P. 1
Drama

Drama

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Published by Abhay Vohra
English Studies
English Studies

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Published by: Abhay Vohra on Jul 17, 2007
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08/26/2012

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Since in drama there is usually no narrator who tells us what is going on in
the story-world (except for narrator figures in the epic theatre and other
mediators, the audience has to gain information directly from what can be
seen and heard on stage. As far as the communication model for literary
texts is concerned (see Basic Concepts ch. 1.3.), it can be adapted for
communication in drama as follows:

Key terms:



communication
model drama
epic theatre
alienation effect
(estrangement effect)
chorus
perspective
dramatic irony

PLAY

STORY-WORLD

Character

author
of sec.
text

Character

reader of
secondary
text

Real
spectator

Real author

Code/Message

In comparison with narrative texts, the plane of narrator/narratee is left
out, except for plays which deliberately employ narrative elements.
Information can be conveyed both linguistically in the characters’ speech,
for example, or non-linguistically as in stage props, costumes, the stage set,
etc. Questions that arise in this context are: How much information is
given, how is it conveyed and whose perspective is adopted?

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