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2. You must be an active or retired City or DWP employee.
3. You must be 18 years of age.
4. You must not have any outstanding balances on previous purchase programs.
PayCheck Direct is currently not available to LA County, State of CA, or LAUSD Club members.
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Your Purchases!
For More Information,
please contact:
Arlene Herrero
(800) 464-0452 x 103
aherrero@cityemployeesclub.com
Enroll today at CityEmployeesClub.com
New Club Beneft
PAYROLL DEDUCTED
No Interest & No Fees
The Club has joined forces with PayCheck Direct
to bring you affordable shopping through the
convenience of payroll deduction.
Buy brand name computers, appliances, TVs,
electronics, and thousands of products through
the ease of payroll deduction without any interest
payments or fees.
Member Eligibility:
1. You must be an active member of the Club in good standings with at least 6 months of payroll deduction.
2. You must be an active or retired City or DWP employee.
3. You must be 18 years of age.
4. You must not have any outstanding balances on previous purchase programs.
PayCheck Direct is currently not available to LA County, State of CA, or LAUSD Club members.
Los Angeles Firemens Relief Association Medical Plan may
cover this examination. Contact your plan provider to verify.
Paid Advertisement:
2 February 2014
February 2014 3
Follow us on Facebook
www.facebook.com/fremensgrapevine
Presidents Message ................................................................................05
Above and Beyond
HELICOPTER CREW MAKES RIVER RESCUE .......................................................07
Battalion News ..........................................................................................08
Retired Guys .............................................................................................31
Department in Action ................................................................................32
Station Fridge ...........................................................................................35
Retirement Dinner Announcement ............................................................36
Spark of Love Toy Drive
MAKING IT THE MOST WONDERFUL TIME OF THE YEAR ..................................37
Firefghters for Christ
RESPONDING TO THE PHILIPPINES ..................................................................38
LAFSD Handball
2013 FALL SINGLES RESULTS .....................................................................41
Fitness for Firefghters
ADAPTATION MAXIMIZING YOUR FITNESS POTENTIAL ..................................43
Mailbox .....................................................................................................44
Memorials .................................................................................................46
Affordable Care Act
HOW DOES IT AFFECT THE LAFRA MEDICAL PLAN ..........................................47
Task Force 102
THE FORCE THAT WAS ............................................................................48
Dollars & Sense
TRIED AND TRUE SAVINGS STRATEGIES ...........................................................51
LAFD History
THE SYLMAR TUNNEL EXPLOSION ...................................................................52
Minutes of the Board of Trustees ..............................................................55
Classifeds ................................................................................................59
CONTENTS
COPYRIGHT 2014
Los Angeles Firemens Relief Association.
No material may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher.
Notice: Production of The Firemens Grapevine magazine is very expensive, and while your dues
serve to underwrite a portion of the magazines costs, the bulk of funding comes from advertisers.
Many businesses advertise in the Grapevine. This does not mean that LAFRA endorses these
advertisers. Use of a Grapevine advertiser is at the risk of the member. If you are interested in any
of the advertisements, we urge you to use any and all means at your disposal to investigate them.
32
On the cover:
Structure Fire - Van Nuys
Photo by:
Mike Meadows
VOL. XC FEBRUARY 2014
NO. 07
4 February 2014
FIREMENS GRAPEVINE
owned and published by the
Los Angeles Firemens Relief Association
815 COLORADO BLVD, 4TH FLOOR, LOS ANGELES CA 90041
EDITORIAL STAFF
Dave Wagner Editor..........................................................editor@lafra.org
Juan-Carlos Snchez Project Coordinator................jcsanchez@lafra.org
Eric Santiago Creative Editor.....................................esantiago@lafra.org
David Vienna Web/Social Media Editor...........................dvienna@lafra.org
Display Advertising....................................(323) 259-5200 ext. 231, 232, 260
PSOs
KATHERINE MAIN, BRIAN HUMPHREY, ERIK SCOTT
CONTRIBUTING WRITERS
MIKE MASTRO, FRANK BORDEN, DAVID VIENNA,
JODY HOUSER, MICHAEL STEFANO, MONTE EGHERMAN, STEVE RUDA
PHOTOGRAPHERS
Ryan BaBRoff, DaviD BlaiRe, Doc DeMulle, GReG Doyle, HaRRy GaRvin,
STEVE GENTRY, JUAN GUERRA, BRIAN HAIMER, GAVIN KAUFMAN, RYAN LING, RICK MCCLURE,
MIKE MEADOWS, LLOYD PAYNE, JEFF ZIMMERMAN, YVONNE GRIFFIN, LAURA LICHTER.
LOS ANGELES FIREMENS RELIEF ASSOCIATION
JUAN ALBARRAN........................................................PRESIDENT
ROBERT STEINBACHER .......................................VICE-PRESIDENT
ANDREW KULJIS ........................................................SECRETARY
BOARD OF TRUSTEES
BARRY HEDBERG
CHRIS HART
CHRIS STINE
CRAIG WHITE
DAVID LOWE
DAVID ORTIZ
DAVID PETERS
DOAK SMITH
FRANK HERNANDEZ
GENE BEDNARCHIK
JAMES E. COBURN
JEFF CAWDREY
MARK AKAHOSHI
RICK GODINEZ
STEVE BERKERY
STEVE RUDA
STEVE TUFTS
STEVEN DOMANSKI
TIM LARSON
CHAPLAINS
GREG W. GIBSON...............SR. CHAPLAIN
DANNY LEON...........................CHAPLAIN
GEORGE A. NEGRETE...............CHAPLAIN
AQUIL F. BASHEER...................CHAPLAIN
TIM WERLE.............................CHAPLAIN
ROGER FOWBLE......................CHAPLAIN
HERSHY Z. TEN........................CHAPLAIN
RICK A. GODINEZ.....................CHAPLAIN
MARK R. WOOLF......................CHAPLAIN
JESUS PASOS..........................CHAPLAIN
CRAIG POULSON......................CHAPLAIN
TELEPHONES
FIRE-RELIEF ................................................................(323) 259-5200
RELIEF ASSOCIATION TOLL FREE NUMBER ...........................(800) 244-3439
RELIEF MEDICAL PLAN ..........................(866) 99LAFRA - (866) 995-2372
FAX NUMBER ................................................................(323) 259-5290
TODD LAYFER EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR...............................(323) 259-5243
MARLENE CASILLAS DEVELOPMENT & MARKETING DIRECTOR(323) 259-5217
BECKY VALVERDE HUMAN RESOURCES ADMINISTRATOR.......(323) 259-5247
TODD LAYFER CONTROLLER/TREASURER.........................(323) 259-5243
BOB DILLON OPERATIONS MANAGER................................(323) 259-5233
ANA SALAZAR MEMBER SERVICES COORDINATOR...............(323) 259-5223
LAFRA MANAGEMENT
HealthSCOPE Benefts
WAYNE SHERMAN MEDICAL CLAIMS MANAGER...................(323) 259-5211
THE FIREMENS GRAPEVINE (USPS 191-060) is published monthly by the Los Angeles Firemens
Relief Association, 815 Colorado Blvd. 4th Floor, Los Angeles, Cal i for nia 90041. Annual $24 Subscription
included with Association mem ber ship; Non-members: $36. Single issues $3 postpaid. Back issues $6
postpaid. Pe ri od i cals post age paid at Los Angeles, CA and at additional mailing offce. POST MAS TER: Send
ad dress changes to: THE FIREMENS GRAPE VINE Magazine, P.O. BOX 41903, Los An ge les, CA 90041.
Printed by Collective Color, Los Angeles CA. For Clas si fed and Display Ad ver tis ing rates please call (323)
259-5200, ext. 231, 232 or 260. All editorial matter must be received by the Editor eight weeks prior to the
month of pub li ca tion. The opin ions ex pressed here in are those of the writ ers and do not nec es sar i ly refect
the offcial views of the Los An ge les City Fire De part ment or the Los An ge les Firemens Relief Association.
February 2014 5
Some dates to remember:
LAFRA Scholarship deadline - April 1, 2014
Hook and Ladder Enduro - March 22, 2014
Corbin Bowling Event - April 27, 2014
LAFRA Pechanga Reunion - May 19-23, 2014
As a fnal reminder, please check
your LAFRA website for the most current in-
formation on all things pertinent to your or-
ganization. This includes death notices, event
scheduling and updates in LAFRA policies and
rates.
Thanks for your support.
Juan Albarran
(323) 259-5200
president@lafra.org
H
ere we are into what is the shortest
month of the year - so this will be brief.
We will take but a small amount of
your time and remind all of our LAFRA family
to make sure that all of the necessary beneficia-
ry designations are updated and in place. This
includes LAFRA, UFLAC, LARFPA, City of
Los Angeles and the Pension Department, just
to mention a few. Trust me when I tell you that
outdated beneficiary information has caused
a great deal of anguish for members over and
over again.
By the time this issue arrives we
will have a full month in the Affordable Care
Act rollout. You can rest assured that your Re-
lief Association is staying on top of the ever-
changing health coverage issues. Included in
this months Grapevine is a small but helpful
attachment to assist the membership in under-
standing the A.C.A. process. As a result of our
most recent open enrollment we are netting a
gain of approximately 80 new people to our
Medical Plan. If you are not currently enrolled
in the LAFRA Medical Plan, you can go to
www.lafra.org or talk to a LAFRA Trustee
about the signifcant benefts of our program.
In addition, there is a new class of 70
recruits that started on January 27, 2014. The
LAFRA staff made a presentation to the re-
cruits touting the benefts available to them as
members of this fne association. We are hope-
ful they will all sign up! This class is currently
at Drill Tower 81 and is scheduled to graduate
in June. This is going to provide some relief for
the feld in flling all those vacant positions.
The 7470 Figueroa building project
continues to move forward. We have owned the
building for just a short period of time. In that
time, we have selected the design frm Ware
Malcomb to design an interior that will be both
functional and esthetically pleasing. This frm
is currently working with the Trustees on the
Building Committee in going through the te-
dious but much needed planning process. The
plan is to move our operations into the new
building in the next 13 months or less.
Please remember to donate to the
Widows, Orphans and Disabled Firemens
Fund in your payroll deduction, or estate and
will preparation. As a gentle reminder, the As-
sociation has a lifetime beneft of $600.00 that
can be applied to the preparation or update of
your trust. It is through your generosity that we
can help others.
Transition of the gavel
Juan Albarran and Bob Steinbacher
are sworn-in by Andy Kuljis
6 February 2014
Paid Advertisement
February 2014 7
O
n January 22, 2010, the weather in
Los Angeles was dismal rainy and
cloudy. A 911 call indicated that a dog
was in distress in the Los Angeles River, and
that a member of the community was attempt-
ing to rescue the dog. The incident commander
requested a hoist rescue operation to retrieve
the animal from the swift-moving water in the
channel.
The rescue was performed by Pi-
lot Scott Bowman, Firefghter Dan Childs,
FF/PM Robert Steinbacher, and FF/PM Joe
St. Georges. The crew was dispatched to the
LA River near 20th Street where they found a
large dog in distress, unable to fnd its way out
of the water channel. The Departments Swift
Water Rescue Team had been unable to reach
the animal for a rescue attempt.
In addition to the terrible weather
conditions, the team encountered high-power
electrical lines in close proximity to the heli-
copters rotor system which added to the dif-
fculty and stress of the rescue attempt. Con-
siderations in this rescue included the bad
weather, rising water, increased water speed,
animal fatigue, and potential involvement of
a civilian. The incident commander wanted to
rescue the dog and keep the civilian safe.
FF/PM St. Georges was secured to
the hoist. When safety checks were completed,
FF Childs began lowering St. Georges from
Fire 4, while FF/PM Steinbacher maintained
situational awareness in and around the air-
craft, continually communicating information
to Pilot Bowman.
After the hoist cable had been ex-
tended approximately twenty feet below the
aircraft, the crew members advised Pilot Bow-
man that the dog had moved to the left side of
the channel, requiring the helicopter to repo-
sition to a less favorable area of the channel,
closer to the high-power wires and tower. St.
Georges was retracted back into the helicopter
and the aircraft was moved to the left side of
the channel.
Then a second rescue attempt was
initiated. Even with a rising water level and
increasing water speed, St. Georges was again
lowered. He knew he would have only one at-
tempt at the rescue. He quickly approached the
dog and applied the capture strap. Even with
the dog defending itself, sustaining an acute
traumatic injury and in extreme pain, St Georg-
es did not release the animal, but fnished ap-
plying the capture strap, securing the dog for
rescue.
FF Child retracted St. Georges and
the dog from the water channel, and Pilot Bow-
man short hauled the pair to awaiting LAFD
personnel on the 20th Street bridge. While they
were being lifted, another element of danger
was added. The
normal position
of the rescuer
and victim at-
tached to the
hoist and cap-
ture strap is
at a vertical
attitude, with
a ground tether line to prevent the rescuer
and victim from spinning. In this case, due to
the dynamics of the capture, St. Georges was
forced to maintain a horizontal position, with
no tether line, during the hoist retraction. Thus,
he and the dog spun in an uncontrolled rotation
until they were grounded on the bridge.
Once the dog was handed off to
LAFD personnel, FF/PM St. Georges injury
was evaluated and he was transported for medi-
cal treatment.
Watching a dog drown or leaving
a rescue in the hands of an untrained civilian
are not options to those who are sworn to save
lives. The crew of Fire 4 placed themselves in a
dangerous situation to save the life of a family
dog named Vernon.
The crew of Fire 4 earned the Medal of Merit: L to R: Pilot Scott Bowman,
FF Dan Childs, FF/PM Joe St. Georges, FF/PM Robert Steinbacher
8 February 2014
Christmas Day was all family at Fire Station 3.
Photos by Adam VanGerpen,
The Los Angeles Firefghter
On New Years Day, Engine 17 members
investigated a loom up and found a com-
mercial building on fre at 1513 Marisol
Street in Boyle Heights.
Photos by Yvonne Griffn
February 2014 9
10 February 2014
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February 2014 11
Firefghters battled a fre at a
Loyola Marymount University
dormitory on 12/07/13.
Photo by Yvonne Griffn
On 12/10/13 companies re-
sponded to a greater alarm
outside fre in 56s frst-in.
Photo by Nick Colbert
12 February 2014
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February 2014 13
Fire Boats 2 and 3 on a diver
training day in December.
Photos by Greg Doyle
14 February 2014
On 12/23/13, Battalion 10 frefghters
found a single family dwelling with a well
involved attic fre at 5309 Lemona Ave.
Photos by Mike Meadows
A multi-car traffc/physical rescue took place
on the S/B 405 at Sherman Way on 12/04/13.
Photo by Mike Meadows
February 2014 15
On 12/16/13 frefghters responded
to fve sets along the 210 Freeway
from Sunland Bl to Polk St.
Photo by Mike Meadows
Companies worked a fatal T/A at
Roscoe and Balboa on 12/30/2013.
Photo by Juan Guerra,
juanguerra.smugmug.com
Recently, the Fire Captains promo-
tional list was posted. Several members of Bat-
talion 11 took the test and should make Captain
during the life of the list. A few did well enough
to get promoted on the frst day! Congratula-
tions to all of them.
Remember that the process is not
over until AFTER the 3-whole score interview.
And then the hard part starts . . .
Speaking of new Captains, over at
Fire Station 20, a new day has dawned. The
newly promoted Capt. II came into this assign-
ment wanting to make a name for himself. You
know, to give something back to the assign-
ment . . .
Well most Captains think about train-
ing their subordinates to a fne point, making
them a wanted commodity in the Battalion.
This new Captain is not like most Captains
though, he is a graduate of the department
sponsored Leadership Academy!
One Captain that never attended the
Leadership Academy was Captain John Peter-
son. Capt. Pete retired out of 20s in 1999 and
died of cancer in 2003. The members at 20s
decided to honor Capt. Petes time there by
leaving his voice on the stations voice mail
system a way to keep his legacy alive indef-
nitely (indefnitely is approximately 15 years).
Yes, you guessed right. Our new sta-
tion commander felt he had a better voice than
Capt. Pete, so he erased the OLD voice mes-
sage and replaced it with his new and improved
version. So much for legacy . . .
OK, send me your stories and photos
and I will get them in print (maybe)
Eyeonbatt11@yahoo.com
16 February 2014
February 2014 17
Battalion 12 companies assisted the
County and U.S.F.S on a single family
dwelling blaze at 12449 Trail 4.
Photos by Steve Gentry
Firefghters from Battalion 12 work a
brush fre along the 405 Fwy at the 118
Fwy on 1/12/14.
Photos by Greg Doyle
18 February 2014
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Paid Advertisement:
February 2014 19
A small plane went down on approach to Whiteman Airport on 12/28/13.
Photos by Jeff Zimmerman & Mike Meadows
Companies handle a physical
rescue on 12/29/2013.
Photo by Nick Colbert
20 February 2014
February 2014 21
Greetings from the Battalion that
never sleeps!
Well I hope everybody had a Merry
Christmas and a Happy New Year. I know
that Santa probably brought you everything
that you wished for, especially if you were
nice. On the other hand, looks like he had his
naughty list really honed in on some of you
and he may have delivered you recalls, assign
hires, an 800 segment, and a pre-deploy on
Christmas Day. Im looking forward to the
new year and curious about the challenges we
as a department are going to face. As long as
we stick together, we can handle anything!
December brought a few cold days,
a bunch of warm days, a few light wind days,
and even fewer high wind days. Along with
any type of wind is always the Red Flag
scare . . . I mean plan. I realize that some of
our biggest confagrations like the Bel-Air Fire
have happened during the cold winter months,
but they also had 35 MPH winds. So why then
are we Pre-Deploying on a 48 degree day
with winds that are 15 MPH? I understand
with our recent past that weve got to able to
say that weve got a plan, but cmon. Check
box for politics=1 - Common sense=0. Some
other great plans that have really made an
impact, include but are not limited to: Quick
Launch, the Tsunami Evacuation Route, and
the Command Post Company. Check box
for politics=4 - common sense=still 0. Also, if
its so important that we have these companies
out in other areas of the City for Pre-Deploy-
ment then why some days are we disbanding
the supervise-able companies at 2000 hours
(Engine Companies and Strike Teams) yet
keeping the supervisors (B.C.s and E.I.T.s)
for a full 24? Hmmm. So all the WORKERS
that will be doing the WORK just in-case
something breaks out in these other areas of
the City go back to their normal assignments,
and the 400 Series Engines go home for the
night, but the extra B.C.s and E.I.T.s are kept
to supervise . . . each other? Luckily, we are
not in an offce setting because that would be
like sending all the employees home at lunch
and having all the managers walk around the
offce until the normal closing time . . . Just
sayin.
Along with the Pre-Deploys dur-
ing the low-wind and heat season this year
also come some new surprises. Almost like
presents, they arrived sneakily and during the
night. Now the gift that always arrives during
the holidays more than any other time is the
Assign Hire. Its like the $5 bill that you get
from your grandmother every year since you
were old enough to remember. Always expect-
ed but if it wasnt there youd wonder what
happened to it and wonder what happened
to the old department. Dare I say that you
might miss it . . . or not. Now the new gift this
year was the Recall. Previously, this was a
gift given during very important times like an
earthquake or Civil Unrest, but now its lost
its pizzazz, and is given on a random Tuesday
in December. This might be like getting $10,
but like a $5 bill, three $1s, four quarters, fve
dimes, two nickels, and 40 pennies . . . ok, ok
you get the point. So, what did management
do to make it special again? Thats right, they
combined them to form the almighty Assign
Hire Recall(insert loud echoing voice). This
gift is like $10 but in Italian Lira. (For those
that dont know, the Lira is no longer a curren-
cy in Italy. It is now the Euro.) The decision
making minds came up with a brilliant plan
to allow (force) some members to work ei-
ther the AM or PM on Christmas Eve or Day.
Wow, what a great option! If you were a C
shifter that fnally had both days off, you got
the Lira or if you were assigned to work one
of the days then you were recalled and you
also got the Lira. Seems like everybody got
the Lira . . . well almost everybody. Luckily,
all the members that have the opportunity to
work SOD in the feld also had the opportunity
to be Assign Hire Recalled . . . oh wait, no
they didnt . . . some of the Inspectors and
special duty members that
take the option to work
SOD out in the feld when
it works for them, decided
that this doesnt affect
them and got to spend
time with their families.
Also, to the decision
makers that put this policy
into effect, Thank You for
stepping up and working
one of those spots, either
up or down. Its nice to
see that you were able to
add a bit of relief to the
crews out in the feld . . .
oh wait, you didnt work
an AM or PM on a major
holiday and instead you
were at home not at all
affected by the Assign
Hires, Recalls, or Assign
Hire Recalls. Fortunately,
we were able to staff
all of our apparatus and
serve the citizens of Los
Angeles in the great
manner that we always
do. Unfortunately, some
who had already given a
ton to this department had
to give a bit more. Even
when it wasnt their turn
in the barrel, they had to
take someone elses turn
in the barrel. A very sincere THANK YOU
goes out to all the members that stepped up
and missed their kids, signifcant others, pets,
etc during this holiday season. Id like to say
that next Holiday Season will be better, but
who knows (No Lira were harmed in the typ-
ing of this article).
Over at 46s, one of the crews
decided to make the best of the start of winter
months and held the inaugural FS 46 C-Shift
Chili Cook Off or FSFSCSCCO for short.
As with any good Chili Cook Off, there
were rules (some of which werent followed)
and score sheets to fll out. On the Offcial
Score Sheet there was a 1-5 score given
for categories such as: Authenticity, Thick-
ness, Spiciness, Flavor, and Appearance - all
the necessities of any good FSFSCSCCO.
Since there was no Originality category, one
member even made his families secret White
Bean Chicken Chili which apparently can
also be seen in cookbooks under the recipe
for Chicken Tortilla Soup. While it lacked
Authenticity, Thickness, and Appearance, it
still had good Flavor, but his score was still
much lower. For 7-out-of-10 shifts these
Cast-Iron-Stomached-Heroes trudged through
Chili-after-Chili. While their bellies took a
beating, Im sure the residents whose homes
they responded to, the small confned dorms,
22 February 2014
These include:
The Leo K. Najarian Memorial Scholarship of $5,000
The Bill Goss Scholarship of $2,500
Relief Scholarship awards of $2,500
Memorial Scholarship of $5,000
Complete online application at
www.lafra.org/scholarships
Each year your Relief Association awards
college scholarships to member dependents.
S CHOL A R S HI P S
Scholarship Dates & Deadlines
Deadline March 28, 2014
Application evaluation & testing April 12, 2014
Winners announced June 2, 2014
Questions? Email: scholarship@lafra.org
February 2014 23
These include:
The Leo K. Najarian Memorial Scholarship of $5,000
The Bill Goss Scholarship of $2,500
Relief Scholarship awards of $2,500
Memorial Scholarship of $5,000
Complete online application at
www.lafra.org/scholarships
Each year your Relief Association awards
college scholarships to member dependents.
S CHOL A R S HI P S
Scholarship Dates & Deadlines
Deadline March 28, 2014
Application evaluation & testing April 12, 2014
Winners announced June 2, 2014
Questions? Email: scholarship@lafra.org
and their loving families the next mornings
took as-much-or-more-of a punishment. In the
end, after much verbal abuse and ribbing, the
trophy was handed out, and the new champ
was crowned for the 2013 Best/Worst Chili/
Chicken Tortilla Soup Competition. Congrat-
ulations FF Hammond and good luck to those
of you looking to dethrone the current winner.
All I can recommend is to start preparing now
for next years FSFSCSCCO!
Finally, over at FS 64 they had a
few vacancies that needed to be flled on both
Christmas Eve and Christmas Day. Luckily for
them, they had a newly promoted Captain II
that was there to step up and help the depart-
ment in a critical role. You see, one of the
vacancies to fll was the Captain II spot on the
truck, and since he was normally assigned to
the A shift and had worked Christmas Eve,
then it only made sense to work the next day
also. Sure enough, he did work the next day
. . . as an E.I.T. driving an A/C. Yes, while an
out-of-house Captain II was forced to work the
AM of Christmas at FS 64 on this Captain IIs
truck, and another out-of-house Captain II was
forced to work the PM at FS 64 also on this
Captain IIs truck, this Captain II was working
as an E.I.T. and driving an LAFD Assistant
Chief . . . Wow! Now that is a great leadership
decision for an offcer of the LAFD to make.
I guess taking care of your own station is no
longer a priority, and its now just taking care
of yourself. Good thing there arent any future
Captains that recently took a Captains test
and are now watching how they should be
acting in the future with their own command.
Good thing there arent any FFs, Engineers,
and A/Os that watch what our offcers do,
so they have something to model their own
Locker-room Leadership style after. With
the new policies sent down about working
out-of-rank and so-forth, at least Captain Hill
was previously a Staff Assistant so he was
qualifed in that spot. Im also glad to see
that an A/C had an E.I.T. for Christmas Day.
Otherwise it could get really dicey driving
a suburban around to get lunch . . . oh wait,
theres a whole bunch of B/Cs that do it daily,
let alone Christmas Day. I guess that old say-
ing, Whats good for the goose . . . is really
only good for the goose. The rest of you are
on your own. Thats the story I heard . . .
With this New Year comes time for
some New Years Resolutions. Things that you
may want to achieve or do to hopefully make
you a better person. I was trying to come up
with some and if you havent got any of your
own by the time this comes out in late January,
feel free to borrow some of mine: 1) Keep
taking care of one another. 2) Remember that
2+2 makes sense. 3) Play Nice. 4) Know your
audience. 5) Figure out which Formula to use
before the media gets ahold of it. 6) You get
out what you put in. 7) If you need to FI-1.
8) Read the label. 9) If youre tired, sleep in.
10) When in need of a driver, call an already
overworked 800 to do your job. 11) Watch
out for irony. 12) Dont fumble Tradition. 13)
Take 1st relief so you can go back to sleep.
14) Never, and I repeat, Never Stand By. 15)
Check boxes for politics always beat Common
Sense. 16) When you have the opportunity to
do the right thing, take the E.I.T. spot instead.
Oh and fnally 17) Keep sending your stories
to wattsfre@gmail.com
Thats all Ive got!
Task Force 66 overhauls
a structure fre at 6035
3rd Ave on 1/5/14.
Photo by Yvonne Griffn
FS 64-A Christmas party
Chili time at FS 46
24 February 2014
Engine 46 extinguished this
rubbish fre on 12/29/13.
Photo by Nick Colbert
LAFD and County Fire
handle a structure fre
on New Years Eve
Photos by Nick Colbert
February 2014 25
40 frefghters responded to
a blaze in the 12900 block of
Landale Street on 12/13/13.
Photos by Juan Guerra,
juanguerra.smugmug.com
Members from Engine 102
work to extinguish an auto fre
on Fulton Ave n/o Victory Blvd
Photo by Rick McClure, EPN
Engine 89 extinguished an auto
at 13136 Sherman Way in the
early morning of January 1st
Photo by Jeffery Geller
26 February 2014
Companies handle an auto vs
gas pump at Balboa Bl and
Lassen St on 12/7/13.
Photo by Adam VanGerpen,
The Los Angeles Firefghter
On December 6, 2013, Battalion 15 frefghters extin-
guished a fre in a commercial building on Lassen Street.
Photos by Adam VanGerpen, The Los Angeles Firefghter
February 2014 27
Hello everyone. Hope you had a
great holiday season with your family and
youre in good health.
Lets get started with some news
from 61s. Whats worse - loading your hose
bed or losing your hose bed? Okay, youre on
a move up to 97s. Its a great looking day
youre not cooking, good stuff right? Wrong!
Things start to go bad as the rig is backing into
quarters at 97s you notice that the 4 hose is
GONE. And the 4-Way too!! You think Oh
shucks for lack of a better word. The business
phone rings and you start to think what are
you gonna tell the chief, but its 61s asking
are you missing some equipment? YES WE
ARE!!!! Okay, I know we wear the earphones
for noise protection and communication, but
holy cow! Or what about a weight change that
had to be about 2000 lbs. when all that hit the
ground. When a civilian calls 911, the member
down at Metro who has probably heard it all
couldnt believe his or her ears. Now if you
know Engineer Czubek, it couldnt have hap-
pen to a nicer guy, really, I mean it.
Battalion 17 companies han-
dled a fatal T/A at Ventura Bl
and Vanalden on 12/16/2013.
Photo by Rick McClure, EPN
Now whos gonna buy cream for
this? Well, lets hope its not Ray Topete,
cause when hes late to work, it seems hell
bring two day old pan dulce for the guys.
Cmon Ray theres a donut shop right across
the street from 61s. Im just saying.
One more story from 61s, Captain
Durso has retired from the department after
33 years on the job. John that mustache hasnt
changed in 33 years except it got GREY, no
WHITE. Congratulations John, enjoy your
life.
Where were you when the new Cap-
tains list came out? I was working, and I was
happy to see the Battalion did pretty good.
Purma? Really, okay congrats dude.
Story outta 43s - Engineer John
Balich is retiring in February after 35 years on
Breakfast celebration for Stu
Premmer at FS 43 on 12/7/13
28 February 2014
Paid Advertisements:
February 2014 29
Send your stories and photos directly to you Battalion News writer
or to the editor at editor@lafra.org
the job. John has been a loyal member to this
department and his presence will be missed.
Congratulations John and enjoy your life. Also
outta 43s the question is What side of the
pike pole do you use? Im just asking?
On December 7, 2013 at Fire Station
43, there was a celebration for retired member
Stu Premmer. Some of you may not know but
our friend Stu is in a battle for his life with a
deadly disease. It was a very special day for
many people who came to 43s for the pan-
cake breakfast. It was a GREAT turnout for a
GREAT person. About 300 people stopped by
to say hi and thanks to a person that left a last-
ing impression on the many people he came in
contact with. 43s was very happy to host this
event for Stu and his family. A special thank
you goes to UFLAC, The Relief Association,
Stentorians, The LAFD Historical Society,
11s, 43s, 58s, 61s, 94s, Battalion 18, and to
the Breakfast Group that has a group break-
fast every month. Theyve been trying to get
Stu to come with them, so they came to him.
There are many more people, organizations,
and businesses to thank but I cant remember
them all (Im old).
Many chief offcers, captains, A/Os,
and frefghters that have passed through 58s
and who were infuenced by Engineer Prem-
mer, came through that morning, and even a
couple of mechanics that worked on Stus rigs
came by to say hi.
For those of you who couldnt make
it, just ask somebody. Stu wasnt the only
one crying in the house. Thank you all who
attended. It was very, very special.
Be safe out there
Batt18news@yahoo.com
Companies extinguished a blaze in
a commercial building on Crenshaw
Bl on Christmas Day.
Photo by Yvonne Griffn
Firefghters battled a structure fre at
1843 Dunsmuir Ave on 12/19/13.
Photo by Yvonne Griffn
30 February 2014
Check out LAFRA.ORG for more details on the above.
SAVE YOUR HOTEL SPOT! SAVE YOUR SPACE!
SAVE THE DATE!
ACTIVITY GUIDE
RV SPOTS AVAILABLE - RESERVE YOURS by
calling Pechanga R.V. Resort (877) 997-8386
:: Resort/Hotel reservation call (888) 732-4264
:: For other Hotels call (323) 259-5202
Monday, May 19, 2014 @ 2PM (check-in) to Friday, May 23, 2014 @ 12PM (check-out)
MONDAY - MAY 19th
:: Check in & catch up with old friends
:: Reception Get-Together - Beer & Wine (Provided)
TUESDAY - MAY 20th
:: Pizza Dinner / Wine & Beer (Provided) - Time: 5PM
at Pechanga RV Clubhouse
:: Organization Reps at Clubhouse - 10am-4pm
WEDNESDAY - MAY 21st
:: Dinner / Wine & Beer (Provided) - Time: 5PM
at Pechanga RV Clubhouse
:: Organization Reps at Clubhouse - 10am-4pm
:: Wine Trolly Tour - Time: TBA
$85 per person
For information email sdomanski@lafra.org
THURSDAY - MAY 22nd
:: Gathering at THE BUFFETT at Pechanga Hotel
- Time: 6pm
$30 per person
:: Golf Journey at Pechanga - Price/Time: TBA

FRI DAY - MAY 23rd
:: Check out! Till next time...
February 2014 31
M
y wife and I dined at our favorite
Italian restaurant in Las Vegas the
other night. Its just a hole-in-the-
wall place but the food is fantastic. After pig-
gin out on garlic bread and wine, the waiter
brought our food and asked if we wanted some
aged parmesan cheese grated over our plates.
My wife declined but I didnt. This block of
cheese was about the size of brick and about as
heavy. About the time my meal was completely
covered with cheese, a large corner of the block
fell off into my plate. I attempted to give it back
but the waiter stated that, By state law, once
the cheese hits your plate, its yours. Of course
he also mentioned that the piece that broke off
was worth about $25, but gave me his blessins
and said, Enjoy! Ever had extra SHARP par-
mesan cheese? Well, take it from me, its bet-
ter than passin gas on a crowded MTA bus. I
think two of my heart valves temporarily went
into emergency shutdown mode, but I im-
mediately downed another glass of vino and
that seemed to solve the problem. Oh yea, that
cheese was worth the near death experience.
Theres no shortage of entertain-
ment in Las Vegas, especially the folks you see
walkin from casino to casino. And theres also
no shortage of homeless folks, who provide ex-
tra entertainment by beatin on drums, playin
guitars or just singin as you approach the vari-
ous hotel entrances. I think their thought is to
get a few bucks outta you before you enter the
casino, or to try to make you feel guilty that
your money is better spent on them.
Well, I didnt fall for that guilty
trick because I came to the frightenin realiza-
tion that my wife hadnt bought any jewelry or
handbags in a month. What would happen if
a new sparklin diamond ring or Louis Vitton
handbag caught her eye and all I had to show
her was an empty money clip? Id have some
serious explainin to do!
COWBOY HUMOR
With a very se-
ductive voice a wife asked
her husband, Have you
ever seen twenty dollars
all crumpled up?
No, said her
husband.
She gave him a sexy smile and re-
moved a crumpled twenty dollar bill from her
jeans pocket. He took the crumpled twenty dol-
lars and smiled approvingly.
She then asked, Have you ever seen
ffty dollars all crumpled up?
No, I havent, he said, with an anx-
ious tone in his voice.
She gave him another sexy smile and
pulled a crumpled 50 dollar bill from her other
jean pocket. He took the crumpled ffty dollar
bill and started breathin a little quicker with
anticipation.
Now, she said, Have you ever
seen thirty thousand dollars all crumpled up?
No way, he said becomin even
more aroused and excited to which she replied,
Go look in the garage.

KEEP SMILIN!
AC
choppedup@att.net
A portion of fre-related
jewelry profts donated to
the Widows, Or phans and
Disabled Firemens Fund.
Paid Advertisement:
Retired guys breakfast in
Thousand Oaks in January
Check out LAFRA.ORG for more details on the above.
SAVE YOUR HOTEL SPOT! SAVE YOUR SPACE!
SAVE THE DATE!
ACTIVITY GUIDE
RV SPOTS AVAILABLE - RESERVE YOURS by
calling Pechanga R.V. Resort (877) 997-8386
:: Resort/Hotel reservation call (888) 732-4264
:: For other Hotels call (323) 259-5202
Monday, May 19, 2014 @ 2PM (check-in) to Friday, May 23, 2014 @ 12PM (check-out)
MONDAY - MAY 19th
:: Check in & catch up with old friends
:: Reception Get-Together - Beer & Wine (Provided)
TUESDAY - MAY 20th
:: Pizza Dinner / Wine & Beer (Provided) - Time: 5PM
at Pechanga RV Clubhouse
:: Organization Reps at Clubhouse - 10am-4pm
WEDNESDAY - MAY 21st
:: Dinner / Wine & Beer (Provided) - Time: 5PM
at Pechanga RV Clubhouse
:: Organization Reps at Clubhouse - 10am-4pm
:: Wine Trolly Tour - Time: TBA
$85 per person
For information email sdomanski@lafra.org
THURSDAY - MAY 22nd
:: Gathering at THE BUFFETT at Pechanga Hotel
- Time: 6pm
$30 per person
:: Golf Journey at Pechanga - Price/Time: TBA

FRI DAY - MAY 23rd
:: Check out! Till next time...
32 February 2014
APARTMENT HOUSE FIRE
EAST HOLLYWOOD
Photos by Steve Gentry and Bernie Deyo
Firefghters were dispatched on
January 3, 2014 to 719 North Heliotrope
Drive for an explosion that damaged a three-
story apartment building, sending one man
to the hospital and displacing eighteen of his
neighbors.
It took the combined efforts of 57
LAFD personnel, who performed a thorough
search of the two dozen apartment units on
three foors while simultaneously battling
a stubborn fre in one second foor unit fed
by a natural gas line, to fully extinguish the
fames in just 26 minutes.
Monetary loss from the incident, which
signifcantly damaged one or more apart-
ments in the 90 year old building, is es-
timated to be at least $85,000 ($75,000
structure & $10,000 contents).
February 2014 33
STRUCTURE FIRE
LOS ANGELES
Photos by Dan Flynn
On December 9, 2013, Engine 25 was frst-in at a structure fre
in their district. Firefghters rescued a terrier and brought it out for the
medics to resuscitate using the canine oxygen mask. The owner lost two
other dogs in the fre.
34 February 2014
STRUCTURE FIRE
VAN NUYS
Photos by Mike Meadows
It took the combined effort of
96 frefghters nearly 45 minutes to ex-
tinguish a fre in a vacant private school
building on December 7, 2013.
Fire loss was not estimable, as
the heavily damaged building was soon
to be demolished. The cause of the blaze
was described as accidental, and at-
tributed to a transients warming fre in
the once-homes vestigial freplace, that
quickly engulfed the large attic.
February 2014 35
36 February 2014
Paid Advertisements:
JOHN HOLTBY, Captain, FS 93-B
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 05, 2014
Braemar Country Club
4001 Reseda Blvd, Tarzana CA
Social Hour: 6:00 PM Dinner: 7:00 PM
Menu: Chicken or Pot Roast - $55 includes tax, tip & gift
Call FS 93 - (818) 756-8693
RSVP by February 24, 2014
GREG GIBSON, Battalion Chief, Batt. 1-A
TUESDAY, MARCH 11, 2014
Odyssey Restaurant
15600 Odyssey Drive, Granada Hills CA
Social Hour: 6:00 PM Dinner: 7:00 PM
Menu: Buffet Style Dinner - $60 includes tax, tip & gift
Call FS 4 - (213) 485-6204 or Battalion 1 Offce - (213) 485-6271
RSVP by March 4, 2014
February 2014 37
T
he Friday after Thanksgiving of-
ficially marks the opening of the
LAFD Toy Program, which runs for
six weeks. LA City is the lead agency
for all of Los Angeles, Ventura, Or-
ange, San Bernardino
and Riverside coun-
ties. Even toys do-
nated through sites set
up by ABC7 are filtered
through Toy Central, the
drill floor at Frank Hotchkin
Memorial Training Center.
According to Program Coordi-
nator Mike Marquez, The
cadets are the ones that
make this thing work.
Some of them are here for
hundreds of hours each.
They come from Posts
27, 94, Crew 3, 12, and
64, just to name a few.
Every toy that comes through Toy Central must be counted,
sorted, allocated and distributed. Its a huge warehouse type operation
with very intricate logistics. After the cadets sort the toys, they are al-
located to more than 700 certifed charitable organizations. The toys are
transported to the closest fre station to the requesting organization for
distribution by the frefghters there.
The success of the program each year can be attributed to all of
the hard work from all of the wonderful volunteers, as well as the media
partnerships. KABC TVs Spark of Love campaign is an invaluable
resource for getting the word out to the community.
The crew from FS 9-A at the LAFD
Toy Drive Christmas Party.
38 February 2014
O
n November 8, 2013, Typhoon Hai-
yan (called Yolanda in the Philippines)
made landfall in this nation of over
7100 islands. It unleashed its fury with sus-
tained wind speeds of 165 mph and one-minute
gusts nearing 200 mph. It was the strongest
storm recorded at landfall, unofficially the
strongest typhoon ever in terms of wind speed
and the deadliest Philippine typhoon on record.
16 million people were affected, 6 million dis-
placed, 1.9 million left homeless and more than
7,000 confirmed dead. Five of those who died
were firefighters from the National Bureau of
Fire Protection, who were engaged in life sav-
ing efforts when they were washed away in
the 20 storm surge. Unfortunately, in todays
fast-paced media and the constant overload of
reality TV this event is now all but forgot-
ten. However, the lives of countless Filipinos
are still struggling to get their feet back on the
ground and their lives back to normal.
In the aftermath of this storm all
communication links were down in the affect-
ed areas and it took time for video clips and
images to begin to emerge depicting the wide-
spread damage. It wasnt until days afterwards
that I began to realize the signifcance of this
event and felt the urge to go. Our Emergency
Relief Team coordinator began sending out
emails and making calls looking for volunteers
as well as an in-country contact. A team of six
Firefghters For Christ volunteers was eventu-
ally formed with representatives from Arizona,
Nevada, Texas, and the LAFD (Ron Price, Luis
Carlos and me). Our destination was Tacloban
to assist a ministry called Kids International
Ministry (KIM). Their primary ministry (in
Manila) is to prevent human traffcking and
getting at-risk youth off the streets, but follow-
ing the typhoon they were coordinating various
relief efforts in Tacloban. We thought our mis-
sion would be salvage and reconstruction, but
our plans changed during a layover in Manila.
After 17 hours aboard two planes, our third and
fnal leg should have been a quick two-hour
hop to Tacloban, but this airline would not al-
low our 1,000 pounds of gear to go with us. We
could not leave it behind and were forced to
forfeit our tickets.
Flexibility remains the key in all mis-
sion trips and we often refer to a scripture that
says, A mans heart plans his way, but The
LORD directs his steps. (Proverbs 16:9) After
prayer for direction, we soon met a Cebu City
frefghter in the airport. Some phone calls were
made, and a few hours later three fre depart-
ment vehicles arrived to take us back to their
headquarters . . . two hours away. We learned
that the Bureau of Fire Protection (BFP) is a
national fre service with over 17,000 members.
They are a paid department and stress formal
education, requiring applicants to have at least
a four-year college degree. We were picked up
because the Fire Chief wanted to meet with us.
We were met at their national headquarters by
a 100-member recruit class lined up standing at
attention. They greeted us by singing the Fire-
mans Prayer. Well . . . Ive seen it written on
plaques, and have read it elsewhere, but never
heard it sung before. It was amazing to hear,
but sad to think that this would never happen in
the good old Land of the Free. The Fire Chief
and his staff treated us just short of royalty.
They greeted us in dress uniforms, fed us, gave
us gifts, put us up in a hotel, gave us a tour of
their training center (700 recruits currently in
training), and eventually arranged for our mili-
tary C-130 fight to Tacloban. Luis and I got to
spend our 33-year anniversary on the LAFD in
the back of a C-130 enroute to Tacloban.
At the Tacloban airport we were
again greeted by some BFP personnel, who
drove us to their central station. When we f-
nally met with the KIM representative, he said
that instead of salvage/construction at one of
their ministries, he had planned for us to work
February 2014 39
Paid Advertisement:
with the BFP doing body retrievals. This is
gruesome work that the BFP has been tasked
with since the disaster and their personnel were
really in need of some relief and encourage-
ment. Retrievals have only gotten worse since
the typhoon. The easy pickins have already
been cleared away and now most bodies are
entangled in huge debris piles (the remains
of light construction blown apart and foated
ashore). Retrievals are now less in volume, but
more diffcult in terms of entanglement and ex-
traction and obviously in more advanced stages
of decay.
Our frst assignment was the most
diffcult. This body had been identifed by
family members much earlier, but previous at-
tempts by the BFP proved unsuccessful (their
tool cache was very limited). It was under a
large ship, about 300 feet in length that had
washed ashore. The debris feld it was resting
on was a mixture of wood, metal, and other
debris and was highly compacted. It required
considerable cutting to free the body intact,
but was much appreciated by the family who
watched. It helped bring some closure to their
loss. The chainsaw and cordless reciprocating
saws we used, along with a portable generator,
water fltration kits, and other miscellaneous
tools, were part of our cargo that we later do-
nated to our BFP hosts.
We averaged about 6-7 body retriev-
als per day - no need to discuss the details. I
would have never guessed that an FFC mission
trip would focus on such work, but working
alongside our brothers and sisters of the BFP
built close relationships in a short period of
time. Luis Carlos connected instantly . . . be-
ing half-Filipino and having lived a few years
of his youth in Subic Bay. He was treated as if
he was an older brother returning home for the
holidays. Another team favorite was Ron Price,
who in his own unique style, schooled-up some
of our BFP hosts in American slang. In the end,
our mission was accomplished. Some work-
load relief was provided, much encouragement
given, and great relationships were made . . .
some impacting lives for eternity.
More information on future FFC trips, domes-
tic or abroad, can be found at: www.ffclosange-
les.com or www.frefghtersforchrist.org
40 February 2014
visit:
www.LAFRA.org
mail:
P.O. Box 41903
Los Angeles CA
90041
phone:
(800) 244-3439
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February 2014 41
D
ecember of 2013 will be remembered
for one of the largest captains lists in
LAFD history, and for Chris Yokoya-
ma becoming LAFD Handballs top singles
player. The tournament this year was especially
challenging due to players dividing their efforts
between preparing for the captains interviews
and training for handball.
The fnals of the Fall Singles Tour-
nament were held at the Los Angeles Athletic
Club on December 12, 2013. All winners re-
ceived LAFD Handball Hoodies. This tourna-
ment displayed new and upcoming talent in
several divisions, and replaced several mem-
bers on the LAFD Handball Ladder. Rankings
on the ladder were adjusted based on perfor-
mance in this tournament.
The A Division fnal was a repeat
of last years match-up with Chris I change
my clothes in a phone booth Yokoyama fac-
ing John Libby Jr. in what proved to be a great
exhibition of endurance and skill. Yokoyama
LAFD Handball Ladder
Christopher Yokoyama - (92-B)
John Libby Jr. - (3-B)
Ryan Carlos - (92-A)
Eddie Marez - (2-C)
Joe Castro - (Batt. 5-C)
Mario Rueda - (BES)
Chris Hart - (26-C)
Paul Croghan - (40-B)
Jared Cooper - (92-C)
Alex Garcia - (66-B)
Ryan Chance - (82-C)
Jerry Puga - (26-A)
Freddie Escobar - (26-A)
Frank Lima - (UFLAC)
Branden Silverman - (92-A)
Trevor Insley - (66-A)
Colin Smith - (90-C)
Ladd Stilson - (95-B)
Enrique Borboa - (26-C)
Gary Maga - (69-C)
came away victorious, winning two straight
games to become LAFDs #1 player.
The B Division fnal featured two
players who have continually improved their
games and advanced in nearly every tourna-
ment over the past three years. Brian Miclette
defeated Tony Arnado in the B Final.
Richard Ramirez defeated Chad Lo-
gan in the C Division fnal. This match was
a contrast of styles, with Ramirez using the
advantage of young legs and aggressive shot
selection to pull out the victory.
The D Division fnal was one of
the most entertaining matches of the day, with
Elliot Ibanez defeating Chris Sebourn in a
battle of hustle and heart. These players have
bright futures.
Ironman Tony Arnado defeated Jerry
Travins in the B Masters Division fnal. This
was a competitive match, but Travins spotted
Arnado more than 20 years, which proved to be
too much to overcome.
The fnal match of the day featured
John Libby Jr. against Eddie Marez in the
Masters Division fnal. Libby was deter-
mined to leave with a title, and he soundly de-
feated Marez in two straight games.
The Golden Masters Final has not
been played, due to scheduling conficts with
the two fnalists Joe Castro and Jesus Pasos.
Results will be published next month.
Ladder Rules: Unranked players may chal-
lenge #16-20. Others may challenge within
fve spots (winner swaps positions.) If you
are not happy with your position on the lad-
der, beat somebody.
JOHN LIBBY & CHRIS YOKOYAMA JERRY TRAVINS & TONY ARNADO
RICHARD RAMIREZ & CHAD LOGAN ELLIOT IBANEZ & CHRIS SEBOURN
EDDIE MAREZ & JOHN LIBBY TONY ARNADO & BRIAN MICLETTE
42 February 2014
February 2014 43
F
irefighters are educated and trained to al-
ter fire. In fire science we learn that there
is more than one way to attack a fire in
progress. Different circumstances call for dif-
ferent measures to insure a successful outcome.
When we implement different strategies during
fire suppression we stress the fire, we force
it to change.
Maximizing your ftness potential
begins with applying this principle to your
weight training routines. In the gym we call it
adaptation. In ftness science we learn if you
want to increase muscle strength and mass, you
alter the variables in your training routine. If
you dont, your body composition will stay the
same and youll be whining that your muscles
arent getting any bigger. Your weight training
requires implementing different strategies in
order to stress your body and create change.
Why do two people of the same
weight and height have such different abilities
in the gym? Because of factors such as muscle
fber type, muscle formation and insertions,
tendon connections, and energy systems. We
are all different with different genetic potential.
But just because you cant squat six hundred
pounds doesnt mean you wont achieve suc-
cess with a weight lifting program. Because
we are not all born with Arnolds genes doesnt
mean we cant develop muscle ftness. It does
mean we must utilize adaptation strategies to
maximize our ftness potential and develop the
muscle ftness we need.
Muscle Fitness: Endurance, Strength and
Power
Muscular strength is how much
force a muscle can exert at one time or how
much the muscle can lift. For example, a fre-
fghter uses muscular strength when lifting
heavy equipment often in awkward positions
such as during extrication events.
Muscular endurance is how long a
muscle can contract before fatiguing. For ex-
ample, a frefghter uses muscular endurance
in almost every freground activity such as
breaching ceilings, manipulating hose lines,
forcible entry, climbing multiple stairs, and the
list goes on and on.
Muscular power is the speed at
which your muscles develop force. This is de-
veloped through the connection between the
central nervous system and the muscle. De-
veloping rapid control over a group of muscle
lessens the impact on the body. When we are
called upon to lift a piece of equipment off
the ground or drag a victim we must develop
rapid power out of our hips and legs to reach
the force we need to do the lift. Once we are
moving; the load is easier to lift, carry or drag.
Because muscular endurance,
strength and power are called upon for differ-
ent responsibilities on the job, we must use
different adaptation strategies to train for their
specifc development in our weight training.
Muscular strength is developed using heavier
weight and fewer repetitions. Muscular endur-
ance is developed through a series of chang-
ing repetitions. Muscular power is developed
through speed and timing.
Adaptation: Strategies at a Glance
Enduro Strength Training was created by
Monte Egherman, a 25 year veteran of the fre
service. He served his frst 20 years with the
city of Peoria, Arizona spending most of his
career as a Captain/Paramedic and retiring as
a Battalion Chief. He now serves as Assistant
Chief for the town of Buckeye, Arizona and
Firefghter Fitness and CPAT Director for the
Fire Science Program for Glendale Community
College in Glendale, Arizona.
44 February 2014
Dear John and Andy,

Enclosed is a check for the Widows, Orphans
and Disabled Firemens Fund. My small gift is
in lieu of the annual gift exchange with my
fellow board members of the L.A. Retired Fire
& Police Assoc. I have also enclosed my letter
to the LARFPA board which better explains my
actions. Im sure this small donation will be put
to better use in our Widows & Orphans Fund.
Fellow Board Members,

In keeping with the tradition of holiday
giving and friendship I struggled with what
I might give my fellow Board Members . . .
comprised of a bunch of aging cops and
fremen. After due consideration and serious
thought, several items came to mind:
*Orthotics
*Super Poly-Grip
*Viagra
*One year supply of Move Free
*Oxycodone
*and the ever popular Depends
After a long deliberation and a half bottle
of bourbon, I decided that in lieu of any of the
above, I have made a donation, in the name
of the LARFPA Board of Directors, to the
Los Angeles Firemens Relief Associations
Widows & Orphans Fund.
Happy Holidays
Don Forrest
Thanks John for your dedicated years of
service to our members of the LAFRA. You
deserve a rest.
Fraternally yours,
Don Forrest
Director LARFPA, LAFD retired
Dear Mr. Jacobsen,
On behalf of the Toluca Lake Chamber of
Commerce we are pleased to enclose a check
in support of your organization and LAFD
families. This was part of the proceeds from the
9th Annual Old Fashioned Pancake Breakfast
on Fire Service Day at Fire Station 86 in Toluca
Lake. We hope to be back next year to carry on
the tradition.
Sincerely,
Stephen Hampar, president
Toluca Lake Chamber of Commerce
LAFRA Widows & Orphans Fund
My donation is dedicated to Leonard Cobb,
my friend since our teen years and a golf
partner forever. His friendship was genuine and
he will be missed. Rest in peace
Richard Rush
Dana Point, CA
Dear Andy:
The enclosed check is for the WODFF in
memory of Dottie Giordano. She was such a
fne lady and anyone who ever has been around
her would say the same thing. Elinor and I have
been on a number of trips both in the USA
and Europe. We will miss her so much. Her
family and the many, many friends will always
remember her and all the fun we had together.
Elinor and Frank Brown
Santa Rosa, CA
Dear Andy
Just a note to say thanks to you and the
entire Relief Association. All of you give
so much and ask very little in return. Your
dedication is unsurpassed.
Please know of my deep appreciation and
best wishes for good health and success in the
New Year. Im sure you can fnd a needy spot
for the enclosed.
God Bless,
Pat Lloyd
Placentia, CA
Dear LAFRA:
We would like to send this donation to the
Relief Association for all of the kindness to our
family at the time of our father Gerald Georges
passing in November of 2011. The Relief
Association was very helpful at the time of our
loss and we want to contribute so that they may
help others in need.
It is good to know that the Association is
always there for us. Although our father retired
in 1969, after working 20 years as a freman,
the Relief Association was still there for us
with words of kindness and encouragement,
and fnancial help. It is good to know that the
Association will always look to help fremen
and their families, both past and present. Thank
you for all that you do.
Sincerely,
The George Family Jerri George, John
Henley, Marilyn George
Chatsworth, CA
To The Widows and Orphans Fund
Hello from the members of Fire Station 87-
B, the third place winners at this years LA
Firemens Credit Union Chili Cook-Off. We are
donating part of our winnings to the Widows,
Orphans and Disabled Firemens Fund. Thank
you for everything that the LAFRA does.
Cruz Macias, Don Welcker and Jason Knight
Fire Station 87-B
Andy,
I would like to donate this check in memory
of Jerry Andrews who recently passed away
and for his wife Betty Lu who passed a few
years back. Jerry was a fne gentleman and
friend. We played many rounds of golf together
with Dick Ostoich and Jim Meier. Thanks for
all your efforts and friendship over the years
Go 66s
Yours,
Mary and Gary Klasse
San Clemente, CA
February 2014 45
Create a Legacy
For information call
Marlene Casillas, Relief Association Development & Marketing Director, at
(323) 259-5217 or email me at MCasillas@LAFRA.org
The Eternal Flame Society is a special group of frefghters, family, friends and
supporters who have included a gift to the Widows, Orphans & Disabled Firemens
Fund in their Estate Plans.
Theyre visionary and uncommonly dedicated. Their kindness has helped our
frefghter families overcome unexpected challenges for more than a century.
We invite you to join these dedicated individuals helping to secure the future of
your frefghter family. With your help, the Widows, Orphans & Disabled Firemens
Funds second century will be as extraordinary as its frst.
Planned gift arrangements include:
Bequest through a will
Gift through a living trust or other non-charitable trust
Gift of life insurance, real estate or other assets
Benefciary designation in retirement plans
Send your letters
& comments
to the editor at:
editor@lafra.org
LAFRA
This donation is in appreciation for all that
the Los Angeles Firemens Relief Association
did for my father over the past two years before
his passing. You made his life much more
comfortable than it would have been. I hope
this will make another fremens family more
comfortable when they are in need.
Sincerely,
Jerry Mihld
Redlands, CA
Dear Andy,
I want to thank you for all the help you gave
me and my family when dad, Charlie Bakovic,
passed away last January. It was such a diffcult
time, but your support and assistance helped us
through the tough times. I wanted to donate to
the Widows, Orphans and Disabled Firemens
Fund in memory of my Dad.
Best wishes,
Marsha Davis (Bakovic)
Oceanside, CA
Los Angeles Firemens Relief Association:

Thank you for the beautiful fower
arrangement you sent in remembrance of
Chuck (Breazeal). So nice to see fellow
frefghters remember retired frefghters after
30 years. Your thoughtfulness and kindness
was truly appreciated during this diffcult time.

Sincerely,

Carol Breazeal
Newbury Park, CA
46 February 2014
MEMBERS
IVAR MIHLD, FIREMAN. APPOINTED APRIL 17, 1938.
RETIRED ON A SERVICE PENSION JULY 01, 1968 FROM FS 1.
PASSED AWAY NOVEMBER 05, 2013. (CORRECTION)
WILLIAM L. SHERMAN, CAPTAIN II. APPOINTED AUGUST 19, 1947.
RETIRED ON A SERVICE PENSION AUGUST 01, 1972 FROM FS 93-A.
PASSED AWAY NOVEMBER 30, 2013.
HENRY R. AUGUSTE, FIRE INSPECTOR. APPOINTED JULY 01, 1941.
RETIRED ON A SERVICE PENSION FEBRUARY 01, 1966 FROM FIRE PREVENTION BUREAU.
PASSED AWAY DECEMBER 01, 2013.
DAVID S. TORNBOM, ENGINEER. APPOINTED NOVEMBER 01, 1956.
RETIRED ON A SERVICE PENSION AUGUST 20, 1979 FROM FS 96.
PASSED AWAY DECEMBER 06, 2013.
WILLIAM D. MCINTYRE, FIREFIGHTER II. APPOINTED JANUARY 12, 1944.
RETIRED ON A SERVICE PENSION JUNE 29, 1980 FROM SUPPLY & MAINTENANCE DIVISION.
PASSED AWAY DECEMBER 13, 2013.
JOHN E. HOLLAND, ENGINEER. APPOINTED MAY 01, 1950.
RETIRED ON A SERVICE PENSION JUNE 15, 1980 FROM FS 40-A.
PASSED AWAY DECEMBER 23, 2013.
LEONARD P. COBB, CAPTAIN II. APPOINTED JUNE 10, 1961.
RETIRED ON A SERVICE PENSION FEBRUARY 01, 1987 FROM FS 80-B.
PASSED AWAY DECEMBER 23, 2013.
ROBERT E. WOODEN, CAPTAIN I. APPOINTED JUNE 21, 1954.
RETIRED ON A DISABILITY PENSION APRIL 01, 1972 FROM FS 107-C.
PASSED AWAY DECEMBER 24, 2013.
CHARLES O. ZUBER, ENGINEER. APPOINTED FEBRUARY 10, 1948.
RETIRED ON A SERVICE PENSION JUNE 01, 1976 FROM FS 82-B.
PASSED AWAY DECEMBER 26, 2013.
JEROLD M. ANDREW, CAPTAIN. APPOINTED MARCH 18, 1947.
RETIRED ON A SERVICE PENSION MARCH 01, 1977 FROM FS 93-B.
PASSED AWAY DECEMBER 30, 2013.

FAMILY
VIVIENNE R. WYNNE, SPOUSE OF TREASVANT A. WYNNE, PASSED AWAY DECEMBER 02, 2013.
HELEN M. PROCTOR, SURVIVING SPOUSE OF FOREST L. PROCTOR, PASSED AWAY DECEMBER 05, 2013.
RUTH A. ANDRESEN, SPOUSE OF LARRY G. ANDRESEN, PASSED AWAY DECEMBER 31, 2013.
February 2014 47
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48 February 2014
Refecting on my 26 years at TF-102
(including LF-102) it was the highlight of 33
years on the department. How could it not? In
the front offce we had people like Buck Teel,
Gary Peck, Doug Murphy, Ron Meador, Ray
Horelly, Ray Case, Bruce Blackwell, Mike
Burns, Wayne Boswell, John Nelson, and Ed
Ortiz, just as an example.
In drafting this article, I spoke with
Walt Wilmington Batt-14-A (ret). His recollec-
tion of TF-102 was one of respect and admira-
tion, both on the fre ground and off. He men-
tioned, also, the level of morale was as high as
he had ever witnessed. This can be attested to
by the fact no one wanted to leave and the mul-
titude of brownies on the fle to transfer in.
Another retired chief, Jim O Neill,
told me of his esteem for 102s. One case in
point was The Normandie Fire. As the I.C.,
when 102s reported on scene, he directed the
T.F. to go to the roof. With 102 ready, Capt
Gary Peck noticed a woman halfway out a
small window on the 5th foor screaming for
help. Peck, knowing TF-29 was on the roof,
told the I.C. and wanted to attempt a rescue. An
aerial ladder wouldnt work, so T-102 threw the
50 three feet short of the window.
Engineer Tom Brennan was frst
up, followed by FF Tom Kessler (27). Chief
ONeill related to me he couldnt watch, and
Capt. Peck thought, Someone is possibly go-
ing to die. Brennan, on the third rung from the
top, got the woman out feet frst. And basically
did what most couldnt without a tragic result.
This action earned Tom Brennan the Medal of
Valor. Other members of TF-102 would also
O
n July 1, 1977, Task Force 102 was es-
tablished and quickly earned a reputa-
tion for the excellence and the respect
of the department, city wide. It soon became
evident 102s first in had no boundaries and
would encompass the entire city via the many
move-ups, day or night and many times both.
(Of course, the numerous cut gallons of B&R
to OCD didnt hurt). Those move-ups provided
102s the ability to experience firsthand areas
of the city and the challenges faced by the com-
panies normally assigned there. From residen-
tial, commercial, industrial, high rise, both air-
ports, harbor, and brush - the knowledge gained
was instrumental to 102s members to further
their career goals via promotions, and impart
the same to new rookies assigned to TF-102.
Thus it seemed only appropriate, the moniker
TF-102 Spearhead of the City was born.
Shortly thereafter, a spray paint sten-
cil was created by the A/Os depicting the same
logo. Its usage went into the overdrive when-
ever the opportunity arose. The grand slam
occurred at the main shops on one particular
Sunday. With stencil and creepers in hand, A/O
Chick Mokracek and Lane Kemper started at
opposite ends of the bays and scored. Via this
clandestine operation, a Christmas card was de-
signed, bearing the same logo and sent to every
LAFD work location. Feedback was positive,
minus one TFC @ 10s. (I wont mention his
name due to his good reputation). Many past
members of TF-102s went on to promote and
their names are too numerous to list. I will add,
in my opinion, each one benefted by having
served at 102s.
be awarded that
same medal for displays of heroism in
the aftermath of the Northridge Earthquake.
Not all of TF-102s responses result-
ed in good outcomes. FF Brain Phillips, 102-
B, lost his life battling an arson fre at Mullen
Lumber in North Hollywood. Other incidents
102 was involved with were fres at which FF
Lynn Hazlett (FS 39), A/O Tom Taylor (FS 60)
and FF Frank Hotchkins (FS 1) made the ulti-
mate sacrifce. All of these were sad times for
the LAFD and fre departments everywhere.
After 102s was once again a single
engine, all three shifts combined their talents
and resources and created a memorial to Brian
Phillips in the stations backyard, beftting a
true American hero. If you havent seen it, stop
by and pay respect to a fremans freman.
On a lighter side, on one particular
overhaul, in 88s district, 102s was left to clean
up. We washed, dried and folded T-88s salvage
covers, and returned them, but not before a
miniature 102s logo was applied on a corner.
TFC Brown, from 88s, was irate and told Div-
3. Verbal reprimands were issued to 102s front
offce. Not quite happy, 102s back room cre-
ated a Browns Crying Towel, and forwarded
to 88s wrapped around a laughing box that
was triggered to go off when the package was
opened. At 88s line up, Brown opened it and
the box went off, and he looked at the towel.
Not a word was said, and thereafter, there were
no more comments from Capt Brown about
102s.
Many of you, reading this, already
know about TF-102s legacy and everything
February 2014 49
those I contacted and the deep emotions I have
for those who served at the Force That Was.
that goes with it. So if I am being repetitive I
apologize. Set-ups and pranks were part of the
LAFD mindset. Games for dishes and cheating
prevailed on the C shift as well. Bill Ward
and Vince Cardinale got together and cheated
TFC Ray Horelly at the game 99. Rays re-
tort You guys cheated, and I will
fnd out! He never did. All said and
done, Ray had the cleanest cuticles on
the F.D.
One classic was FF Denny
Silgen @ FS-10 and his frecracker ca-
per that went awry. He was then trans-
ferred to TF-102-A. Capt. Tom Frank
was the dept. advocate. Down the road,
after Denny settled in at 102s, Capt.
Frank worked a SOD @ 102s. Being
congenial - both agreed to a photo on the
apron. (Check the banner and engine des-
ignation in the accompanying photo)
It is my hope that, anyone omitted, is
not offended in anyway. I talked to many past
alumni, both active and retired, to make this ar-
ticle as factual as possible.
A parting note: Engine 102
was pictured on the frst color
cover photo of the Grapevine,
after a move-up to 9s, and frst
in at a major hotel fre (fall of
1980). As I end, I wish my
many thanks and appreciation to
50 February 2014
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February 2014 51
by Mike Mastro, President/CEO
Los Angeles Firemens Credit Union
SHARE CERTIFICATES AND MONEY MARKET
ACCOUNTS - A TRIED-AND-TRUE SAVINGS
STRATEGY
Savings. This simple word should
evoke a sense of security and peace-of-mind.
But to those whose entire savings are strapped
into the stock market roller coaster, queasy
may more closely describe the feeling.
Its reassuring to know there are
other savings options. Share Certifcates of De-
posit (CDs) and Money Market accounts offer
a guaranteed return while insured by American
Share Insurance (ASI), thereby helping reduce
the overall risk of your investment portfolio.
HOW DO CERTIFICATES WORK?
Share certifcates allow you to invest
a lump sum toward a future goal and feature
a dividend rate that is signifcantly better than
those associated with a regular share savings
account. The dividend rate is locked in un-
til your certifcate reaches maturity, so youll
know from the start exactly how much youll
earn. Its a perfect solution for funding a home
improvement project or next years vacation, or
even as gifts to children and grandchildren.
Whats more, share certifcates come
in a variety of dividend rates and terms. Terms
can range from six months up to fve years
at the Credit Union. The longer the term, the
higher the rate of return applied to your invest-
ment. To make the most of your investment
timeline, you can choose a share certifcate that
will mature near the date your money is need-
ed. There are penalties for early withdrawals,
so its important to select maturity dates in line
with your goals.
LADDERING TO SUCCESS
Add extra liquidity to your portfolio
by buying a series of share certifcates with lad-
dered, or staggered, maturities. The result of a
laddering strategy will often gain you higher
yield than if you kept all of your funds short
term. Additionally, the average life of your lad-
dered portfolio will be relatively short even
while earning those higher rates of return.
For example, if you have $12,000 to
invest, you could put $3,000 into four separate
CDs, such as those with a 6-month, 12-month,
24-month, and 36-month maturity dates. As
each certifcate matures, you can roll it into an-
other certifcate. This continued cycle of stag-
gered CDs keeps funds available for you to use,
if needed. Plus, laddering evens out interest
rate fuctuations. Should rates rise, your next
rollover can take advantage of the higher rate.
And should rates drop, youll still be locked in
at higher rates for a portion of your certifcate
investments.
MONEY MARKET ACCOUNTS
If youre concerned about locking in
funds for a specifc term, a money market ac-
count offers the liquidity you may be looking
for. These accounts provide higher dividends
than a savings account when you maintain a
higher balance. The more you save, the higher
dividends you can earn, yet youll have the
ability to access funds when needed. At the
Credit Union, you can expect to receive divi-
dends competitively priced at balance tiers of
$2,500, $50,000, and $100,000.
SAFETY
Accounts held at the Credit Union
are insured for up to $500,000 per account
through ASI, whereas other fnancial institu-
tions may insure accounts for up to $250,000.
ASI provides deposit insurance exclusively to
credit unions. They are a member-owned, share
guaranty corporation, and the nations largest
non-federal insurer of credit union deposits.
Please keep in mind that your LAF-
CU Board of Directors has also awarded an
Extraordinary Dividend bonus on savings
products including money market and term
certifcates. In 2013, the effective yields on
money market and term certifcate balances
were increased by 0.13% and 0.28%* respec-
tively after taking into consideration the added
bonus. In fact, a number of members received
over $10,000 in bonus dividends, with one bo-
nus dividend exceeding a whopping $22,000.
To open a share certifcate or money market
account, please call a Credit Union Represen-
tative at (800) 231-1626, visit our web site
at www.lafrecu.org or visit a regional offce.
Setting up a share certifcate or money market
takes just a few minutes, but youll be thank-
ful for the peace-of-mind youll enjoy into the
New Year and beyond.
The more business we do together as a Fire
Family, the greater the fnancial reward will be
for all members.
Have a great month!
Mike Mastro
Funds on deposit at LAFCU are insured up to $500,000 per account.
This institution is not federally insured, and if the institution fails, the
Federal Government does not guarantee that depositors will get back
their money. Accounts with this institution are not insured by any state
government.
Share certifcate and money market account notes: Dividends are cal-
culated daily from day of deposit to day of withdrawal and are posted
monthly. These are variable rate accounts and rates may change after
account opening. Deposit minimums and withdrawal limitations vary
with different account types. Certifcate accounts are subject to penal-
ties for early withdrawal. These accounts are at a fxed rate until ma-
turity. Dividends are calculated daily from day of deposit to day of
withdrawal and are posted monthly.
*Calculation of additional yield based on a $50,000 balance (money
market rate of 0.30%; term certifcate rate of 0.66%).
52 February 2014
LAFD HISTORY - THE LAFD IS 128 YEARS OLD!
Submitted by Frank Borden Director of Operations, LAFDHS
I
n January of 1886, the City of Los Angeles
was protected by volunteer fire companies
with names like Thirty-Eights-No.1, Con-
fidence Engine Company No.2 and Vigilance
Hook & Ladder Co. No. 1.
On Monday, February 1, 1886 the
Los Angeles Fire Department offcially went
into service with four stations, two steam
powered 750 gpm pumpers (steamers), each
housed with a two wheeled hose reel, a hook
and ladder truck, a hose wagon and 11 horses.
On that day the City began to pay 31 fremen,
including a Chief Engineer and an Assistant
Chief, for a service, which for 15 years, had
been provided virtually without pay by 380
members of the Los Angeles Volunteer Fire
Department. Most of the paid, or permanent
men as they were offcially designated, were
former volunteers who took over the existing
stations and equipment. Augmenting the per-
manent force were 24 reserve fremen. They
were most likely former volunteers who were
starting on February 1, to be paid a small hono-
rarium. These callmen, apportioned among the
fre companies, were required to answer all
alarms in their stations district, large fres any-
where in the City and drill with their respective
outfts at least twice monthly. It all started with
a meeting in Billy Buffums Saloon in down-
town L.A.
The frst Chief Engineer of the
Los Angeles Volunteer Fire Department was
Charles E. Miles. He was elected by the vol-
unteers on June 20, 1876. Chief Miles two ear-
liest priorities were to lobby the City Council
for a better fre alarm system and to obtain a
more suitable hook and ladder. He got the hook
and ladder but would have to wait for the alarm
system. Walter S. Moore was the frst Chief
Engineer of the newly created LAFD. Chief
Moores monthly salary was $125. He too was
a volunteer freman and Chief of the Volunteer
Fire Department, and like many of our early
volunteers came from San Francisco to join the
LAFD.
In January 1886 the Fire Commis-
sion came up with the frst set of 32 Rules and
Regulations. Among them were: Rule 18 - Cau-
tioned engine, hose and hook and ladder truck
drivers not to drive out of a trot in going to or
returning from fres and alarms and further, rac-
ing was strictly prohibited. Rule 23 - Stipulated
that destruction of property by water at fres
was ineffcient fremanship.
In 1886, Los Angeles 30 square
miles roughly encompassed an area of struc-
tural density only as far north as Ord Street
and south to 7th street. The easternmost area
of building concentration did not extend much
past Los Angeles Street and Olive Street on the
west. Six years before the start of the LAFD,
the citys population was 11,183. Four years
after the LAFD went into service, population
soared to more than 50,000. The Old Plaza Fire
Station 1, which is a museum today in down-
town Los Angeles and operated by the Box 15
Club of Los Angeles volunteers, went from a
volunteer station with eight members to one of
the frst LAFD stations.
Our museums have much of the early
history of the LAFD for all of our visitors to see
including fre apparatus, tools and equipment,
and photos so come for a visit to learn about
our history.
The frst parade of the Los Angeles
Volunteer Fire Departments at Spring
St. and Temple in 1872.
The Sylmar Tunnel Explosion, June 23, 1971
By Paul Ditzel for The LAFD - A Century
of Service
Sylmar seemed jinxed when another
disaster, a few months after the earthquake,
hit the area. The Lockheed Shipbuilding and
Construction Company of Seattle was digging
a 5.5 mile-long tunnel, 170 feet underground,
for the Metropolitan Water Districts Feather
River Project. The frst clue of impending di-
saster came at 2:30 a.m., June 23, 1971, when
Task Force 98, Engine 91, Rescue-Ambulance
98 and Battalion 12 Chief Leo Najarian were
dispatched by Coldwater to 12800 Fenton Av-
enue, following a report of an explosion at the
tunnels digging head.
Four tunnel workers suffered frac-
tures and burns in what Najarian determined
was a methane explosion touched off by a
welders torch or by a mole digger machine
striking a spark when it hit a hard rock. Najar-
ian called for one more rescue-ambulance and
was sent Rescue 89. Using generator fans, En-
gine 91 began venting the tunnel at an opening
February 2014 53
on Foothill Boulevard, just west of Roxford
Street. Determining that the workers were only
periodically testing for the presence of meth-
ane, Najarian instructed supervisors to make
continuous testings and to obtain better breath-
ing apparatus.
Najarian, who was scheduled to
work a double shift, was concerned by the di-
saster that almost happened. During the day he
monitored activities at the tunnel and learned
that state safety inspectors had certifed that
work could continue. When no more alarms
came from the 18-foot-diameter bore site, Na-
jarian began to hope his worst fears would not
be realized. Considered by the department as
its foremost authority on hazardous materials,
Najarians nagging worries continued into the
evening.
Najarian had just returned from an
alarm after midnight when Rescue-Ambulance
98, stationed in his quarters, was dispatched at
12:51 a.m., to a tunnel explosion at the same
address as the earlier one. Najarian would have
followed Rescue 98, except that at the same
time he was dispatched to a fre in Engine 24s
district in Sunland. When 24s sizeup indicated
the fre was small, Najarian radioed Rescue
98 for a radio report on the tunnel explosion.
Rescue 98s frefghters said a severe explosion
had occurred some fve miles inside the Fenton
Street portal where as many as 20 workers were
digging with the mole.
En route at 1:00 a.m., Najarian called
for Task Force 98 to respond to the Fenton tun-
nel entrance and Engine 91 to go to the vent
hole at Roxford and Foothill. Najarian also
called for a second ambulance and was sent
Rescue 89. Najarian decided to go to the vent
hole location because that would put him closer
to the actual site of the explosion. Upon arrival,
Najarian was told by Lockheed Project Manag-
er Loren G. Savage that an explosion 20 times
worse than the previous night had occurred
5.3 miles inside the tunnel. Only one worker
had escaped. Eighteen were missing.
Najarian asked what the methane
readings were at the time of the explosion. He
was told workers had recorded readings of only
one percent when the digger was not work-
ing. When the mole started boring, however,
the workers were entering an earthquake fault
and the dirt turned into a powdery consistency.
While the digger cut, the gas appeared to be
coming out in puffs as if from pockets of heav-
ily concentrated methane.
A crane was ordered to the vent hole
opening on Foothill as Najarian hurried to the
Fenton portal opening where a search team
would have to go in to look for the 18 missing
workers. En route he radioed Coldwater in all
probability, a major disaster has occurred. Na-
jarian called for a longer duration breathing ap-
paratus and the air utility unit with its compli-
ment of additional air bottles and capabilities
for on-scene reflling of them as well as bottles
normally carried on apparatus.
To reach the tunnel entrance, fre-
fghters had to be lowered in a cage some 170
feet to the portal opening. Task Force 98 fre-
fghters began loading a rescue train of two
donkey engine gondola cars with all available
breathing apparatus, extra air bottles, litter
baskets and stretchers, fashlights, resuscita-
tors and frst aid equipment. Rescue 98 fre-
fghters Gerald R. Rainmaker and Thomas L.
Cox, along with Savage and two tunnel work-
ers would go on the frst rescue train. If one
gondola car derailed, the other donkey engine
car could back out of the tunnel with the rescue
team. With triple backup 30 minute air supplies
for each team member, it was pre-arranged that
if they did not both come out after 30 minutes a
second train would go in after them.
As the rescue train entered the tunnel
and rounded the frst bend, radio contact was,
as expected, lost due to the winding nature of
the tunnel. Najarian, Task Force 98, and Rescue
89 proceeded to the Foothill Boulevard vent
hole. When the rescue team did not return in
half-an-hour, a second rescue team was starting
into the tunnel when they heard honking and
saw the red light of the returning rescue team.
The news was all bad. Rainwater and Cox rid-
ing in the front gondola reported that visibility,
even with their powerful Wheat lamps was zero
in the million-cubic-feet inside the tunnel, their
gondola suddenly struck an object, derailed and
turned sideways. The frefghters had climbed
out of the gondola and found they had run
over a body which could not be seen with their
lights. Cox and Rainwater determined the body
was that of a worker obviously killed in the ex-
plosion. Rainwater proceeded down the tracks
while looking for more victims until he fell into
a four foot hole and was injured.
Uncoupling the lead gondola, the
rescue team returned to the Fenton Street por-
tal. The frefghters concurred with Savage that
the excessive concentrations of smoke and
gases meant that if any of the 18 workers on
the graveyard shift survived the explosion, they
were almost assuredly dead from exposure to
lethal heat, smoke and gases. Regardless of
whether anyone remained alive inside the tun-
nel, rescue attempts had to be continued and
bodies had to be brought out. A second search
and rescue train slowly entered the tunnel,
disappeared around the bend and, while pro-
ceeding deep into the murk discovered, 1000
feet inside an unconscious worker, Ralph Bris-
sette. Miraculously, the force of the explosion
threw him to an area where fresh air was being
pumped into the tunnel. Rescue 39 rushed him
to Pacoima Lutheran Hospital where he would
survive.
During the next two days, fre com-
panies worked in tandem, under extremely haz-
ardous conditions, while riding rescue trains in
and out of the hot smoky, water flled tunnel
while extinguishing fres and searching for vic-
tims. The LAFD operations continued for three
days until June 26, when all 17 bodies were
recovered. Medals of Valor were awarded to
Rainwater and Cox as well as to 17 other fre-
fghters who participated in the Sylmar tunnel
disaster.
Crane operations at the vent
hole at Roxford & Foothill.
Deputy Chief Kenneth Long
giving instructions to the
rescue team going below.
54 February 2014
Calendar for March 2014
The LAFD awarded the Medal of
Valor to the following 19 members for their
personal courage at great personal risk during
rescue operations at the 1971 Sylmar Tunnel
Disaster: Argus E. Abney, Donald F. Anthony,
Walter F. Ball, Cameron P. Cramer, Thomas
L. Cox, Frank Fasmer, John C.Gerard. John
H. Holdsworth, Robert E. Radke, Gerald R.
Rainwater, Leon Ross Rauh, David P. Rich-
ardson, Alfred B. Risk, Fred W. Stoddard, For-
rest E. Taylor, Jerome P. Tenhundfeld, Kenneth
R. Thompson, Keith A. Wilson, Thomas A.
Wilson.
LAFDHS Volunteers of the Year 2013
The LAFD Historical Society is op-
erated by a great, but small group of dedicated
volunteers and each year those volunteers se-
lect those who have done outstanding work
through the year. They are selected for the Hol-
lywood Fire Museum, The Harbor Fire Muse-
um and the Fireboat Ralph J. Scott. The Vol-
unteers for the Year 2013 are: Tim McHenry
for his work at the Hollywood Fire Museum,
Gordon Briggs for his work at the Harbor Fire
Museum and Glenn Wilkinson for his work re-
storing Old Fireboat 2. A special brunch was
held in January to honor these men for their
exceptional volunteerism and hard work.
Tim McHenry working on the
tractor and trailer restoration
of our 1910 Seagrave/Anderson
City Service Truck.
Gordon Briggs displaying an
inventory book he developed
for the Harbor Fire Museum.
Glenn Wilkinson is fnishing
the paint job he did on the Old
Fireboat engine hatch cover.
Forty-two years after the disaster the
Los Angeles Metropolitan Water District cre-
ated a memorial for the workers killed in the
explosion. On December 9, 2013, an event was
held at their building for the families of those
who lost their lives and for the lone survivor,
Ralph Brissette, who with his family attended
the program. I was honored to be given the
opportunity to speak on behalf of the Histori-
cal Society about the heroism of those LAFD
members who were awarded the Medal of
Valor for their efforts to rescue those tunnel
workers.
Gordon Briggs displaying an
inventory book he developed
for the Harbor Fire Museum.
Don Anthony on the left
and Fred Risk on the right
up from the tunnel.
The lone survivor, Ralph
Brissette, speaking to the
families and guests at the
Metropolitan Water District
memorial ceremony.
February 2014 55
CALL TO ORDER
President John Jacobsen called the meeting
of the Board of Trustees of the Los Angeles
Firemens Relief Association to order at 10:00
a.m.
ROLL CALL
MEMBERS PRESENT:
John Jacobsen, President
Juan Albarran, Vice President
Andrew Kuljis, Secretary
Trustee James Coburn
Trustee Robert Steinbacher
Trustee Doak Smith
Trustee Steven Domanski
Trustee Jeff Cawdrey
Trustee David Peters
Trustee Rick Godinez
Trustee Steve Tufts
Trustee Chris Stine
Trustee Craig White
Trustee Chris Hart
Trustee Steve Ruda
Trustee Francisco Hernandez
Trustee Steve Berkery
Trustee Barry Hedberg Pension
Trustee Tim Larson Pension
David Ned Smith - Executive Director
Controller Todd Layfer
MEMBERS ABSENT:
Trustee Michael Overholser (Excused)
Trustee David Ortiz (Excused)
Trustee Gene Bednarchik (Excused)
Trustee Mark Akahoshi (Excused)
Trustee David Lowe Pension (Excused)
GUESTS:
Dennis Mendenhall, Retired
Tom Stires, Retired
David Wagner, Grapevine Editor
INVOCATION & Flag Salute
Rick Godinez led the invocation. Chris Hart led
the fag salute.
RATIFICATION OF MINUTES
John Jacobsen entertained a motion to ratify
and dispense with the reading of the minutes of
the Board of Trustees meeting held November
6, 2013. David Peters so moved. Tim Larson
seconded. There was no further discussion or
objections.
Motion carried to ratify and dispense with
the reading of the minutes of the Board of
Trustees held November 6, 2013.
PRESIDENT REPORT
1) Jacobsen referred to the transition of offcers
in 2014 and indicated that on January 8, 2014,
Juan Albarran and Robert Steinbacher will be
sworn-in as President and Vice President.
2) Jacobsen referred to the ACA (Obama
Care) reference sheet provided to the Trustees
and stated that its purpose was to help feld
questions from the membership. He indicated
that Heather Leavitt of Bradawn Inc. has
produced this basic information and stated that
it will also be placed on the LAFRA website.
3) Jacobsen informed the Board that Trustee
Michael Overholser has submitted his
resignation from the Board effective December
1st. He indicated that Overholser expressed
that he would like to come back and serve on
the Board in the future.
VICE PRESIDENT REPORT
1) Juan Albarran distributed the 2014 LAFRA
Committees list and informed the Board that
he is open for suggestions. He stated that those
Trustees appointed to Chairman and Assist
Chairman positions were those with experience
and also to develop some as future Chairmen.
INVESTMENT REPORT

Robert Steinbacher stated that they will
schedule a date to meet with Beacon Pointe.
He also indicated that those interested in
joining the Investment Committee for 2014
are welcome. Jacobsen also mentioned that
LAFRA has fully funded its commitment with
BRAVO and indicated that their last capital call
has been made.
EXECUTIVE DIRECTORS REPORT
1) David Smith referred to the on-going
operations of the new building and mentioned
that there was one tenant making some
unrealistic requests in response to our petition
that they move out before their lease expires in
December 2014.
2) David Smith reported that the new LAFRA.
org website is up and running.
3) Todd Layfer presented the 2013 Year-
to-Date Expenditures through September
compared to the budget. He reported on the
revenue sources and mentioned that they are
ahead with medical premiums, donations and
member dues. He referred to the benefts paid
to members and stated that the sick & injury
benefts were down because they had received
I.O.D. reimbursement monies. He reported on
Operating Expenses and stated that payroll
and benefts were pacing 2.1% below what
was budgeted. He stated that Trustee expenses
have not all been turned in yet. He included the
7470 building income and expenses report. He
reviewed the investment balances and stated
that the total portfolio value has increased
substantially even with the purchase of the
building.
ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEE
REPORT
Robert Steinbacher presented the following
motions.
The committee recommends and I so move to
pay the usual and customary bills in the amount
of $756,306.35. There was no discussion or
objections.
Motion carried to pay the usual and customary
bills in the amount of $756,306.35.
The committee recommends and I so move
to pay the professional fees in the amount
of $27,788.32. There was no discussion or
objections.
Motion carried to pay the professional fees in
the amount of $27,788.32.
The committee recommends and I so move
to approve $250 for Stu Premmers Pancake
Breakfast at Fire Station 43. There was no
discussion or objections.
Motion carried to approve up to $250 for Stu
Premmers Pancake Breakfast at Fire Station
43.
LOS ANGELES FIREMENS RELIEF ASSOCIATION MINUTES OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES
December 04, 2013
56 February 2014
The committee recommends and I so move to
enter into contact with Burchfeld for $16K
for an Rx Audit of the plan. There was no
discussion or objections.
Motion carried to enter into contract with
Burchfeld for $16K for an Rx Audit of the
plan.
MEDICAL COMMITTEE REPORT
Barry Hedberg presented the following motion.
The committee recommends and I so move to
accept the applications to the Medical Plan.
There was no discussion and no objections.
Motion carried to accept all applications to
the Medical Plan.
RELIEF COMMITTEE REPORT
James Coburn presented the following motion.
The committee recommends and I so move to
pay:
The Sick & Injury benefts in the amount of
$22,999.40,
The Estate Planning beneft in the amount of
$9,214,
The Life & Accident Death Benefts of $12,000,
The Life & Accident Withdrawals of $3,153,
The Relief Death Benefts in the amount of
$27,000.
There was no discussion or objections.
Motion carried to pay the above Relief
benefts.
James Coburn read the names of members who
recently passed and asked for a moment of
silence from the Board.
MEMORIALS
Joseph O. Michell, Jr.
Frank H. Nickel
Ivar L. Mihld
Ronald J. Vance
John F. Virgil
Wayne E. Sanquist
ASSISTANCE COMMITTEE
James Coburn presented the following motions.
The committee recommends and I so move
to accept the donations in the amount of
$51,674.65 to the Widows, Orphans & Disabled
Firemens Fund. There was no discussion or
objections.
Motion carried to accept the donations in the
amount of $51,674.65 to the Widows, Orphans
& Disabled Firemens Fund.
The committee recommends and I so move to
approve the fnancial assistance applications for
surviving spouses, active and retired members.
There was no discussion or objections.
Motion carried to approve the fnancial
assistance applications for surviving spouses,
active and retired members.
The committee recommends and I so move
to approve the Christmas Bonuses for the
Widows & Orphans. There was no discussion
or objections.
Motion carried to approve the Christmas
Bonuses for the Widows & Orphans.
EMERGENCY ADVANCEMENTS
James Coburn presented the following motion.
The committee recommends and I so move
to approve the emergency advancement
applications for active and retired members.
There was no discussion or objections.
Motion carried to approve the emergency
advancement applications for active and
retired members.
GRAPEVINE/WEB REPORT
Chris Hart referred to the new website and
indicated that they had very minimal issues or
errors.
SECRETARYS REPORT
Andy Kuljis stated that the election results
have been certifed and stated that the by-law
changes have been approved.
Andy proceeded to give the Oath of Offce
to those Trustees elected through the election
process.
EXECUTIVE SESSION
The Board entered into Executive Session at
10:47am.
The Board adjourned from Executive Session
at 11:09am.
Jacobsen entertained a motion to approve the
actions from the Executive Session. David
Peters so moved. Tim Larson seconded. There
was no discussion or objections.
Motion carried to approve the actions from
the Executive Session.
Jacobsen announced that the Board appointed
Todd Layfer as the Executive Director effective
December 4th. Todd Layfer thanked the Board
for their support and guidance. He stated that
he would work to the best of his ability to make
the organization stronger for the beneft of all
its members. He thanked the Board for their
confdence in selecting him for this great honor.
NEW BUSINESS
Jacobsen informed the Board that Engineer
Dana Larsen from Fire Station 80 has been
selected as this years Firefghter of the Year.
SETTING OF DATES
1) UFLAC Holiday Open House
December 6th
2) LAFRA Open House December 7th
3) L.A. Retired Fire & Police Christmas
Celebration December 8th
4) Buzzard Bait Family Ride
January 17th 20th
5) Hook & Ladder Enduro March 22nd
6) Corbin Bowl April 27th
7) LAFRA Reunion Pechanga
May 19th 23rd
8) Hope for Firefghters June 5th
RETIREMENT DINNERS

1) Joe Foley January 10th Warner Center
2) John Durso January 18th The Odyssey
3) Jon Holtby March 5th Braemar
Country Club
4) Greg Gibson March 11th
Odyssey Restaurant
ADJOURNMENT
John Jacobsen entertained a motion to adjourn.
Tim Larson moved. Craig White seconded.
There was no discussion and no objections.
Motion carried to adjourn. The Board of
Trustees meeting adjourned at 11:24 pm.

John Jacobsen, President
February 2014 57
Donations to Widows, Orphans & Disabled Firemens Fund
December 2013
LA FIRE HOGS FOUNDATION
STEPHEN HAMPAR/TOLUCA LAKE CHAMBER OF
COMMERCE from proceeds of the Pancake Breakfast at FS 86
RON I. MIHLD & FAMILY in memory of IVAR ROY MIHLD, our father
JERRY L. MIHLD in memory of my father, IVAR MIHLD
LYNN D. ROGERS
SHIRLEY C. ROOK/ROSEWOOD RETIREMENT
COMMUNITY in memory of my husband, RALPH ROOK
ANONYMOUS DONATION in memory of, JOHN S. KOUYOUMJIAN
GLENN W. JAYNES
EDWARD WHITE C/O JOHN J. NICHOLSON
HARLAN R. WOOD
ANTONETTE C. RAYCRAFT in memory of my husband, GEORGE RAYCRAFT
FIRE STATION NO 37/BATTALION 9 from the FIRE EXTINGUISHER FUND
RUSSELL T. RUEDA
DON & BARBARA RICKLES
HELEN L. SCHULZ
WILLIAM & MARIAN J. TANNAHILL in memory of our parents
CHRISTINE M. BRUMBAUGH in memory of MIKE BRUMBAUGH,
husband, father, grandfather & great-grandfather
MARY E. LEAKE
CAROLYN MORRIS in memory of my husband, MARVIN W. MORRIS
NICHOLAS TUZZOLINO
MARSHA R. DAVIS in memory of my father, CHARLES BAKOVIC
BURDETTE CREATH for the DME
BUCKLE SALE PROCEEDS
JAMES E. GILLUM from the SIMI VALLEY BREAKFAST CLUB
DANIEL LYNCH
BONNIE LANTZ in memory of MRS. LILLIAN GOODWINE
FRED E. IHDE in memory of, JOSEPH D. MICHELL
JANE A. FREY in honor of, RICHARD HALLORAN
PATRICIA G. SHOEMAKER in memory of, LILLIAN GOODWINE
NETWORK FOR GOOD
FUMIKO HUMBERD in memory of my husband, JOHN L. HUMBERD JR.
SIMI VALLEY BREAKFAST CLUB DONATION
JAMES P. LANGSFELD
DONNA M. DAVID in memory of JAMES ANDERSON
GERALD L. LAYTON in memory of JAMES ANDERSON
ARCHER R. MORGAN in memory of BOB ORMAN
ARCHER & CAROLYN MORGAN in memory of DOTTY GIORDANO
MALEN W. JACOBS
FRANCIS & ELINOR BROWN in memory of DOTTY GIORDANO
KERRI PETERSON
UNITED WAY INC.
LILLIAN GOODWIN C/O SUSAN SCOTT
DOUG C. NOONAN
DAVID L. SWLSVILLE
MANUEL CASTANEDA
DAVID COWDREY
DAVID D. DUMLER
MAEVE FORDE in memory of RICHARD WRIGHT
JAMES RITTER in memory of ED CASTLE
BETTY UNIBE in memory of ANNE BULLARD
TOM & JOANNE BESIGNANO in memory of ANNE BULLARD
JERRY & BRENDA HORWEDEL in memory of DAVE HERYFORD
KATHY MINTZER in memory of JOSEPH MICHELL
WILLIAM BAMATTRE
PETER BENESCH in memory of GLENN ALLEN
GARY BOWIE
DAVID EVERETT in memory of JOSEPH EVERETT
RICHARD FIELDS in honor of CHARLES ZUBER
KEN KRUPNIK for sale of song PARAMEDIC RESCUE 101
RALPH & PENNY LA PREZIOSA
JENNIFER CASTLE LAMOTTE in memory of EDWARD L. CASTLE
KATE NEWELL in memory of MIKE NELMS
MARGARET PALIC
ALLEN RABIN in honor of NORTHRIDGE FIRST RESPONDERS
PAUL SEMERJIAN in memory of JOHN SQUIRE
BENNETT SILVERMAN in memory of MIKE NELMS
NIKKI SOLYOM
RUTH TAYLOR in honor of KEN BUZZELL
JEANNE URQUIZA in memory of RALPH URQUIZA, forever in our hearts~
Jeanne, Jessica & Troy
KEN WIGCHERT
58 February 2014
MERCHANDISE
FOR SALE
2001 HONDA ACCORD,
2-door coupe, original owner.
134,000 miles (approximately
30 mpg). Excellent car. 5
speed manual transmission,
anti-theft system, AC, AM/
FM multi CD, cruise control,
sunroof, power locks/seat/
steering/windows, leather
interior. $4000 OBO. Call (661)
297-2503.
COLLECTOR CARS. 1990
Chevy SS454 pick-up from
hell runs perfect. Needs some
TLC. Best offer!
1979 VW Convert last year
ever made white/white/white.
780 miles on engine. New tires
on polished porsche wheels.
Best offer over $5500. Stored
inside in Palmdale. Call Monty
Majesky - retired LAFD any-
time (661) 265-6557
PROJECT CARS. 1954
Mercury. 1957 Ford. 1939
Ford 2-door sedan. 1940 fords
- 2 and 4 door sedans. 1940
sedan delivery. 1961 T-Bird
convertible. 1941 Railway
Express van. Miscellaneous
parts. Contact Jim McPherson
LAFD retired. (805) 501-8102
or email jimmymac567@
charter.net
REAL ESTATE
FOR RENT
HORSE PROPERTY, LAKE
VIEW TERRACE - Near FS24.
3 bedroom, 2 bath, newly
remodeled kitchen with granite
countertops and stainless
steel appliances. Formal liv-
ing room, plus family room. 3
pipe corrals, arena, 2 barns,
trail access. Motor home and
horse trailer parking. Gardener
included. Available October.
$2800/month. Eng. Ames
(818) 257-4549.
REAL ESTATE
FOR SALE
EXCEPTIONALLY UNIQUE
PROPERTY!! Two homes,
one featuring 3000 sq.ft. 2
story with basement, 1 car ga-
rage, 4 bedrooms, 3 1/2 baths,
large living room, den, wood
foors, newer carpet, all new
dual pane windows and sliding
doors, ceramic tile counters in
kitchen. Ceramic foors, coun-
ters & showers in bathrooms.
Koehler tubs, sinks and toilets
though out home. Two 90%
effcient forced air heaters.
The guest house, 1024 sq. ft.,
has 2 bedrooms, a loft, laundry
room, dining room, living
room, newer carpet, tile foors
in kitchen and laundry room.
Wall heater. All this and much
more, must see to appreciate
how well these homes and
yard have been maintained.
A rare fnd for sure!! Gary A.
Wilson, Broker/Owner/Realtor
(01139925), (888) 856-0001
garywilson@garywilson.com
SERVICES
ALTERNATIVE & TRA-
DITIONAL Termite & Pest
Control - ECOLA Ecological
Solutions. Smart choices,
simple solutions. Problem
solved. Call for FREE ter-
mite estimate or pest quotes
over the phone - escrow and
inspections excluded. Fireman
wife Sue Fries - Termite Lady.
(818) 652-7171.
termitelady@ecolatermite.com
COUNSELING SERVICES.
Licensed Clinical Psychologist
Dr. Susan Purrington special-
izes in anxiety, depression,
relational diffculties, eating
disorders, spiritual or per-
sonal growth, marital confict,
family of origin issues. Find
a supportive and confdential
place for healing and growth.
Located in Old Towne Orange.
Questions or consultation:
(949)648-7875
susanpurrington@gmail.com
CRAIG SANFORD HEAT-
ING & AIR - Free estimates,
residential, commercial. Great
rates for LAFD and LAPD. Toll
free (877) 891-1414, (661) 298-
3070, FAX (661) 298-3069.
State License No. 527114
GARAGE DOOR INSTALLA-
TION & SERVICE. Garage
doors and openers. Need to
replace your broken springs?
or does your door need repair,
even replaced? We do it all
from new product to repair-
ing old. Call (661) 860-4563
Grassroots Garage Doors, Inc.
Lic# 950020. Son of 35 year
veteran freman.
ITS TAX TIME AGAIN!
Specializing in Firefghter and
Paramedic Returns, Electronic
Filing available, year round
bookkeeping and account-
ing, business and partnership
returns, payroll. All computer-
ized processing with over 30
years experience. Call early for
an appointment around your
schedule. Robert Sanchez
LAFD-OCD retired (818) 367-
7017, cell (818) 216-1040.
MARRIAGE, FAMILY, IN-
DIVIDUAL COUNSELING.
Licensed therapist Cathy
Chambliss helps couples and
individuals work through con-
ficts in relationships, stress,
anxiety, affairs, communica-
tion issues, and divorce. All
counseling is confdential.
Insurance taken. Call Cathy at
(310) 303-9132. Offce located
in Hermosa Beach.
www.cathychamblissmft.
com
REBECCA MARTIN LAND-
SCAPE. Architectural land-
scape design and installation.
A full service design/build land-
scape frm that creates unique
custom exterior environments
that will increase the value of
your home and bring you years
of outdoor enjoyment. Rebecca
Martin, LAFD wife. (818) 216-
3637. Lic# 936577. rebecca-
martinlandscape@gmail.com
TAX ALERT FOR FIREFIGHT-
ERS. Dont lose thousands of
dollars during your profession-
al career to taxes! Let HEWITT
FINANCIAL GROUP prepare
your tax return. We specialize
in tax preparation and fnancial
planning for frefghters. We
offer a FREE REVIEW of your
last three years of tax returns.
Call us today at (800) 573-
4829 or visit us at
www.hewittfnancial.com
WINDOWS & PATIO DOORS
- vinyl replacement windows
& Patio doors. I also carry
aluminum, wood and entry
door systems. Rick Brandelli,
Capt. LACoFD, FS 8-C (800)
667-6676.
www.GeeWindows.com
VACATION
RENTALS
BIG BEAR CABIN - All sea-
son, restful views from decks.
Two story, sleeps 6, half mile
to lake, two plus miles to
slopes. Fireplace/Wood, cable
TV/DVD/VCR. Full kitchen,
completely furnished except
linens. Pets ok. $95/$105 (two
day minimum). $550/$600 a
week, Beep or Donna Schaffer
1+(760) 723-1475.
www.schaffercabin.com
BIG BEAR CABIN. 2 bedroom,
2 bath, 2 story. Sleeps 8. Near
ski slopes & lake. Fireplace/
wood, cable TV, DVD,VCR, full
kitchen. Completely furnished.
$85/$95 per night. Minimum 2
nights. Holidays extra. Weekly
available. All Season. Sheri
(909) 851-1094 cell or (760)
948-2844 home.
BIG BEAR CABIN IN SUG-
ARLOAF - Cozy upgraded 2
bedroom cabin. Sleeps 8. Fire-
place, deck, Wif - internet and
cable TV. On a large lot with
sled hill. Fully furnished except
linens. $125 Winter $100 sum-
mer. Details and availability,
call/text/email Jessica (949)
874-5294
sugarloafcabin@cox.net
sugarloafcabin.com
BIG BEAR LAKES FINEST-
Deluxe lakeside townhouse,
2 bedrooms, 3 baths, 2 cable
TVs, HBO, DVD, WiFi, 2 wood
burning freplaces, laundry
room, tennis court, indoor pool,
sauna, spa, boat dock. Fully
equipped, including all linens.
Sleeps 6. 310-541-8311 or
email nmbigbear@gmail.com
CLASSIFIEDS
February 2014 59
CATALINA BEACH
COTTAGE - 3 bedrooms, 1
bath, one block to beach, view,
fully equipped housekeeping
unit. Marci (818) 347-6783 or
Clarence (310) 510-2721.
FABULOUS CAYUCOS
BEACH CONDO. 180-degree
ocean front view, 1 bedroom, 1
1/4 bath, living room, sofa bed,
outdoor patio ocean front view.
Morro Bay/ Hearst Castle,
Central California Area. Steps
to beach and fshing pier.
Nearby public golf & tennis.
Weekly or monthly. Contact
Sondra (818) 985-9066.
JUNE LAKE CABIN -
2BR/2BA cabin with Carson
Peak view. Close to fshing &
skiing. Furnished, wood deck,
equipped kitchen, wood burn-
ing stove, tree swing, cable /
DVD/phone. Garage/ample
parking. $95/night plus clean-
ing fee. Email for pictures. Jeff
Easton 93-A (805) 217-5602.
junebound@gmail.com
LAKE ARROWHEAD BLUE
JAY CABIN. Charming 2-story
with creek, large deck, two
baths, complete kitchen, TV/
VCR/DVD, freplace, washer
& dryer. Walk to Blue Jay Vil-
lage. Sleeps 8. $90/night. NO
PETS! Bruce or Sue Froude,
(805) 498-8542.
LAKE HAVASU LANDING-
Waterfront, steps to the water.
Boat mooring out front, off-
road desert behind house. 3
bed/3 bath, fully furnished w/
linens. Direct TV/DVR, BBQ,
Casino, Grocery/Meat Market,
Launch Ramp, Marina with
Boat House, Gated Commu-
nity. No pets/smoking. $350
Dan Cook 310 418 1577.
LAKE HAVASU BEAUTY FOR
RENT - 3 bdrm, 2 bath, 1600
sq.ft. Fully furnished with all
amenities- Laundry & BBQ.
13,000 sq.ft. lot. 3 car boat-
deep garage. 3 miles from
launch ramp. Close to down-
town shops & restaurants. View
of the lake. Quiet street in good
neighborhood. No pets. No
smoking. Snowbird rates. Call
Mike (661) 510-6246
MAMMOTH - 1 bedroom Sum-
mit condo, sleeps 6. Conve-
nient underground garage
parking. Jacuzzis, gym (pool/
tennis in summertime), shuttle
right outside! Across from
Eagle Lodge, Winter $110 per
night, Summer $80 per night
plus $65 cleaning fee and 13%
tax. All linens included. Drew
or Nancy Oliphant (661) 513-
2000 or email
mammoth241@aol.com
MAMMOTH CONDO. 1 Bed/
1.25 Bath sierra manors con-
do. In town, on shuttle route.
Sleeps 4 easily. Pets OK. Fully
furnished with new furniture/
HDTV/WIFI Woodburning
freplace. Hot Tub, sauna, W/D
in complex. Reduced rates for
FFs starting @100/nt
oldtownmammothcondo.
ownernetworks.com
mammothmtncondo@ya-
hoo.com
Ryan (310) 717 8483 for more
info/ rates
MAMMOTH CONDO. 2
bedroom, 2 bath, sleeps 6.
Near Canyon Lodge. Newly
remodeled recreation room
with pool and spa. Laundy
facilities, condo has been
beautifully remodeled. Photos
available on website. Winter
- $300 per night, Summer -
$150 per night. $150 cleaning
fee. Call for holiday terms and
pricing. Joseph Angiuli (626)
497-5083.
MAMMOTH CONDO-CHAM-
ONIX. 2 bedroom & large loft,
3 full baths, sleeps 8. 5 minute
walk to Canyon Lodge. Fully
furnished, TVs, VCR/DVD,
pool, spa, rec room, sauna,
linens included. Winter $175
weekdays, $195-weekends/
holidays; summer $125, plus
cleaning. No smoking; no pets.
Craig Yoder (909) 948-3659.
MAMMOTH CONDO Cozy
2 bedrooms, 2 bath. Fully
furnished, WIFI, 3 TVs, pool,
spa, walk to shuttle, Old
Mammoth area. Winter $115,
Summer $90, plus maid $126.
Includes linens. No pets, no
smoking. Call (310) 540-4648.
MAMMOTH CONDO NEXT
TO THE GONDOLA VIL-
LAGE Fully furnished, three
bedroom, two bath with towels
and linens, newly remodeled
kitchen, internet and cable
TV, pool and Jacuzzi. Walk to
the gondola, shops, restau-
rants and ski in on the new
comeback trail. Parking at the
front door. Winter: $250/night.
Summer $150/night. Holidays
$300/night. Cleaning is in-
cluded. Call Mike Whitehouse,
Retired, 805-987-6122, email:
btkwhitey@yahoo.com or
Bruce Galien, Retired, 661-
645-7448, email: luvbaja2@
aol.com
MAMMOTH CONDO AT
MAMMOTH ESTATES,
4BR/3BA, sleeps 10, fully
furnished, 2 TVs, DVDs, WiFi,
towels/linens, freplace. Full
kitchen. Walk to Gondola
Village and shuttle. Complex
has pool, spa, sauna, laundry.
Winter $335/night, Summer
$215/night, plus cleaning.
Includes city bed tax. No pets,
no smoking. Dory Jones (310)
918-0631 or Kelly Corcoran
(310) 619-5355
MAMMOTH CONDO - 2 bdrm,
2 bath, 2 TVs, phone, garage,
pool, jacuzzi, fully furnished
- exept linens. Near shuttle/
chair 15. Winter $125/night.
Weekends and Holidays $110
midweek. Summer $95/night.
$495/week. No smoking. No
pets. Jim Johnson (818) 992-
7564, FS 80C.
MAMMOTH CONDO rental.
Large 2bed/2bath winterset
condo. Fully furnished, across
from Vons, on shuttle route,
easily sleeps 8. Hot tub,
heated pool, sauna, full size in
unit W/D HDTV/WiFi through-
out, woodburning freplace,
pets OK FIREFIGHTER
DISCOUNTS, rates from $150/
night
facebook.com/mammoth-
mtncondo@yahoo.com
Ryan @ (310) 717-8483
MAMMOTH CONDO - Sierra
Manors Sleeps 7. 3 bedroom
2 1/2 bath. Fully furnished ex-
cept linens. 2 TVs/VCR/DVD,
stereo/CD. Dishwasher, mi-
crowave, sauna, jacuzzi, pool.
No smoking/No Pets. Shuttle
at door. Winter $155/night,
Summer $100/night, Plus $80
cleaning fee and City Bed Tax.
Brian & Karen Salvage LAFD
Retired (805) 499-7752.
MAMMOTH LAKES - One
bedroom, extremely charming
wildfower condo. Full ameni-
ties, close to shuttle. Antiques,
art, satellite TV, freplace.
Sleeps 4. Winter $110, Sum-
mer $85 plus cleaning fees.
Call Bill Clark (818) 371-6722
Email: shakesong@aol.com
MAMMOTH SKI & RACQUET:
Studio/loft, 2 bath, king bed,
sleeps 4. Full kitchen, TV,
VCR, DVD. Garage parking.
Walk to Canyon Lodge. Ski
back wall. 2 night minimum.
Winter $100/nite, $126 Fri, Sat
& Holidays. Summer $50/nite.
Plus $95 cleaning & linens.
Jeff & Lisa Moir. LAFD Air Ops
(661) 254-5788.
MAMMOTH SKI & RACQUET:
Walk to Canyon Lodge. Studio
loft sleeps 4. Queen beds, full
kitchen, 2 baths, garage park-
ing, TV, VCR, DVD. Winter
Sun-Thurs $100.nite; Fri & Sat
$115/nite plus cleaning fee
$100. Non smoking complex.
Joel Parker, LAFD retired.
email: cat25sailor@juno.com
or (213) 399-6534.
MARIPOSA/GOLD COUN-
TRY. North entrance to
Yosemite. 2 bedrooms, 1 bath,
sleeps 6. Newly built. Com-
plete kitchen, washer & dryer,
wi-f, satellite TV. Seasonal
rates. www.thecottageonev-
ergreenlane.com
Call 888-977-1006
MAUI CONDO 1 AND 2 BED-
ROOMS. Centrally located on
beautiful Maalaea Bay. Excel-
lent swimming and snorkeling;
white sandy beach. Minutes
from golf, tennis, fshing, shop-
ping, airport and resort areas.
Marsha Smith or Jeanne
McJannet. Toll free (800) 367-
6084. www.maalaeabay.com
60 February 2014
MAUIS MOST BEAUTI-
FUL BEACH - Napili Bay.
Beautiful furnished condo
that sleeps 4. Lanai/bal-
cony, full kitchen, king bed,
fat screen TVs/DVD, ACs
free WiFi (internet), com-
plimentary maid service,
complimentary coffee every
morning and breakfast on
Fridays. Special frefght-
ers discount - Best value
in West Maui! Nice pool &
BBQ area - Close to beach!
(800) 336-2185 www.
napilivillage.com
Don Sprenger - retired
LAFD (949) 548-5659
MAUI BEACH FRONT
CONDO ON NAPILI BAY -
50 from water. Studios and
1 bdrm. Luxury furnishings +
full kitchen. All the ameni-
ties! Mauis best snorkeling/
beach. All island activities &
Kapalua within 4 minutes.
5-day minimum, from $150
per night (regularly $310
night). Call Sherrie or Bill for
info/reservations (805) 530-
0007 or email: pmimaui@
aol.com
or visit: www.napilibay-
maui.com
PALM DESERT-3
bed/2bath, one level. New
re-model, fully furnished w/
linens. Cable TV/DVR, Pri-
vate Patio, BBQ, Laundry,
Garage, Gated Community,
2(Pools, Jacuzzis, Tennis
Courts). Near College of the
Desert. $175 Dan Cook 310
418 1577.
SOUTH LAKE TAHOE
Romantic Chalet Family
getaway. 3 bed/2 bath plus
loft. Sleeps 810. Cable
TV, washer/dryer, micro-
wave, woodburning stove.
7 minutes to casinos and
Heavenly. Located in Tahoe
Paradise. $105 per night
plus cleaning. Call Shawn or
Rose Agnew at (661) 250-
9907 or (661) 476-6288.
VACATION
VEHICLES
LUXURY RV FOR RENT.
New class A 40 motorhome.
Sleeps 8, bunk beds, 4
slides, 4 TVs, fully loaded.
$270/day (with active/retired
frefghter/police discount),
includes cleaning fee and
unlimited miles. 3-day
minimum, tow dolly avail-
able. Get more, pay less.
Call Shawn, LAFD. (888)
540-4835.
www.ocdreamrv.com
CALL OR EMAIL US FOR MORE INFORMATION
Eric Santiago - eric@lafra.org - (323) 259-5231
Dave Wagner - editor@lafra.org - (323) 259-5232
SALE
Spring into Action
12 months of
Grapevine Classified Advertising
Regularly $150 Now only $99
Available for new contracts and contract extensions until February 28, 2014.
All other terms and conditions still apply. All contracts must be paid in full in advance.
February 2014 61
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2. This account earns interest at a variable rate. Rate may change at any time without prior notice. Fees could reduce earnings on the account.
Minimum opening deposit is $25.
3. Valid for online savings accounts only.
4. A 0.10% bonus APY may apply. To receive the Bonus APY on the High Yield Savings account you must maintain a linked PMA Premier Checking
account. If the PMA Package relationship is terminated, the bonus interest rate on all eligible savings accounts, discounts, or fee waivers on other
products and services will discontinue and revert to the Bank's current applicable rate or fee. If the PMA Package relationship is terminated, you must
convert any remaining unlinked PMA Premier Checking, PMA Prime Checking, PMA Checking, and PMA Investment Checking account to
another checking product or close the account and move the remaining funds to another account.
5. Chase Relationship Required. You receive relationship rates when your account is linked to an active Chase Premier Plus Checking account
or an active Chase Premier Platinum Checking account. Otherwise, non-relationship rates apply.
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