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CoralPetition03-02Final_1

CoralPetition03-02Final_1

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Published by nashworld
This document is a 111 page formal academic petition to the US government (in the form of NOAA Fisheries) to list the Caribbean Acroporiid corals: Elkhorn coral (Acropora palmata), Staghorn coral (Acropora cervicornis), and the hybrid Fused-staghorn coral (Acropora prolifera) under the Endangered Species act (ESA).

This formal petition was created and submitted by the Center for Biological Diversity.

The document features many photographs taken by Sean Nash on trips to Andros Island in The Bahamas with groups of high school students enrolled his marine biology course.
This document is a 111 page formal academic petition to the US government (in the form of NOAA Fisheries) to list the Caribbean Acroporiid corals: Elkhorn coral (Acropora palmata), Staghorn coral (Acropora cervicornis), and the hybrid Fused-staghorn coral (Acropora prolifera) under the Endangered Species act (ESA).

This formal petition was created and submitted by the Center for Biological Diversity.

The document features many photographs taken by Sean Nash on trips to Andros Island in The Bahamas with groups of high school students enrolled his marine biology course.

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Categories:Types, Research, Science
Published by: nashworld on Sep 13, 2009
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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05/11/2014

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Parrotfish (Figure 40) bite at coral branches, removing tissue and the underlying skeleton
(Bruckner and Bruckner 1998). Parrotfish feed on the endosymbiont zooxanthallae of the
coral tissue, producing extensive scrape marks and destruction of tissue and skeleton. In

Figure 38: These snails leave white trails of exposed skeleton where
they've eaten the coral [Craig Quirolo]

61

stressed colonies, filamentous algae often colonize the patches, whereas under normal
conditions the coral tissue and skeleton recovers. The constant scraping of parrotfish is
an element in transmitting diseases from one colony to the next.

Figure 40: This little Parrotfish is busy eating his coral lunch [Sean Nash]

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