KADOKA PRESS

The official newspaper of Jackson County, South Dakota

$1.00
includes tax

Volume 107
Number 26
January 9, 2014

After frigid temperatures, it’s a welcomed heat wave

Aer several days of below zero temperatures and freezing wind chills, the students at Kadoka Elementary were excited to play outside. Even though the temperature was only 29º there was no complaining about the cold. All the students were having a
great time at recess playing with friends. Pictured on the jungle gym is Kaylee Kusick, Emery Kukal, Leia Bennett, Laney Eisenbraun, Madison Stilwell, and Makaylan Bonenberger.

KCBA elects officers
and prepares for
2031 celebration

Savanna Suedmeier (bottom, L), Kylee Fromm, and Lilly Uhlir were busy
playing at recess.

Kreg Stoddard (L) and Judah Huber having some fun on the slide.

Ranchers workshop to be held in Mission on Tuesday, January 14
The 35th Annual Ranchers Workshop
will be held on Tues., Jan. 14 at the Sinte
Gleska University Multipurpose Building
(Antelope Campus) Mission, SD. Registration begins at 9:00 am (CST) with a Rainfall Simulator demonstration at 9:30
followed by the first speaker presentation
at 10:30. The Ranchers Workshop is free to
the public. Informational booths will be
available at the Expo to view.
Jeff Hemenway, State Soil Quality Specialist with the United States Department
of Agriculture (USDA) –Natural Resources

Conservation Service (NRCS), will be conducting two demonstrations. The Rainfall
Simulator will demonstrate how land management impacts the runoff water and soil
infiltration on South Dakota rangelands
and croplands.
Joshua Dukart, a Certified Educator of
Holistic Management from North Dakota,
will present two different topics. The
morning session is entitled “Sustainable
Agriculture and How to Make it Work” and
the afternoon session is entitled “Grazing
with a Purpose”.

“When City and Country Collide” will be
the topic of Amanda Radke’s presentation.
Radke is the Editor of Beef Daily and is a
fifth generation rancher from the Mitchell
area.
Case Blom, a South Dakota native, will
speak on “Mineral Nutrition for LivestockDoes it Matter?” Blom has 25 years of experience in livestock nutrition and doing
custom formulations to fit individual
ranches. For additional information please
call (605) 259-3252 Ext. 3.

Farm Generational Transition, ‘Managing for
Today and Tomorrow’ course for farm and
ranch women begins January 15 in Kadoka
Creating a transition plan to make sure
a farm or ranch continues as a productive
business can be challenging. Farm women
can learn how to plan a successful farm
transition in a five-session course offered
by SDSU Extension.
The “Managing for Today and Tomorrow: Farm Transition Planning,” program,
a new Annie’s Project course, has been
scheduled for January and February 2014
in Kadoka, on Wednesday evenings; January 15, 22, 29, February 12, and 19th.
A light supper will be served before each
class at 5:30 p.m. Course size is limited, so
please register soon.
Farm and ranch women will learn about
business, estate, retirement and succession
planning from SDSU Extension Field Specialists and area professionals. In addition
to brief presentations, there will be discus-

sions based on participant questions and
follow-up activities for family members to
complete at home.
“We’re happy to be a partner in bringing
this valuable program to Jackson County,”
said Adele Harty, SDSU Extension Cow/
Calf Field Specialist. “This farm transition
course is an opportunity for farm and
ranch women to meet with others who
share similar issues and concerns. We
limit the size of the class to make it comfortable for everyone to speak up and get
questions answered.”
Annie’s Project, an agricultural risk
management education program for
women, has successfully reached more
than 9,000 farm and ranch women in 30
states.
“This new Farm Transition program
emphasizes the role women play in helping

transfer farms and ranches from one generation to the next,” said Harty.
Managing for Today and Tomorrow:
Farm Transition Planning is designed to
empower women to take ownership of the
future of their farms. Farm Credit Services
of America is a statewide sponsor of
Annie’s Project courses.
For more information and to register
contact Harty, at 605-394-1722 or
adele.harty@sdstate.edu;
or
Belinda
Mitchell, local contact at 605-837-2281 or
Belinda.Mitchell@bankwest-sd.com.
Managing for Today and Tomorrow is
supported by the Beginning Farmer and
Rancher Development Program of the National Institute of Food and Agriculture,
USDA, Grant # 2011-49400-30584. More
information can be found on the Annie’s
Project website at www.AnniesProject.org.

by Robyn Jones
Kadoka Community Betterment Association elected officers at the monthly
meeting that was held on Thursday, January 2014.
Cindy Wilmarth stated that she had
been contacted by a member who could
not attend the meeting and inquired
about voting by proxy. Since there are no
by laws to refer to, no action was taken.
With 22 members present at the meeting, elections were held. Jackie Stilwell
was re-elected president, a position that
she has held for the past two years. Colby
Shuck was elected vice president and will
replace Kenny Wilmarth. Sarah VanderMay will be the secretary and will replace Patty Ulmen, and Jessi Fromm will
replace Cindy Wilmarth as treasurer.
A card of thanks was read from the
Kadoka Nursing Home for the donation
of the 58 inch flat screen television.
KCBA sponsored $500 and the American
Legion sponsored $867. The TV has been
mounted on the west wall in lobby for all
residents to enjoy.
Jessi Fromm stated that she has visited with the alumni association and they
were supportive of trying to promote
some activities to be held during reunion
weekend. She stated a meeting has been
planned and everyone that is interested
is encouraged to attend. The meeting will
be held on Wednesday, January 29 at
Club 27 and if there are any questions regarding the planning, please contact her.

Nona Prang spoke on behalf of the
KHS Alumni Association. She stated
that they are continuing to gather photos
of the graduating classes so they can be
displayed in the annex. The school has
given them permission to use the class
photos that are hanging in the school of
the ones they have not been able to locate. The association is also wanting to
get more people involved, hopefully from
the younger generations.
The residential lighting contest was
very successful. Prizes were sponsored by
West Central Electric and KCBA.
Membership letters will be mailed out
soon to all businesses. This year’s winners will now judge the contest next year.
Treasurer report showed a balance of
$12,084.81. Bills in the amount of
$687.20 were presented and approved to
be paid.
A motion carried to transfer $1,000
from the KCBA checking account to the
savings account to be used for the
Quasquicentennial, which will be in
2031. This will be done each year to have
a fund available to sponsor events during
the celebration.
It was questioned whether there could
be additional night meetings or if the
meetings could be held on Fridays at
noon, so more members could attend.
This will be discussed at the next meeting which will be held on Thursday, February 6 at noon at Jigger’s Restaurant.

Clements will seek
re-election in 2014
Jackson County Sheriff Ray Clements,
Jr., has announced that he will seek reelection in 2014, a position that he has
held for the last five years.
Clements started his law enforcement
career in 1991 as a reserve officer for the
City of Hot Springs. Later as a full-time
deputy in both Custer and Butte Counties.
Clements has been married for 37
years to his wife, Barb, and they have
two grown sons. One lives in Amarillo,
Tex., and one lives in Newell, So. Dak.,
where he is a deputy sheriff for Butte
County.
Clements was born and raised on a
ranch northwest of Philip. He attended a
rural school and graduated from Philip

High School. Barb’s family came from the
Kadoka area, where they still have several family and friends.
Over the last five years, Clements has
tried to promote a proactive enforcement
rather than reactive; be out and about,
been seen to deter crime before it starts.
Currently the sheriff’s office has a good
working relationship with the tribal officers in Wanblee.
Clements stated that at the Jackson
County Sheriff’s Office, each call is
treated with the resect it deserves and
the people of the county expect. There
has always been an open door policy,
which will continue and the coffee pot is
always on.

Editorial

2 - Thursday, January 9, 2014 - Kadoka Press

Lookin’ Around | Syd Iwan
Scenarios
The local priest often wears
black clothes and a white collar.
No surprise there. He also drives
a black pickup with white and silver-white markings. What’s more,
in the back of that pickup can
often be seen a black-lab dog with
his red collar enjoying a ride.
What is wrong with this scenario?
Can you spot the discrepancy?
That’s right. The dog obviously
needs a white collar to fit into the
family color scheme. A red collar is
all wrong.
As a result, I have been keeping
my eyes open for a white dog collar
whenever I go by a display of pet
supplies. So far I haven’t found
one. There are blue, red and yellow and the occasional black, but
no white that I’ve come across.
There must be a white one out
there somewhere, but to date it
hasn’t shown itself. I’ll keep looking.
Quite often we look at a scene
or situation and just feel there is
something wrong. Maybe we can’t
quite put our finger on it, but we
sense things aren’t quite right
somehow. I’ve been to a lot of
weddings in my lifetime through
either being a musician or the
photographer, and several times
I’ve thought the couple hopelessly
mismatched. Time has proven me
right on occasion and, on the other
hand as a nice surprise, wrong.
Sometimes you go into a business and think, “This enterprise
isn’t long for this world.” Maybe it
is a matter of too little or too much
inventory although too little is apt

Office of the Governor | Gov. Dennis Daugaard

to be worse than too much. Maybe
the clerk or cashier is grumpy or
incompetent. It could even be that
the color scheme offends you as do
the insides of some fast-food
places. I guess red and yellow are
a color scheme pleasing to some,
but too much of all that brightness
and cheeriness wears on me fairly
soon.
Occasionally, I play a new piece
on the piano and come across a
chord or some notes I don’t like.
They jar me and don’t seem to fit
in. The solution here is easy in
that you can just change things to
suit yourself. This solution doesn’t
apply to classical music you perform before those who know classical music because they will just
think you messed up. Bach needs
to be played just as the composer
as
do
Brahms,
intended
Beethoven, and Hindemith. Actually, Hindemith is so discordant
that most people might not be able
to tell the difference, but there is
always the possibility that someone will. It’s better to play it safe
with classical music, but alterations can safely be made in a lot
of the rest.
When it comes to ranching,
most everyone does certain things
in ways that could be improved
upon. One of the most common errors is to spend too much on equipment or supplies with the thought
that only the best is right for your
operation. That may be so but not
if it costs more than it brings in.
Your pride may have to take a hit
to avoid losing money in the deal.
See now if you can spot the er-

rors in the following: On Sunday,
I enjoyed lying on the beach with
the sun full in my face. “Well,” you
reply, “there’s nothing wrong with
that scenario except you haven’t
been anywhere, there is no ocean
in South Dakota, and it was ten
degrees below zero that day. Other
than that, it sounds legitimate.”
Okay, you got me. Instead of the
beach, I turned on the strong ceiling light in the office, sat back in
my recliner under a blanket, and
closed my eyes with the overhead
light full on my face. I just pretended I was at the beach. I could
almost hear the surf and the seagulls and smell the salt air. It was
fine. I even dozed off for a bit without the danger of sunburn and
woke up refreshed. I’ve been to
beaches in Florida, California and
Hawaii, not to mention Israel,
Greece, Cuba and Haiti. I can just
run those places by in my mind
and enjoy them again without the
expense and bother of actually
going there. There’s nothing
wrong with pretending once in a
while if you can bring yourself
back to reality afterwards. I generally look down on self-deception
except in those cases where I need
a brief escape to a nice place
where it’s sunny and warm.
Anyway, I’m back to reality
now and tomorrow is another day.
Maybe I’ll book a flight to Florida
and enjoy a bit of sun and surf for
real. Alternately, I might continue
my search for a white dog collar.
Either scenario will suit me fine.
There’s nothing wrong with either
one.

Practical Money Matters | Jason Alderman, Financial Education Advisor
How to Dispute a
Credit Card Charge
Have you ever ordered something online that was delivered
damaged ' or never arrived at all?
Or been double-billed by a merchant? Or spotted a charge on
your credit card statement you
didn't make? Most of us have.
Fortunately, the 1975 Fair
Credit Billing Act (FCBA) protects
your rights during such credit
card billing disputes. It also outlines the process for contesting
charges made to your account.
Here's how it works:
First, FCBA protection applies
only to "open-end" credit account
transactions ' those involving
credit cards or revolving charges
(e.g., department store accounts).
It doesn't cover installment contracts you repay on a fixed schedule, such as car loans.
Billing errors that are covered
by the FCBA include:
Fraudulent or unauthorized
use of your credit card, whether it
was stolen or merchants charged
unapproved items to your account.
Charges that list the wrong
date or amount.
Charges for goods or services
you either did not accept or that
weren't delivered as agreed.
Math errors, such as being
charged twice for a transaction.
Failure to post payments or other
credits.

(Note: Report suspected fraud
immediately. By law, you're only
liable for the first $50 in unauthorized charges; however, most card
issuers waive that liability if you
report the charges quickly.)
Review all billing statements
carefully upon receipt because in
order to be covered under FCBA
rules, most disputed transactions
must be reported within 60 days of
the statement date on which the
error appeared.
First, contact the merchant and
try to resolve the dispute directly
with them. If this good-faith resolution attempt doesn't work, you
can escalate the process by filing a
written report with your credit
card issuer within the 60-day window.
The card issuer is then obligated to investigate the dispute on
your behalf. They must acknowledge your complaint, in writing,
within 30 days of receipt and resolve the dispute with the merchant within two billing cycles '
but not more than 90 days.
Send your letter via certified
mail to the card issuer's billing inquiry address, not the payment
address. Include your name, address, account number and a description of the billing error.
Include copies of sales slips or
other documents that support
your position.
According to the Federal Trade
Commission (FTC), you may with-

hold payment of the disputed
amount and related charges during the investigation. In fact,
many card issuers may voluntarily remove the charge until the
matter is resolved since they are
representing you, their client, in
the dispute.
If it turns out your bill contains
a mistake, the creditor must explain, in writing, the corrections
that will be made. In addition to
crediting your account, they must
remove all finance charges, late
fees, or other charges related to
the error.
However, if the card issuer's investigation determines that you
owe part ' or all ' of the disputed
amount, they must promptly provide you with a written explanation. If you disagree with the
investigation's results, you may
further dispute your claim with
the creditor, as outlined by the
FTC at www.consumer.ftc.gov/articles/0219-fair-credit-billing.
(That site also contains a sample
dispute letter and other helpful
FCBA information.)
If you believe a creditor has violated the FCBA, you may file a
complaint with the FTC or sue
them in court.
Hopefully, you'll never have a
billing dispute that goes to these
extremes. But it's good to know
how consumer laws protect you,
just in case.

press@kadokatelco.com
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Publications, Inc.:
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Faith Independent: 967-2161
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Murdo Coyote: 669-2271

Jackson County
Title Co., Inc.
615 Poplar St. • Kadoka, SD 57543
u u u u u
Monday - Friday, 9 a.m. to Noon
and by appointment.
Over 20 Years of Service

(605) 837-2286

DISCOUNT
FUEL
Kadoka Oil Co.
Kadoka, SD

Snacks
Food
Coffee

605-837-2271
For fuel &
propane delivery:

1-800-742-0041
Ice • Beer
Pop
(Toll-free)
Groceries Mark & Tammy Carlson

Fromm’s
Hardware
& Plumbing, Inc.

Contact us for all your plumbing
service calls

605-837-2274

Spending time over the holidays with my adult children, I was
reminded how important it is to
give every young person an opportunity to stay in South Dakota to
live, work and raise a family.
That means creating more jobs
in our state. It also means educating our young people about the
many jobs that are available in
high demand fields: engineering,
information technology, health
care, accounting, construction
trades and manufacturing.
Many of these opportunities can
be pursued through a program at
one of our state’s technical institutes: Lake Area Tech in Watertown, Southeast Tech in Sioux
Falls, Western Dakota Tech in
Rapid City and Mitchell Tech.

Kay Reckling
Independent Norwex Consultant

605-391-3097 cell
kayreckling.norwex.biz
kmreckling@gmail.com

South Dakota’s
Changing Landscape
South Dakota’s landscape has
significantly changed since the
first block of native sod was
turned over by a horse-drawn
plow more than 150 years ago.
These changes include native
grasslands converted to fertile
croplands that can now produce
more than 250 bushels of corn per
acre; massive herds of bison replaced by cattle, horses, and
sheep; and a population that has
grown from a few thousand settlers to more than 840,000 people.
This winter’s bitter cold accompanied by gusty winds across
South Dakota’s prairie landscape
demonstrate how shelterbelts,
crop stubble left standing in fields,
and a patchwork of Conservation
Reserve Program (CRP) fields
offer protection to the land, humans, and wildlife. Noticeable to
all of us is how much South
Dakota’s landscape has changed
just over the past few years. Many
long-standing tree belts have disappeared and the number of CRP
fields have grown smaller resulting in less permanent vegetative

When Modern Day
Slavery Hits Home
Issues that exist in dozens of
countries and on nearly every continent become easy to pass off as
an international problem rather
than a local one, so it’s understandable that when most South
Dakotans hear the words “human
trafficking,” our focus goes across
the border. Maybe the movie
Taken comes to mind and we
think of the daughter of Liam
Neeson’s character who is kidnapped while in Paris, drugged
and put up for auction by human
traffickers.
Sadly, the issue exists right in
our backyard. I-90 is known as the
“Midwest Pipeline” and is used to
transport victims of human trafficking across the country. Traffickers use places like Sioux Falls
as a base to gain access to demand
from the Twin Cities, North

ALL types!

837-2690
Craig cell 605-390-8087
Sauntee cell 605-390-8604

Ask about our solar wells.

601 Chestnut
Kadoka, SD 57543-0640

•Grain •Feed •Salt
•Fuel •Twine

Fax: 837-2061 Ph: 837-2257

Kadoka, SD

Phone: 837-2235

605-837-2431

Check our prices first!

605-859-2610

Advertise your
business here!
Let people know of the
services you offer!
$31.50 for three months
for this space.

Philip, SD

Check out our website!
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Complete line of veterinary
services & products.
MONDAY - FRIDAY

8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
SATURDAY

8:00 a.m. to noon
by appointment

production switches used in satellite communications, these upgrades will offer significant
improvements to our programs.
The programs targeted by the Future Fund grants are those in
highest demand in the state. I am
committed to ensure that South
Dakota’s workforce needs are addressed. These dollars will ensure
that these programs have both the
capacity to address the workforce
needs and the quality to ensure
that program graduates are ready
to join the workforce.
High quality technical education is not cheap, but it is valuable
both to the individuals who receive the education and to the
state as a whole. I hope this is another step to offering even
stronger and more numerous opportunities for our young people
here in South Dakota.

ground cover, habitat, and protection from South Dakota weather.
The loss of habitat coupled with
the 60 percent drop in pheasant
numbers last year spurred Governor Daugaard to call a pheasant
habitat summit in Huron on December 6, 2013. I attended this
event and had the opportunity to
visit with a large cross-section of
South Dakotans who shared the
common goal of reviving South
Dakota’s pheasant population.
I was encouraged by the willingness of those who spoke and attended the summit to work
together to preserve South
Dakota’s pheasant hunting legacy.
In attendance were city government officials, farmers and ranchers with both large and small
operations, commodity organization representatives, as well as
good friends from Pheasants Forever, Ducks Unlimited, National
Wildlife Federation, and other
conservation and agriculture organizations.
I believe that once again, South
Dakotans will meet this new challenge with workable solutions to
the dwindling pheasant numbers.
What encouraged me the most

was the spirit of cooperation
among those who attended. Recognizing that South Dakota’s number one industry is agriculture, we
must continue to keep South
Dakota agriculture strong and vibrant and maximize its crop production potential while protecting
the land and its inhabitants.
Much of the protection from
South Dakota’s sometimes harsh
weather has been placed on the
land thanks to assistance from
federal conservation programs.
Tree planting, establishment of
permanent vegetative cover, and
conservation tillage, along with
the technical assistance needed to
ensure they achieve maximum results have all been authorized by
Farm Bill Conservation Titles.
As a member of the Senate
Agriculture Committee and an
avid hunter, I have been very
vocal in making sure my colleagues understand the critical
importance of balanced Commodity and Conservation Titles in
each of the Farm Bills. While
South Dakotans continue working
to rebuild the pheasant population
in South Dakota, I will continue to
do my part in Washington.

From the U.S. House | Representative Kristi Noem

Kadoka Clinic & Lab
Kadoka, South Dakota

Offering high quality programs,
with state of the art equipment
and training, is vital to the future
of our state. Strengthening these
programs gives our young people
the opportunity to stay in the
state in a high-demand field, and
it gives our businesses new employees so they have the confidence to add jobs in South Dakota.
That is why I am announcing a
commitment of $3.8 million from
the Future Fund to purchase
major equipment upgrades at our
technical institutes. These grants
will help the technical institutes
ensure our students can train on
the same equipment they will use
in the real world. From hemodynamic monitors used in cardiovascular procedures, to computer
numerically controlled press
brakes and robotics trainers used
in manufacturing, to telecaster

From the U.S. Senate | Senator John Thune

Ditching & Trenching of

Main Street • Kadoka, SD

•Major Appliances
•Color Match Paint System

Strengthening Our
Technical Institutes

MONDAY
Dave Webb, PA-C
TUESDAY
Dave Webb, PA-C
Wednesday - CLOSED
Please call Philip Clinic
800-439-8047
THURSDAY
Dr. David Holman
FRIDAY
Dr. Coen Klopper
Clinic Hours:
8:00 - 12:00 1:00 - 5:00
Lab Hours:
8:15 - 12:00 1:00 - 5:00
The Lab & X-ray departments
accept orders from any provider.
Kadoka Clinic is a Medicare provider &
accepts assignments on Medicare bills.

Dakota’s Bakken Oil Field, the
Sturgis motorcycle rally, and
areas that draw in thousands of
out-of-state hunters.
We also cannot ignore the crisis
occurring on Indian Reservations
across the country where Native
American women and children are
being targeted and exploited by
sex traffickers. During a Senate
Homeland Security Committee
hearing last September, Lisa
Brunner of the White Earth
Ojibwe Nation in Minnesota called
human trafficking involving Native women an “epidemic.”
January is National Slavery
and Human Trafficking Prevention Month, a time to draw a renewed focus to eliminating this
tragic industry. Here in South
Dakota, local law enforcement officials have worked hard to identify sex traffickers and bring them
into custody. Less than two
months ago, officials arrested a
Wisconsin man in Sioux Falls for
luring in two girls, including a
minor, and then forcibly selling
them as escorts via the Internet.
We have seen a handful of arrests like this over the last few
years, but more can and must be
done with the support of the public and Congress.
Today’s federal trafficking laws
provide protections and resources
for victims and equip prosecutors
with the tools they need to go after
traffickers. The law, however, isn’t
as clear when it comes to those
who solicit the services of a trafficking victim.
These buyers create demand
and drive this criminal business.

As President George W. Bush
stated, “We cannot put [human
traffickers] out of business until
and unless we deal with the problem of demand.”
To begin to better combat
human trafficking, I’ve co-sponsored the End Sex Trafficking Act,
which would strengthen prosecutors’ ability to go after those who
solicit, patronize, or obtain these
illegal services.
While Congress works to
strengthen and clarify our nation’s
human trafficking laws, there are
things you can do to help as well.
One of the most important things
you can do is keep a look out for
indicators of human trafficking. Is
someone you know not free to
come and go as they wish from
their home or workplace? Do they
owe a large debt that they’re unable to pay off? Are they anxious,
depressed, submissive, or tense?
These are all signs that should be
taken seriously and be reported.
As many as 300,000 children
are at risk of becoming victims of
sex trafficking every year in the
United States – some of them are
right here in South Dakota. Join
me today in finding better ways to
combat this disgusting trade.
Look for signs in our communities.
Talk to your friends and family to
help build awareness. Support the
local organizations that help heal
the victims of this appalling industry.
Now is the time to dismantle
human trafficking networks, help
survivors rebuild their lives, and
bring all those who exploit other
human beings to justice.

Kadoka Press
USPS 289340

Telephone 605-837-2259 • PO Box 309, Kadoka, South Dakota 57543-0309
E-mail: press@kadokatelco.com
Fax: 605-837-2312

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PO Box 309 • Kadoka, SD 57543-0309
Publisher: Don Ravellette
Graphic Design/News Writing/Photography: Robyn Jones
Published each Thursday and Periodicals postage paid at
Kadoka, Jackson County, South Dakota 57543-0309
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the Town of Cottonwood, the County of Jackson and the Kadoka School District #35-2.

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Correspondent News
Gateway News | Lola Joyce Riggins, 837-2053 (Let it ring.)
It has been a busy uneventful
past while.
I did get three Christmas calls
from my son, Stuart, and grandsons, Chris and John. John was
visiting his dad and Jenny’s parents in and around Logandale, Nevada. Chris and Anitalyn and
family enjoyed Christmas in Colorado Springs, Colorado, where

they were able to see many friends
and relatives.
Lloyd Olson enjoyed the holidays with his daughter, Susan,
who was here to visit from Idaho.
I really enjoyed an invite to the
nursing home for New Year’s Eve
supper and a group of us had a
nice time playing Bingo. The visits
were quick since the weather is

sey home also.
Misti Anderson arrived at the
Verda and Curtis Anderson home
from her military base at Ft. Lee,
VA, on December 18. While here
she and William Davis were married in Wanblee on December 28.
She was also able to attend
Verda’s brother’s, Richard Pinney’s, funeral which was held in
Wanblee on December 19. Misti
and William returned to Ft. Lee on
January 2, where they are both
stationed.
Shirley and Orville Josserand
are the great grandparents of a
baby girl, Elsie Ann, born to Jessica and Austin Grimes on December 23 in Rapid City. She weighed
seven pounds, six ounces and has
two big brothers, Jace and Owen.
Local grandparents are Jerry and
Merilee Grimes. Jessica’s dad and
a brother and sister were able to
spend some time here to meet the
baby from their home in Wisconsin.
Joyce Hicks accompanied Raymond and Linda Hicks of Rapid
City to Pierre for the Christmas
holiday. They spent it at the home
of Chad Hicks and family. They returned home on December 25.
Lila and Bruce Whidby, Alisha
Oldenberg of Philip, Michelle McConnell, Gwen and Paul McConnell and Brianna of Creighton
all traveled to Westbrook, MN, to
attend the wedding of Chelsea McConnell and Peter Noding which

cold.
Mary Jane and Andy Hemmingson and Lova Bushnell seem
to be feeling better again after
having the flu.
Have you broken any New
Year’s resolutions? Wishing everyone and a happy and healthy new
year!

was on December 28. Chelsea is a
granddaughter of the Whidby’s.
They traveled back to Kadoka in
below zero temperatures, but the
roads were good. Lila said that her
sister, Lois Lurz, of Hot Springs is
at the moment stranded by
weather in Erie, PA, and cannot
get a flight home until January 10.
Jackson County American Legion Auxiliary will hold its January meeting on Thursday, Jan. 9
at 7 p.m. in the Community Room
at the Gateway Apartments. The
District President, Janet Wasserburger, plans to attend so members are urged to attend.
Sydne Lenox arrived home on
January 3 after a two-week trip to
Weston, OH, where she was a
guest at the home of Jonathan and
Carol Lenox and family over the
holidays. Her oldest son, Michael,
and his daughter, Erin, spent a
day and a half in Ohio from their
home in Greenwood, IN, and she
also visited with son, Mark, and
his family of Oregon, Ohio. She got
to meet a new great grandson,
Charles William, who was born on
December 26 in Toledo. Traveling
home was not great, as the
weather at the Detroit airport was
very snowy and foggy, but after
de-icing, the plane took off for
brighter skies in Minneapolis and
Rapid City. Since then many
flights in the east have been cancelled and delayed because of winter weather conditions.

Norris News | June Ring, 462-6328
“Power will intoxicate the best
hearts, as wine the strongest
heads. No man is wise enough,
nor good enough, to be trusted
with unlimited power.”
Charles Caleb Colton (1780-1832)
Cliff and Elaine Krogman
headed for Colorado the day after
Christmas to visit daughter Dee
and family in Castlerock. They enjoyed the time spent with grandchildren, Alley, Evan and Olivia,
and also a tour of the new house
the family is building. They returned home New Year’s Day.
The Master Gardeners held
their January meeting Saturday,
January 4 at the museum in
White River. Vice President
Donna Adrian conducted the
meeting. A highlight of the meeting was a lesson on the many uses
of a laptop. The members brought
their laptops and Jeannine Woodward and Karla Heyduck led the
lessons.
Rose West and Jeannine Woodward left December 22 to visit
Rose’s brother, Len Wilson, and
family in McHenry, Illinois. They
enjoyed a tour of his glass ware
studio. They returned home the
Friday after Christmas.
The January meal and bake
sale was held Wednesday, January 8 at the museum.
Blaine and Louann Krogman’s
children were all home for Christmas. Christmas Day was spent at
Cliff and Elaine’s for the Krogman
gathering.
Blaine and Louann flew to
Texas on December 27 to visit
friends, Raul and Dorrie Hernandez, in San Antonio. They came
back New Year’s Eve and attended the New Year’s Eve party
at David and Gina Adrian’s home.
New Year’s Day was spent with
Evan, Hilary and Nash Nesheim.
Torey and Linda Ring and sons
are slowly recovering from the illness that hit them over Christmas. They recovered enough to go
down to Robert and Sharon’s on
December 31 to celebrate Jeremy’s 15th birthday.
Two days later Sharon Ring
hosted St. John LA-LWML at her
home. Pastor Denke led the topic,
and June joined Marjorie Popkes,
Jan and Sharon after Torey
hunted her down and reminded
her about the meeting at Sharon’s.
Friday Robert and Sharon
headed for Winner for Robert’s
physical therapy session for his
shoulder. While they were in Winner they had lunch with Sharon’s
birthday twin, Carol Hossle, and
her husband, Everett. They also
had a chance meeting with some
friends in the grocery store there.
The DJ Addison family and the

Brent Peters family were all
guests of Rueben and Jan Ring
Christmas Day. Brett and Gina
Strain came for Christmas dinner
that day, too.
Janice M. Ring spent Christmas Day with her sister-in-law,
Karen Week, in White River.
Bruce and Jessie Ring and family left for Iowa the day after
Christmas and spent a week with
family and friends in Cresco,
Iowa. It was pretty cold there
nearly the whole time and the
kids only had one day when it was
warm enough to get some sledding
in. They arrived home Thursday,
January 2.
Maxine Allard and June Ring
shared a meal New Year’s Eve
day. Evan and Dorothy Bligh stop
in to visit Maxine often as their
cattle are right near her place.
News was received of the death
of Alvin Simmons, Susan Taft’s father. He was returned to the hospital in Martin earlier in the
week, and passed away Thursday
evening. Sympathy is extended to
the family. The funeral will be Friday, January 10, at 10:00 a.m.
MST at the new legion building in
Martin.
Services at St. Peter Church in
Midland were cancelled Sunday
due to the weather conditions.
Twenty brave souls made it to
church at St. John Lutheran
Church of Norris, as there was installation of officers during the
service and Sunday School afterward. The car stated two degrees
after church, but it continued to
drop after that.
The Bill Huber’s hosted a New
Year’s Eve party at their home for
some family and neighbors. They
were also celebrating the finishing
of harvesting.
Toby Heinert spent Christmas
with his family, the Howard Heinert family. This past Friday
Howard and Nette went to Valentine for supplies and also visited
Erna Heinert. This past week
Tafts came and helped cut up
their meat at Heinert’s.
The Blake Lehman family plus
Jason’s fiancé, Jordan, spent some
time after Christmas visiting
Blake’s family in Iowa. They returned home and then welcomed a
visit from Kevin and Kris
Hachmeister, who flew in from
Canada for a few days. They flew
back to Vancouver on Sunday.
JoAnn Letellier visited Marjorie Letellier in Philip on Friday.
Marjorie is back in her apartment
in Silverleaf.
Tuesday, Jim and Marjorie
Letellier met up with Julie, Sue
and Marty Larson, and the Beckwith’s of Pierre and traveled on to
Gettysburg where the Sunshine

3

Kadoka Nursing Home | Cathy Stone, 837-2270

Kadoka Area News
Christmas Day visitors at the
Marv and Deb Moor home included their three sons, Matthew
of Cedar Rapids, IA, Marcus of
Springfield, MO, and his fiance,
Misty Hicks, and Mitch of Pierre;
Marv’s mom and brothers –
Dorothy Moor and John of Bonesteel, and Harland of Mitchell, and
Pastor Denke of Norris. The next
day Deb and her sons and Misty
went to Pierre where they visited
with Deb’s father, Hank Kosters
and Denise Kosters, of Sioux Falls.
All returned to their homes on
Saturday, December 28.
Larry and Alvina Parkinson
were with the Chuck Parkinson
family in Rapid City for a few days
during the Christmas holidays.
Alex and Sam Parkinson were
home during the holidays from college. A friend, Sam Haglund, was
also a guest. All three are students
at the University of South Dakota
in Vermillion.
We are happy to announce that
Viola Olney is finally home after a
long stay in the Rochester, MN,
and Philip hospitals. She was able
to return home on December 27
after going to Rochester to the
Mayo Clinic on March 17 and then
being transferred to Philip on May
31. She is doing fine and says she
and Russ spent Christmas Day
and Eve at the home of Marcy and
Bart Ramsey in Philip. Rusty
Olney and Laurel Hildebrand
spent Christmas Eve at the Ram-

Kadoka Press - Thursday, January 9, 2014 -

Bible Acedemy girls’ basketball
team had a game. Cassie plays on
the Sunshine team. The game was
in the afternoon and they returned to Pierre for supper with
the Beckwith’s. Plans had been to
stay longer, but weather decreed
otherwise and they headed home.
Sue and Julie were guests New
Year’s Day. Thursday Julie took
Sue home to Rapid City.
Saturday the Letellier’s attended a reception for newlyweds
Allen and Kristen Patton at the
Lakeview Fellowship Hall of the
Christian Reformed Church. The
couple was married December 6 in
Indiana, and had pictures to show
of their large wedding party, as
they each had many attendants.
Dorothy and Evan Bligh were also
there for the dessert reception, as
were many other friends and
neighbors.
Glen Krogman came from
Fargo for Christmas with his family and attended with Richard and
Noreen the Christmas Day gathering at the Cliff Krogman home.
December 28, Richard and Noreen
were in Winner for the 100th
birthday party for Emma Waack
at Christ Lutheran Church. Sunday, the 29th, Richard, Noreen
and Glen headed north and west
to spend Christmas time with
Mark and Carolyn and family.
New Year’s Eve they were among
the friends and neighbors at the
gathering at David and Gina
Adrian’s home. Since then
Richard and Noreen have been
watching a lot of bowl games.
Early Saturday morning the
Kary’s headed for Hill City for the
funeral of Jean’s brother-in-law,
Robert Johnson. They stayed and
visited with friends and family for
as long as they could, but had to
head home that evening because
of the weather. Robert Johnson
was 82 years old.

HAPPY NEW YEAR! We would
like to wish one and all a very
happy, and healthy New Year and
let everyone know how much we
appreciate all those who support
and visit the Kadoka Nursing
Home. It truly means a lot to our
residents to know that they are
not alone, and that we are to here
for them at all times!
A very special thank you to
Santa Claus (Mike Struble), the
KCBA members, Bonnie Madsen,
the American Legion, and to all
others who assisted in purchasing
and installing our large flat screen
TV. We have already enjoyed
watching a couple of great movies
and the Green Bay and San Francisco game. Maybe next year
Packer fans! Also, we would like to
thank
Interior
Presbyterian
Church, the Eagles 4-H Club, the
fourth and fifth graders, Darlene
Red Elk, the Presbyterian Sunday
School Class, the All Women
Count Too Club, and to anyone
who made this years Christmas
special in any way for the residents!
Visiting with Emma Jarl this
week were Debbie, Trey, and Sa-

vannah Knispel. Also, stopping by
was her grandson, Steve, and a
friend. They all enjoyed their time
together.
Dorothy and Brad Louder drove
down to see their husband and
dad, Dwight Louder. It’s been so
cold they haven’t been able to
come quite as often.
Ron and Renate Carson and
Wilma Carleton were in to visit
with Aunt Joy Parker.
Bunny Green had a surprise
visit from her grandson, Jordon
and his family, Tim, Sally, and
Matt Green. Others visiting with
Bunny this week was her granddaughter, Shalista.
Jim and Kathy Rock stopped in
to visit with Betty VanderMay,
and other residents.
Shorty Ireland rode to Rapid
City with his son, Kenny, for a doctor appointment. They had a great
lunch, with liver and onions being
Shorty’s choice! Honestly, I sure
could have found something better
than that!
Ken and Karen Toews were in
the last two Sundays to lead the
church services and music. We really enjoy the both of them and we

are blessed to have them come in
on Sundays. We sure appreciate
all those who come in on a regular
basis for services and Bible Study.
Don Kemnitz was here to visit
with his wife, Elaine. They usually
play a game or two of Rummy and
I don’t know for sure who wins
but, I bet Elaine gives it her best
shot!
Lola Joyce Riggins dropped by
to see and visit with many of the
residents. She came as a guest to
Ruth Klundt’s New Year’s Eve
party. Bingo was played, supper
and refreshments were served,
and there were many prizes donated by Ruth to be won! The residents enjoyed a fun-filled night.
Tiffany Brown called Bingo for
them, you’re awesome!
Mary Bull Bear had several
friends and family members stop
by. Those coming by were Amanda
Reddy, Nevaeh, Cage and Peyton.
Mary loves the company!
Upcoming Events: Robert Tridle’s birthday is 1/8/1927.
February 27 is the third annual
pie auction and a Deadwood weekend package getaway.

Belvidere News | Syd Iwan, 381-2147
Bill and Norma Headlee had all
their kids home this weekend to
celebrate a late Christmas. Billy
and family came from Ames, Iowa,
Anora and family from the Winner
area, Corale and family from Dell
Rapids, Monica and her husband
from the Brookings area, and
Donella and a friend from Sioux
Falls. All nine grandchildren were
there and all but the youngest one
enjoyed sleeping in the bunkhouse
in the barn with Bill and Norma
while the rest stayed in the house.
Some came on Thursday and others later. They all left on Sunday
when the weather and roads were
not ideal. Norma said she worried
a bit about all of them as mothers
do until she got phone calls saying
they were either home or in a safe
place. Besides gift exchanges and
the like, other entertainments included some games of cards. One
grandson managed to beat everyone at cribbage while he was here.
Monica’s husband, John, got in
some ice fishing and actually
caught some fish. Norma’s
brother, Tom DeVries, came by on
a couple of occasions to visit everyone. Her sister, Barb, came
through on her way home to Nebraska from visiting daughters in
Aberdeen. Norma said it was a really nice weekend, and it was
great to see everyone.
Aaron, Michelle and Tyrel
Mansfield went to Rapid City last
week so Tyrel could visit the dentist. Grandmother Fayola Mansfield said Tyrel didn’t fuss
beforehand about having to go and
didn’t complain afterwards so he
must have handled it okay. While
in Rapid City, the family met
Michelle’s folks for lunch.
Betty Kusick was visited last
week by Joe Livermont. They naturally played some games of cribbage and were evenly matched so
each won the same number of
games. Betty said she hasn’t been
many places recently since the
streets in town are basically all
ice. She prefers the 40s and 50s
and clear streets. She also has had
a nasty cold for a couple of weeks
although it is now losing its grip
and she is quite a bit better. She
figures she is going to live, “fi-

Belvidere Store
344-2277

Open Daily
Monday-Saturday
7 a.m. - 6 p.m.

Sunday

7 a.m. - 4 p.m.

24/7 Credit
Card Pumps
Beer specials during the
month of December!

Help Cora (Letellier) Dillman
celebrate her

95th birthday on
January 11th with a
card shower.
Cards may be sent to
PO Box 154
Kadoka, SD 57543

nally.”
Mary Johnston celebrated an
early Christmas here with family
and then took off to spend actual
Christmas with her sister in Milaca, MN, and her brother of
Ogilvy, MN. She was planning to
come back right after the first of
the year but roads and weather
delayed that trip. On Sunday,
Larry Johnston was working on
his pickup in the shelter of the
shop and making sure Jenny’s car
was up to snuff for driving to
school on Monday. He was also fixing a tire which was a little frustrating since they’d just gotten
new tires only to have one go flat
already. On New Year’s Eve, the
Johnston went to JR’s in Belvidere
for the potluck supper and the
evening. They left before midnight, however, and Jo said she
was safely in bed when the New
Year arrived.
Mike and Marlene Perault saw
the New Year in at Club 27 in
Kadoka. On Sunday, they were
chopping thick ice for the cattle
and trying to fix floats in tanks
that had frozen up. Bert Perault
went to Deadwood with friends to
see the New Year in but reported
the trip was nothing all that special although it was okay. Marlene
reports that her mom, Lillian
Carlson, remains at the rehab center in New Underwood where she
seems to be enjoying herself. She
has a phone there under Golden
West so calls to her aren’t long distance. Her phone is often busy,
however, since she has to keep in
touch with her many kids and
grandkids. She has been telling
everyone not to come visit until

the roads and weather improve.
She is a normal mom who worries
about all her kin.
Marj and Marvin Street arrived
at their house in Belvidere under
the water tower on Friday. Marj
was prepared to play the organ for
church on Sunday, but church and
the annual congregational meeting were cancelled due to the cold
and wind chills. The Streets visited kin in Rapid City one day and
will visit their son in Mitchell next
weekend. They hope to be here
until the 19th of so. Our cold
weather, however, is practically
shirtsleeve weather to them since,
at the airport near their home in
Cook, MN, (way up north close to
Canada) on Sunday, the temperature was 35 degrees below zero
and has been 33 below on several
days last week.
Jo Rodgers said they had a nice
bunch of people at JR’s on New
Year’s Eve for a potluck. On Sunday, however, the weather was so
vile that no one stayed very long
and they closed the place down
fairly early that evening. On New
Year’s Day, Jo and Jory celebrated
a late Christmas with Jo’s family
at the home of her mom, Carolyn
Manke. Her brothers, Bill and
Buddy, were there as were sisters,
Jewell and Jamie, along with various members of their families.
There was too much snow in Belle
Fourche for Jeri to want to come
however. Jory did some ice fishing
while at the ranch, but Jo said he
caught more cold than fish. It’s
back to work at the Murdo Post
Office on Monday for Jo if her car
will start.

You are invited to a Baby Girl Shower
who is planned to arrive on February 10, 2014

for Dwan Kendrick

on Saturday, January 11
at 1 p.m. at the

Gateway Apartment Community Room in Kadoka
Registered at Target

A card shower is being
held to honor
Lova Bushnell
on her 95th birthday
January 10, 2014.
Please send her a card at
PO Box 171, Kadoka 57543

Sports

4 - Thursday, January 9, 2014 - Kadoka Press

Wrestlers match up against East River

From the Desk of | George Seiler, KASD 6-12 Prinicpal
Let me start off by wishing
everyone a merry Christmas and
a happy New Year’s. December
was a fast month, the students
and staff had a two week long
break to relax and recover for the
final two week push for the end of
our semester. The students even
had an extra half of a day vacation
due to the inclement weather the
Thursday before Christmas break.
Semester tests will be January
13 and 14 for high school students,
students can chose one semester
test to be exempt from if they have
a 94% or above attendance rate
this year. Students will not be allowed to be exempt from AP or
dual credit course semester tests.
I have attached a copy of the semester test schedule for the semester test dates. If your child is
gone on one of those days they will
need to complete their semester
test before they will receive their
final grade on their transcript, if
they do not complete their test it
may result as a zero which would
impact their final grade.
The student council put on a

blood drive for the United Blood
Services on December 10 and had
sixteen people who donated blood
which all blood stays locally unless they have an abundance of a
particular blood type. December
brought about the start of the winter sporting events for our high
school basketball teams, gymnastics, and wrestling. During this
time of year we ask that you remind your kids to prepare for the
long bus trips by bringing a winter
coat, warm hat, and gloves or mittens. The season is moving along
and before we know it track season will be starting and spring will
be here although with this cold it
doesn’t feel like spring could come
soon enough. I am looking for a
few people to sit in on a prom
dress code committee in order to
look at changes in the prom dress
code. I would like to thank you all
for your continued support with
your students and if you have any
questions or concerns please contact me at the school. I am looking
for a few people to sit in on a prom
dress code committee in order to

look at changes in the prom dress
code.
Thank you,
George Seiler
Semester Test Schedule
January 13 & 14, 2014
Monday, January 13
8:00 to 8:55: Homeroom (study
time for students) Report to your
first hour class.
9:00 to 10:30: 1st Period Test
10:30 to 10:38: Break
10:40 to 12:10: 2nd Period Test
12:10 to 12:38: Lunch
12:40 to 2:10: 3rd Period Test
2:10 to 2:18: Break
2:20 to 3:47: 4th Period Test
Tuesday, January 14
8:00 to 8:55: Homeroom study
time for students Report to your
5th hour class.
9:00 to 10:30: 5th Period Test
10:30 to 10:38: Break
10:40 to 12:10: 6th Period Test
12:10 to 12:38: Lunch
12:40 to 2:10: 7th Period Test
2:10 to 3:47: ICU Study Hall/
incentive day

Kougars have tough time on the court
The Kadoka boys’ basketball
team traveled to Philip on December 23.
“The game against Philip was
tough for us as a team, said Coach
Mark Reiman. “Philip stepped up
their defense and we couldn't get
anything going offensively.”
The Kougars were defeated 3679 by the Scotties. Deontae Thorn
had high score of 12 points.
On December 27, the Kougars
meet up against Stanley County in
Ft. Pierre. The Kougars won 29-21,
with Wyatt Enders and AJ Bendt
both scoring seven points each.
“We came back and played solid
defensively
against
Stanley
County. I was very proud of the
way the boys worked that whole
game. It was a lower scoring outing
but was a nice win for the boys,”
said Reiman.
The Kadoka Classic was held on
Saturday, January 4 where the
Kougars took on Lower Brule. They
lost in a tough battle 42-58.
“Our game with Lower Brule
was another well played game except for the 3rd quarter. We competed each and every minute of the
game,” said Reiman. “The team is
playing better defense each game
and once our offense starts clicking
we will be turning some heads.
Congratulations on another win
boys and keep up the hard work.”
The next round of action for the
Kougars will Thursday, January 9
at White River at 5:30 MT. On Saturday, January 11 it will be a double
header
against
New
Underwood with the first game tipping off at 2:30 p.m.

True Buchholz

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•Pin by Josh Vaith (BH/S) 0:35
•Default to Kaleb Peterson (BER)
160 lbs: Reed Johnson 2nd
record 9-7
•Win by Forfeit
•Dec. Trent Lyle (BER) 8-1
•Dec. Turner Serr (B/G) 2-1
•Pin by Jace Christiansen (FLA) 3:43
170 lbs: Chandlier Sudbeck 1st
record 15-2
•Pin Andrew Flannery (EPJ) 0:54
•Pin Eli Orr (BER) 1:52
•Pin Kordell Buick (PKR) 2:48
•Dec. Jerry Kappenman (MCM) 6-3
182 lbs: Grady Carley 4th
record 9-8
•Pin Skye Soesbe (B/G) 2:39
•Pin by Turner Blasius (KWLPG) 0:39
•Pin Caleb Brandt (WW) 0:24
•Dec. Adam Harms (PKR) 5-1
•Dec. Luke Vogel (PC) 5-4
•Dec. by C.J. Geary (EPJ) 0-7
195 lbs: Gabe Sandal
record 3-5
•Pin by Nathaniel Schroeder (KWLPG) 3:58
•Win Disqualif. Jacob Zmolek (KC)
•Pin by Dowain Kerner (B/G) 0:19
220 lbs: Gavin DeVries 3rd
record 9-6
•Pin by Justice Verhey (PKR) 5:40
•Bye
•Pin Brody Gilbertson (KC) 2:52
•Dec. Matt Warejcka (KWLPG) 5-1
•Pin Cody Condon (MCM) 4:09
•Dec. OT Andrew Teply (EPJ) 4-2
285 lbs: Geoffrey DeVries
record 4-6
•Pin Ernie Johnson (M/F) 1:17
•Pin by Dan Stibral (BH/S) 0:33
•Pin by Logan Barboza (FLA) 2:13

Philip Area heads to Presho for
the Lyman wrestling tournament
January 10-11. Donnelly noted
that the tournament has 29 teams
competiting and most of the weight
classes will have full brackets. He
expects the 106, 132 and 138
weight classes to be the toughest.

Jed Brown

Allie Romero in a fast break in the
game against Lower Brule at the
Kadoka Classic that was held on Saturday, January 4. e Lady Kougars lost
25-52.

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106 lbs: Hunter Peterson 4th
record 12-6

•Bye
•Dec. Carl Cronin (PC) 8-2
•Dec. by Stas Sutera (BH/S) 10-11
•Pin Dylan Colt (EPJ) 3:25
•Pin by Atlas Willuweit (B/G) 2:29
113 lbs: Keagan Fitch
record 0-2
•Maj. Dec. by Roman Fehr (EPJ) NA
•Bye
•Maj. Dec. by Paul Lauck (MCM)
120 lbs: Trey Elshere
record 1-2
•Pin by Ty Haneke (BER) 1:22
•Pin Noah Heezen (MVPC) 4:55
•Pin by Dalton Bodewitz (M/F) 2:55
126 lbs: Jed Brown 1st
record 11-3
•Bye
•Pin Jayden Even (PKR) 2:38
•Pin Blake Konstanz (BH/S) 2:57
•Pin Nick Casperson (BER) 5:58
132 lbs: Rance Johnson 2nd
record 12-5
•Bye
•Pin Sam Wente (DV) 2:36
•Dec. Brody Schatz (PC) 9-6
•Dec. by Justin Haneke (BER) 13-14
138 lbs: Nick Donnelly 1st
record 11-5
•Bye
•Tech Fall Chris Zuber (PC) 4:27
•Dec. Jared Lyle (BER) 6-2
•Dec. Kurt Braun (B/G) 2-0
145 lbs: Kaylor Pinney 4th
record 7-5
•Pin by Austin Kaul (BH/S) 1:10
•Maj. Dec. Dylan Negelstad (PKR) 18-4
•Dec. Brad Bogue (BER) 13-8
•Maj. Dec. Brock Belkham (FLA) 13-5
•Win by Default Tanner Risseeuw (MVPC)
•Pin by Levi Schonebaum (B/G) 2:23
152 lbs: Lane Blasius 1st
record 12-0
•Pin Cody Davis (EPJ) 1:34
•Pin Si Flatten (FLA) 2:24
•Pin Colin Walth (AH) 1:29
•Pin Brady Dam (DV) 3:34
152 lbs: Austin Pinney 8th
record 2-3
•Pin Pierce Plucker (PKR) 3:19
•Dec. Flatten 11-6

Chandlier Sudbeck

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A trip deep into East River country to participate at the McCook
Central/Montrose wrestling tournament January 4 at Salem was
very successful for the Badlands
Brawlers as they brought home 11
individual place awards and runner-up honors for the team.
Coach Matt Donnelly said the
Philip Area team had a good tournament, wrestling some of the
state’s top grapplers. He noted
Beresford, who won the tournament, has a very strong feeder program, pulling in some top talent.
He said the 132 and 138 weight
classes had a lot of state placers
competing and they are probably
the two toughest weight classes in
the state right now.
Philip Area was missing two seasoned wrestlers, Logan Ammons
and Raedon Anderson, said Donnelly, both of whom should be back
in action this weekend.
Team points at tournament’s end
were Beresford – 241, Philip –
220.5, Bon Homme/Scotland –
202.5, Burke/Gregory – 184, Elk
Point-Jefferson – 145, McCook
Central/Montrose – 144, Parker –
120.5, Potter County – 81, Flandreau – 64.5, Dakota Valley – 58.5,
Mt. Vernon/Plankinton/Corsica –
57, Kimball/White Lake/PlatteGeddes – 50, Alcester-Hudson – 40,
Wessington Springs-Woonsocket –
35, Marion/Freeman – 34, Kingsbury County – 15, Lyman – 9,
Wolsey/Wessington – 3

press@
kadokatelco.
com
Gavin DeVries

Peters Excavation
Home: (605) 837-2945
Cell: (605) 381-5568

53/,65
53/,6
53/,6

Excavation work of
ALL types!
WBackhoe WTrenching
WDirectional Boring
WCobett Waters
Located in
WTire Tanks
Kadoka, SD
WDozer
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Excavation

Brent Peters

Community
Information from JacksonKadoka Economic Dev. Corp.

Notice of
Annual Meeting
The Tri-County Predator District’s annual
meeting will be held Thursday, January
30, at 6:00 p.m. at The Steakhouse in
Philip.
[Published January 9, 16 & 23, 2014, at
the total approximate cost of $8.45]

Town of Belvidere
End of Year Meeting
December 23, 2013
A motion was made by Wayne Hindman
to call the meeting to order. John
Rodgers seconded the motion. The following people were present: Wayne
Hindman, John Rodgers, and Jo
Rodgers. Absent was Rudy Reimann.
OLD BUSINESS: None
NEW BUSINESS: None
BILLS APPROVED AND PAID:
Jo Manke-Rodgers, wages . . . .60.03
US Treasury, payroll taxes . . . .135.46
Upholstery & Stuff,
office repairs . . . . . . . . . . . .119.25
West Central, electricity . . . . . .964.34
With there being no further business,
Wayne Hindman made a motion to adjourn the meeting. John Rodgers seconded the motion. The next regular town
council meeting will be January 13, 2014
at 7:00 p.m. in the city office. . . . . .
John L. Rodgers
Council President
ATTEST
Jo Manke-Rodgers
Finance Officer
[Published January 9, 2014, at the total
approximate cost of $13.00]

KADOKA CITY COUNCIL
SPECIAL MEETING
DECEMBER 30, 2013
5:15 P. M.
Council Vice President Ryan Willert
called the special meeting of the Kadoka
City Council to order at 5:15 p.m. with the
following members present: Colby
Shuck; Ryan Willert; Cory Lurz; and Dick
Stolley. Members absent: Mayor Weller,
and Council Members Arne Lund and
Brad Jorgensen. Others present: Patty
Ulmen, Finance Officer; Jackie Stilwell;
and Nathan Riggins.
Stolley made Motion 13-12-30:147 to approve the minutes of the regular meeting
of December 9, 2013. The motion was
seconded by Shuck, with all members
voting yes and the motion carried 4-0.
The bills were presented for approval.
After discussion, Lurz made Motion 1312-30:148 to approve the bills as submitted. The motion was seconded by
Stolley. A roll call vote was taken, with all
members voting yes and the motion carried 4-0.
BILLS TO APPROVE AT THE
DECEMBER 30, 2013 MEETING.
AFLAC, Monthly Premium 85.82; Avenet,
Register Domain Names 440.00; Delta
Dental, Monthly Premium 537.60; J & S
Restore, Repairs 782.03; KCBA, Reimburse/Expenses 2,494.20; Northern Hills
Collections, Inc., Wage Assignment
150.00; Quill, Supplies 540.91; SD Retirement, Monthly Contribution 2,141.10;
SpeedTech Lights, Inc., Light Bar/Police
Vehicle 715.94; Verizon Wireless, Cell
Phone 95.94; West River Excavation,
Solid Waste Transportation 557.60; Total
Bills Presented: 8,541.14
Shuck made Motion 13-12-30:149 to
transfer $3,352.53 from the general
funds contingency fund (Dept. 41150) to
the following departments within the general fund: Fire Department (Dept. 42200)
- $1,334.12 and Street Lighting (Dept.
43160) - $2,018.41. The motion was seconded by Lurz. A roll call vote was taken,
with all members voting yes and the motion carried 4-0.
Stolley made Motion 13-12-30:150 to authorize the transfer of funds from the
liquor fund and general fund to the water
fund in an amount sufficient to offset the
deficit in the water fund. The motion was
seconded by Shuck. A roll call vote was
taken, with all members voting yes and
the motion carried 4-0.
Shuck made Motion 13-12-30:151 to adjourn. The motion was seconded by Lurz,
with all members voting yes and the
meeting was adjourned at 5:20 p.m.
Ryan Willert, Council Vice President
ATTEST:
Patty Ulmen,
Finance Officer
City of Kadoka
[Published January 9, 2014, at the total
approximate cost of $27.30]

This week’s Economic Development information is on programs
that the state of South Dakota has
to offer from the Governor's Office
of Economic Development. Their
contact
information
is
800.872.6190
www.SDreadytowork.com or www.SDreadytopartner.com
Agriculture Processing and Export Loan Program (APEX Fund)
The APEX Loan Program is designed to assist companies which
add value to raw agricultural
products through processing and
are located in communities with a
population of 25,000 or less. The
program is open to for-profit businesses and local economic development corporations. This program
may provide up to 75% of the total
project cost and requires the applicant to secure the other funds before applying for the APEX loan,
including a 10% minimum equity
contribution. The maximum loan
amount available from the APEX
program is $250,000.

fers subordinated, fixed rate financing to healthy and expanding
small businesses. Long-term,
fixed rate financing (10-20 years)
and reasonable rates (near longterm U.S. Treasury bond rates),
make the 504 program an attractive and effective economic development financing tool. The 504
Program is available for fixed
asset purchases only: land, building, and equipment with a useful
life of 10 years or more. Working
capital, inventory, and venture
capital are NOT eligible. SBA 504
financing is "permanent" take-out
mortgage financing. Interim or
construction financing must be
utilized to complete the project.
South Dakota WORKS
The South Dakota WORKS program, created in 2011, offers expanding businesses access to
working capital, up to $1 million.
The program works in conjunction
with a private lender who provides at least 20% of the total project costs.

Revolving Economic
Development Initiative
Fund- REDI Fund
The REDI (Revolving Economic
Development and Initiative) Fund
is designed to help promote job
growth in South Dakota. This low
interest loan fund is available to
start-up firms, businesses that are
expanding or relocating and local
economic development corporations. Funds may be used for fixed
capital expenses. The REDI Fund
provides up to 45% of a project's
total cost. Companies should secure matching funds and be able
to provide a 10% minimum equity
contribution before applying to
the Board of Economic Development for a REDI Fund loan.

MicroLOAN Program/MicroLOAN Express
The intent of this program is to
provide low interest, gap financing for small businesses which
may not have other types of financing available. These loans are
made available to small businesses within the borders of South
Dakota and South Dakota residents, including Main Street and
retail operations. The funds may
be used for working capital, equipment, real estate or other project
costs. The maximum loan amount
is $100,000. These loans are
funded in conjunction with a
bank, credit union, or local lending partner.

SBA 504
The SBA 504 Loan program of-

--submitted by Jo Beth Uhlir
KJEDC Director of Operations

The Canadian Pacific (CP) railway announced on Thursday, January 2, that it will sell the former
Dakota, Minnesota and Eastern
(DM&E) rail line, west of Tracy,
Minn., to Genesee & Wyoming,
Inc., for $210-million
Genesse & Wyoming is a Greenwich, Conn., based rail company
that is the nation’s largest operator of short-line rails. The sale involves 660 miles of track.CP will
retain the former DM&E holdings
east of Tracy.
The
announcement
comes
shortly after the Surface Transportation Board (STB) issued a decision on the state of South
Dakota's Canadian Pacific petition requiring CP to produce documentation of capital investments made to improve the line.
“I am hopeful this sale to a
short-line operator is in the best
interest of the state,” said Governor Dennis Daugaard. “With the
recent decision from the Surface
Transportation Board, I am also
hopeful that our questions about
the Canadian Pacific’s obligations
to improve the line will be answered. As I’ve said before, South
Dakotans deserve to know
whether CP kept its promises. The
line is too important to our state
for our questions to go unanswered.”
Last year, Daugaard set forth
four values that he would use to
determine whether or not to support any future sale of the line.
Those values are:
•The buyer’s ability and willingness to maintain and operate
the line between Pierre and Rapid
City.
•The buyer’s ability to maintain
healthy competition, both as to

shipping rates and access to markets.
•The buyer’s ability to provide a
high level of service to South
Dakota shippers and producers.
•The buyer’s commitment to
providing long term service in
South Dakota.
“The fact that the proposed sale
is to a well-known short line operator appears to be a good step in
the right direction,” the governor
added.
The STB rendered their decision on December 19, which will
also require the Canadian Pacific
to answer written questions and
produce further documentation requested by the state.
After CP indicated that it may
sell the line west of Tracy, Minn.,
the governor filed a petition with
the STB. The petition requested
that the STB look into whether CP
fulfilled the representations it
made while seeking to acquire the
line. Based upon CP’s representations, the STB approved the company’s purchase of the DM&E
Railroad in 2008.
After filing the petition, the governor traveled to Washington,
D.C. to discuss the importance of
the line with United States Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack
and United States Transportation
Secretary Anthony Foxx.
Since the fall of 2012, Daugaard
and members of his administration have been in contact with CP
to examine whether CP had ful-

filled its promises to the STB.
Though there has been some communication with CP, the governor’s questions have still largely
gone unanswered.
The deal is expected to close by
the middle of 2014, provided it receives approval from the U.S. Surface Transportation Board and
meets other conditions.
Genesee & Wyoming Inc., which
operates short-line and regional
freight railways in the United
States, Australia, Cana-da, the
Netherlands and Belgium.
According to a story in The
Canadian Press, Calgary, “G&W
will rename the line the Rapid
City, Pierre & Eastern Railroad
and will hire 180 employees, most
of whom will have already been
working on the line. It will be able
to link up to the networks of CP
and other major North American
railways.”
The Canadian Press also reported, “As a result of the transaction, CP is expected to record a net
after-tax writedown of about
$240-million in its fourth-quarter
2013 financial statements. The
sale is expected to be cash positive
for the Calgary-based railway and
have no material effect on future
earnings.”
According to reports from “The
Street,” “It (Genesee & Wyoming)
expects the acquisition to generate
annual revenue of $65 million and
boost earnings per share immediately.”

Daily Noon Specials
Monday through Friday

Join us for lunch…
Special Every Sunday
Serving 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Jigger’s Restaurant
837-2000 • Kadoka

ily, that of Gullick Olson, joined
their voices together in singing
Christmas carols.
The theme at the Cultural Heritage Center in Pierre this holiday
season is “Sharing Holiday Traditions.” While Mrs. Johnson was
recalling holiday traditions in
Sweden, other pioneer families
were no doubt recalling Christmases in their native land.
Traditions in Norway included exchanging presents on Christmas
Eve and attending church on
Christmas Day, followed by socializing in the days after Christmas.
Traditions in Germany included
bringing the Christmas tree into
the house and exchanging presents within the family on Christmas Eve.
On the prairie, pioneers were
adapting holiday traditions to
their circumstances.
An article in the Dec. 30, 1862,
Yankton Press & Dakotan stated,
“Christmas was celebrated in the
usual manner – children’s stockings were filled with candy, nuts,
etc., on Christmas Eve.”
The Faulk County Times in
Faulkton stated on Dec. 28, 1882,
“It being the time honored custom
for Santa Claus to come in a
sleigh, there had been grave ap-

5

Genesee & Wyoming
buys DM&E Railroad

Sharing holiday traditions
Settlers in
Dakota Territory carried
Christmas
with them and
celebrated it
wherever they
were
with
whatever they
could find at
hand.
In
what
would become
Grant Township in northe a s t e r n
Dakota Territory, a mother
was
struggling to give
her children
the
best
Christmas she
could.
Mrs.
Charles Johnson
feared
that her six
children were
facing a meager celebration in 1876,
not like the
ones the family enjoyed in
Sweden.
In Sweden,
the children
enjoyed lutefisk, Swedish
meatballs, potato sausage,
c h i c k e n ,
baked rolls,
Christmas cakes and cookies on
Christmas Eve, according to a
Dec. 23, 1970, article in the Grant
County Review by Alfred E. Nord,
a grandson of Mrs. Johnson. In
Grant County, no special food
would grace the table on Christmas Eve.
Much had been made of giving
gifts in Sweden on Christmas Eve.
There were no gifts for the Johnson family in 1876. Nor was there
a Christmas tree, which had always been in the family’s home at
Christmas time in Sweden.
“In Sweden they make much of
lighting candles and placing as
many as possible in all their windows on Christmas eve,” Nord
wrote. “They sing, ‘Now a thousand Christmas candles are
alight’ (Nu tandas tusen juleljus).
In the dugout there were no windows. Grandmother lit a few candles and asked them to sing the
song anyway as there might be
one thousand candles in Minnesota, even if there were only a
dozen candles in Grant county.”
The tradition in Sweden was to attend church services at 6 Christmas morning and sing hymns to
welcome in Christmas. As there
was no church to attend, the Johnson family and a neighboring fam-

Kadoka Press - Thursday, January 9, 2014 -

prehension, on the part of the little folks, lest he would not be enabled to make Southern Dakota
this season, but the snow, even so
little, on Saturday night was just
in time to accommodate the old
fellow, and quiet all uneasiness on
the part of the little ones.”
In their dugout in Grant
County, Mrs. Johnson and her
children ate for Christmas Eve the
same foods that they had eaten for
months – pickled herring, summer
sausage, potatoes and rye krisp.
Mrs. Johnson told the children
about the good earth, the fertile
soil, and the abundant harvest
they would have in the future.
While the family did not have
gifts, Mrs. Johnson pointed out
that they were rich in love for each
other and that being a pioneer
was a great gift. She told the
youngsters that people in Grant
County would be planting evergreens and they would have a
Christmas tree in a few years.
“Do they have Christmas out
West?” wrote the Rev. Cyrus
Brady in Children of the West by
Cathy Luchetti. “Well, they have
it in their hearts, if no place else,
and, after all, that is the place
above all others where it should
be.”

Church

Kadoka Press - Thursday, January 9, 2014 -

6

Lois (Stotts) McFall_____________________________ Shirley Raue__________________________________
Lois (Stotts) McFall, age 71 of
Lehigh Acres, Fla., died December
17, 2013, at her home.
Lois Jean Stotts was born December 13, 1942, the daughter of
Roy and Mary (Marshall) Stotts.
She grew up in the Okaton area,
and graduated from Murdo High
School. She later ran the Downhome Cafe, the Old City Bar and
spent many years waitressing and
cooking. Lois was active in Eastern Star, Bad River Dance club, 4H Leader, and a lifetime member
of the American Legion Auxiliary.
Lois moved to Florida in the
mid-1980s. At the time of her
death, Lois was first vice president of the American Legion Auxiliary Department of Florida and
was to be sworn in as president in
June 2014.
Survivors include four sons,
Clint Jensen and his wife, Brenda,
of Midland, Rick Jensen and his
wife, Ana, of Pierre, Daniel Flom
and his wife, Haeyoung, of Belle
Fourche, and Derek Flom and his
wife, Aleesha, of Oklahoma City,
Okla.; four daughters, Anita Lar-

son and her husband, Jim, of Hot
Springs, Janet Gourneau and her
husband, Calvin, of Pierre,
Rochelle Schuler and her husband, Norman, of Eagle Butte,
and Carmen Jensen of Spokane,
Wash.; 18 grandchildren; seven
great-grandchildren; her special
friend, Dennis Boland of Lehigh
Acres; two brothers, Roy Stotts
and his wife, Joyce, of Sioux Falls,

and Carl Stotts and his wife,
Linda, of Missoula, Mont.; two sisters, Helen Root of Casper, Wyo.,
and Pat Jensen of Kadoka; and a
host of other relatives and friends.
Lois was preceded in death by
her husband, Jimmy McFall; her
parents, Roy and Mary (Marshall)
Stotts; a grandson, Jared Jensen;
four sisters, Grace Hagan, Ada
Fedderson, Alice Mae Fosheim
and Mary Jones; and a brother,
Harold Stotts.
A memorial service was held at
the Lehigh Acres American Legion Post on Saturday, December
21.
A second memorial service will
be held at 9:30 a.m. (MT) Saturday, January 11, at the American
Legion in Midland, with Pastor
Kathy Chesney officiating.
A memorial has been established.
Arrangements are with the
Rush Funeral Home of Philip.
Her online guestbook is available at www.rushfuneralhome.
com

Fellowship of God | Dr. James L. Snyder
Cold is as cold feels and I
don’t like feeling cold.
I was sitting on the back porch
sipping an ice-cold tea with a
splash of lemon when I received a
text from a relative up north. I was
enjoying a pleasant afternoon
basking in the winter sun of
Florida.
I am not sure what God was
thinking of when He created the
north with all that bad weather
and snow and such, but I know
what He was thinking of when He
created the South especially
Florida. He was thinking in particular of me and my insatiable love
of the sun. Basking in the Florida
sun is the great reward of being
smart and moving to Florida.
I have some friends who were
born in Florida and think they are
a little bit better than me. I remind them that they had no choice
of being born in Florida but I, on
the other hand, moved to Florida
on my own volition. I think I have
the upper hand on that one.
I may be old but I certainly do
delight in the modern technology.
It used to be that when you got a
call from a relative you had to answer the telephone and talk to the
person on the other end for as long
as they hung on. Today, thanks to
modern gadgetry; when a relative
wants to contact me, they usually
do it by text. I love it.
Getting a text is a strange
thing, or it can be. If I do not respond right away, I can always
claim that there is “something
wrong with my cell phone and my
texting isn’t working right today.”
Then I can get back to that relative whenever it suits me. Or, as
the case with some relatives, and
you know who I mean, I can ignore
it.
If you are a relative of mine and
have not heard from me or had

any of your text answered the simple answer is, I am not really ignoring you (ha ha ha) my cell
phone is not working correctly.
This relative that text me was
complaining about how cold it was
up north and even had the courtesy to send me a picture of their
backyard just chock-full of some
white substance known as snow.
The text read, “I bet you wish
you were here to enjoy this?”
I think that relative would have
lost that bet for sure. I love those
snow scenes on postcards or in text
messages like this one, but as to be
personally involved with all of the
frigid snow, do not bet on me!
Years ago, Cold and I experienced a deep disagreement and we
have been separated ever since. As
far as I am concerned, the separation is final! I really do not want
anything more to do with Cold. We
are not even on speaking terms.
Cold, after all, is a relative
thing especially when the relatives
are up north in the winter.
Up north, they complain when
the temperature falls below 30.
Here in Florida I complain
when the temperature falls below
70.
Whenever the temperature dips
below that magical 70, I have to
break out one of my sweaters.
What an inconvenience for me to
have to put on a sweater because
it is just a little bit cool on the outside.
Then my relative sent me a picture of her standing in the snow
looking like the abominable snowman. She had more clothes on
than I actually own and have in
my closet. I wonder how she walks
around wearing all those clothes?
How in the world does she ever sit
down wearing all those clothes?
And what about that thing
wrapped around her head? We
have hats here in Florida but not

Meals for the Elderly

quite like the one she was wearing. It looked like she was wearing
some igloo.
At this point in my life, I could
not afford, for a variety of reasons,
to move back north.
I do not think my relatives up
north could put up with me at this
point. They offer me a friendly invitation to come and spend some
time with them during the winter
season. I really could not handle it.
As soon as the temperature
dropped below 70, I would be complaining, grouching and working
on everybody’s nerves.
I would be such a nuisance that
they would have to get together
and buy me a plane ticket back to
sunny Florida. My relatives
should thank me for not moving
up north to “enjoy the snow” with
them. See how much I am saving
my relatives? Do they appreciate
it?
No relationship is quite like
that relationship that spans several hundred miles. You know the
old saying, “Absence makes the
heart grow fonder.” So, if you add
distance to that absence you have
the epitome of a wonderfully fond
heart.
Many things separate us from
one another. Sometimes that separation is voluntary and sometimes it isn’t.
The apostle Paul understood
that nothing could separate him
from God. “For I am persuaded,
that neither death, nor life, nor
angels, nor principalities, nor powers, nor things present, nor things
to come,  Nor height, nor depth,
nor any other creature, shall be
able to separate us from the love of
God, which is in Christ Jesus our
Lord” (Romans 8:38-39).
It does not matter how cold it is
outside as long as inside there is a
warm relationship with God bordering on fiery expectation.

Shirley J. Raue, 78, of Pierre,
S.D., passed away December 30,
2013, at her home.
Shirley was born June 29, 1935,
in Pierre to Wallace and Marie
(Plasschaert) Hansen.
She attended country school
near her parents’ home, 27 miles
northeast of Philip, from the first
through the eighth grade and
graduated from Philip High
School in 1953. She attended
Black Hills Teachers College during the 1953-1956 summer sessions and graduated from Black
Hills State College with a teaching degree in 1960. Shirley had
started teaching country school
shortly after graduating from high
school and taught in and around
the Philip, Pierre and Fort Pierre
areas for 11 years. She also taught
at McKinley Elementary School in
Pierre from 1962 through 1966.
Shirley married Fred Raue on
August 14, 1955, in Philip. To this
union were born seven children.
These seven, however, were not
her only kids! Shirley opened her
business, Raue Day Care Center,
50 years ago and had the pleasure
of caring for thousands of children. She cared for three generations of families, each and every
child having a special place in
Shirley’s heart. She also taught
nursery school to the children.

When she wasn’t caring for children, she would often be found in
a concession stand as she operated
the Post 8 baseball concession
stand from 1988 to 2011. Her
stand was considered one of the
best, if not the best, stands in the
state. She was most famous for
her super nachos, loaded baked
potatoes and her quarter-pound
hot dogs and brats. As if that wasn’t enough, she also handled the
concession stand for the Varmint
Hunters Association during their
annual shindigs for more than 10
years.
Shirley was a dedicated collec-

In the Kitchen
Tex-Mex Beef Stew
Ingredients
1/2 cup all-purpose flour
3 teaspoons chile powder
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 pounds beef chuck, cut into 1-1/2inch cubes
3 tablespoons vegetable oil
1 large onion, chopped
3 cloves garlic, smashed
2 cans (14.5 ounces each) beef broth
1 can (14.5 ounces) stewed
tomatoes
1 teaspoon dried oregano
1 bag (1 pound) peeled baby carrots
1 box (10 ounces) frozen corn and
roasted red and green pepper,
thawed

Caramel Apple Trifle
Ingredients
3 tablespoons butter
4 cups chopped peeled tart apples
(about 5 medium)
1 cup chopped walnuts
1/2 cup packed brown sugar
1 teaspoon apple pie spice, divided
1 package (8 ounces) cream cheese,
softened
1 jar (12-1/4 ounces) caramel ice
cream topping, divided
1 carton (12 ounces) frozen
whipped topping, thawed,

Sausage Macaroni
Supper
Ingredients
2 cups uncooked elbow macaroni
1 pound bulk Italian sausage
1 cup chopped onion
2 teaspoons canola oil
1 can (11 ounces) condensed cream
of tomato bisque soup, undiluted

1 can (4.25 ounces) diced green
chiles
4 1/2 cups cooked brown rice (1-1/2
cups raw)
Directions
•In shallow dish, mix together
flour, 2 teaspoons chile powder and
the salt. Coat beef cubes with flour
mixture. Reserve any remaining
flour mixture.
•In a large pot or Dutch Oven,
heat 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
over high heat. Add beef, working
in batches to avoid crowding pot;
cook, turning, until all sides are
browned, about 5 minutes. Set
meat aside on a platter and repeat.
•Heat remaining 1 tablespoon

divided
2 loaves (10-3/4 ounces each) frozen
pound cake, thawed and cut
into 1-inch cubes
Additional apple pie spice, optional
Directions
•In a large skillet, melt butter
over medium heat. Stir in the apples, walnuts, brown sugar and 1/2
teaspoon apple pie spice. Cook and
stir for 8-10 minutes or until apples
are tender.
•In a large bowl, beat cream
cheese until smooth. Beat in 1/2
1/2 cup 2% milk
1/2 cup shredded Parmesan cheese
2 teaspoons Italian seasoning
4 cups frozen broccoli florets,
thawed
Directions
•Cook macaroni according to
package directions. Meanwhile, in
a Dutch oven, cook sausage and

Monday, January 13: French dip with au jus, scalloped corn, tossed
salad, and tropical fruit.
Tuesday, January 14: Barbecue pork, company potatoes, green
beans, dinner roll and peach cobbler.
Wednesday, January 15: Fish portions, creamed potatoes and peas,
whole wheat bread, and apple juice.
Thursday, January 16: Meatloaf, baked potato, broccoli and cauliflower with cheese, bread, and apricots.
Friday, January 17: Ham and bean soup, meat salad sandwich,
fruit cocktail with topping.

Upcoming Area Events
Wednesday, January 8:
•Kadoka Area School Board meeting at 3:30 at the Long Valley
School.
•Kadoka City Council zoning public hearing at 7:00 p.m. at annex.
Friday, January 10:
•Wrestling at Lyman.
Saturday, January 11:
•Wrestling at Lyman.
•Gymnastics at Stanley County.
•Boys and girls basketball against New Underwood.
Sunday, January 12:
•Presbyterian Church in Kadoka will have a potluck dinner after the
11:00 a.m. worship service. At the potluck they will honor Lova Bushnell for her 95th birthday. The elders and Kadoka Presbyterian Women
will have their meetings after the potluck dinner. Everyone is cordially
invited.
Monday, January 13:
•Jackson County Commissioners meeting at 9:00 a.m.
•Kadoka City Council meeting at 7:00 p.m.
Sunday, January 19:
•SD Humanities discussion leader, Dorothy Liegl, 2:00 p.m. at the
Jackson County Library. Books are in for the Dakota Readers group for
the book "The Land They Possessed."
Wednesday, January 22:
•Annual Meeting of the Kadoka Nursing Home will be held at 7:00
p.m. in the dinning room.

tor whose collections include more
than 1,400 Beanie Babies, 300
Beanie Buddies, Barbie dolls,
Princess Diana plates and coffee
cups.
Grateful for having shared in
her life are her seven children,
Vonnie (Dave) Long, David Raue,
Debra (Duane) Evans, Kristine
(Joseph)
Simmons,
Michele
Grezik, Scott Raue and Michael
(Amy) Raue; 22 grandchildren; 22
siblings
great-grandchildren;
John “Jack” Hansen, Robert “Bob”
Hansen, Darryl Hansen, Paula
Poss and Charlene Reed; special
friend, Chris Gant; numerous extended family members and
countless friends.
She was preceded in death by
her husband, Fred; her parents;
siblings, Gene, Richard and Arlyce; grandson, Charles; and
great-grandson, Kyan.
Services were held Friday, January 3, at Lutheran Memorial
Church with interment following
at Riverside Cemetery.
Memorials may be directed to
Pierre American Legion Post 8
Baseball Association or Avera@
Home (formerly St. Mary’s Homehealth/Hospice).
Condolences may be conveyed
to the family at www.feigumfh.
com.

Inspiration Point
What God Wants You to Know
Romans 8:14-17
The Lord “desires all men to be saved and to come to the knowledge of the
truth” (1 Tim. 2:4). In other words, God would like all of humanity to accept
Christ as Savior. Today we will explore certain truths that the Father longs
for His children to know.
• Salvation. It is the Holy Spirit’s job to convict us of our sinfulness and
bring us to the knowledge that Jesus Christ died for our sin. When we receive
the Lord as our personal Savior, we are reconciled to God and accorded full
fellowship with Him. This happens the moment salvation occurs. Our sin
debt is paid in full so we are free from guilt. Also, we are sealed by the Holy
Spirit for eternity and set apart for God’s service.
• Identity. What is our identity in the Lord? Believers are children of God.
The Bible calls us “joint heirs with Christ”—in other words, we share in the
wealth of the Lord Jesus. Also, we have been transformed from sinners into
saints. We may not always act saintly, but a true saint is someone who has
been saved and set apart for the purposes of God.
• Position. Jesus Christ is always present to guide and provide for the believer. Through Him, we have instantaneous access to God the Father.
• Mission. Our primary mission in life is to demonstrate Christ to the
world. Believers should live in such a way that others see the life of Jesus
within us. And because we understand the wonder of our salvation, our identity in Christ, and our position to the Father, we share about the Savior with
other people. God wants everyone to know the truth.

PEOPLE’S
MARKET
WIC, Food
Stamps & EBT
Phone: 837-2232
Monday thru Saturday
8 a.m. - 6 p.m.

oil in same pot. Add onion and garlic; cook over medium heat, stirring
to keep garlic from burning, until
onion is softened, 3 to 5 minutes.
Stir in reserved flour mixture from
step 1.
•Stir in beef and any juices, beef
broth, stewed tomatoes and
oregano. Bring to boiling. Reduce
heat; simmer, covered, 1 hour, stirring occasionally.
•Add carrots and remaining teaspoon Ancho Chile Powder; simmer, covered, 20 minutes or until
carrots are tender. Add corn-pepper
mixture and chiles; heat through.
•Serve with cooked brown rice.
Makes 6 servings.

cup caramel topping and remaining
apple pie spice. Fold in 2 cups
whipped topping.
•In a 3-1/2-qt. trifle bowl or
glass serving bowl, layer a third of
the cake cubes, cream cheese mixture and apple mixture. Repeat layers twice. Garnish with remaining
whipped topping and drizzle with
remaining caramel topping. Sprinkle with additional apple pie spice
if desired. Cover and refrigerate for
at least 1 hour before serving.
Yield: 14 servings.

onion over medium heat in oil until
meat is no longer pink; drain.
•Stir in the soup, milk, cheese
and Italian seasoning. Bring to a
boil; reduce heat. Drain macaroni;
add to sausage mixture. Stir in
broccoli; heat through. Yield: 6
servings.

Church Calendar
CONCORDIA LUTHERAN
Kadoka • 837-2390
Sunday Services: 10:00 a.m.
LUTHERAN PARISH - ELCA
OUR SAVIORS LUTHERAN • Long Valley
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
Sunday Services: 5:00 p.m.
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Kadoka • Pastor Gary McCubbin • 837-2233
Worship Services: 11:00 a.m.
Sunday School: Sr. Adults - 9:45 a.m.
Sunday School: All Ages - 9:45 a.m., • Sept. - May
Release Time: 2:15 p.m. Wednesdays. • Sept. - May
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Interior • 859-2310
Sunday Worship: 11:00 a.m.
BELVIDERE COMMUNITY CHURCH
Pastor Gary McCubbin • 344-2233
Sunday Worship: 9:30 a.m.
Coffee & Donuts: 10:30 a.m.
Sunday School: 10:45 a.m. Sept. - May
OUR LADY OF VICTORY CATHOLIC CHURCH
Father Bryan Sorensen • Kadoka • 837-2219
Mass: Sunday - 11:00 a.m.
Confession After Mass
INTERIOR COMMUNITY CHURCH
Sunday School: 9:30 a.m. • Church: 10:30 a.m.
EAGLE NEST LIFE CENTER
Gus Craven • Wanblee • 462-6002
Sunday Church: 11:00 a.m.
ST. PETER LUTHERAN CHURCH-LCMS
Midland • Rev. Glenn Denke • 462-6169, SD
(6 mi. north and 3 mi. east of 1880 Town)
Sunday Worship--10:00 a.m. MT/11:00 a.m. CT

Classifieds
Classified Advertising & Thank You Rates:

$5.00 minimum for 20 words, plus 10¢ for each additional word. To
place an ad call 605-837-2259 or email: press @kadokatelco.com

Notices

Farm/Ranch

BABY SHOWER for Elsie Grimes,
daughter of Austin and Jessica, will
be held on Sunday, January 11 at 2
p.m. at the Kadoka Presbyterian
Church.
K26-1tc

HAY FOR SALE: 1,500 Ton Net
Wrapped, 1,650/1,700 lb. round
bales. 80% alfalfa/20% grass; 10%
alfalfa/90% grass; and some all
grass. Would load and could help
arrange for trucking. $100/ton. Located 10 miles east of Belvidere, SD.
843-2869.
K24-tfn

Help Wanted
WANTED awesome people to work
part and/or full-time and willing to
work evenings and weekends. Sunset Grill is hiring cooks and counter
attendants. Kadoka Subway is hiring
sandwich artisits. Great work atmosphere, wages and profit sharing. If
you’d like to join our team, apply in
person or online at subway.com or
call 837-2400.
KP26-tfn

COPIES: 8-1/2x11 - 25¢ each; 81/2x14 - 30¢ each; 11x14 - 40¢ each.
At the Kadoka Press.
tfc

Rentals

Thank You

APARTMENTS: Spacious one-bedroom units, all utilities included.
Young or old. Need rental assistance
or not, we can house you. Just call 1800-481-6904 or stop in the lobby
and pick up an application. Gateway
36-tfc
Apartments, Kadoka.

Thank you to our Secret Santas
for the gift we received. We truly appreciate you thinking of us.

Business/Services
HILDEBRAND
STEEL & CONCRETE: Will do all your concrete
construction jobs. Call us and we will
give you a quote. Office 837-2621,
Rich’s cell 431-2226, toll free 877867-4185.
K45-tfn
WEST RIVER EXCAVATION: will do
all types of trenching, ditching and directional boring work. See Craig,
Diana, Sauntee or Heidi Coller,
Kadoka, SD, or call 605/837-2690.
Craig cell 390-8087, Sauntee cell
390-8604, email wrex@gwtc.net.
27-tfc
SEPTIC TANK PUMPING: Call 8372243 or contact Wendell Buxcel,
Kadoka, SD.
10-tfc
NEED A PLUMBER? Licensed
plumbing contractor for all your indoor plumbing and outdoor water
and sewer jobs call Dale Koehn 4411053 or leave a message at 8370112.
KP22-4tp
STATEWIDE CLASSIFIED: South
Dakota's best advertising buy! A 25word classified ad in each of the
states’ 150 daily and weekly newspapers. Your message reaches
375,000 households for just $150.00!
This newspaper can give you the
complete details. Call (605) 8372259.
tfc

Supplies

EMPLOYMENT
THE MOODY COUNTY ENTERPRISE, located in Flandreau, is
seeking an ambitious and talented
team player to fill the Editor position.
This position requires the ability to
work some nights and weekends,
strong writing and editing skills
along with solid photography skills.
Full benefit package available. Applicants interested in joining the
team at this terrific weekly newspaper should send cover letter, resume
and writing samples to: The Brookings Register, attn: William McMacken, PO Box 177, Brookings,
SD 57006 or email to bmcmacken@brookingsregister.com.
CUSTER REGIONAL HOSPITAL
has full-time RN opportunities available working in the beautiful southern Black Hills of SD. We are
located just a short distance from
Mount Rushmore, Wind Cave National Park, Custer State Park,
Jewel Cave National Park and many
other outdoor attractions. We offer
competitive salary and excellent
benefits. Please call 605-673-9418
for more information or log on to
www.regionalhealth.com to apply.
EOE.
IMMEDIATE OPENINGS: LPN’s &

Last
Vegas

Sudoku

PG-13
January
16-17-18-19
Anchorman II:
The Legend
Continues
PG-13

Fri: 8:00 p.m.
Sat: 8:00 p.m.
Mon: 7:00 p.m.
Sun: 1:30 p.m.
For updates on movies, call:

Larry & Karen Denny
2014 is here and as we reflected on
2013 we thought of all the people
that reached out and helped Eagle
Nest Life Center, in Wanblee, in so
many ways. It was such an honor to
once again be asked to deliver the
message under the tent at Alumni
Days and thank you for the generous
offering. The turn out for the taco
sale for the Youth Group mission trip
really surprised us and we felt bad
we ran out. We owe some of you a
taco!
Our True Grit Git Together, with
the help of the Interior Fire Dept., at
Interior, raised $500.00 for the
Rancher Relief Fund. Also, thanks to
all who helped with our many outreaches such as: Hee-Haw Night,
Camp Noah, Winter Survival Awareness Day, Harvest Festival, Thanksgiving
Outreach,
Christmas
Celebration and Feeding South
Dakota.
We appreciate your
prayers, support, encouraging words
and friendship. We are blessed here
at Eagle Nest Life Center. We look
forward to 2014.
How will God use us all to spread
His message of love and forgiveness
to a hurting world? Remember to
look up for your redemption draws
closer than ever before.
May God richly bless you in 2014!
Happy New Year from all of us at
Eagle Nest Life Center!
Gus and Terry Craven
Assemblies of God
US Missionaries to
Native Americans

Statewide Classifieds:

CITY OF PLATTE is seeking proposals from qualified firms to assist
City with designing, engineering and
constructing new Aquatic Facility for
community. Copy of request for proposals available by contacting City
of Platte, Shauna Meyerink Finance
Officer, 605-337-3921. Proposals
shall be returned to City Office on or
before February 3, 2014, at which
time review process will begin.

January
10-11-12-13

7

POSTER BOARD: White and colored at Kadoka Press.
tfc

South Dakota's best advertising buy! A 25-word classified ad in each of the states’
150 daily and weekly newspapers. Your message reaches 375,000 households for
just $150.00! This newspaper can give you the complete details.
Call (605) 837-2259.

BIDS/PROPOSALS

Farmers’
Income Tax
Record
Books
available
at the
Kadoka
Press

Kadoka Press - Thursday, January 9, 2014 -

Word Search

!

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"

Full- or Part-Time
Position
available at the
Kadoka Press

CNA’s, top weekly pay, direct deposit, & flexible schedules. Take
control of your schedule with TriState Nursing. Apply online today.
www.tristatenursing.com 800-7271912.

Duties include, but are not limited to:
•Helping produce newspaper weekly
•Photography
•Attendance at Meetings
•General Office Work

Buy • Rent
Sell • Trade
Giveaway

THE BROOKINGS REGISTER is
looking for an ambitious and talented individual to fill a news reporter position. Experience at a daily
newspaper preferred. This is an
hourly position with full benefit package. Any persons interested in joining the news department at an
award-winning daily newspaper
should send a cover letter and resume, along with professional writing samples to: Jill Fier, PO Box
177, Brookings SD 57006 or email
jfier@brookingsregister.com.

For application

ADVERTISE

call 837-2259 or 859-2516

In the Classifieds

Word Search Answers

LOG HOMES
DAKOTA LOG HOME Builders representing Golden Eagle Log Homes,
building in eastern, central, northwestern South & North Dakota.
Scott Connell, 605-530-2672, Craig
Connell, 605-264-5650, www.goldeneagleloghomes.com.
NOTICES
ADVERTISE IN NEWSPAPERS
statewide for only $150.00. Put the
South Dakota Statewide Classifieds
Network to work for you today! (25
words for $150. Each additional
word $5.) Call this newspaper or
800-658-3697 for details.
OTR DRIVERS
DRIVERS WANTED: CDL, owner
operators, freight from Midwest up
to 48 states, home regularly, newer
equipment, Health, 401K, call
Randy, A&A Express, 800-6583549.

Suduko Answers

605-837-2259

Winter Hours
Monday - CLOSED
Tuesday - Thursday
1 p.m. to 10 p.m.
Friday - Saturday
Noon to Midnight
Sunday
1 p.m. to 10 p.m.

344-2210

BELVIDERE BAR

Agriculture

8 - Thursday, January 9, 2014 - Kadoka Press

For $150, place your ad in 150
South Dakota daily & weekly
papers through the …

Winner Regional Extension Center

Bob Fanning, Plant Pathology Field Specialist 842-1267
Making it Work – Budgets,
Leases, Custom Work, etc.
A few recent office callers reinforced what agricultural producers know quite well; farming and
ranching is not for the weak of
heart.
One caller asked for land rental
rates in his area. My standard response to these requests are the
values found in the latest SD Ag
Statistics Service, “Cash Rents
Land
Values”:
and
http://www.nass.usda.gov/Statistics_by_State/South_Dakota/Publications/Cash_Rents_and_Land_
Values/index.asp, and the latest
version of the SDSU South
Dakota Farm Real Estate Survey:
http://igrow.org/up/resources/037007-2013.pdf. Of course these
calls generally involve some discussion and interpretation, and as
is often the case, the values in
these references are somewhat
lower than he was hearing. One
reason may be that the surveys
are done once each year, so the information can be over a year old.
In any event, increasing land
rents pose constant challenges to
farmers and ranchers as they try
to generate a profit.
The discussion also involved
share leases and what the “standard” arrangements are as he was
evaluating his options. SDSU Extension is often consulted for information on share leasing
arrangements of all kinds. Our
standard approach is obvious; the
parties need to determine what inputs each contribute, and share
the crop in the same percentage.
Inputs that are expected to increase yield are suggested to be
shared at the same percentage as
the crop as both parties stand to
benefit. Ideally both parties receive a reasonable return for their
efforts and investments. The
tricky part is assigning values to
each of those inputs that are
agreeable to both parties, and
that’s often where Extension
comes in.
This is also the time of year
when both Private and Commercial Pesticide Applicators either
complete their re-certification or
become certified for the first time.
Common reasons for people to become certified as Commercial Pesticide Applicators are to help pay
for a sprayer they recently bought,
or because they already own a
sprayer and feel they have time to
do some custom spraying to help
make ends meet. These same reasons are why most farmers and
ranchers do custom work; pay for
the machine, spread its cost over

more acres or hours, etc.
Although cattle prices have
been hovering at record levels, the
breakeven price has also been reported as high, and several of the
grain commodities have been declining from recent highs, all of
which challenge producers.
This is a bit of an advertisement, as SDSU Extension can be
a resource for producers striving
to make ends meet in challenging
times. Hopefully land rent surveys
reflect something close to what
rates in various are, not to affect
them but report what they were at
the time of the survey. Much of
the research at SDSU is conducted to address economic
thresholds of pests, return on investment to fertilizer and other inputs, etc., and can be helpful in
making important decisions. The
Economics Department generates
crop and livestock budgets, marketing information and other
profit generating tips. If we can be
of help, give us a call or stop in.

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Publications, Inc.

Kadoka
837-2259
Philip
859-2516
Murdo
669-2271
Wall
279-2565
Faith
967-2161
Bison
244-7199
New
Underwood
754-6466

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if we put it on
the radio.

Call 605•837•2259

Calendar
1/13/2014: PAT, 1:30 p.m.,
CST/12:30 MST, SDSU Extension
Centers in Winner, Pierre and
Lemmon, and the West River Ag
Center in Rapid City
1/17/2014: PAT, 1:00 p.m.,
MST, Library Community Room,
Martin, SD
1/28/2014: PAT, 1:00 p.m., CST,
Fire Hall, Presho, SD
2/5/2014: PAT, 1:00 p.m., CST,
Civic Center, Burke, SD
2/10/2014: PAT, 1:00 p.m., CST,
SDSU Extension Center, Winner,
SD

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