You are on page 1of 7

Carleene Bennett Professor: Dr. Ann Sebald EDSE 322: Habits of Mind Framework 5/26/13 Topic 1.

Cognitive Processing Beliefs and Values We believe it is important to know how a student's cognitive processing works and where challenges may exist in order to plan effective lessons and interventions to help him/her succeed. Research The field understands the importance of identifying an individual's cognitive profile in order to plan effective interventions in teaching. It is also important to know how cognitive processing works so we can help learners interpret and construct meaning. (See Raymond, 2004 from the EDSE 322 Class, Sebald, 2013) Instruction and Intervention: CONTENT (main components/curriculum & standards) The critical components involve how information is presented so that students can process, apply, and generalize the strategies. Cognitive processing is supported by many standards involving problem solving, reasoning, decision making, communication skills, “ability to receive and relay information clearly and effectively” (CDE, 2013), etc.

We can use cognitive processing tools and research to target challenges students may have with their information processing and to formulate individualized meta-cognition teaching strategies.

Experiences:

We have all used graphic organizers to help students with their cognitive processing through lessons at both the primary and secondary levels.

Topic 2. Cultural Diversity

Beliefs and Values

Research There are three levels of cultural awareness: overt, covert, and subtle. Overt cultural awareness is very obvious, outward appearance. Examples may be

The ultimate goal of understanding cultural diversity is to have explicit,

CONTENT (main components/curriculum & standards) We need to identify the overt, covert, and subtle components of our student’s culture and of our own culture. We need to know and understand our students’ cultures in

collaborative conversations and partnerships between families and professionals focused on the needs, strengths, preferences, and interests of the student.

clothes and accents. Covert cultural awareness includes differences that may not be immediately identifiable, such as religion or communication styles. Subtle cultural awareness is imbedded within an individual. These may include belief systems and underlying values that individuals may not even be aware of until challenges arise (University of Kanas, 2013).

order to create effective connections for our students. We also need to learn from discussions with and observations of our students and their families so we can make allowances, gain mutual respect, and be inclusive of their needs and viewpoints. Applicable standard: “World Languages, Standard 1: Communication in languages other than English” (CDE, 2013.)

Instruction and Intervention:

When planning instruction and interventions for students of varying cultural backgrounds, it is important to understand each student’s exposure and cultural biases regarding topics and curriculum. When planning interventions, it is important to consider the student’s culture, boundaries, and activities that may or may not be acceptable within his/her culture. It is also important not to make assumptions based on a student’s culture, but, rather, get to know the student and parents as individuals. Let students have a voice, and allow opportunities for them to express and showcase their culture and what is important to them as an individual. “Teachers must create a classroom culture where all students, regardless of their cultural and linguistic background, are welcomed and supported, and provided with the best opportunity to learn” (Richards, 2006). We have all experienced morning greetings in different languages – led by the students, cultural celebrations, and parent “show-and-tells” with cultural artifacts and traditions.

Experiences:

Topic

Beliefs and Values

Research

CONTENT (main components/curriculum & standards)

3. Classroom Management

In order to be successful in the classroom, a teacher must have a multitude of strategies in his/her toolbox for classroom management.

“The most important factor governing student learning is classroom management” (Wong, 1994).

    

Consistency and organization Manage the classroom, not discipline Set procedures and routines with clear and positive expectations Create a safe and community-centered learning environment Intentional regard for every student’s physical, cognitive, emotional, and cultural needs.

Empower students within the classroom – it is their classroom and community.

Instruction and Intervention:

Take time to set expectations and establish rules and routines the first day to save time and issues throughout the year. When issues arise, it is important to collect data surrounding the behavior. The data should identify the specific problem behavior, the setting(s) in which the behavior takes place, the duration of the behavior, and the intensity. Using this information, an intervention plan should be created, implemented, reflected upon, and adjusted as needed. Have an emergency behavior plan to address issues that need immediate response. This plan should include the safety and needs of all students and a specific action plan.

Experiences:

We have all been a part of collecting data for student behaviors and implementing behavioral plans that involve behavior charts and communication plans and tools.

Topic

Beliefs and Values

Research

CONTENT (main components/curriculum & standards)

4. SelfDetermination

We believe self-determination must be explicitly taught. It is essential to successful transitions throughout life, specifically into adulthood. In order to be successful as an adult, students need selfdetermination to know who they are including their abilities, their needs, and their preferences. Instruction and Intervention:

Research shows that fostering selfdetermination promotes choice making, develops self-advocacy, encourages risktaking, teaches problem-solving, goal setting, and planning, facilitates selfesteem, and helps individuals better understand and communicate their disabilities and the challenges and strengths they, as individuals, possess (Bremer, 2003).

The critical components of SelfDetermination include understanding your environment, knowing and valuing yourself, and then knowing how to use this in your environment and self-realization to plan, act upon that plan, and then comprehend and learn from the experiences and outcomes (Hoffman, 2004).

When planning instruction and interventions for students to achieve self-determination, it is important to understand a student’s culture, their individual values, priorities, and goals. In order to do this, we need to evaluate a student’s current performance, identify a need, determine a condition, establish an objective, and collaborate with the student, staff, and parents to formulate a plan. Once the plan has been agreed upon, we need to implement the plan, reflect and evaluate the outcomes, and then adjust if necessary (Sebald, 2013). One of the most common phrases we all use in our schools is, “use your words” when a student needs something but won’t vocalize it. We teach our students how and constantly encourage them, to advocate for themselves and their own individual needs with peers, teachers, and other acquaintances.

Experiences:

Topic 5. Transitions

Beliefs and Values The process of transition should enable the student to move successfully from school to postsecondary education and training, employment, independent living, and community participation based on the student's preferences, interests, and abilities.

Research Research shows that a positive and strong transition program builds selfregulation, empowerment, and selfrealization for people with disabilities who are entering adulthood. When working with families of different cultures, it is important to follow the four steps toward cultural reciprocity found within the Transition Coalition Module. These four steps are: 1. Identity imbedded professional cultural values, 2. Identify and recognize family values and differences, 3. Show respect for cultural differences and explain professional assumptions, 4. Collaborate to determine the best recommendation for the student (University of Kansas, 2013.)

CONTENT (main components/curriculum & standards)  Support students to be knowledgeable about and able to explain their strengths and needs (self-advocacy)    Involve students, when appropriate, in the transition process Measurable postsecondary goals Identify community or adult services that may assist the student in achieving post-school goals Standard: Develop and maintain the ongoing evaluation of factors that impact health, and modify lifestyle accordingly (CDE, 2013.)

Instruction and Intervention:

Steven Covey says to "begin with the end in mind." Teachers must plan instruction for students with post-secondary goals, life-skills and independent

living needs as a focus.
Experiences: We have all been a part of community-based outings in both primary and secondary settings to prepare students to be functional members of the community.

References: Bremer, C., Kachgal, M., & Schoeller, K. (April, 2003). NCSET Publications. Self-Determination: Supporting Successful Transition. Retrieved on May 11, 2013 from www.ncset.org/publications/viewdesc. Hall, T., Stragnman, N., & Meyer, A. (2009). Differentiated instruction and implications for UDL implementation. National Center on Accessible Instructional Materials. Retrieved Septermber 15, 2010. Hoffman, A., Field, S., & Sawilowksy, S. (2004). Self-Determination Assessment Battery User’s Guide. Self-Determination. College of Education Waynestate University. Retrieved on May 11, 2013 from http://www.ou.edu/content/dam/Education/documents. Richards, H., Brown, A., Forde, T. (2006). Addressing Diversity in Schools: Culturally Responsive Pedagogy. Retrieved on May 11, 2013 from http://www.nccrest.org/briefs/Diversity_Brief.pdf. Sebald, A. (2013). University of Northern Colorado. EDSE 322 Self-Determination Power Point. University of Kansas (2013). Transition Coalition. Secondary Transition and Cultural Diversity. Retrieved on May 11, 2013 from http://transitioncoalition.org/transition/module. Wang, M., Haertel, G., & Walberg, H. (1993-1994). “What Helps Students learn?” Educational Leadership, pp. 74-49.