARD  Program  Coordinator's  salary  by    
Spring  2014  to  begin  implementing  necessary  steps  for  course  creation  during  
Summer  2014.  
Objective  2:  To  secure  $4,000  for  faculty  curriculum  development  by  Spring  2014  for    
implementation  during  Summer  2014.  
Objective  3:  To  secure  $15,600  for  faculty  overload  costs  associated  with  course    
implementation  by  Spring  2014  for  implementation  of  the  course  during  the  
2014-­‐15  academic  year.  
Objective  4:  To  secure  $2,760  for  miscellaneous  costs  including  materials,  speaker/artist    
honorariums,  and  associated  transportation  costs  by  Spring  2014  for  
implementation  during  the  2014-­‐15  academic  year.  
Objective  5:  To  secure  $400  to  facilitate  faculty  guest  speakers’  participation  during  the    
semester.  
 

Goal  2:  To  ensure  the  sustainability  of  funding  for  the  HEARD  Creative  Arts  Outreach  course.  
Projected  Cost:  $24,340  
Objective  1:  To  solicit  both  internal  and  external  funding  through  Patricia  Spencer's  Grant  and    
Proposal  and  Grant  Writing  class  during  Spring  2014  for  future  course  
development  and  implementation  funds.  
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

 
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IV. Funding Plan of Action  
 

Stage  1:  Secure  primary  internal  funds  
Since  the  program  is  an  interdisciplinary  effort  at  its  essence,  the  bulk  of  the  funding  should  come  
from  the  institutional  budget  for  IC  20/20  initiatives.  The  provost  will  refer  this  program  to  the  IC  
20/20  advisory  committee  who  will  review  the  proposal  and  make  recommendations  to  the  
budgeting  committee.  Upon  their  approval,  the  major  portion  of  the  funds  could  be  released  to  
compensate  the  faculty.  Supplementary  internal  support  will  be  solicited  directly  from  Anthony  
Hopson  the  director  of  the  Office  of  Civic  Engagement  and  Provost  Marisa  Kelly.  This  preliminary  
funding  will  be  secured  by  Spring  2014.  
 

Anticipated  Revenue  from  Internal  Funders:  
As  a  suggested  cost  breakdown  we  seek  75%  of  the  funding  from  the  IC  20/20  Initiative  for  
a  total  of  $18,750.  The  remaining  25%  will  be  sought  in  a  combined  effort  from  the  Office  
of  Civic  Engagement  and  Office  of  the  Provost,  totaling  $8,750.  
 

Stage  2:  Secure  secondary  financial  support  
Financial  support  for  the  faculty  developing  the  course  will  be  requested  from  alternative  internal  
sources  including  the  Instructional  Development  Fund  in  the  Ithaca  College  Center  for  Faculty  
Excellence,  which  offers  stipends  for  professors  engaged  in  Direct  Course  Development  and  in  
Diversity  Projects.  In-­‐kind  donations  will  be  incorporated  from  the  faculty  steering  committee  
beginning  Spring  2013  and  the  MacCormick  liaison  will  join  the  program  at  the  launch  of  the  
course  in  Fall  2014.  
 

Stage  3:  Seek  out  external  foundation  support  
Once  internal  funding  is  obtained  and  the  Outreach  course  has  demonstrated  positive  results  in  
assessments,  HEARD  will  leverage  this  support  to  seek  out  external  funding  to  maintain  and  
expand  the  program.  Funding  will  be  solicited  from  a  number  of  regional  and  national  benefactors,  
including  The  Mockingbird  Foundation,  The  Legacy  Foundation,  The  Daphne  Foundation,  the  Arts  
and  Cultural  Council  for  Greater  Rochester,  the  Public  Welfare  Foundation,  the  New  York  State  
Education  Department,  and  the  New  York  State  Council  on  the  Arts  to  aid  in  equipment  and  
operating  costs  for  the  AY  2015-­‐2016  Service  Learning  Creative  Arts  Outreach  course.  These  
organizations  are  potential  sponsors  because  of  their  dedication  to  the  emotional  and  artistic  
enrichment  of  underprivileged  youth.  
 
 

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V. Steps to Monitor and Evaluate Funding Objectives

                 

                 

The  program  coordinator,  in  conjunction  with  the  HEARD  steering  committee,  will  work  with  the  
Ithaca  College  Office  of  the  Provost  and  the  IC  20/20  advisory  committee.  The  following  steps  will  
be  taken  to  evaluate  the  efficacy  and  progress  of  the  funding  throughout  AY  2014-­‐2015:  
 
Step  1:  The  program  coordinator  will  meet  regularly  with  the  steering  committee  following  the  
timeline  and  stages  of  funding.  The  goals  throughout  the  year  will  be  to  continually  check-­‐
in  to  ensure  that  the  projected  expenses  match  weekly  transportation,  supplies,  and  
teaching  costs.  They  will  also  utilize  the  flexibility  of  the  budget  to  adjust  small  routine  
expenses  as  necessary.  
 
Step  2:  In  addition  to  continual  progress  checks,  the  program  coordinator  and  steering  committee  
will  compile  reports  for  the  Office  of  the  Provost  and  the  Office  of  Civic  Engagement,  via  
Provost  Marisa  Kelly  and  Director  Anthony  Hopson,  two  times  per  semester.  These  reports  
will  detail  the  major  expense  trends,  and  discuss  ways  in  which  funds  can  be  properly  
distributed  in  future  blocks  and  semesters.  
 
Step  3:  As  reports  are  filed,  the  Offices  of  the  Provost  and  Civic  Engagement  will  communicate  
with  the  IC  20/20  advisory  committee  and  other  relevant  internal  offices  to  distribute  the  
materials  and  discuss  the  financial  successes  and  weaknesses  of  each  block’s  use  of  funding  
resources.  The  steering  committee  will  serve  as  the  hub  to  receive  each  office’s  
suggestions  and  re-­‐adjust  funding  as  needed  to  further  the  effectiveness  and  sustainability  
of  the  program  for  years  to  come.    

 

 
HEARD  

21

HEARD Funding Search  
Potential Internal and External Financial Support  
 

 

Internal Funding Prospects
ORGANIZATION:  Ithaca  College  IC  20/20  Initiative  
MISSION:  To  provide  a  common  set  of  learning  outcomes  and  set  of  experiences  that  will  be  part  
of  every  Ithaca  College  student’s  experience  
FUNDING  HISTORY  &  INFORMATION:  No  funding  history  but  preference  will  be  given  to  
integrated  curriculum  development  funds.  
URL:  http://www.ithaca.edu/icc/    
CONTACT  INFORMATION:    Members  of  the  IC20/20  Advisory  Committee;  care  of  Provost’s  
Office  
 
ORGANIZATION:  Ithaca  College  Office  of  the  Provost  
MISSION:  Grants  for  Creative,  Collaborative,  and  Community  Service  and/or  Service  Learning  
Projects:  These  grants  are  made  to  faculty  for  general  project  expenses  entailed  by  this  category  
of  projects.      
FUNDING  HISTORY  &  INFORMATION:  These  grants  fund  creative  projects  that  are  in  the  fine  
and  performing  arts  that  are  generally  viewed  as  being  outside  of  the  category  of  "traditional"  
academic  work  (e.g.,  music  composition  as  performance,  film  production,  fine  arts,  etc.)  as  well  as  
community  service/service  learning  projects  that  are  directed  toward  activities  that  have  specific,  
concrete  outcomes  in  the  Ithaca/Tompkins  County  Community.  
URL:  http://www.ithaca.edu/provost/docs/internalgrants/CCCSLP/    
APPLICATION  DUE  DATE:  Rolling  
CONTACT  INFORMATION:    
Director  of  Center  for  Faculty  Excellence,  Wade  Pickren  
wpickren@ithaca.edu  
316  Gannett  Center  
607-­‐274-­‐3734  
 
 
 

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ORGANIZATION:  Ithaca  College  Office  of  Civic  Engagement  
MISSION:  The  Office  of  Civic  Engagement  (OCE)  will  foster  the  development  and  coordination  of  
curricular  and  co-­‐curricular  community  partnerships  and  activities  including  service  learning  
courses,  volunteer  community  service  initiatives  by  students  and  student  organizations  and  all  
areas  of  institutional  community  access.  
FUNDING  HISTORY  &  INFORMATION:  No  funding  history;  requests  for  grants  for  IC  20/20  
related  curriculum  development  and  delivery  with  service  learning  overlay  will  be  reviewed.  
URL:  http://www.ithaca.edu/civic-­‐engagement  
CONTACT  INFORMATION:  Anthony  Hopson,  Director;  and  of  Service  Learning  Design  &  
Implementation  Workgroup  (SLDIW)  
 
ORGANIZATION:  Ithaca  College  Center  for  Faculty  Excellence  
MISSION:  The  main  objective  of  the  Instructional  Development  Fund  (IDF):  Direct  Course  
Enhancement  is  to  improve  qualitatively  the  content  and/or  methods  of  instruction  in  existing  or  
proposed  courses  at  Ithaca  College.  The  fund  intends  to  encourage  faculty  members  to  respond  to  
specific  academic  needs  at  this  institution  by  refining  or  updating  teaching  skills,  cultivating  
expertise,  or  developing  innovative  instructional  materials  and  resources  that  contribute  to  an  
improved  and  more  current  curriculum.  
FUNDING  HISTORY  &  INFORMATION:  To  be  considered,  any  proposal  submitted  for  this  fund  
must  specifically  address  concrete  benefits  to  classroom  or  laboratory  instruction  and  
demonstrate  the  extent  to  which  the  College’s  curriculum  will  be  enhanced  and  the  improvement  
that  might  demonstrate  for  the  College’s  curriculum  more  generally.  Faculty  applicants  are  
encouraged  to  discuss  ideas  or  drafts  with  Committee  members  beforehand.  IC  faculty  members  
are  continually  responsible  for  developing  and  revising  the  curriculum.  Hence,  the  IDF  funds  
primarily  support  proposals  that  are  notably  innovative,  require  assistance  beyond  those  available  
from  school  or  department  sources,  or  address  College,  school,  or  departmental  priorities,  and/or  
seek  to  activate  a  key  component  from  the  Mission  Statement  of  Ithaca  College.  Individual  
projects  may  be  funded  to  a  maximum  of  $1500.  For  projects  that  require  budgets  in  excess  of  
$1500,  additional  funds  from  other  sources  should  be  sought.  Reviewers  often  welcome  evidence  
that  the  dean  and/or  department  have  pledged  support  to  an  IDF  proposal  through  travel  funding,  
supplies,  and  reassigned  duties  
URL:  http://www.ithaca.edu/cfe/research/idf_course_enhancement/    

 

 
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CONTACT  INFORMATION:    
Director,  Wade  Pickren  
wpickren@ithaca.edu  
316  Gannett  Center  
607-­‐274-­‐3734  
 
ORGANIZATION:  Ithaca  College  Center  for  Faculty  Excellence  
MISSION:  Instructional  Development  Fund  (IDF):  Diversity/International  Projects  focuses  on  the  
understanding  that  students  benefit  when  their  teachers  are  enthusiastic  about  exploring  new  
ideas  and  are  actively  engaged  in  broadening  their  knowledge.  As  faculty  members  are  enriched,  
so  ultimately  are  the  students’  educational  experiences.  In  addition  to  grants  for  course  
improvement  focused  on  curriculum  development  and  pedagogical  experiments,  IDF  grants  also  
encourage  and  support  projects  that  incorporate  diversity  and  international/cultural  content.    
Although  immediate  curricular  impact  is  not  necessary,  it  is  expected  that  ground  work  for  future  
courses  and/or  other  interactions  that  encourage  the  exchange  of  ideas  and  practices  focused  on  
enhancing  diversity  and  international  understanding  between  faculty  members  will  result.  Please  
note  that  the  program  is  not  intended  for  use  by  faculty  members  in  their  quest  for  advanced  
degrees.  
FUNDING  HISTORY  &  INFORMATION:  Diversity/International  projects  are  funded  under  two  
categories:  joint  projects  involving  two  or  more  faculty  members  (up  to  $3,000)  and  individual  
projects  ($1,500).  In  order  to  support  the  faculty  in  their  efforts  to  introduce  and  expand  the  
international  focus  of  their  teaching  and  curriculum  development,  the  IDF  program  may  fund,  in  
exceptional  circumstances,  a  limited  number  of  double  awards  per  year  (maximum  $3000  each)  to  
support  faculty  who  need  to  travel  abroad  to  participate  in  appropriate  activities.  The  activities  for  
which  this  expanded  support  is  requested  should  be  directly  related  to  the  statement  of  
international  focus  of  the  proposer’s  department  and  school.  This  award  may  be  combined  with  
reassigned  released  time,  at  the  discretion  of  the  dean,  to  allow  adequate  opportunity  for  the  
integration  of  the  international  experience  into  the  curriculum.  
URL:  http://www.ithaca.edu/cfe/research/idf_interdisciplinary/    
CONTACT  INFORMATION:    
Director  of  Center  for  Faculty  Excellence,  Wade  Pickren  
wpickren@ithaca.edu  
316  Gannett  Center  
607-­‐274-­‐3734  

 
 

HEARD  

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ORGANIZATION:  Ithaca  College  School  of  Humanities  &  Sciences      
MISSION:  The  Educational  Grant  Initiative  (EGI)  supports  activities  and  projects  that  promote  
student  learning  and  achievement.  Generous  donations  from  Ithaca  College  alumni  and  friends  to  
the  IC  Fund  for  the  School  of  Humanities  &  Sciences  provide  the  funding  for  this  program.  
FUNDING  HISTORY  &  INFORMATION:  The  H&S  EGI  encourages  projects  that  provide  students  
with  opportunities  to  integrate  theory  and  practice  in  the  development  and  execution  of  research,  
professional,  or  creative  projects  that  extend  beyond  the  classroom,  to  enhance  their  
understanding  of  academic  content  gained  in  the  classroom/course  with  direct  engagement  with  
the  subject  of  study,  and  to  develop  their  professional  skills  and/or  their  understanding  of  careers  
and  professional  requirements.  $23,500  in  grant  money  was  awarded  to  various  groups  in  the  
2012  -­‐  2013  academic  year,  often  supporting  speakers  and  experiences  for  students  to  develop  
skills  outside  of  the  classroom.  
URL:  http://www.ithaca.edu/hs/awards_and_honors/awardsgrants/edugrants/    
CONTACT:  Stacia  Zabusky,  Associate  Dean  of  H&S  
 
ORGANIZATION:  Ithaca  College  Office  of  the  Provost:  Faculty/Student  Academic  Challenge  Funding  
FUNDING  HISTORY  &  INFORMATION:  The  Academic  Challenge  Funding  program  is  designed  
to  raise  the  College  profile  in  scholarship,  more  specifically  faculty-­‐student  collaboration.    This  
could  be  in  the  form  of  special  curricular  opportunities  that  will  be  available  for  those  who  wish  to  
challenge  themselves  to  new  academic  levels  such  as  high-­‐impact  pedagogy,  enhanced  curricular  
and  extra-­‐curricular  models,  cross-­‐  and  multi-­‐disciplinary,  self-­‐directed,  problem-­‐based  learning  
which  could  include  “specialized”  research,  and  other  scholarly  research.    Please  note  that  priority  
is  given  to  projects  that  directly  or  indirectly  contribute  to  the  IC  20/20  plan.  
URL:  http://www.ithaca.edu/provost/docs/internalgrants/ACF/    
CONTACT  INFORMATION:    
Director  of  Center  for  Faculty  Excellence,  Wade  Pickren  
wpickren@ithaca.edu  
316  Gannett  Center  
607-­‐274-­‐3734  
 
 
 

 

 
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Federal Funding Prospects
 

ORGANIZATION:  The  National  Endowment  for  the  Arts  
MISSION:  The  National  Endowment  for  the  Arts  was  established  by  Congress  in  1965  as  an  
independent  agency  of  the  federal  government.  To  date,  the  NEA  has  awarded  more  than  $4  
billion  to  support  artistic  excellence,  creativity,  and  innovation  for  the  benefit  of  individuals  and  
communities.  The  NEA  extends  its  work  through  partnerships  with  state  arts  agencies,  local  
leaders,  other  federal  agencies,  and  the  philanthropic  sector.    
FUNDING  HISTORY:  The  National  Endowment  for  the  Arts  supports  numerous  projects  that  
support  arts  in  many  areas  such  as  arts  education,  dance,  literature,  music,  visual  arts,  presenting,  
etc  and  to  date  have  awarded  over  $4  billion.  The  endowment  center  focuses  especially  on  using  
different  types  of  art  for  the  betterment  of  the  community  as  a  whole.  Their  funding  history  is  
pages  and  pages  long.  Recently  they  gave  to  an  organization  in  LA  called  Street  Poets.  This  
organization  engaged  in  poetry  for  high-­‐risk  youth  in  detention  centers,  schools  and  community  
centers.  Another  project  includes  the  San  Diege  State  University  Foundation,  where  $10,000  were  
given  for  an  outreach  program.  This  program  created  a  space  for  young  musicians  in  underserving  
communities  to  put  on  concerts  and  workshops  in  juvenile  justice  systems  facilities,  community  
centers  as  well  as  libraries.      
URL:  http://arts.gov/about  
APPLICATION  DUE  DATE:  Next  deadline  information  coming  in  January  2014.    
CONTACT  INFORMATION:  
National  Endowment  for  the  Arts    
1100  Pennsylvania  Avenue,  
NW  Washington,  DC  20506-­‐0001  
Phone:  (202)-­‐682-­‐5400  
Email:    webmgr@arts.gov  
 

State Funding Prospects
 

ORGANIZATION:  The  New  York  State  Council  on  the  Arts  
MISSION:  The  New  York  State  Council  on  the  Arts  is  dedicated  to  preserving  and  expanding  the  
rich  and  diverse  cultural  resources  that  are  and  will  become  the  heritage  of  New  York's  citizens.  
The  Council  believes  in  supporting  artistic  excellence  and  the  creative  freedom  of  artists  without  

 
 

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censure,  and  the  rights  of  all  New  Yorkers  to  access  and  experience  the  power  of  the  arts  and  
culture,  and  the  vital  contribution  the  arts  make  to  the  quality  of  life  in  New  York  communities.  
FUNDING  HISTORY:  The  New  York  State  Council  on  the  Arts  has  a  long  history  of  funding  both  
the  emergence  of  specific  forms  of  the  arts  in  the  public  sphere,  as  well  as  the  vital  maintenance  
of  arts  within  governmental  and  educational  institutions  throughout  New  York  State.  Past  
funding  has  gone  to  hundreds  of  projects,  ranging  from  dance  to  theatre  to  teaching  artist  
residencies  in  schools  to  other  arts  outreach.  In  2012,,  NYSCA  gave  $2,792,130  to  228  
organizations,  and  has  given  similar  amounts  over  recent  years.  Since  2000,  $60,431,517  was  
granted  to  over  3,000  organizations.  While  a  major  focus  of  the  Council  is  on  making  arts  available  
to  the  public  at  large,  their  funding  of  projects  within  schools  and  other  educational  settings  
would  set  precedent  for  possible  funding  of  HEARD,  especially  in  regard  to  the  section  of  their  
mission  that  extols  arts  accessibility  and  arts  education  accessibility.  
URL:  http://www.nysca.org/public/home.cfm    
APPLICATION  DUE  DATE:  No  deadline  
CONTACT  INFORMATION:  
New  York  State  Council  on  the  Arts  
175  Varick  Street,  New  York,  NY  10014-­‐4604  
(212)  627-­‐4455  
Fax    (212)  620-­‐5911  
Email:  info@nysca.org  
 
ORGANIZATION:  The  Arts  &  Cultural  Council  for  Greater  Rochester  
MISSION:  The  Arts  &  Cultural  Council  for  Greater  Rochester  is  a  nonprofit  association  which  
promotes  and  strengthens  arts,  culture,  and  education  in  the  greater  Rochester  region,  including  
Cayuga,  Genesee,  Livingston,  Monroe,  Ontario,  Orleans,  Seneca,  Wayne,  Wyoming,  and  Yates  
counties.  The  Arts  &  Cultural  Council  provides  a  broad  range  of  services  and  programs  for  the  
cultural  community,  particularly  
• Community  Arts  Grants  –  Funding  for  public  arts  programming,  capacity  building  for  
nonprofit  cultural  organizations,  and  for  the  creation  of  new  work.  
• Education  Through  the  Arts  Grants  –  Funding  for  partnerships  between  schools  (grades  K-­‐
12),  artists,  and  cultural  organizations  for  arts  integrated  classroom  learning.  
• Strategic  Opportunity  Stipends  –  Funding  for  opportunities  that  enhance  the  career  
development  of  artists.  

 

 
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Although  HEARD  is  not  based  in  Monroe  County,  it  serves  Monroe  County  and  its  communities  
because  MacCormick  residents’  homes  are  in  Monroe  County.  By  way  of  reducing  recidivism  
through  creative  arts,  HEARD  serves  Monroe  County  and  would  apply  for  these  grants:  
• Decentralization  Grant:  of  up  to  $5,000  are  available  for  nonprofits  for  arts-­‐related  
programs  that  serve  Monroe  County  residents  in  2012.  
• Education  through  the  Arts  Grant:  The  program  is  designed  to  encourage  artists,  teachers,  
administrators,  and  parents  to  collaborate  on  well-­‐planned  partnership  programs  that  
involve  interdisciplinary  art  programs  in  a  curriculum.  
 
Both  grants  are  funded  by  the  New  York  State  Legislature  and  the  New  York  State  Council  on  the  
Arts  in  partnership  with  the  Arts  &  Cultural  Council.  
FUNDING  HISTORY:    A  Decentralization  grant  of  up  to  $5,000  was  given  in  2011  to  a  nonprofit  
that  benefited  arts-­‐related  programs  that  served  Monroe  County  residents  in  2011.  The  grant  was  
funded  by  the  New  York  State  Legislature  and  the  New  York  State  Council  on  the  Arts  in  
partnership  with  the  Arts  &  Cultural  Council.  
URL:  http://www.artsrochester.org/artscouncil/grants.htm#AIE    
APPLICATION  DUE  DATE:  Fall  2014  
CONTACT  INFORMATION:  
Justin  Croteau,  Director  of  Development  and  Grant  Programs  
(585)  473-­‐4000,  ext.  206  
Audrey  Shaughnessy,  Grants  and  Database  Coordinator  
(585)  473-­‐4000,  ext.  215  
 
ORGANIZATION:  New  York  State  Education  Department:  The  Office  Access  Programs  
MISSION:  The  Office  of  K-­‐16  Initiatives  aims  to  improve  college  graduation  rates  for  ethnic,  
cultural  and  other  underrepresented  and  or  disadvantaged  students  and  to  close  the  gap  for  
students  in  need  of  academic  intervention  services  to  meet  the  Regents  graduation  requirements.  
FUNDING  HISTORY:  The  Office  of  K-­‐16  Initiatives  and  Access  Programs  has  awarded,  in  total,  
approximately  $90  million  in  grants,  contracts,  and  scholarships  to  colleges,  universities,  school  
districts,  community  based  organizations,  non-­‐profits,  and  students.      
URL:  http://www.highered.nysed.gov/kiap/    

 
 

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APPLICATION  DUE  DATE:  No  deadline  
CONTACT  INFORMATION:  
Stanley  S.  Hansen  Jr,  Executive  Director  
Office  of  K-­‐16  Initiatives  and  Access  Programs  
New  York  State  Education  Department  
Room  969,  Education  Building  Addition  
Albany,  NY  12234  
(518)  474-­‐3719  
kiap@mail.nysed.gov  
 

Corporate and Foundation Funding Prospects
 

ORGANIZATION:  The  Mockingbird  Foundation  
MISSION:  The  foundation  offers  competitive  grants  to  schools  and  nonprofit  organizations  that  
effect  improvements  in  areas  of  importance  to  the  Phish  fan  community,  including  music  (projects  
that  encourage  and  foster  creative  expression  in  any  musical  form,  but  also  recognize  broader  and  
more  basic  needs  within  conventional  instruction),  education  (including  the  provision  of  
instruments,  texts,  and  office  materials,  and  the  support  of  learning  space,  practice  space,  
performance  space,  and  instructors/instruction),  and  children  (programs  that  benefit  
disenfranchised  groups,  including  those  with  low  skill  levels,  income,  or  education;  with  
disabilities  or  terminal  illnesses;  and  in  foster  homes,  shelters,  hospitals,  prisons,  or  other  remote  
or  isolate  situations).    
FUNDING  HISTORY:  The  foundation  is  particularly  interested  in  organizations  with  low  
overhead,  innovative  approaches,  and/or  collaborative  elements  to  their  work.  Grants  range  from  
$100  to  $5,000  and  are  made  on  a  one-­‐time,  non-­‐renewable  basis.  
URL:  www.mockingbirdfoundation.org    
APPLICATION  DUE  DATE:  February  1st  and  August  1st    
CONTACT  INFORMATION:    
Ellis  Godard,  Executive  Director  
6948  Luter  Circle  
Moorpark,  CA  93021  
 

 

 
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ORGANIZATION:  The  Daphne  Foundation  
MISSION:  The  foundation  funds  programs  that  confront  the  causes  and  consequences  of  poverty  
in  the  5  boroughs  of  New  York  City.  The  foundation  has  a  particular  interest  in  grassroots  and  
emerging  organizations  which  engage  their  members  in  the  creation  and  implementation  of  long-­‐
term  solutions  to  intractable  social  problems.  The  foundation  believes  it  should  fund  in  a  manner  
that  reinforces  and  facilitates  the  work  of  the  programs  it  funds  and  that  the  most  inventive  and  
humane  solutions  to  social  problems  often  come  from  the  people  most  affected  by  those  
problems.  
FUNDING  HISTORY:  Has  awarded  17  grants  (A  total  of  $572,120)  for  the  year  ending  6/30/12  for  
organizations  focusing  on  youth  development,  community  outreach,  education,  and  social  
change.  
URL:  www.daphnefoundation.org    
APPLICATION  DUE  DATE:    No  deadline  
CONTACT  INFORMATION:    
Yvonne  L.  Moore,  Executive  Director  
4444  Lakeside  Drive  3rd  Floor  
Burbank,  CA  91505  
Telephone:  (212)  782-­‐3711  
Fax:  (212)  228-­‐5275  
E-­‐Mail:  info@daphnefoundation.org  
 
ORGANIZATION:  OppeneimerFunds,  Inc.  Corporate  Giving  Program  
MISSION:  OppenheimerFunds  makes  charitable  contributions  to  nonprofit  organizations  involved  
with  youth  entrepreneurship  and  business  education.  The  Future  Enterprisers  program  provides  
students  kindergarten  through  college  with  access  to  a  continuum  of  proven  entrepreneurship  
education  programming  designed  to  equip  and  inspire  students  to  succeed  in  school,  work  and  
life.  Types  of  support  includes  employee  volunteerism  and  corporate  matches  of  employee  
donations.  
FUNDING  HISTORY:  Not  public  
URL:  www.oppenheimerfunds.com    
APPLICATION  DUE  DATE:  No  deadline  

 
 

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CONTACT  INFORMATION:    
Jennifer  Stevens,  Director  of  Corporate  Communication  
2  World  Financial  Center,  11th  Fl.  
225  Liberty  St.  
New  York,  NY  10281  
Telephone:  (212)  323-­‐5224  
Fax:  (212)  912-­‐6710  
 
ORGANIZATION:  AEGON  Transamerica  Foundation    
MISSION:  The  foundation  supports  programs  designed  to  promote  arts  and  culture;  civic  and  
community;  education  and  literacy;  and  health  and  welfare.  The  grantmaker  has  identified  the  
following  area(s)  of  interest:  
Arts  and  Culture  
The  foundation  supports  programs  designed  to  foster  music  and  the  performing  arts,  including  
venues  for  artistic  expression.  
Civic  and  Community  
The  foundation  supports  programs  designed  to  promote  community  development;  encourage  
civic  leadership;  enhance  workforce  and  business  development;  and  empower  people  and  
communities.  
Education  and  Literacy  
The  foundation  supports  programs  designed  to  provide  knowledge  and  expand  individual's  
capabilities.  Special  emphasis  is  directed  toward  programs  designed  to  promote  financial  
literacy,  financial  security,  and  personal  success  through  financial  education  and  planning  for  
individuals.  
Health  and  Welfare  
The  foundation  supports  programs  designed  to  improve  the  condition  of  the  human  body  
though  nutrition,  housing  for  the  homeless,  disease  prevention,  and  other  support  services.  
FUNDING  HISTORY:  In  the  year  ending  in  12/31/11  they  awarded  a  total  of  $5,261,190  in  gifts  to  
educational  services,  youth  programming,  arts  outreach,  and  social  change.  
URL:  http://www.transamerica.com/about_us/aegon_transamerica_foundation.asp    

 

 
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APPLICATION  DUE  DATE:  No  deadline  
CONTACT  INFORMATION:    
c/o  Tax  Dept.  
4333  Edgewood  Rd.,  N.E.  
Cedar  Rapids,  IA  52499-­‐3210  
E-­‐mail:  shaegontransfound@aegonusa.com    
 
ORGANIZATION:  The  Legacy  Foundation  
MISSION:  The  Foundation  supports  programs  and  projects  in  the  areas  of  health,  education,  
recreation,  human  and  social  services,  aging,  and  the  arts  in  Tompkins  County,  New  York.  Support  
is  also  given  to  requests  for  capital  expenditures  and  "seed"  money  for  new  or  innovative  projects  
or  programs.    
FUNDING  HISTORY:  In  2011-­‐2012,  The  Legacy  Foundation  awarded  $85,000  to  health  initiatives,  
environmental  sustainability,  programming  for  disabled  adults,  and  public  education  in  Tompkins  
County.  
URL:  http://www.tclegacy.org/index.htm  
APPLICATION  DUE  DATE:  April  15/  September  15th  
CONTACT  INFORMATION:    
Jane  Hewitt,  Recording  Secretary  
P.O.  Box  97,  Ithaca,  NY  14851  
jhewitt@tompkinstrust.com  

 

 
 

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External Documents

 

 
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Marisa  Kelly,  Provost  and  Vice  President  of  Educational  Affairs  
Office  of  the  Provost  
3rd  Floor,  Peggy  Ryan  Williams  Center  
Ithaca  College  
953  Danby  Rd  
Ithaca,  NY  14850  
 
RE:  Letter  of  Inquiry  Regarding  Support  of  the  HEARD  Program  
 
Dear  Provost  Kelly,  
 
On  behalf  of  the  HEARD  Program  (Human  Expression  through  the  Arts,  Resident  Development),  we  
are  writing  to  introduce  you  to  our  organization  and  to  respectfully  request  an  opportunity  to  submit  a  
full  proposal  for  $25,000  in  support  of  the  emerging  partnership  between  Ithaca  College  and  the  
MacCormick  Secure  Center,  which  will  implement  a  creative  arts  Curriculum  that  will  inspire  and  
stimulate  the  young  men  at  the  facility  as  well  cultivate  a  vital  service  learning  opportunity  for  Ithaca  
College  students.    
 
PARTNERSHIP  HISTORY  
The  MacCormick  Secure  Center  has  been  tasked  with  the  responsibility  of  educating  and  inspiring  a  
population  of  14-­‐  to  20-­‐year-­‐old  male  juvenile  offenders.  These  services  are  provided  in  a  safe,  secure,  
therapeutic  environment  that  embraces  learning,  mutual  respect,  and  teamwork,  with  the  expressed  
purpose  of  creating  an  effective  permanent  change  to  the  mutual  benefit  of  the  residents  and  society.  
 
The  HEARD  Program  was  developed  in  the  Fall  of  2010  by  a  group  of  Proposal  and  Grant  Writing  
students  at  Ithaca  College  under  the  advisory  of  MacCormick  staff  psychologist  Carol  Whitlow,  and  
Patricia  Spencer,  the  course  instructor.  The  Fall  2010  team  founded  the  program  to  deliver  multiple  
art  courses  with  options  in  the  performing  arts,  in  cooperation  with  Performing  Arts  for  Social  Change  
(PASC),  a  strategic  initiative  with  the  Center  for  Transformative  Action  at  Cornell  University,  under  the  
direction  of  Cynthia  Henderson,  an  Ithaca  College  theater  professor.  The  Spring  2011  grant  writing  
team  proposed  and  received  $30,000  to  pilot  a  Creative  Arts  Outreach  course  in  cooperation  with  the  
School  of  Music.  The  course,  African  Drum  and  Dance,  served  as  a  capstone  professional  practice  and  
community-­‐based  learning  course  for  10  upper  level  undergraduate  students  at  Ithaca  College  to  
deliver  a  music  program  to  28  residents  at  the  MacCormick  Secure  Center.  The  HEARD  Program  is  
currently  broadening  its  scope  to  benefit  the  MacCormick  residents  through  a  sustainable  host  of  
resources  at  Ithaca  College.    
 
PURPOSE  OF  REQUEST  
The  HEARD  program  seeks  to  deliver  on-­‐going  creative  arts  programming  to  the  residents  of  the  
MacCormick  Center  in  Brooktondale,  NY,  a  maximum  security  facility  for  young  men  ages  14-­‐20.  
Building  off  of  the  success  of  the  pilot  course  in  AY  2011-­‐12,  HEARD  proposes  a  permanent  service  
learning  course  to  be  offered  beginning  in  Fall  2014  that  guides  IC  students  through  the  process  of  
developing  and  delivering  creative  arts  curriculum.  Blending  the  study  of  social  justice  issues  and  
development  of  practical  skills,  the  course  is  in  ideal  alignment  with  Ithaca  College's  vision  of  civic  
 
 

HEARD  

34
engagement  and  integrative  learning.  This  ground-­‐breaking  course  design  will  serve  as  a  model  for  
other  institutions  of  higher  education.  
 
SUMMARY  
As  a  partner  institution,  Ithaca  College  will  sponsor  the  college’s  participation  expenses  for  the  
Creative  Arts  Outreach  course  at  MacCormick,  while  additional  funding  will  supplement  aspects  of  the  
HEARD  Program  not  supported  by  Ithaca  College.  Full  funding  for  the  Creative  Arts  Outreach  course  
will  bring  innovative  and  comprehensive  arts  curricula  to  MacCormick  and  provide  the  residents  with  
positive  outlets  for  creative  energy  and  self-­‐expression  in  addition  to  providing  Ithaca  College  
students  with  a  transformational  service  learning  opportunity.  The  full  implementation  of  this  
program  will  significantly  improve  the  quality  of  life  for  the  MacCormick  residents  as  well  as  the  Ithaca  
College  hands-­‐on  student  experience.  
 
With  a  grant  of  $25,000  from  the  IC  20/20  budget  to  support  the  HEARD  Program,  the  MacCormick  
Secure  Center  and  Ithaca  College  will  create  an  enriching  and  educational  curriculum  for  the  2014  -­‐
2015  academic  year  and  beyond  that  will  provide  a  positive  transformational  experience  to  both  
residents  and  students  alike.  
 
Our  team,  and  course  instructor  are  happy  to  meet  with  you  in  January  of  2014  to  review  the  details  of  
the  proposal.  In  addition,  our  December  19,  2013  formal  proposal  materials  will  be  made  available  to  
you  on  request.  If  you  have  any  questions,  please  do  not  hesitate  to  contact  any  member  of  the  team  
or  our  course  instructor,  Patricia  B.  Spencer.  
 
Sincerely,  
 
Adrian  Anderson  ’14,  Theatre  Arts  Management,  Aanders3@ithaca.edu  
Karamvir  Bhatti  ’14,  Anthropology,  Kbhatti1@ithaca.edu  
Bridget  Cafaro  ’15,  Theatre  Arts  Management,  Bcafaro1@ithaca.edu  
Elizabeth  Levine  ’14,  Writing,  Elevine2@ithaca.edu  
Moriah  Petty  ’14,  International  Communications,  Mpetty1@ithaca.edu  
 
Patricia  B.  Spencer  
Assistant  Professor  and  HEARD  Program  Advisor  
Ithaca  College  
 
Cc:  HEARD  Faculty  Advisory  Group  

 
 

 

 

 
HEARD  

 

35
Marisa  Kelly,  Provost  and  Vice  President  of  Educational  Affairs  
Office  of  the  Provost  
3rd  Floor,  Peggy  Ryan  Williams  Center  
Ithaca  College  
953  Danby  Rd  
Ithaca,  NY  14850  
 

RE:  Cover  Letter  
 
Dear  Provost  Kelly,  
 
I  am  pleased  to  submit  a  proposal  for  a  collaboration  between  Ithaca  College  students  and  the  
MacCormick  Secure  Center  through  the  HEARD  Program  (Human  Expression  through  the  Arts:  
Resident  Development.)  We  look  forward  to  your  assistance  in  our  efforts  to  provide  a  new  service-­‐
learning  course  for  IC  students  and  faculty  as  well  as  enriched  creative  arts  programming  for  residents  
at  the  MacCormick  Center  in  Brooktondale,  NY.  
 

Our  proposal  requests  $25,000  for  the  upcoming  academic  year.  These  funds  will  help  offset  the  
costs  of  instructor  salaries  as  well  as  creative  arts  curriculum  materials  that  will  develop  a  two-­‐
semester  program  at  the  MacCormick  Center.  Two  different  parties  will  benefit  from  the  credit-­‐
bearing  course,  Ithaca  students  looking  to  gain  experience  in  education,  arts  therapy,  and  social  
outreach,  as  well  as  young  men  at  the  secure  facility.  The  HEARD  program  has  a  strong  history  with  
the  College,  primarily  through  volunteerism  but  also  through  a  similar  pilot  course  taught  by  Music  
Education  Professor  Baruch  Whitehead,  during  AY  2011-­‐2012.  Although  the  HEARD  Program  is  an  
emerging  collaboration,  there  are  many  faculty,  staff  members  and  volunteers  who  are  dedicated  to  
bringing  enrichment  programs  to  the  residents.  Those  involved  have  the  unique  skills  it  takes  to  
implement  a  successful  program  and  evaluate  its  effectiveness.  
 

Thank  you  for  your  interest  in  the  HEARD  Program.  We  envision  a  successful  collaboration  to  establish  
an  active,  service-­‐learning  course  focused  on  providing  arts  curriculum  at  the  MacCormick  Center  and  
we  welcome  your  feedback  and  participation  in  this  effort.  If  you  have  any  questions,  please  do  not  
hesitate  to  contact  any  member  of  the  team  or  our  course  instructor,  Patricia  B.  Spencer.  
 
Sincerely,  
 

Adrian  Anderson  ’14,  Theatre  Arts  Management,  Aanders3@ithaca.edu  
Karamvir  Bhatti  ’14,  Anthropology,  Kbhatti1@ithaca.edu  
Bridget  Cafaro  ’15,  Theatre  Arts  Management,  Bcafaro1@ithaca.edu  
Elizabeth  Levine  ’14,  Writing,  Elevine2@ithaca.edu  
Moriah  Petty  ’14,  International  Communications,  Mpetty1@ithaca.edu  
 
Patricia  B.  Spencer  
Pspencer@ithaca.edu  
Assistant  Professor,  Department  of  Writing,  Faculty  Consultant  to  Institutional  Advancement,  HEARD  Program  advisor  
Ithaca  College  
 
cc:  HEARD  Advisory  Group  

 
 

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36

Executive Summary
Transformation Through Community Service

The  HEARD  Program  (Human  Expression  through  the  Arts:  Resident  Development)  seeks  $25,000  
for  the  development  of  a  service  learning  course  at  Ithaca  College  in  partnership  with  the  
MacCormick  Secure  Center.  In  collaboration  with  departments  and  faculty  across  campus  and  the  
IC  20/20  initiative,  the  HEARD  course  would  serve  as  an  interactive  teacher-­‐training  program  for  IC  
students  and  a  creative  arts  outlet  for  MacCormick  residents.  
 
Diverse  in  Scope,  Focused  in  Support  
The  HEARD  course  would  run  as  a  repeating  semester-­‐long  course,  split  into  two  blocks.  Each  
week,  students  would  design  curriculum  to  then  be  delivered  at  MacCormick—with  ample  
opportunity  given  for  both  groups  to  provide  feedback  and  interact  as  co-­‐partners  in  learning.  The  
faculty,  with  a  broad  range  of  interests  and  creative  arts  backgrounds,  will  serve  as  mentors  in  
teacher  training  as  well  as  resources  in  a  cross-­‐cultural  learning  environment.    
The  MacCormick  Center,  located  in  rural  Brooktondale,  New  York,  is  a  maximum-­‐security  prison  for  
male  juvenile  offenders,  ages  14-­‐20.  The  MacCormick  vision,  aligned  with  that  of  the  HEARD  
Program,  is  to  provide  its  services  in  a  secure  environment  that  embraces  the  development  of  
expressive  skills  and  confidence  of  its  residents.  Meeting  together  in  a  shared  space  of  student,  
faculty,  and  resident,  the  HEARD  Program  desires  to  bridge  cultural  gaps  through  music,  dance,  
creative  writing,  and  studio/media  arts.  
 
Addressing  Two  Needs  
HEARD  recognizes  that  the  students  of  Ithaca  College  and  residents  of  the  MacCormick  Secure  
Center  are  bound  together  not  simply  by  geographical  contiguity  but  by  a  shared  need  to  express  
themselves  through  a  creative  medium.  The  HEARD  Program  rests  on  the  belief  in  the  
transformative  power  of  a  communal  space  for  both  students  and  residents  to  learn  and  grow  in  
tandem.  To  truly  maximize  HEARD’s  potential  impact,  the  program  must  expand  from  the  pilot  
course  (delivered  in  AY  2011-­‐2012)  into  a  sustainable  semester-­‐long  course.  The  following  
proposal  breaks  down  the  necessary  costs  as  well  as  a  full  funding  and  curriculum  plan  for  the  re-­‐
envisioned  course.  It  also  provides  instructional  resources  and  the  mechanisms  for  promoting  
HEARD’s  mission  and  results  of  teaching  to  the  greater  Ithaca  College  and  Tompkins  County  
communities.  By  expanding  campus  and  community  awareness  through  successful  programming  
and  publicity,  HEARD  foresees  the  course  becoming  an  integral  and  impactful  part  of  the  fabric  of  
an  Ithaca  College  student’s  education.  
 

 

 
HEARD  

37

Organizational History
A Shared Passion for Learning

At  its  most  basic  level,  [prison-­‐exchange  programs]  allow  students  and  others  outside  of  prison  to  go  
behind  the  walls  to  reconsider  what  they  have  learned  about  crime  and  justice,  while  those  on  the  
inside  are  encouraged  to  place  their  life  experience  in  a  larger  framework.  However,  much  more  
occurs  in  the  exchange—layers  of  understanding  that  defy  prediction.  In  the  groups’  discussions,  
countless  life  lessons  and  realizations  surface  about  how  we  as  human  beings  operate  in  the  world,  
beyond  the  myths  and  stereotypes  that  imprison  us  all.  
-­‐  Lori  Pampa,  Founder  and  National  Director  of  The  Inside-­‐Out  Prison  Exchange  Program  
A  Shared  Mission  to  Educate  Beyond  the  Classroom  
The  HEARD  program,  at  its  very  core,  sets  out  to  transform  a  student’s  understanding  of  
schooling  versus  education.  Schooling  conjures  images  of  desks,  academic  essays,  a  teacher  
lecturing  at  the  chalkboard—the  knowledge  gained  from  within  an  institution.  Education,  
conversely,  is  a  continuous  and  ever-­‐transforming  activity  to  which  we  may  dedicate  our  entire  
lives.  The  power  of  education  is  that  it  exists  and  gathers  strength  from  our  interactions  with  the  
world  around  us.  The  HEARD  program  sees  the  walls  of  the  classroom  as  permeable  and  the  
students  in  it  as  active  citizens  of  their  communities.  
 
Beyond  its  pedagogical  mission,  HEARD  functions  as  a  Creative  Arts  Outreach  program  between  
Ithaca  College  students  and  the  MacCormick  Secure  Center  in  Brooktondale,  NY.  Ithaca  College  
presents  the  ideal  space  from  which  to  pioneer  the  HEARD  program.  Born  out  of  a  desire  to  share  
a  passion  for  the  creative  arts,  specifically  music,  with  others,  Ithaca  College  now  boasts  over  a  
century  of  excellence  in  music,  drama,  art,  and  creative  writing  along  with  a  rigorous  liberal  arts  
curriculum  in  politics,  sociology,  teacher  education,  and  beyond.  In  the  intersection  of  these  two  
tenets  of  Ithaca  College’s  curriculum,  the  HEARD  program  is  steadily  gaining  momentum.  With  
the  development  of  the  campus-­‐wide  educational  transformation  known  as  IC  20/20  and  the  
introduction  of  a  new  Integrative  Core  Curriculum—emphasizing  experiential  learning,  diversity  
education,  and  the  creative  arts—the  HEARD  program  becomes  all  the  more  relevant1.  Bridging  
disciplines,  artistic  mediums,  and  socio-­‐political  backgrounds,  HEARD  desires  to  provide  a  
sustainable  means  to  connect  aspiring  student  educators  with  residents  at  the  MacCormick  
Secure  Center.  
                                                                                                                       
1
 1.  https://www.ithaca.edu/ic2020/about/      

 
 

2

 Corriero,  Michael.  "The  Criminal  Responsibility  of  Juveniles."  Judging  Children  as  Children:  A  Proposal  for  a  Juvenile  
 

 

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A Successful Pilot
I  realized  that  I  started  looking  forward  to  our  outreach  days  the  most  out  of  my  whole  week.  I  was  
constantly  thinking  about  further  programming  and  ideas.  I  was  thinking  of  ways  to  connect  with  the  
students.  
                   -­‐Samantha  Underwood,  pilot  HEARD  Program  participant  
 

Samantha  Underwood,  IC  Music  Education  ’12,  stumbled  upon  the  HEARD  program  by  accident.  
Already  registered  for  the  African  Drum  and  Dance  Ensemble,  she  discovered  the  “Creative  Arts  
Outreach”  elective  in  its  first  year  and  decided  each  course  would  enhance  the  experience  of  the  
other.  In  the  Fall  of  2011,  Baruch  Whitehead,  associate  professor  of  Music  Education  took  the  first  
group  of  IC  students,  including  Samantha,  to  the  MacCormick  Secure  Center.  This  program,  now  
known  as  HEARD  (Human  Expression  through  the  Arts:  a  Resident  Development  Program),  was  
intended  to  serve  as  a  vehicle  to  give  vital  teaching  experience  to  creative  arts  education  majors  
while  providing  MacCormick  with  a  service  they  so  desperately  needed—a  voice  and  a  means  to  
express  themselves.  
 
MacCormick,  a  maximum  security  prison  housing  up  to  39  young  men  ages  14-­‐20,  was  the  primary  
site  of  a  course  piloted  in  the  Fall  of  2011.  The  course,  a  three  credit-­‐bearing  special  topics  seminar  
which  combined  music  education  and  writing,  was  intended  to  utilize  the  passion  Ithaca  College  
students  and  faculty  had  for  the  creative  arts  and  direct  it  towards  a  sector  of  the  population  that  
is  often  disenfranchised  and  disengaged  from  creative  pursuits.  
 
The  semester  culminated  with  a  collaborative  performance  between  the  residents  and  students  
incorporating  spoken  word.  Although  part  of  this  course  was  focused  on  making  music,  no  musical  
experience  was  necessary  for  IC  students  or  MacCormick  residents.  Samantha’s  experience  at  
MacCormick  transformed  her  educational  and  professional  trajectory.  Teaching  at  MacCormick  
taught  her  the  importance  of  resiliency,  accountability,  flexibility,  and  inspired  her  to  consider  
Expressive  Therapies  and  Community  Arts  as  a  potential  career.  After  graduating  from  Ithaca  
College,  she  spent  a  year  teaching  full-­‐time  at  MacCormick.  
 
While  the  course  has  not  been  offered  again  after  its  pilot  semester,  the  second  branch  of  the  
HEARD  Creative  Outreach  Initiative—the  student  organization—continued  to  provide  that  service  
at  another  level.                
   
The  Future  of  the  HEARD  Program  
Unfortunately,  due  to  funding  challenges  and  lack  of  school-­‐wide  recognition,  neither  the  credit-­‐
bearing  course  nor  the  student  organization  have  been  able  to  fully  realize  their  goals  for  creative  

 

 
HEARD  

39

arts  outreach.  With  its  focus  on  empowerment,  both  for  the  residents  of  MacCormick  and  the  
student-­‐teachers  in  the  program,  HEARD  desires  to  become  an  established  component  of  Ithaca  
College’s  curriculum.  Although  she  is  not  working  in  MacCormick  at  this  time,  Samantha  
integrates  the  tenants  of  HEARD  into  her  current  teaching  job—hoping  one  day  to  ensure  “that  
people  who  need  music  and  arts  are  getting  the  access  they  deserve…and  spreading  the  arts  to  
places  where  it  was  previously  non-­‐existent.”    
 
The  Fall  of  2013’s  Proposal  and  Grant  Writing  Team,  in  partnership  with  interested  faculty  and  
administrative  staff,  have  been  working  towards  just  that  goal:  combining  the  love  for  creative  
arts  and  education  already  felt  within  the  Ithaca  College  community—its  students,  faculty,  and  
administration—with  the  current  positive  relationship  built  between  IC  and  the  MacCormick  
Center.  
 
 
 
 

Proposed Initiative Statement
Integrating Arts Outreach into the Course Catalog

The  Ithaca  College  HEARD  program  seeks  $25,000  to  create,  expand,  and  solidify  a  service  
learning  course  reflecting  creative  arts  outreach  with  the  MacCormick  Security  Center.  A  blended  
academic  and  practicum  course  offers  students  the  opportunity  to  participate  in  interdisciplinary  
coursework  and  field-­‐based  service  learning  aimed  at  supporting  incarcerated  underserved  youth  
through  creative  arts  instruction.  Funds  will  support  (1)  a  salary  for  the  program  coordinator,  (2)  
stipends  for  professors  providing  instruction  surrounding  their  specific  disciplines,  (3)  necessary  
equipment  to  make  the  practice  of  taught  disciplines  possible,  as  well  as  (4)  logistical  costs  such  as  
transportation  and  outside  programming.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 

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Opportunity Statement
Transcending Barriers with Service Learning

 
Transitioning  to  an  Established  Curriculum  
Currently,  the  HEARD  program  is  operating  strictly  as  a  student  organization.  Although  this  is  
useful  for  spreading  word  on  campus  about  the  program,  the  resources  available  are  extremely  
limited.  The  organization’s  SGA-­‐restricted  budget  limits  the  potential  of  the  program  and  what  it  
can  achieve.  If  the  program  continues  to  run  solely  as  a  student  organization,  access  to  
instruments,  guest  speakers  and  audio  production  equipment  will  be  limited.  The  creation  of  a  
sustainable  HEARD  course  would  ensure  adequate,  regular  programming  for  MacCormick  
residents,  and  would  also  be  instrumental  in  facilitating  a  high-­‐caliber  learning  experience  for  both  
residents  and  students.  
 
The  creation  of  this  new  course  would  be  a  testament  to  the  college’s  commitment  to  serving  
their  student  body  and  the  local  community.  In  efforts  to  best  serve  Ithaca  College  faculty  and  
students,  as  well  as  MacCormick  residents,  the  HEARD  course  requires  a  considerable  amount  of  
coordination  between  Ithaca  College  departments,  schools,  and  administrative  offices.  The  course  
will  need  approval  from  academic  departments  within  the  school  (Humanities  and  Sciences,  
Music,  and  Park  School  of  Communications)  as  well  as  the  Provost’s  Office  and  the  Registrar’s  
Office.  
 
Shifting  from  Volunteerism  to  College  Credit  
With  contingent  and  primarily  volunteer-­‐based  staff,  the  HEARD  program  is  limited  in  the  extent  
of  programming  it  can  provide  at  the  MacCormick  Secure  Center.  Government  funding  to  the  
Center  allows  only  for  standard  academic  programming,  leaving  HEARD  as  the  only  way  to  offer  
supplementary  arts  engagement.  Since  HEARD’s  inception  in  2010,  it  has  been  facilitated  by  
almost  entirely  faculty  and  student  volunteers.  To  increase  participation  and  effective  teaching,  a  
service  learning  course  at  Ithaca  College  will  properly  train  and  support  students  to  facilitate  
creative  arts  programming  with  MacCormick  residents,  as  a  means  for  coping  with  the  
psychological  effects  of  imprisonment.  
 
Incarceration  as  a  Social  Justice  Issue  
The  United  States  is  the  world  leader  in  imprisonment.  Young  offenders  are  efficiently  enrolled  in  
the  system,  but  once  incarcerated  they  do  not  receive  the  rehabilitation  services  they  need  and  
suffer  from  the  estrangement  from  their  families  and  communities,  resulting  in  an  increased  
likelihood  of  recidivism.  This  is  a  rather  recent  phenomenon  directly  corresponding  to  a  shift  in  

 

 
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federal  policy.  The  U.S.  had  a  stable  and  average  incarcerated  population  for  most  of  the  20th  
century  until  it  began  to  rise  in  the  mid-­‐1970’s  and  skyrocketed  over  the  course  of  the  next  four  
decades.  
 
Incarceration  statistics  are  intimately  related  to  behavior  and  living  conditions  during  childhood.  
Researchers  have  identified  risk  factors  for  child  delinquency  including  poor  academic  
performance,  early  childhood  aggression,  poverty  and  lack  of  resources,  and  the  absence  of  
parental  involvement.    Boys  may  be  more  likely  to  become  delinquent  if  they  are  mistreated  at  
home,  have  delinquent  friends,  drop  out  of  school,  use  drugs,  or  face  community  violence2.  
 
Cumulative  Disadvantages  for  Young  Men  of  Color  
A  2006  study  commissioned  by  the  Joint  Center  for  Political  and  Economic  Studies  in  Washington  
D.C.  labeled  these  external  factors  as  “cumulative  disadvantages.”  According  to  the  study,  only  56  
percent  of  African  Americans,  compared  to  78  percent  of  whites,  and  only  23  percent  of  Black  high  
school  students  and  20  percent  of  Latinos  were  eligible  to  pursue  a  college  education.  
Employment  statistics  present  a  similar  picture.  The  unemployment  rate  for  black  males  ages  16  
to  19  was  35.6  in  2004  compared  to  16.3  percent  for  whites.3  
 
This  is  the  precise  demographic  of  the  majority  of  MacCormick  residents  who  benefit  from  the  
HEARD  program.  Their  lives  have  been  shaped  by  the  cumulative  disadvantages  that  largely  
contributed  to  their  current  circumstances.  The  stigma  surrounding  the  provision  of  services  for  
convicted  criminals  challenges  the  program,  yet  this  research  demonstrates  that  systemic  
limitations  of  opportunities  for  people  of  color  in  the  U.S.  is  a  root  cause  of  juvenile  delinquency  
and,  therefore,  often  exists  outside  the  control  of  the  individual.  
 
An  imminent  duality  exists  within  the  modern  juvenile  justice  system  where  incarcerated  youth  
are  both  perpetrators  of  crimes  and  the  victims  of  institutional  racism  and  the  prison  industrial  
complex.  Moreover,  the  justice  system  is  increasingly  influenced  by  politics  and  big  business  due  
to  the  rise  of  private  corrections  firms.  Understanding  and  contextualizing  these  sociological  and  
political  dimensions  of  juvenile  delinquency  is  a  key  learning  objective  of  the  Ithaca  College  
service  learning  course.  When  applied  to  his  or  her  teaching  at  MacCormick,  a  student’s  
understanding  of  this  nuanced  and  politicized  set  of  issues  will  increase  substantially.  
                                                                                                                       
2

 Corriero,  Michael.  "The  Criminal  Responsibility  of  Juveniles."  Judging  Children  as  Children:  A  Proposal  for  a  Juvenile  
Justice  System.  Philadelphia:  Temple  UP,  2006.  35-­‐36.  
3
 Belk,  Jr.,  Adolphus  G.  A  New  Generation  of  Native  Sons:  Men  of  Color  and  the  Prison-­‐  
Industrial  Complex.  Washington,  D.C.:  Joint  Center  for  Political  and  Economic  Studies  Health  Policy  Institute,  2006.  
 
 

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Art  as  Rehabilitation    
Despite  the  arts’  well-­‐established  role  in  therapy,  creative  arts-­‐related  programming  is  often  the  
first  to  go  in  terms  of  budget  cuts.  Internal  funding  from  the  MacCormick  Center  regretfully  can  
no  longer  support  creative  arts  class  offering  to  residents.  The  natural  therapeutic  effects  of  
creating  art  prove  to  produce  increased  self-­‐awareness,  enhance  cognitive  abilities,  lower  stress,  
and  offer  a  coping  mechanism  to  manage  trauma  and  avoid  conflict4.  Denying  young  people  like  
those  at  the  MacCormick  Center  the  benefits  of  exposure  to  the  arts  perpetuates  the  inequalities  
that  may  have  led  to  their  initial  criminal  activity.    
 
Student-­‐Driven  Momentum  
The  program  is  based  on  best  practice  models  for  the  delivery  of  a  creative  arts  outreach  program  
in  detention  facilities  across  the  country.  However,  while  other  programs  include  student  
involvement  with  the  supervision  and  primary  leadership  of  professionals,  HEARD  is  primarily  
student-­‐driven,  with  the  aid  of  faculty  instructors  and  advisers.  Volunteers  of  different  academic  
years  and  backgrounds  will  combine  their  creative  efforts  to  fulfill  a  specific  need  at  the  
MacCormick  Center  by  providing  an  outlet  for  creative  expression.  The  interest  expressed  by  
Ithaca  College  students  and  their  tireless  passion  in  developing  this  initiative  is  rooted  in  the  
character  the  college  strives  to  cultivate.  
 
Due  to  the  interactive  nature  of  such  programming,  service  learning  accommodates  many  
different  types  of  learners—especially  those  for  whom  traditional  educational  models  have  failed.  
Moreover,  the  post-­‐service  or  “reflection”  component  of  most  service  learning  curricula  
encourages  the  student  to  actively  critique  their  involvement  in  the  program,  which  can  both  
bolster  self-­‐confidence  in  teaching  abilities  and  self-­‐awareness  of  their  learning  and  teaching  
styles.  Above  all,  and  the  reason  why  higher  education  institutions  must  consider  seriously  the  
inclusion  of  such  programs  in  their  curriculum,  is  that  these  programs  are  geared  towards  the  
formation  of  conscious  citizens—the  kind  of  student  who  will  take  with  them  all  that  they  have  
learned  and  apply  it  in  positive  and  constructive  ways  to  the  world  around  them.  
 
The  Right  Time  to  be  HEARD  
The  HEARD  Program’s  mission  aligns  closely  with  IC  20/20  and  its  current  funding  initiatives,  
particularly  the  enhanced  focus  on  cross-­‐cultural  service  learning.  In  accordance  with  the  IC  20/20  
vision,  the  transformative  nature  of  integrative  learning  “has  demonstrated  a  linkage  to  higher  
grade  point  average,  course  content  retention,  and  life  skills,  such  as  leadership  ability,  critical  
                                                                                                                       
4

 Erickson,  Bonnie  J.,  and  Mark  E.  Young.  "Group  Art  Therapy  With  Incarcerated  Women."  Journal  of  Addictions  &  Offender  
Counseling  31.October  (2010):  38-­‐51.  

 

 
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thinking,  and  self-­‐confidence.”5  With  support  from  internal  offices  at  Ithaca  College,  one  or  more  
instructors  per  semester  or  academic  year  can  be  hired  to  monitor  the  learning  of  both  college  
students  and  MacCormick  residents.    
 
The  HEARD  program  has  been  slowly  gaining  support  on  campus.  Faculty  and  staff  from  a  variety  
of  offices  and  schools  champion  the  program  and  have  demonstrated  interest  in  expanding  its  
reach,  attracted  by  both  the  educational  value  and  the  cause.  During  AY  2011-­‐2012  Professor  
Baruch  Whitehead  taught  a  year-­‐long  pilot  course  blending  Ithaca  and  MacCormick  students  and  
he  wishes  to  take  on  the  role  of  coordinator  in  order  to  offer  this  experience  to  more  students.  
Professors  across  disciplines,  including  Baruch  Whitehead  of  Music  and  Jessica  Barros  and  Eleanor  
Henderson  of  Writing,  have  already  expressed  interest  in  taking  on  the  role  of  instructor  and  the  
administrators  in  various  schools  support  establishing  a  credit-­‐bearing  course.  The  timing  is  right  
to  transform  the  theoretical  framework  of  the  course  into  a  reality.    
 
 
 

Program Description  
The Components for Success

Statement of Goals and Objectives
 

The  Ithaca  College  community  thrives  on  the  principles  that  knowledge  is  acquired  
through  discipline,  competence  is  established  when  knowledge  is  tempered  by  
experience,  and  character  is  developed  when  competence  is  exercised  for  the  benefit  of  
others.  
                             –  Ithaca  College  Mission  Statement  
 

Goal  1:  To  create  a  sustainable  curriculum  centered  on  high-­‐impact  experiential  learning  for  
Ithaca  College  students  to  support  them  both  academically  and  professionally.  Closely  aligned  
with  the  overall  mission  of  the  college,  the  HEARD  program  seeks  to  apply  the  knowledge  gained  
in  the  classroom  through  teaching  simulations,  course  development  exercises,  and  regular  
teaching  opportunities  at  the  MacCormick  Secure  Center.  
                                                                                                                       
5

 Hansen,  Ken.  "A  Practical  Guide  for  Designing  a  Course  with  a  Service-­‐Learning  Component  in  Higher  Education."  Journal  
of  Faculty  Development  26.1  (2012):  29-­‐36.  ERIC.  Web.  

 
 
 

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Short-­‐term  objectives  for  the  course:  
Objective  1a:  Baruch  Whitehead,  Associate  Professor  of  Music  Education  in  the  School  of  Music,  
will  be  appointed  as  the  coordinator  to  streamline  all  Creative  Arts  Outreach  efforts  between  
participating  bodies  in  the  Spring  of  2014.  Moving  forward,  Professor  Whitehead  will  assist  in  the  
curriculum  development  and  the  coordination  between  the  HEARD  student  organization,  course  
programming,  and  the  MacCormick  Secure  Center,  in  addition  to  instructing  the  first  block  of  the  
pilot  course.  
 
Objective  1b:  The  semester-­‐long  course  will  launch  in  the  Fall  of  2014  with  a  total  of  18  students  
participating.  It  will  be  divided  into  two  blocks,  with  an  option  of  3  credits  for  the  students.    
 
Objective  1c:  The  course  will  involve  two  faculty  members  from  distinct  creative  arts  backgrounds  
who  will  receive  three  credits  in  overload  from  the  institution.  Through  this  collaboration,  the  
students  will  be  allowed  more  exposure  to  different  teaching  experiences.  Additionally,  the  
opportunity  to  work  with  varying  artistic  mediums  will  draw  students  and  faculty  from  all  over  the  
college  and  build  the  base  of  support.  
 
Objective  1d:  The  course  will  rely  heavily  on  evaluative  and  reflection  materials  to  ensure  a  
valuable  experience  for  all  involved:  
a.  Student  Evaluation  and  Reflection:  There  will  be  extensive  reflection  materials  for  the  
benefit  of  enhancing  the  student  experience.  These  reflections  will  serve  as  an  important  
component  of  the  course  and  will  be  intended  to  measure  the  level  of  student  engagement  
and  perceived  value  of  the  experience  as  a  whole.  Pre-­‐service  surveys  will  also  be  utilized  to  
quantify  the  changes  in  perception  and  skill  development  after  participation  in  the  course.  
b.  College-­‐wide  Assessment:  Due  to  its  potential  service  learning  designation  and  inherent  
interdisciplinary  nature,  the  course  can  function  as  a  pilot  for  a  college-­‐wide  assessment  
program  as  a  means  to  properly  assess  specific  faculty  participation  and  the  success  of  the  
course  as  an  interdisciplinary  program.  
 
Long-­‐term  objectives  for  the  course:  
Objective  1e:  With  the  combined  efforts  of  Professor  Whitehead  as  coordinator  and  HEARD’s  
growing  awareness  campus-­‐wide,  the  HEARD  student  organization  will  grow  by  15%  by  Spring  
2015.  The  student  organization  can  then  function  as  a  volunteer  opportunity  for  students  who  
cannot  or  have  already  participated  in  the  course.    
 

 

 
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Objective  1f:  The  course  will  continue  to  expand  its  outreach  and  efficacy  as  the  curriculum  
becomes  more  refined  and  HEARD  grows  in  recognition.  In  the  spirit  of  integration  between  a  
student’s  educational  life  and  citizenship,  the  faculty  and  coordinator  will  develop  coursework  
that  would  follow  the  trajectory  of  a  student’s  college  career.  Courses  would  be  available  at  every  
level  and  focus  on  distinct  aspects  of  a  teacher  training  and  fall  in  line  with  IC  20/20’s  Power  &  
Justice  theme  and  Creative  Arts  perspective.    
 

Goal  2:  Provide  opportunities  for  the  development  of  meaningful  partnerships  in  learning  
and  creative  arts  expression  between  Ithaca  College  students  and  MacCormick  residents.  
HEARD’s  unique  positioning  as  a  course  for  both  Ithaca  College  teachers-­‐in-­‐training  and  
MacCormick  residents  allows  for  a  focus  on  dialogical  learning—that  is,  learning  that  occurs  in  a  
dialogue  between  teacher  and  student.  HEARD’s  classroom  would  function  as  a  platform  for  both  
groups  to  work  together  towards  developing  a  successful  model  for  creative  arts  outreach  and  
education.  
 
Outcomes  for  the  partnership:  
Outcome  2a:  Through  the  formation  of  partnerships  between  IC  students  and  MacCormick  
residents,  a  mutual  understanding  of  each  other’s  needs  will  develop.  This  understanding  is  
imperative  in  driving  the  IC  students’  lesson  plans  and  will  ultimately  enhance  participation  in  the  
program  from  both  sides.  
 
Outcome  2b:  Provide  MacCormick  residents  opportunities  for  creative  arts  education  to  function  
as  a  coping  mechanism,  a  means  of  self-­‐expression,  and  a  development  of  technical  skills.  
Through  the  integration  of  these  three  components  of  the  curriculum,  the  residents  will  be  
exposed  to  many  ways  to  utilize  the  creative  arts  for  their  own  personal  and  professional  growth.  
 
Outcome  2c:  The  program  will  also  develop  an  extensive  evaluation  system  for  both  MacCormick  
residents  and  staff  to  map  initial  interest  and  understanding  of  subject  matter  in  comparison  to  
post-­‐experience  opinions.  This  data  will  be  essential  to  the  further  expansion  of  the  HEARD  
program.  
 

Goal  3:  Confront  the  stigma  of  incarceration,  especially  of  young  men  of  color,  from  within  
Ithaca  College  and  in  the  larger  Tompkins  County  Community.  Stemming  from  Ithaca  College’s  
longstanding  mission  to  encourage  social  justice  pursuits  from  its  student  body  and  faculty,  the  
HEARD  program  would  also  serve  as  a  platform  to  discuss  and  act  upon  central  issues  related  to  
race,  class,  gender,  and  opportunity—especially  within  the  context  of  education.  

 
 

HEARD  

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Objectives  for  the  social  justice  initiative:  
Objective  3a:  The  course  will  provide  students  with  the  unique  opportunity  to  interact  with  
numerous  guest  speakers  on  issues  of  race  and  class,  identified  by  March  2014.  Their  expertise  will  
advance  the  students’  understanding  of  the  larger  context  within  which  they  are  providing  
effective  programming  to  the  MacCormick  residents.  The  guest  speakers,  primarily  from  different  
schools  within  the  College,  will  be  recognized  and  compensated  for  their  involvement  with  the  
course.      
 
Objective  3b:  A  larger  mission  of  the  HEARD  program  is  to  expand  the  impact  beyond  the  walls  of  
the  classroom  and  the  MacCormick  Secure  Center.  Participating  students,  faculty,  and  
MacCormick  residents  will  be  given  a  public  platform  to  share  their  impressions  and  discoveries,  if  
they  so  desire.  After  the  Fall  2014  semester,  the  students  will  be  provided  the  opportunity  to  
present  the  experiences  with  a  campus  and  community-­‐wide  audience.  This  will  not  only  boost  
awareness  of  the  course  and  associated  programming  but  also  of  the  larger  goals  of  HEARD  as  a  
creative  arts  vehicle  to  combat  issues  of  oppression.    
 
 
 

Methods: Service Learning Arts Outreach Course  
A Sustainable Ithaca College Course Offering

 

I. Curriculum Framework
 

 “HEARD  represents  all  the  things  we  want  our  students  involved  in.”    
-­‐  Professor  Baruch  Whitehead  
 

Overview  
Based  on  the  pilot  course  offered  during  AY  2011-­‐2012,  the  proposed  Service  Learning  Creative  
Arts  Outreach  4-­‐block  course  will  offer  different  approaches  to  presenting  the  residents  at  
MacCormick  with  creative  arts  programming.  The  credit-­‐bearing  course  being  proposed  will  
consist  of  two  semesters  of  interdisciplinary  learning,  team  taught  by  two  faculty  each  semester,  
from  departments  and  schools  across  Ithaca  College's  campus.  We  are  currently  seeking  support  
among  faculty  with  foci  in  music,  theatre,  dance,  creative  writing,  studio,  and  media  arts.  This  
tentative  curriculum  structure  incorporates  a  pre-­‐service  orientation,  which  includes  protocol  and  
personal  context  exercises,  an  introduction  to  understanding  pedagogical  theory  surrounding  

 

 
HEARD  

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creative  arts  outreach  at  a  maximum-­‐security  facility,  as  well  as  skill  development  in  the  
designated  creative  art  for  that  block.  Throughout  the  course,  students  will  reflect  on  their  
experiences  as  well  as  their  personal  and  professional  growth  and  development.    
 

 

 
 
Integrative  Core  Curriculum  
The  professors  of  the  HEARD  Service  Learning  course  will  build  coursework  using  guidelines  of  
the  Integrative  Core  Curriculum.  
 
Power  and  Justice  Potential  inquiries:  
1)  How  have  power  and  justice  been  theorized,  described,  and  explained  within  different    
disciplines?  
2)  How  is  power  generated,  distributed,  transformed  and  mobilized,  be  it  physically,    
culturally,  or  psychologically?  
3)  How  do  sexualities,  class,  race,  ethnicity,  sustainability  affect  and  reflect  structures  of    
power  and  notions  of  justice?  
4)  How  does  a  historical  understanding  of  power  or  fights  for  justice  help  us  understand  our    
contemporary  conflicts?  
 
 

 
 

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Creative  Arts  Perspective  Competencies  
Upon  completion  of  a  CA  course,  students  are  able  to:  
1)  Recognize  and  explain  the  forms,  techniques,  and  processes  used  in  at  least  one  area  of    
creative  arts;  
2)  Analyze,  in  themselves  and  others,  how  performances  or  creative  works  stimulate    
emotions,  provoke  thoughts,  or  guide  actions  and  beliefs;  and  
3)  Articulate  the  role  of  the  creative  arts  in  the  construction  of  historical  and/or    
contemporary  cultures.6  
 
Service  Learning  
Building  upon  acknowledged  best  practices  in  service  learning  models,  we  will  ensure  the  
following  attributes  are  included  in  the  outreach  course:  
 

Disciplinary  Skills  are  Applied  and  Practiced:  The  experience  involves  the  application  of  
concepts  and  knowledge  learned  in  the  students’  regular  coursework,  in  a  real-­‐world,  or  simulated  
real-­‐world,  environment.  
 

Faculty  Mentoring  is  Consistent:  The  experience  involves  significant,  on-­‐going  mentoring  by  
faculty  throughout  the  experience.  The  evolutionary  nature  of  experiential  learning  requires  
consistent  faculty  involvement  to  remain  focused  on  the  predetermined  learning  objectives.  
 

Learning  is  Purposeful  and  Measurable:  The  experience  is  purposeful,  designed  in  advance  with  
clear  goals  and  explicit,  measurable  learning  outcomes.  The  pressures  and  unpredictability  of  the  
real-­‐world  environment  are  likely  to  produce  unexpected  results,  and  of  course,  goals  may  change  
in  the  process  of  the  experience.  Clear  goals  from  the  outset  will  enhance  the  likelihood  that  both  
the  instructor  and  the  students  can  adapt  to  the  unexpected  while  maintaining  intended  
outcomes,  and  that  shifts  in  goals  will  be  deliberate  and  productive  for  student  learning.  
 

Reflection  is  a  Key  Component:  The  experience  provides  opportunities  for  reflection  about  what  
and  how  the  student  is  learning.  Examples  of  such  opportunities  include  journaling  and  systematic  
recording  of  the  experience,  thorough  post-­‐experience  community  outreach  as  a  vehicle  for  
professional  practice  learning.7  
   
 
 
                                                                                                                       
6
 Guidelines  for  Integrative  Core  Curriculum  Themes  and  Perspectives  Designations  
http://www.ithaca.edu/hs/depts/politics/docs/ICC/ICCguidelines.pdf  
7

 

 A  Framework  for  Experiential  Learning  in  H&S  http://www.ithaca.edu/hs/faculty/explrng/explrngframework/  

 
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Tentative  Course  Structure  
Pre-­‐service  Component:  Based  on  best  practice  models  for  service  learning  coursework,  the  
HEARD  Creative  Arts  Outreach  course  will  begin  with  a  pre-­‐service  orientation.  Through  guest  
lectures  from  faculty  Center  for  the  Study  of  Culture  Race  and  Ethnicity  and  classes  with  their  
instructors,  students  will  study  the  complexities  of  the  US  criminal  justice  system.  They  will  be  
paired  with  an  introduction  to  the  complexities  of  working  with  underserved  minority  youth.  The  
next  component  will  focus  on  an  introduction  to  the  pedagogy  and  methodology  of  creative  arts  
outreach  specific  to  that  block's  designation.  
 

Course  Content  and  Outreach  Component:  The  majority  of  the  semester  will  consist  of  
refinement  and  delivery  of  outreach  curriculum  to  MacCormick  residents.  MacCormick  residents  
are  divided  into  three  units  and  the  Ithaca  College  course  will  be  divided  in  this  way  to  match.  One  
unit  will  visit  MacCormick  per  class  period  while  the  remaining  students  remain  on-­‐campus  to  
develop  lesson  plans  with  the  other  professor.  Each  week  students  will  be  expected  to  submit  a  
short  reflection  that  addresses  outreach  expectations  and  outcomes  and  personal  and  
professional  development.  Individual  creative  arts  outreach  faculty  will  incorporate  this  
framework  into  their  own  pedagogical  style  and  artistic  area  of  expertise.    
 
Reflection  and  Evaluation  Component:  The  final  week  will  be  devoted  to  constructive  reflection  
on  individual  growth  related  to  the  student  learning  objectives,  outlined  in  the  IC20/20  student  
learning  initiatives.  In  addition,  formal  student,  professor,  staff  and  resident  evaluations  are  to  be  
completed  and  submitted  by  the  end  of  this  block  period  for  potential  course  refinement.    
 
 

II. Timeline
 

Timeframe  

Objective  

December  2013  

Confirm  participation  from  instructors  Baruch  Whitehead  and  instructional.  
Finalize  course  curriculum  and  student  learning  objectives  for  IC  students  as  
well  as  MacCormick  residents  for  Creative  Arts  Outreach.  
Request  funds  of  $25,000  from  the  Office  of  the  Provost,  The  Office  of  Civic  
Engagement,  The  Director  of  Institutional  Advancement,  The  Office  of  
Alumni  Relations,  The  Dean  of  the  School  of  Music,  and  The  Dean  of  the  
School  of  Humanities  and  Sciences,  and  various  private  foundations.  

Request  permission  from  the  Dean  of  the  School  of  Music  (Karl  Paulnack)  

January  2014  

 
 

HEARD  

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March  2014  



Summer  2014  


August-­‐  
December  2014  


December  
2014  

 

 

 
HEARD  

and  the  respective  Dean  for  participation  for  his  instructional  partner  for  
their  participation.  
Request  permission  from  the  Dean  of  the  School  of  Music  and  the  respective  
Dean  for  his  instructional  partner  to  allow  instructors  to  add  course  to  
current  course  load  or  as  an  overload.  
Request  permission  from  the  All-­‐College  Tenure  and  Promotion  Committee  
for  instructors  to  request  credits  to  their  tenure  promotion  if  applicable.  
Request  permission  from  the  Office  of  the  Provost  to  allow  students  to  take  
the  course  for  1  to  3  credits.  
Contact  MacCormick  Center  staff  for  conductive  times  of  the  week  for  IC  
students  to  bring  outreach  initiative  to  residents.  
Hire  and  appoint  Faculty  Coordinator  
Invite  Guest  Lecturers  to  present  
Begin  marketing  initiatives  for  student  enrollment,  such  as  Intercom  
announcements,  direct  emails  to  students  majoring  in  Education,  Music,  Art,  
Theatre,  Writing,  and  Media  Arts,  word-­‐of-­‐mouth  recommendations  from  
faculty  involved,  etc.  
Whitehead  and  instructional  partner  finalize  curriculum  and  grading  policies.  
Apply  for  ICC  Designations:  Power  and  Justice  theme;  Creative  Arts  
perspective.  
Pilot  Creative  Arts  Outreach  semester-­‐long  course  for  the  semester  
IC  students  will  be  in  class  for  2  hours  a  week  working  on  lesson  plans  and  
gaining  teaching  skills  and  at  the  MacCormick  Center  two  hours  a  week.  
18  Students  will  rotate  in  three  groups  of  six.  Six  students  will  be  at  the  
Center  during  the  week,  while  the  other  two  groups  will  be  in  class  at  IC.  
Block  I  will  teach  residents  skills  in  instrumental  music  while  Block  II  will  
focus  on  creative  writing.  

• Evaluate  effectiveness  of  instructors,  student-­‐teachers,  and  MacCormick  
participants.  
• Devise  curriculum  for  Creative  Arts  Outreach  Course  for  Spring  2015.  
o Potentially  utilize  different  forms  of  art  and  different  instructors  

51

III. Diversity/Nondiscrimination Policy Statement
 

Diversity  encompasses  multiple  dimensions,  including  but  not  limited  to  race,  culture,  nationality,  
ethnicity,  religion,  ideas,  beliefs,  geographic  origin,  class,  sexual  orientation,  gender,  gender  
identity  and  expression,  disability,  and  age.  Ithaca  College  continually  strives  to  build  an  inclusive  
and  welcoming  community  of  individuals  with  diverse  talents  and  skills  from  a  multitude  of  
backgrounds  who  are  committed  to  civility,  mutual  respect,  social  justice,  and  the  free  and  open  
exchange  of  ideas.    We  commit  ourselves  to  change,  growth,  and  action  that  embrace  diversity  as  
an  integral  part  of  the  educational  experience  and  of  the  community  we  create.  National  African  
American  and  Hispanic  demographics  are  disproportionately  affected  by  crime  and  incarceration.  
The  HEARD  program  thereby  addresses  issues  of  racial  disadvantages  surrounding  the  prison  
system.  We  will  also  employ  coordinators,  professors,  and  additional  staff  in  accordance  with  
OSHA’s  federal  requirements  for  Protection  from  Discrimination.  
 

 

IV. Management & Key Personnel
 
Program  Coordinator  
Baruch  Whitehead,  Associate  Professor  of  Music  Education,  will  not  only  teach  Block  I  of  the  
Creative  Arts  Outreach  course  but  will  serve  as  the  logistical  coordinator  between  Ithaca  faculty,  
MacCormick  faculty  and  residents,  and  Ithaca  College  students.  Prior  to  the  start  of  the  Fall  2014  
semester,  he  will  develop  lesson  plans  and  the  evaluation  process  with  his  collaborative  
instructional  partner,  as  well  as  schedule  guest  speakers  for  the  pre-­‐service  portion  of  the  course.  
His  work  before  the  start  of  the  semester  will  also  entail  screening  potential  students  to  deem  
their  qualifications  for  creative  arts  instruction,  including  conducting  interviews  with  IC  students,  
as  well  as  coordinating  with  the  Division  of  Legal  Affairs  in  terms  of  risk  management.  Whitehead  
will  aid  in  marketing  initiatives  for  student  involvement,  including  managing  the  organization’s  
website  and  promoting  student’s  past  work.  
 
During  the  length  of  the  course,  additional  responsibilities  will  include  aiding  in  fundraising  and  
grant  writing  with  upcoming  Proposal  and  Grant  Writing  courses,  coordinating  schedules  with  the  
faculty  at  the  MacCormick  Center,  and  planning  performances  and  exhibitions  of  residents’  work.  
 
Faculty  Steering  Committee  
Baruch  is  one  member  of  the  Faculty  Steering  Committee  that  provides  overhead  supervision  for  
the  HEARD  Program.  The  Steering  Committee  consists  of  eight  skilled  and  interested  IC  faculty  
and  administrators  from  a  variety  of  disciplines  and  departments.  They  oversee  the  program  to  
 
 

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ensure  a  long-­‐term  partnership  between  the  College  and  the  MacCormick  Secure  Center.  The  
Committee  reviews  the  proposed  syllabus  for  the  course  and  consults  with  the  MacCormick  liaison  
to  evaluate  the  appropriateness  of  the  arts  courses  for  MacCormick  residents.  It  will  meet  three  
times  a  semester:  once  to  review  professor  proposals,  once  to  select  the  focus  of  the  course  to  be  
implemented  for  the  following  semester,  and  once  to  evaluate  the  effectiveness  of  the  current  
semester’s  course.  See  Addendum  A  for  full  biographies  of  Committee  members.  
 

The  key  personnel  in  maintaining  the  HEARD  program    
-­‐  Staff  Psychologist  and  Faculty  at  the  MacCormick  Center  
-­‐  Faculty  Advisory  Committee  at  Ithaca  College  
-­‐  Ithaca  College  course  Coordinator  
 

Ithaca  College  Service  Learning  Course  Instructors  
-­‐  Music  block:  Baruch  Whitehead,  Associate  Professor  of  Music  Education,    
Instructor  of  the  Fall  2011  Creative  Arts  Outreach  course  
-­‐  Writing  block:  TBD  
 

Guest  Speakers  
-­‐  The  Study  of  Race,  Culture,  and  Ethnicity:  Paula  Ioanide  and  Sean  Eversley-­‐Bradwell  
-­‐  Art  Education:  Carla  Stetson,  Assistant  Professor  of  Art  
-­‐  Prison  Education  and  Rehabilitation:  Nancy  Menning,  Assistant  Professor  of  Religion  
-­‐  Service  Learning:  Patricia  Spencer,  Assistant  Professor  of  Writing  
-­‐  Performing  Arts  for  Social  Change:  Cynthia  Henderson,  Associate  Professor  of  Theatre  
 

Ithaca  College  Administration  
-­‐  Christy  Agnese,  Senior  Assistant  to  the  Deans,  School  of  Music      
-­‐  Anthony  Hopson,  Director  of  Civic  Engagement  
 

Further  Funding  and  Coordination  
-­‐  Proposal  &  Grant  Writing  students  (current  and  future  groups  working  with  HEARD)  
-­‐  Proposal  &  Grant  Writing  professor  Patricia  Spencer  
-­‐  Warren  Calderone,  Director  of  Foundation  and  Corporate  Relations  
 

Further  Campus  Allies  
-­‐  Writing  Professors:  Tom  Kerr,  Jim  Stafford,  Eleanor  Henderson,  Barbara  Adams  
-­‐  Music  Professors:  Chad  West,  Brian  Dozoretz  
-­‐  Theatre  Arts  Professors:  Chrystyna  Dail,  Cynthia  Henderson,  Paula  Murray-­‐Cole  
-­‐  Art  Professors:  Susan  Weisend  
-­‐  Media  Arts  Professors:  Jon  Hilton  
-­‐  Sociology  Professors:  Belisa  Gonzalez,  Jonathan  Laskowitz  

 

 
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Impact Statement  
The Ripple Effect

 
On  Ithaca  College  Students    
The  optimal  impact  of  a  service  learning  course  is  the  formation  of  students  who  will  engage  with  
what  they  have  learned  and  apply  it  in  positive  and  constructive  ways  to  their  future  careers  and  
education.  The  HEARD  course  facilitates  civic  engagement  that  allows  students  to  reinterpret  and  
apply  past  college  coursework  to  a  direct  action  project,  making  them  into  active  seekers  of  
learning  rather  than  passive  recipients.8    
 

The  HEARD  experience  will  challenge  previous  assumptions  of  the  world  students  might  have,  
forcing  them  out  of  their  comfort  zone,  and  to  apply  theory-­‐based  solutions  on  real-­‐world  
problems.  Pre-­‐service  studies  provide  students  with  a  new  understanding  of  political  and  
sociological  factors  of  incarceration  in  the  U.S.  while  the  service  component  provides  context  and  
observed  evidence.  The  post-­‐service  or  “reflection”  will  empower  students  to  critique  their  own  
participation  as  well  as  the  participation  of  others  in  the  program,  which  can  both  establish  
confidence  in  their  teaching  abilities  and  consciousness  of  their  learning  and  teaching  capabilities.  
 
On  MacCormick  Participants  
The  natural  therapeutic  effects  of  creative  expression  can  produce  similar  results  to  counseling,  
such  as  increased  self-­‐awareness,  enhanced  cognitive  abilities,  lower  stress,  and  a  coping  
mechanism  to  manage  trauma  and  avoid  conflict.  Studies  show  that  rehabilitation  arts  
programming  is  particularly  effective  among  incarcerated  juveniles  with  learning  or  emotional  
disabilities,  such  as  many  MacCormick  residents,  who  often  struggle  to  express  themselves  
through  reading  and  writing.9    
 

Activities  in  the  arts  promote  personal  growth  and  creative  expression  with  a  freedom  that  is  
otherwise  suppressed  by  the  highly  structured  nature  of  detention  facilities.  Participants  in  the  
arts  classes  will  regain  a  sense  of  control  that  it  is  often  lost  through  the  dehumanization  of  
incarceration  and,  in  this  way,  art  can  help  reconnect  the  prisoners  with  their  own  voice.  The  arts  
have  been  associated  with  rehabilitation  methods  to  overcome  anger  and  increase  self-­‐esteem  as  
well  as  build  a  work  ethic  and  self-­‐confidence.  Without  these  skills,  a  young  person  may  be  more  
                                                                                                                       
8
   Eyler,  Janet,  and  Dwight  Giles.  Where's  the  learning  in  service  learning?  San  Francisco:  Jossey-­‐Bass,  1999.  p.  18.  
9

 

Venable,  Bradford  B.  "At-­‐Risk  and  In-­‐Need:  Reaching  Juvenile  Offenders  Through  Art."  Art  Education  July  (2005):  p.  49.  

 
 

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likely  turn  to  violence  and  drugs,  potentially  putting  themselves  and  their  communities  at  risk.    
 

On  Ithaca  College  
The  Ithaca  College  faculty  who  participate  as  instructors  or  contributors  gain  the  experience  of  
teaching  in  an  alternative  classroom.  Participating  in  the  course  will  alter  their  perspective  on  
teaching  and  their  role  as  community  members  with  unique  services  to  offer.  Instructing  
MacCormick  residents  poses  a  professional  and  personal  challenge  as  they  readapt  their  teaching  
technique  to  interact  with  a  new  demographic.    The  Ithaca  College  course  could  showcase  the  
power  of  service  learning  and  the  set  standards  for  cross-­‐cultural  education.  The  innovative  course  
design  will  serve  as  a  model  for  other  institutions  of  higher  education  and  the  college  will  receive  
recognition  for  instituting  civic  engagement  through  curriculum.  
 

On  the  Tompkins  County  Community  
In  the  face  of  overwhelming  differences,  Ithaca  College  and  the  MacCormick  Center  share  the  
unfortunate  potential  to  act  as  isolated  islands  separate  from  the  surrounding  community.  The  
HEARD  program  challenges  this  notion  by  inviting  participation  from  the  Tompkins  County  
community.  Only  through  the  engagement  of  the  local  population  will  HEARD  achieve  the  goal  of  
relieving  stigmas  of  incarcerated  individuals  and  raise  consciousness  of  the  prison-­‐industrial  
complex.  Publication  of  artwork  created  by  HEARD  participants  will  provide  further  exposure  to  
the  arts  and  inspire  interest  in  the  program  and  the  power  of  creative  expression.    

Evaluation Plan  
Looking Ahead

A  wide  variety  of  feedback  will  be  necessary  to  sustain  and  improve  the  HEARD  program  at  Ithaca  
College.  For  the  program  to  be  successful  it  must  benefit  the  needs  of  the  MacCormick  residents,  
Ithaca  College  students,  and  the  vision  of  the  Ithaca  College  core  curriculum.  Through  direct  
reflections  by  each  participant,  the  program  will  be  better  able  to  prepare  for  a  successful  and  
sustainable  future.  
 
Ithaca  College  Students  
At  the  end  of  each  block  session,  students  who  have  participated  in  the  class  will  be  asked  to  
contribute  an  evaluation  reflecting  on  their  experience  with  the  IC  HEARD  program.  Students  will  
be  asked  to  assess  aspects  of  the  program  such  as  curriculum  planning,  program  execution,  as  

 

 
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well  as  the  fulfillment  of  all  student  learning  outcomes  set  forth  by  the  coordinator.  This  reflection  
process  will  include  a  written  component  in  addition  to  an  in-­‐person  interview  with  the  program  
coordinator.  Through  their  feedback,  students  will  be  able  to  determine  which  aspects  of  the  
program  need  to  be  altered  in  order  to  maintain  the  program’s  longevity.    
 
MacCormick  Residents  
After  each  visit,  the  MacCormick  residents  will  be  encouraged  to  write  about  their  experiences  
with  the  HEARD  program.  In  addition  to  responses  from  the  residents,  MacCormick  personnel,  
such  as  the  staff  psychologist,  will  be  able  to  evaluate  the  program’s  success  based  on  verbal  
responses  from  residents,  observed  emotional  improvements,  tangible  products  created  through  
the  program,  and  the  improvement  of  former  resident's  lives  upon  their  return  to  external  
communities.    
Ithaca  College  Vision  
Each  semester  the  Ithaca  College  deans  and  professors  associated  with  the  HEARD  program  will  
evaluate  its  alignment  with  the  college’s  integrative  core  curriculum  and  its  overall  IC  20/20  vision.  
This  panel  of  faculty  must  determine  how  the  program  will  continue  to  benefit  the  mission  of  the  
college  and  its  students.  

Dissemination Plan  
Raising the Volume

The  objectives  of  our  dissemination  are  to:  
• Attract  students  to  enroll  in  the  service  learning  course.  
• Establish  the  course  as  an  enduring  presence  of  Ithaca  College.  
• Gain  recognition  for  the  work  of  students  and  faculty.  
• Spread  awareness  of  social  justice  concerns  of  incarceration.  
• Promote  responsible  and  respectful  civic  engagement  among  the  student  body.  
 
Recruitment    
The  dissemination  of  information  regarding  the  HEARD  Service  Learning  course  must  commence  
during  the  spring  semester  of  2014  prior  to  registration  for  fall  classes.  The  unique  format  of  a  
service  learning  course  and  its  potential  for  transformation  must  be  clarified  to  prospective  

 
 

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students  in  order  to  attract  enrollment.    
 
Faculty  and  campus  allies  will  act  as  the  main  vehicle  for  disseminating  information  about  the  
course.  Professors  from  various  disciplines  will  attract  students  to  the  program  by  promoting  it  in  
their  classes  that  bear  relevance  to  HEARD’s  mission.  This  includes  classes  in  art  education,  
writing,  music  and  the  visual  arts,  as  well  classes  in  political  and  social  justice  or  those  in  the  
Center  for  Culture,  Race  and  Ethnicity.  Faculty  endorsements  and  class  recommendations  have  a  
powerful  influence  on  students,  especially  when  shared  by  a  respected  professor.    
 
The  course  will  be  advertised  through  department  list-­‐serves,  during  informational  sessions,  and  
on  the  Ithaca  College  website.  Baruch  Whitehead  will  be  available  for  consulting  to  those  students  
who  would  like  more  information.  Students  from  past  grant  writing  teams  as  well  as  members  of  
the  student  organizations  will  act  as  spokespeople  for  the  course  and  spread  the  news  through  
word-­‐of-­‐mouth.  
 
Local Outreach: Ithaca College and City
A  central  feature  of  the  dissemination  plan  is  reaching  out  to  creative  arts-­‐based  community  
organizations  in  the  local  area  and  arts  clubs  on  the  Ithaca  College  campus.  These  partners  can  
spread  the  word  among  their  own  networks,  suggest  further  contacts,  and  provide  insight  for  
further  program  development.  Local  art  collections,  including  the  Handwerker  Gallery  on  campus,  
may  be  able  to  incorporate  works  by  MacCormick  residents  into  their  exhibitions.  
 
National  Outreach:  Networking  
HEARD  will  collaborate  with  similar  prison  education  programs  and  service  learning  courses  
centered  on  residents  of  secure  facilities.  These  partnerships  will  raise  the  profile  of  Ithaca  College  
nationally  and  help  the  HEARD  program  gain  recognition.  Networking  with  the  organizers  of  
similar  programs  allows  for  an  exchange  of  ideas  as  well  as  professional  development  
opportunities  for  service  learning  students  as  well  as  IC  faculty.  
 
Cross-­‐Platform  Media  Coverage  
To  increase  visibility  we  will  reach  out  to  campus  publications  such  as  The  Ithacan,  ICTV,  Buzzsaw  
Magazine,  and  Fuse.  The  program  was  already  covered  by  360  Magazine  in  the  spring  of  2012.  
Student  coordinators  will  also  spread  word  through  social  media  venues  that  will  reach  the  widest  
range  of  interested  students,  faculty,  and  community  participants.  The  initiative’s  Facebook  
page10  and  student  organization’s  website11  will  continue  to  operate  and  with  increased  presence.  
                                                                                                                       
10

 

 https://www.facebook.com/groups/HEARD.IC/  

 
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As  part  of  a  service  learning  initiative,  information  on  the  course  and  students  involved  could  
additionally  be  posted  within  The  Office  of  Civic  Engagement’s  section  on  Ithaca  College’s  
website.  Students  would  be  able  to  blog  about  their  teaching  experiences  as  well,  assuming  
residents’  identities  are  protected.  
 
Publishing  Artwork  of  MacCormick  Residents  
Media  students  will  be  encouraged  to  develop  a  website  to  document  HEARD’s  current  activities  
as  well  as  publish  the  art  produced  by  MacCormick  residents  in  the  form  of  written  documents,  
visual  pieces,  or  recorded  sound  files.  This  could  take  several  different  forms  such  as  a  blog,  a  
Tumblr  or  SoundCloud  depending  on  the  type  of  work  produced  by  students  in  the  class.  The  
School  of  Music  could  house  the  website  initially  with  links  from  other  departments.  
 
HEARD  coordinators  and  student  teachers  will  also  solicit  air  time  on  local  radio  for  music  
produced  by  the  residents.  Their  work  could  broadcast  on  IC  radio  stations  WICB  and  VIC,  or  on  
Crossing  Borders  Live,  an  independent  radio  program  produced  locally  that  brings  together  
people  of  diverse  backgrounds  through  a  shared  appreciation  of  music.  Their  mission  aligns  
closely  with  HEARD  objectives  and  is  a  venue  for  connecting  with  an  audience  that  may  hold  a  
bias  against  individuals  in  the  justice  system.  MacCormick  residents  will  receive  credit  for  any  
work  shared  with  the  public.  
 
 
 

Future Funding Statement  
Exploring All Options

The  HEARD  initiative  will  initially  seek  funding  from  internal  sources  at  Ithaca  College,  namely  the  
Office  of  the  Provost,  the  Office  of  Civic  Engagement,  and  various  schools  within  the  College.  
Monetary  support  from  Ithaca  College  will  ensure  proper  levels  of  salaries  for  the  prospective  
instructors,  as  well  as  funds  for  transportation,  instructional  supplies,  and  upkeep  of  instruments  
at  the  MacCormick  Center.  In  addition,  future  funding  could  potentially  be  received  from  the  
Legacy  Foundation,  New  York  State,  The  National  Endowment  for  the  Arts,  The  US  Department  
of  Education,  and  private  foundations.  
 
 
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           
11
 https://ithaca.collegiatelink.net/organization/HEARD  
 
 

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Conclusion  
An Innovative and Timely Initiative

 
The  HEARD  program  will  provide  Ithaca  College  students  with  the  tools  needed  for  outreach  to  
the  community  through  civic  engagement.  Stabilizing  the  program  would  allow  for  the  deeper  
connection  between  Ithaca  College  professors  and  students  and  the  residents  at  MacCormick  to  
emerge.  If  supported,  this  program  will  not  only  benefit  the  residents’  lives  and  give  them  the  
opportunity  to  creatively  express  themselves,  but  it  would  also  allow  for  personal  and  professional  
development  opportunities  for  students  and  staff  and  overall  growth  in  the  community.  
 
The  creation  and  continuation  of  this  interdisciplinary  course  would  make  room  for  hands-­‐on  
experience  for  future  teachers  at  Ithaca  College.  It  also  integrates  IC  students  into  the  local  
community  in  accordance  with  the  IC  20/20  goal  of  incorporating  civic  engagement  into  
coursework.  
 
MacCormick  residents  are  curious  and  driven  to  continue  learning.  Providing  them  with  an  arts  
focus  in  education  exposes  them  to  a  constructive  environment  where  they  are  creating  
something  personal.  The  program  provides  them  with  tangible  results  and  rewards  of  working  
individually  and  collaboratively  IC  students  for  an  overall  benefit  to  their  social  and  mental  well  
being.  Expanded  programming  will  feed  the  curiosity  and  love  for  learning  of  students  and  
teachers  alike.  Ithaca  College  students  will  gain  the  invaluable  experience  of  interacting  with  
people  of  diverse  backgrounds  as  well  as  fulfilling  their  desire  to  apply  their  knowledge  and  
develop  skills.  By  embracing  the  HEARD  Program,  Ithaca  College  has  the  opportunity  to  reach  
multiple  diverse  audiences  in  a  single  innovative  and  timely  initiative.  
 
 

 

 
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Budget Summary  
Academic Year 2014-15

 

     BUDGET  CATEGORY  
   Personnel  Costs  

IN-­‐  KIND  COSTS  
 

   Instructor  Stipend  
   Program  Coordinator  
   MacCormick  Liaison  

 
 

 

SUBTOTAL  
PROJECT  COSTS  
 

$15,600.00  

$15,600.00  

$2,240.00  

$2,240.00  

$2,100.00  

 

$2,100.00  

 

$400.00  

$400.00  

   Faculty  Steering  Committee  

$5,600.00  

 

$5,600.00  

   Grant  Consultants  

$4,000.00  

 

$4,000.00  

   PERSONNEL  SUBTOTAL    

$11,700.00  

   Faculty  Guest  Speakers  

$18,240.00  

 

   Course  Development  Stipend  

 

$4,000.00  

$4,000.00  

$5,040.00  

$1,320.00  

$6,360.00  

$460.00  

$240.00  

$700.00  

   Transportation  

$1,200.00  

$1,200.00  

$2,400.00  

   NON-­‐PERSONNEL  SUBTOTAL  

$7,700.00  

$6,760.00  

$12,260.00  

     TOTALS  

$18,400.00  

$25,000.00  

$43,400.00  

42%  

58%  

100%  

   IC  Student  Performances  

 

$29,940.00  

   Non-­‐personnel  Costs  

   Teaching  Supplies  

   

   REQUESTED  
FROM  SPONSOR  

 

 
 

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Requested Funds Breakdown by Semester:
 

   BUDGET  CATEGORY  

Per  Semester  

Per  Academic  Year  

         Instructor  Stipend  

$7,800.00  

$15,600.00  

         Program  Coordinator  

$1,120.00  

$2,240.00  

$200.00  

$400.00  

$2,000.00  

$4,000.00  

         Teaching  Supplies  

$660.00  

$1,320.00  

         IC  Student  Performances  

$120.00  

$240.00  

$600.00  

$1,200.00  

$12,500.00  

$25,000.00  

         Faculty  Guest  Speakers  
         Course  Development  Stipend  

         Transportation  
   TOTALS  

 
Cost Per Participant Breakdown:
Requested Funds
Cost  per  AY  year  
75  total  participants  

$25,000  
75  

$333.33  

Cost  per  Week  
28  weeks  per  AY  

$333.33  
28  

$11.90  

Cost  per  Contact  Hour  
2  hours  of  outreach  per  week  

$12.00  
2  

$6.00  

   

With  requested  funds:  
$6  per  participant  per  contact  hour  
 
 

 

 
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61
 

Total Program Cost
Cost  per  AY  year  
75  total  participants  

$42,200  
75  

$562.67  

Cost  per  Contact  Hour  
28  weeks  per  AY  

$562.67  
28  

$20.10  

Cost  per  Contact  Hour  
2  hours  of  outreach  per  week  

$20.10  
2  

$10.05  

   

With  total  funds:  
$10  per  participant  per  contact  hour  
 

 
 

Budget Narrative  
Spring 2014-Spring 2015

 

Personnel Costs
MacCormick  Liaison  
In-­‐kind  Donation:  $2,100  
The  MacCormick  liaison  will  work  directly  with  the  program  coordinator  and  provide  IC  students  
and  faculty  the  necessary  information  to  visit  the  MacCormick  Center.  They  will  also  help  to  
establish  functioning  curriculum  with  the  residents.  The  work  of  the  liaison  is  valued  at  $25  per  
hour.  
 
$25  per  hour  x  3  hours  per  week  =  75  x  28  weeks  per  academic  year  =  $2,100  valued  
 
Professor  Salary  for  1.5-­‐credit  course  
Funding  Request:  $15,600    
Ithaca  College  professors  receive  $1,300  per  credit  for  a  course  overload.  The  HEARD  Program’s  
Creative  Arts  Outreach  course  will  be  a  3-­‐credit  course,  adding  up  to  $3,900  per  semester.  The  
course  will  be  co-­‐taught  by  two  professors,  each  teaching  a  block  from  their  creative  arts  field.  

 
 

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Both  will  be  working  for  the  entire  semester.  While  one  teacher  takes  a  team  of  student  
instructors  to  MacCormick,  the  other  will  stay  with  the  remaining  students  to  develop  lesson  
plans,  conduct  reflections,  and  host  guest  lecturers.  Funding  for  professor  salaries  for  both  Fall  
2014  and  Spring  2015  for  a  total  of  $15,600.  
 
$1,300  per  credit  x  3-­‐credit  course  x  2  semesters=  $7,800  per  semester    
 
=  $15,600  full  request  
 
HEARD  Program  Coordinator  
Funding  Request:  $2,240  
The  HEARD  Program  is  a  paid  position  that  ensures  a  consistent  presence  for  the  HEARD  Program  
at  MacCormick  from  semester  to  semester  and  therefore  the  sustainability  of  the  course.  They  
will  sit  of  the  Faculty  Steering  Committee  and  be  in  close  contact  with  the  MacCormick  liaison.  
Their  responsibilities  include  but  are  not  limited  screening  prospective  students,  scheduling  class  
visits  and  performances,  collecting  evaluations  from  MacCormick,  and  managing  dissemination  of  
information  on  the  program  
The  Program  Coordinator  will  be  hired  through  Ithaca  College  for  a  part-­‐time  position  totaling  an  
average  of  4  hours  per  week.  The  coordinator  position  will  be  compensated    
 
$20  per  hour  x  4  hours  per  week  =  $80  x  28  weeks  =  $2,240  full  request  
 
Faculty  Advisory  Steering  Committee  
In-­‐kind  Donation:  $5,600  
The  Steering  Committee  provides  additional  overhead  supervision  and  guidance  for  the  course.  It  
consists  of  eight  skilled  and  interested  IC  faculty  and  administrators  from  a  variety  of  disciplines  
and  departments  and  meets  three  times  per  semester:  once  to  review  professor  proposals,  once  
to  select  the  focus  of  the  course  to  be  implemented  for  the  following  semester,  and  once  to  
evaluate  the  effectiveness  of  the  current  semester’s  course.  The  Steering  Committee  is  
instrumental  to  the  long-­‐term  goal  of  expanding  the  arts  programming  to  further  mediums  art  
such  as  theater,  dance,  or  sound  mixing.  We  value  the  8  faculty  committee  members  at  $25  per  
hour.  See  Addendum  A  for  full  biographies  of  Committee  members.  
 
$25  per  hour=  25  x  28  weeks  academic  year  =  $700  x  8  faculty  members  =  $5,600  valued  
 
Faculty  Guest  Speakers  
Funding  Request:  $400  
Faculty  from  a  variety  of  disciplines  will  visit  the  class  for  one  period  to  deliver  additional  academic  
content.  Possible  speakers  include:  Nancy  Menning,  Assistant  Professor,  Department  of  
Philosophy  and  Religion;  Dr.  Paula  Ionide  and  Dr.  Sean  Eversley-­‐Bradwell,  Assistant  Professors,  
Center  for  the  Study  of  Culture,  Race  and  Ethnicity;  Carla  Stetson,  Assistant  Professor,  

 

 
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Department  of  Art  and  Department  of  Education;  Tom  Kerr,  Associate  Professor,  Department  of  
Writing.  See  Addendum  B  for  full  biographies.  
 
Each  guest  lecturer  will  receive  a  $100  stipend  for  his  or  her  contribution.  
 
2  professors  per  semester  x  $100  =  $200  x  2  semesters  =  $400  full  request  
 
Grant  Consultants  
In-­‐kind  Donation:  $4,000  
HEARD  funding  streams  of  all  varieties  are  identified  by  the  grant  consultant  team  of  students  in  
the  IC  course  Proposal  and  Grant  Writing  with  oversight  and  guidance  by  development  
professional  and  IC  faculty  member,  Patricia  Spencer.  After  initial  funding  is  secured,  subsequent  
grant  consultant  teams  will  seek  out  support  from  private  foundations  that  will  be  interested  in  
funding  an  established  program  and  investing  in  its  sustainability.  Their  work  time  is  valued  at  
$4,000.    
 

Non-Personnel Costs
Course  Development  Stipend  
Funding  Request:  $4,000  
Ithaca  College  provides  a  stipend  of  $2,000  for  professors  to  develop  new  courses  over  the  
summer  before  an  academic  year.  Both  instructors  of  the  Creative  Arts  Outreach  course  will  
receive  this  stipend  in  order  to  develop  their  lesson  plans  in  accordance  with  the  ICC  guidelines.    
 
$2,000  per  course  x  2  professors  =  $4,000  full  request  
 
Teaching  Supplies  
In-­‐kind  Donation:  $5,040  
Funding  Request:  $1,320    
The  start-­‐up  supplies  from  the  initial  pilot  course  are  still  housed  at  MacCormick  and  available  for  
use.  The  inventory  includes:  Music:  4  keyboards  ($400),  2  guitars  ($400);  Recording:  1  Pro-­‐Tools  
software  kit  ($600),  an  iMac  ($1,500),  a  microphone,  amp  and  mixing  board  ($740).  The  total  value  
of  these  supplies  is  $3,640.  Ithaca  College  School  of  Music  provides  the  drums  for  the  African  
Drumming  block  taught  by  Baruch  Whitehead.  Eight  drums  with  a  value  of  $175  each  is  a  total  of  
$1,400.  
The  total  for  donated  musical  supplies  is  $3,640  +  $1,400  =  $5,040.  
As  the  HEARD  Program  renews  its  work  at  the  MacCormick  Center,  a  small  sum  of  $1,320  is  
required  to  build  on  those  supplies  and  publish  the  residents’  artistic  output  for  internal  
circulation.  This  includes  maintenance  of  the  instruments,  supplies  for  the  writing  block  of  the  

 
 

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course,  printing  cost  for  the  compilation  of  resident’s  written  work.  The  MacCormick  liaison  will  
approve  all  materials  to  ensure  they  meet  safety  regulations  and  restrictions.    
 
IC  Student  Performances  
Funding  Request:  $240  
In-­‐kind  Donation:  $460  
The  arts  programming  delivered  at  MacCormick  will  include  guest  performances  and  workshops  
by  Ithaca  College  student  performance  arts  groups  such  as  Spit  That!  Spoken  word  poetry,  dance  
troupes,  a  cappella  singers  and  Artists  for  Artists.  The  course  will  support  two  visits  per  semester.  
An  additional  van  valued  at  $60  is  required  for  their  transportation  to  the  Center  but  their  artist  
fee  of  $115  per  performance  is  donated.  
 
Transportation:  $60  x  4  performance  groups  per  AY  =  $240  full  request  
 
Artist  Fee:  $115  x  4  performance  groups  per  AY  =  $460  valued  
 
Transportation  
Funding  Request:  $1,200    
In-­‐kind  Donation:  $1,200  
The  students  and  professors  from  the  Creative  Arts  Outreach  course  will  be  traveling  to  and  from  
the  MacCormick  Center  approximately  11  times  over  the  course  of  one  semester,  using  rented  
vans  from  Ithaca  College.  These  vans  cost  $60  per  day,  totaling  to  $1,200  for  the  academic  year.  
There  will  also  be  a  $30-­‐$35  participation  cost  for  students  valued  in-­‐kind  that  will  cover  additional  
transport  to  and  from  the  Center  an  additional  10  times  per  semester.      
 
60  per  trip  x  20  trips  per  AY  =  $1,200  full  request  
 
$33.33  per  student  x  36  students  per  AY  =  $1,200  valued  
 

 

 
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65

Addendum Materials
Addenda A: Steering Committee Members

 
Office  of  Student  and  Multicultural  Affairs  (OSEMA)  
Don  Austin:    Assistant  Director;  Community  Service  &  Leadership  Development.  
Don  Austin  is  the  assistant  director  of  OSEMA,  the  Office  of  Student  Engagement  &  Multicultural  
Affairs,  at  Ithaca  College.  OSEMA  is  an  organization  dedicated  to  developing,  implementing,  and  
coordinating  Civic  engagement  projects  throughout  Ithaca  College’s  campus.  His  experience  as  a  
committee  member  that  organizes  and  coordinates  complex  student  projects  is  in  excellent  
keeping  with  our  programming.  
 
Communications  
Jon  Hilton:  Lecturer  in  Audio  Production,  Park  School  of  Communications.  
Professor  Hilton  is  a  professor  of  Audio  Production  in  the  Park  School  of  Communications,  
founder  and  CEO  of  Hiltronex  Sound  Production  Studios,  and  Secretary  of  the  Learning  Web  of  
Tompkins  County.  His  expertise  in  the  field  of  sound  recording  and  his  associations  with  various  
programming  is  well  suited  to  the  recording  arts  projects  outlined  within  the  HEARD  program  
between  IC  and  MacCormick  Secure  Center.  
 
Music  
Baruch  Whitehead:  Associate  Professor  of  Music  Education,  Whalen  School  of  Music.  
Given  Professor  Whitehead’s  past  work  with  the  GAIC  (Greater  Ithaca  Activities  Center)  
supporting  disenfranchised  and  underrepresented  students  in  Ithaca,  as  well  as  collaborative  
efforts  with  IC  faculty,  students,  and  local  artists,  his  expertise  is  vital  to  the  steering  committee  of  
the  HEARD  program.  In  the  Fall  of  2011,  he  also  delivered  an  African  Drumming  and  Dance  course  
to  the  residents  of  MacCormick  Secure  with  Ithaca  College  students.  
 
Whalen  School  of  Music  Dean’s  Office  
Christy  Agnese:  Christy  Agnese  works  in  the  School  of  Music  as  the  senior  assistant  to  the  dean.  
Her  primary  responsibilities  include  overseeing  ensemble  tours  and  major  events,  teaching  a  
career  orientation  course  for  music  majors,  managing  School  of  Music  special  initiatives,  working  
as  the  liaison  to  development  and  alumni  affairs,  and  formalizing  and  overseeing  School  of  Music  
activities  related  to  community  engagement.    
 
 
 
 

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Writing  
Tom  Kerr:  Associate  Professor,  Department  of  Writing,  School  of  Humanities  and  Sciences.  
As  a  professor  of  Writing,  Professor  Kerr’s  areas  of  expertise  include  Composition  and  Rhetoric,  
Cultural  Studies,  non-­‐fiction,  and  rhetorical  theory.  Professor  Kerr  has  worked  with  adult  inmates  
in  the  past,  including  Death  Row  inmates  of  San  Quentin.  Kerr’s  encouraged  and  worked  with  the  
inmates  to  refine  and  guide  their  writing  skills  in  a  positive,  and  altogether  beneficial  way.      
 
Eleanor  Henderson:  Associate  Professor,  Department  of  Writing;  School  of  Humanities  and  
Sciences.  
Professor  Henderson’s  specialties  within  writing  are  fiction  writing,  historical  fiction,  and  the  short  
story  cycle.    In  addition  to  her  experience  as  a  writing  workshop  facilitator,  her  prior  experience  
working  with  middle  and  high  school  students  developing  writing,  and  critical  thinking  skills,  
immediately  makes  her  stand  out  as  a  valuable  asset  to  the  steering  committee.  
 
Jessica  Barros:  Assistant  Professor,  Department  of  Writing;  School  of  Humanities  and  Sciences  
With  academic  backgrounds  in  political  science,  creative  writing,  and  vernacular  literature,  
Professor  Barros  currently  instructs  an  Ithaca  College  freshman  seminar  focused  on  community  
service.  She  additionally  has  taught  courses  on  African-­‐centered  cultural  literacy  and  spoken  word  
poetry.  Outside  of  the  academic  realm,  Jessica’s  community  work  includes  mentoring  individuals  
transitioning  out  of  the  prison  system  and  providing  literacy  programming  to  underserved  
children  in  Tompkins  County.  
 
Patricia  Spencer:  Assistant  Professor,  Writing;  School  of  Humanities  and  Sciences.  
With  over  twenty-­‐five  years  of  experience  in  higher  education,  ranging  from  classroom  instruction  
to  administrative  units,  Professor  Spencer  is  a  valuable  faculty  member  who  will  play  a  key  
consultant  role  for  the  logistical  needs  and  curriculum  delivery  of  the  HEARD  Program.  Professor  
Spencer’s  background  includes  undergraduate  and  graduate  level  teaching  experience  in  writing  
and  education;  specializing  in  proposal  and  grant  writing,  as  well  as  civic-­‐engagement  curriculum  
development,  delivery,  and  promotion  across  department,  school,  and  college  venues.  Beyond  
her  record  of  professional  excellence  as  an  educator,  her  extensive  experience  in  fund  
development,  marketing,  and  promotion  will  be  instrumental  in  sustaining  the  HEARD  Program.  
 
 
 
 
 

 

 
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Addenda B: Faculty Guest Lecturers
Theatre  Arts  
Cynthia  Henderson:    Associate  Professor,  Theatre  Arts;  School  of  Humanities  and  Sciences.  
Performing  Arts  for  Social  Change  founder,  Associate  Professor  of  Theatre  Arts,  and  returning  
member  of  the  HEARD  Initiative  of  Fall  2010,  Professor  Henderson  has  expressed  an  interest  in  
both  teaching  the  residents;  and  serving  as  a  program  advisor  on  the  steering  committee.    Her  
experience  as  a  group  workshop  producer,  as  well  as  her  familiarity  with  MacCormick  Secure  and  
the  founding  of  HEARD  program  in  Fall  2010,  make  her  an  asset  to  our  committee.  
 
Center  for  Culture,  Race  and  Ethnicity  
Dr.  Sean  Eversley-­‐Bradwell:  Dr.  Bradwell  is  an  assistant  professor  at  Ithaca  College.  He  serves  as  
the  co-­‐coordinator  for  the  African  Diaspora  Studies  minor  in  the  Center  for  the  Study  of  Culture,  
Race  and  Ethnicity  and  has  research/teaching  interests  in  educational  policy,  race  theory,  and  hip  
hop  culture.  
 
Dr.  Paula  Ioanide:  Dr.  Ioanide's  research  focuses  on  political,  economic,  social,  and  cultural  
practices  that  reproduce  and  disrupt  gendered  racism  in  the  post-­‐civil  rights  era.  Particularly,  
Ioanide  investigates  dominant  public  fantasies  and  feelings  about  race  and  sexuality  that  make  
exploitation,  exclusion  and  elimination  appear  permissible  and  justifiable.    
 
Visual  Arts  
Carla  Stetson:  A  multi-­‐faceted  arts  professor,  Carla  Stetson  serves  both  the  Art  Department  and  
the  Department  of  Education  here  at  IC.    Professor  Stetson  specializes  in  Art  Education  and  the  
visual  arts,  including  Intro  to  Drawing,  Intro  to  Sculpture,  and  Three-­‐Dimensional  Design.  
 
Philosophy  and  Religion  
Nancy  Menning:  Nancy  Menning  holds  a  Ph.D  from  the  University  of  Iowa  in  Religious  Studies  
with  a  specialty  in  Ethics.    She  is  a  graduate  of  the  National  Instructor  Training  Institute  of  Temple  
University’s  Inside-­‐Out  Prison  Exchange  Program,  which  encourages  partnerships  between  
institutions  of  higher  learning  and  correctional  systems  in  order  to  offer  transformative  learning  
experiences  in  prison  contexts.  
 
 
 
 

 
 

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Addenda C: Letter of Support
 
 
Dr. Baruch J. Whitehead
Ithaca College School of Music
953 Danby Rd.
Ithaca, N.Y. 14850
December 5th, 2013

To whom it may concern:

I wholeheartedly endorse this proposal to bring creative arts to the resident of the MacCormick Center. I
was involved with the program one year ago and very much enjoyed my time teaching and helping IC
students connect through the arts with a marginalized community.
The Creative Arts Outreach course of the HEARD Program (Human Expression through Arts: a
Resident Development Program) positively impacted the young men of the MacCormick Secure Center.
Although the course used music as a means for working with the young men, a lack of musical
knowledge didn’t disqualify students from the class. The class was open to juniors and seniors from all
academic schools at Ithaca College. Students researched about teaching in correctional facilities and
used a participatory approach to teaching the residents.
Sincerely Yours,

Dr. Baruch J. Whitehead

 

 
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Addenda D: Materials from Pilot Course
Service Learning Reflection Questions
HEARD Service Learning Course
Directions: Please submit a 1-2 page typed reflection of your service-learning experience in this course
to date by _________. Use the categories and bulleted prompts below to guide your reflection, which
should be in paragraph form. This exercise provides you with an initial opportunity to capture both the
writing skills and the community-based insights that you are gathering. You will also be asked to submit
a final reflection in December.

Course theory focus questions
• How does the service experience relate to class material?
• Does the experience contradict or reinforce class material?
• How does course material help you overcome obstacles or dilemmas in the service
experience?
• What aspects of your learning may be due to your service experience?
Issue focus questions





Why is there a need for your service?
What do you perceive as the underlying issue, and why does it exist?
Who is involved in this issue? (in helping solve it, or perpetuating it)
Do you see connections to public policy at the local, state, or national level?
What social, economic, political and educational systems are maintaining and perpetuating
it?
What would it take to positively impact the situation (from individuals, communities,
education, and government)?

Teaching focus questions





What similarities do you share with the people (stakeholders) you are indirectly
serving? What differences?
What are their strengths? What can you learn from them and their strengths?
How are you perceived by the people you are serving?
What do you think a typical day is like for the people you serve? What pressures do they
confront?
How does their situation impact their life socially, educationally, politically, recreationally,
etc.?
What stereotypes are you confronting about the people you serve? Have you reconceptualized these stereotypes? What new information leads you to do this?

 
 

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Self focus/personal development questions

In what ways is your involvement with your service partner challenging? What about your
personality/temperament helps you move past these challenges?
What personal qualities (e.g. leadership, communication skills, compassion, teaching etc.)
have you developed through service-learning? How will these qualities help you in the
future?
What happened that made you feel you would like to pursue this field as a career? Or not?

Civic focus questions



What can you do with the knowledge you gained from the experience to promote change?
How is what you study preparing you to address this issue?
How do your lifestyle choices affect this issue? Is there anything you are doing/not doing
that perpetuates the situation?
How has your orientation to or opinion about this issue changed through this experience?

Pre-professional questions



Is there a difference between the way [professionals in your discipline] view problems and
the way they are viewed by people you are working with? What are the differences? Why do
these differences exist?
What non-technical information did you learn about the project from the people you worked
with? Is this information relevant to your work? If so why?
How can [professionals in your discipline] work with other citizens together to solve
problems? Why should they?
Did you have any ethical dilemma about taking on this project? Have you been asked to do
something that contradicts your values or beliefs? Are there social issues which affect or are
affected by the project you have been assigned and, if so, how will/did you take then into
account? What is the ultimate outcome of your project? Who will benefit?
If you put this project on a résumé, would you list it as community "service" or as
professional skills? Does the [your discipline] community value volunteer work? Why is this
important?
Think of a [your discipline] principle that can be applied to help understand a social problem.
How does your thought process as a [your discipline] affect the way you view social issues?
Can social issues affect the way you do science?
What is the responsibility of a person in this field to address this issue?

NOTE: “Pre-professional questions are adapted from Decker, R. and Moffat, J. (2000). "Servicelearning reflection for engineering: A faculty guide" in Tsang, E. (Ed.). Projects that matter:
Concepts and models for service-learning in engineering. Washington , D.C.: AAHE. The
remaining questions in this reflection activity were taken from the Boise State University ServiceLearning site:
http://servicelearning.boisestate.edu/index.cfm?fuseaction=content.view&section=16&page=46

 

 
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Template for Learning Goals and Objectives
HEARD Service Learning Course
1. Title of Lesson/Workshop:
2. Proposed Date(s) for Delivery:
3. Personnel (organizations and/or individuals)
Instructor(s):
Volunteers needed to facilitate experience:
4. Creative arts fields involved (e.g., creative writing, poetry, music, music history, studio art, media arts, etc.):
5. Program type (e.g., workshop, performance, discussion, etc.):
6. Coping skills* addressed (e.g., channeling self expression, clarifying identity, building awareness or selfesteem, learning how to learn, developing emotional control, etc.)
*Coping skills are the methods a person uses to deal with stressful situations. These may help a person face a
situation, take action and be flexible and persistent in solving problems.

7. Goals and Objectives:
a) Learning Outcomes for MacCormick residents:
Examples for a “lyric development and song-production” experience:
To enhance writing skills and channel emotions through lyric development
To enhance musical instrument knowledge and use
To enhance music production knowledge and experience
To enhance awareness of diverse life experiences through interaction w/other residents and student
instructors
b) Learning Outcomes for Ithaca College student facilitators:
Examples for a “lyric development and song-production” facilitation experience:
To enhance writing instruction skills through lyric development
To enhance musical instrument instruction skills
To enhance music production instruction skills
To enhance awareness of diverse life experiences through interaction w/residents and other student
instructors
8. Procedures:
a) Materials –
b) Structure of Lesson –
9. Timeline: Date(s) scheduled:
_______________________

 

Scheduled Event(s):
________________________

 

 
 

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