Welcome

Celebrity portraits are fascinating because a good photographer can show us something beyond the movie, music or sports star. They can take us beyond the roles or stereotypes that celebrities work within and show us the person behind the mask. A great example of this is the award-winning photography of Brian Smith (p24). With the idea of celebrity, of course, comes the idea of the rich and famous jetting off to exotic locations. On p32 we have just that: the ultimate guide to achieving great photography of far-flung landscapes and fascinating cultures.

Another way to look at landscapes is in a wide, cinematic format. A panorama is a great way to make the scene the star of your shot. Find out everything you need to know about shooting and editing panoramas on p50. One part of the celebrity narrative we can’t ignore is romance. Weddings are big business for photographers, and what’s interesting about that side of the industry is that customers are increasingly influenced by the high-end photography they see in glossy celeb or fashion shoots rather than the standard group shot of yore. Find out more about this and much more about wedding photography on p50. Enjoy the issue, and happy shooting! April Madden, Editor

GET IN TOUCH WITH US Ask a question, tell us your thoughts or share your photos…

Twitter: @DPhotographer Tweet us your opinions or shots and see them printed

Facebook: Search Digital Photographer and join 8,200 like-minded photographers

Email: team@dphotographer.co.uk with the subject clearly marked

Website: Share your images for free at www.dphotographer.co.uk
DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHER 3

© Karl Taylor

The Ultimate

Travel Lens 18-270mm f3.5-6.3 VC PZD Lens
15x
ZOOM

270
mm

mm

18

Travel Light!

The new small and lightweight lens from Tamron is the ideal ‘one solution’ lens for travelling. It’s jam packed with features including our new piezo ultrasonic motor for superfast and silent autofocus, plus built-in Vibration Compensation (VC). It also comes with a 5 year guarantee, not that we think you’ll need it! Just put it in your bag and this lens can handle almost any situation you can throw at it.

Possibly the only lens you’ll ever need!

18-270mm F/3.6.3 Di II VC PZD
The world’s lightest, most compact 15x Zoom
Available for Nikon, Canon and Sony DSLR cameras.
i) For SLR camera high-zoom-ratio lenses with 15x magnification capability. Current as of December 2010. (Source: Tamron).

i

Lens shown Actual Size
*

Available from all fine camera stores www.tamron.co.uk
Intro 2020 Ltd. Priors Way, Maidenhead, Berkshire SL6 2HP Tel: 01628 674411
*Lens shown for illustration purpose only, sizes may vary. E&OE

New eyes for industry

Imagine Publishing Ltd Richmond House 33 Richmond Hill Bournemouth Dorset BH2 6EZ % +44 (0)1202 586200 Web: www.imagine-publishing.co.uk www.dphotographer.co.uk www.greatdigitalmags.com

Magazine team
Editor April Madden
april.madden@imagine-publishing.co.uk % 01202 586218

Senior Designer Newton R. de Oliveira Features Editor Hayley Paterek Staff Writer Matt Bennett Photographer James Sheppard Editor in Chief Dan Hutchinson Head of Publishing Aaron Asadi Head of Design Ross Andrews
Contributors
Mark Bauer, Kevin Carter, Sherwin Coelho, Rachael D’Cruze, Natalie Denton, Philip Morris, Adam Smith, Amy Squibb, Joanna Stass, Jodie Tyley, Poz Watson and Steve Wright

Cover image Advertising

© Brian Smith, photographed for ‘Art & Soul’ in partnership with the Creative Coalition and Sony Digital or printed media packs are available on request. Head of Sales Hang Deretz % 01202 586442 hang.deretz@imagine-publishing.co.uk Advertising Manager Jennifer Farrell % 01202 586430 jennifer.farrell@imagine-publishing.co.uk Account Manager Becky Palmer % 01202 586438 becky.palmer@imagine-publishing.co.uk

Cover disc

Head of Digital Mat Toor Multimedia Editor Matt Deeble DPxtrahelp@imagine-publishing.co.uk
© Brian Smith

Digital Photographer is available for licensing. Contact the International department to discuss opportunities. Head of International Licensing Cathy Blackman % +44 (0)1202 586401 licensing@imagine-publishing.co.uk subscriptions@imagine-publishing.co.uk For all subscriptions enquiries Email: digitalphotographer@servicehelpline.co.uk % (UK) 0844 848 8407 % (Overseas) +44 (0)1795 592 862 13-issue subscription (UK) – £52 13-issue subscription (Europe) – £70 13-issue subscription (ROW) – £80

International

Subscriptions

Circulation

Head of Circulation Darren Pearce % 01202 586200

Our contributors
HAYLEY PATEREK
Website:

Production Founders

Production Director Jane Hawkins % 01202 586200 Group Managing Director Damian Butt Group Finance & Commercial Director Steven Boyd Group Creative Director Mark Kendrick

MATT BENNETT
Website:

PAUL JOYNSONHICKS
Website:

dphotographer.co.uk Features Editor Hayley has a degree in Photography and is an expert image editor to boot. This issue, she takes a look at wedding photography, exploring best-practice behaviour, savvy business ideas and the latest trends that customers are inspired by.She also takes Nikon’s new D7100 out for a spin.

dphotographer.co.uk After working as a photographer in Australia, Matt can really get to grips with landscapes on the grand scale. This issue he demonstrates how to set up, shoot and edit incredible panoramic shots. He also rounds up some of the must-have software and accessories and interviews product photography pro Karl Taylor.

pauljoynson-hicks.com Pro photographer and African-wildlife expert, Associate Member of the Royal Photographic Society and with an MBE for his charity work, Paul showcases the tips he shares with students during his Capture Safari workshops as we go behind the scenes with the winner of our Capture Safari competition winner from 2012, Andrew Scriven.

Printing & Distribution

Wyndeham Heron, The Bentall Complex, Colchester Road, Heybridge, Maldon, Essex CM9 4NW Distributed in the UK & Eire by: Seymour Distribution, 2 East Poultry Avenue, London, EC1A 9PT % 0207 429 4000 Distributed in Australia by: Gordon & Gotch, Equinox Centre, 18 Rodborough Road, Frenchs Forest, NSW 2086 % + 61 2 9972 8800 Distributed in the Rest of the World by: Marketforce, Blue Fin Building, 110 Southwark Street, London, SE1 0SU % 0203 148 8105

Disclaimer

The publisher cannot accept responsibility for any unsolicited material lost or damaged in the post. All text and layout is the copyright of Imagine Publishing Ltd. Nothing in this magazine may be reproduced in whole or part without the written permission of the publisher. All copyrights are recognised and used specifically for the purpose of criticism and review. Although the magazine has endeavoured to ensure all information is correct at time of print, prices and availability may change. This magazine is fully independent and not affiliated in any way with the companies mentioned herein. © Imagine Publishing Ltd 2013 ISSN 1477-6650

bRIAN SmITh
Website:

www.briansmith.com Celebrity photographer Brian Smith captured cover star Anne Hathaway’s serene expression during a shoot for one of his recent books. The Pulitzer prizewinning shooter shares his advice on what makes a great portrait and shares some of his stories from the wonderful world of celebrity photography.

Website:

mARK bAUER

RAChAEL D’CRUZE
Website:

tinyurl.com/DPMarkB Landscape pro Mark Bauer is one of the UK’s leading landscape photographer and is well known for his images of Dorset. This issue he shares his advice on panoramic images and also kicks off a regular column in which he’ll share his thoughts on photography.

rachaeldcruze.com Our careers guru Rachael D’Cruze is a photography journalist and writer. Each and every issue she shares essential advice on how you can achieve the photography career of your dreams. This issue she’s focusing on social media and how you can use it to raise your photographic profile.
DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHER 5

15,663

1 Jan- 31 Dec 2012

Contents
Issue 135
©Kimberley Coole

Techniques
32 Ultimate guide to travel Capture memorable shots of exotic locations around the world

Your Images

Improve your shooting and editing skills with a wealth of inspiration
42 The power of panoramas Discover how to set up, shoot and edit perfect panoramic images 54 Shoot your bestever wedding photos How to make your customer’s special day into a truly special shoot

8 Reader portfolio Neon brights from Chris Patterson 16 Story behind the still Fabian Oefner goes for a spin

In Focus

32 42

18 News A workshop from Claude Nori plus new kit from Canon 22 Shadow and light Sarah Meister of MoMA discusses her Bill Brandt retrospective 24 Shooting stars How Brian Smith captures incredible celebrity portraits

© Ian Rolfe

©Brian Smith

Image editing
82 Smooth skin Retouch your portraits 84 Create aerial perspective Fake a realistic landscape look 86 Enhance a cityscape Improve your urban shots

Helpdesk
© Ian Rolfe

88 Helpdesk Essential advice to fix your photos 90 Career advice Use social networks effectively

Portfolio

104 Taylor made Karl Taylor on shooting success 110 Shooting in the wild On safari with Paul Joynson-Hicks
© Paul Joynson-Hicks

©XXXX

6 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHER

YOUR FREE COVER DISC
Turn to p114 for your bonus resources

Kit Bag
62 Group test Which compact is the toughest of the bunch? Find out here...

Discover the latest cameras, lenses and much more
70 Nikon D7100 Nikon’s latest DX-format DSLR has its feature set put to the test 74 Fujifilm FinePix HS50 EXR How super is this super zoom? 76 Lenses The latest lenses from Canon, Olympus and Nikon on test 78 Accessories A round-up of the latest practical and fun kit, books, bags and more 80 Software Perfect your portraits and more with new software and apps

View Point

114

Orange sunsets and orange brides

104

24

Issue 132

© Karl Taylor

110

© Andrew Scriven

Turn to page 96, or go online and buy direct from

30%
©Brian Smith

Subscribe and save

DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHER 7

© Mark Bauer

YOUR IMAGES

Bright and beautiful
Check out some of the standout shots from the Gallery this month. Reader Chris Patterson also shares her bold fashion and beauty portfolio. Don’t forget to upload your photos for a chance to feature here!
8 DIGITAL pHOTOGRApHER
© Chris Patterson

“This image was shot at Mayfield Studio so I could play with my assistant’s 90mm f2.8 lens as I am looking to purchase one. Now where is my debit card?” Shot details: Canon EOS 7D with a 90mm lens and f7.1, 1/125sec, ISO 100

PERCHWANE

DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHER 9

YOUR IMAGES

“This image was taken as a portfolio update for the dynamic hair and make-up duo I adore working with. Shot with a beauty dish” Shot details: Canon EOS 7D with a 90mm lens and f7.1, 1/125sec, ISO 100

STePHaNie

10 DIGITaL pHOTOGRapHER

© All images by Chris Patterson

Chris Patterson
DP Gallery name: Chris Patterson DP Gallery address: www.dphotographer.co.uk/ user/christeeny Website: www.christeeny.com Day job: Photographer/ retoucher Photographic speciality: Portraiture Long-term photo ambition: To not be judged on my gender for photography jobs. Other than that, I would love to shoot portraits for magazines. How long have you been shooting digitally? Four years. I jump between digital and film when I can; I would say digital is my day job, film makes me happy. What does your kit bag hold? A Canon EOS 7D (aka ‘Precious’!), a 50mm f1.8 lens and a 17-85mm lens. I rarely use my 17-85mm unless I am shooting live music shows. My kit is tiny but it’s all I need for what I do. What does your dream kit bag hold? A Mamiya RZ67! My assistant Greg just got one and I spent an afternoon just pressing the shutter, it is the most incredible thing you have ever heard. I would want digital, Polaroid and film backs for it too. What’s the best advice you’ve ever received? Know your client, do your research and always use adjustment layers in Photoshop, never work on the image itself. Top tip for anyone who wants to take shots like yours: Lots of contrast and colour, also read lots of comic books. Favourite location: Anywhere, I love a challenge. I do like the studio as I like playing around with lights a lot. Photographer you most admire: Tom Munro, Perou, Rankin, James White and Mario Testino – they all do incredible portraits and are a huge influence [on me].

“Little sexpot Beth asked me to shoot her EP cover, I had an amazing team working on this shoot. Everyone was happy with the results” Shot details: Canon EOS 7D with a 17-85mm lens at 38mm and f8, 1/160sec, ISO 160

BETH MACARI EP COVER

“I had a crazy make-up idea that I just had to do and the incredible Sarah who has done make-up on several of my shoots brought it to life. One giant octobox was used to light this” Shot details: Canon EOS 7D with a 17-85mm lens at 38mm and f7.1, 1/160sec, ISO 100

LOVE, HATE, LOVE

8
diGiTAl pHoToGRApHeR 11

YOUR IMAGES

12 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHER

© Tarmo Tulit

John Aguihap 

Image title: Buddha Tooth Relic Singapore DP Gallery name: John Aguihap DP Gallery address: www.dphotographer.co.uk/user/ johnspeed The Buddha tooth relic and Museum is one of the tourist attractions in Chinatown, Singapore. It’s the home of golden Buddha relics and a place for meditation for many Buddhists. To edit this shot I used Lightroom 4. Shot details: Olympus OMD-EM5, 12-50mm f3.5 kit lens at 12mm and f14, 5.0sec, ISO 200

Image title: Untitled DP Gallery name: Tarmo Tulit DP Gallery address: www.dphotographer.co.uk/user/ Mick%20Estland It was the first ever ‘proper’ shoot for our young model Bonnie, but I think her slight stage freight and the cold weather of February actually brought out naturally the emotion we were looking for in this shot. Shot details: Olympus E-30, Zuiko 1454mm f2.8-3.5 at 27mm and f3, 1/250 sec, ISO 250

Darren Wilson

Image title: Splash DP Gallery name: Darren Wilson DP Gallery address: www.dphotographer.co.uk/ user/natterjack Taken during the recent poor weather, [this is] my version of this subject. Using an off-camera flash, remote trigger and coloured glass, I captured some interesting patterns with this splashing setup. Shot details: Canon EOS 7D with a 24-105mm lens at 100mm and f7.1, 1/250sec and ISO 200

DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHER 13

© Darren Wilson

© John Aguihap

 

Tarmo Tulit

YOUR IMAGES

Image title: A Summer’s Dream DP Gallery name: Peter Bolman DP Gallery address: www.dphotographer.co.uk/ user/Peter%20Bolman “A beautiful day in The Netherlands. After scouting the location, I knew this scene would only work at sunset in the summer because of the blooming flowers for foreground interest” Shot details: Canon EOS 5D Mark II with a 17-40mm lens at 20mm and f11, 1/20sec, ISO 100

DPHOTOGRAPHER.CO.UK: Create your own online gallery for free now! Simply sign up today by visiting www.dphotographer.co.uk
14 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHER

© Peter Bolman

8

Peter Bolman

Some images shown are WhiteWall.co.uk editions, e.g. S. Hagge, F. Holland, E. Waßerführer, H. Droste, T. Tarcal, D. Wieck, T. Müller, P. Fischer (detailed view)

THE LAB FOR PHOTOGRAPHERS
Special of the Month

Direct print behind acrylic glass
from

£ 5.90

1. Upload picture 2. Choose from professional prints, aluminium or acrylic mountings, canvases, framings 3. Select your format to the exact inch 4. Quick delivery from the lab direct to you

Phone: 020 - 3411 1846 E-mail: info @WhiteWall.com

WhiteWall.co.uk

YOUR IMAGES

© Fabian Oefner

16 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHER

behind the

Photographer: Fabian Oefner Website: www.fabianoefner.com www.facebook.com/pages/ Dfphotography/160446400668204 Location: Photo Studio, Fabian Oefner Client: Personal work Shot details: Nikon D800 with a Zeiss-Makro Planar 100mm lens at f9, 1sec, ISO 100, custombuilt flashes and controllers

still

About the shot: Professional photographer Fabian Oefner has a portfolio full of striking shots. Each image raises intriguing questions about how they were taken and what the initial idea and inspiration was behind them. This incredible photograph, known as Black Hole, is based on paint being modelled by different forces. Fabian says, “The inspiration for this project comes from looking at the drip paintings of Jackson Pollock. Contrary to Pollock’s masterpieces, which show the result of his action painting, I am putting the focus on showing the action itself, what does it look like when paint gets whirled around by centripetal forces? Or by air pressure? I’m not so much interested in what happens when the paint hits the canvas, but rather what happens in between.” To capture the image, Fabian first paint-proofs his studio and then sets up. He says, “The setup for the shot is fairly simple. Various shades of acrylic paint are dripped onto a metallic rod, which is connected to a drill. When switched on, the paint starts to move away from the rod, creating these amazing structures.” He adds, “The motion of the paint happens in a blink of an eye, the images you see are taken only a millisecond after the drill was turned on. To capture the moment, I connected a sensor to the drill, which sends an impulse to the flashes. These specialised units are capable of creating flashes as short as a 1/40000 of a second.” Check out Fabian’s full behind-the-scenes DP video at https://vimeo.com/61485013.

Fabian connects a metal rod to a drill. Using sensors, the flash heads fire and the camera’s shutter will release once paint is dripped onto the rotating rod. With the correct timing, it’s possible to capture stunning abstract shots like Black Hole DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHER 17

IN FOCUS

In pursuit of happiness
Photographic flirt, Claude Nori, set for ‘happiness’ workshop

© Claude Nori

Claude Nori’s photo Rimini Lovers, from 1983, is an example of capturing a ‘soap bubble’ of happiness

T
Words by Poz Watson

he French photographer and director of publishing house Contrejour, Claude Nori, is to hold an Eyes in Progress workshop in Biarritz for nine professional or advanced amateur photographers. Nori’s workshop – entitled ‘The Photographic Flirt’ is one of a series of events held by Eyes in Progress, where photographers can push themselves and try alternative techniques, while being taught by the masters of their art. The aim of Nori’s workshop will be the idea of photographing happiness. Nori says “[it’s] really very difficult, perhaps more complicated than taking photographs of poverty or tragedy. It is something intangible, like a soap bubble that slips away, it’s hard to catch because we find ourselves on the inside and everything is fragile. When you are happy, you do not feel the urge to take a photo but rather to indulge yourself in the intoxication of the moment, drinking, eating, kissing, rising up…”

Claude Nori is a master photographer and director who has worked for Vogue and many other prestigious titles. He was introduced to photography in 1968 by a classmate and rapidly became interested in exploring photographic techniques and creativity. He also works to promote and display the work of other photographers, running a publishing house, magazines and arts festivals. After founding Backlight (a newspaper, publishing house and gallery) in 1974, the Toulouse-born pro released his first book of photography in 1976. Backlight itself published books by the likes of Arnaud Claass and Denis Roche. Nori and his wife also founded the Terre d’Images festival in Biarritz, France. Nori is fascinated by the idea of photography as flirting, with the camera symbolising a go-between or connection between the photographer and their subject, and he aims to show participants in his workshop how to achieve this fragile, fleeting moment.

You can apply to be one of the nine participants on Nori’s course at www.eyesinprogress.com. It costs €700 to attend the workshop, which will be held 2023 August. Applications must be in by 22 July 2013. After the workshop, participants’ portfolios will be showcased on the Eyes in Progress website. Another way to get a glimpse of the photography masters in action is to attend the National Photography Symposium, which takes place on 17 May 2013 as part of LOOK/13, Liverpool’s international photography festival. There are events and exhibitions from 17 May to 15 June this year, with a ‘Who Do you Think you are?’ theme. Highlights include work from two of the founding fathers of photography, August Sander (1876-1964) and Arthur Fellig aka Weegee (1899-1968), whose contrasting looks at realism and portraiture will set the tone for the festival. The Walker Art Gallery is also going to hold a major new exhibition from Rankin. See lookphotofestival.com for more.

KEEP INFORMED: For more news, updates and inside information from the ever-changing world of digital photography, be sure to pay a visit to
18 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHER

News

Graduate showcase set to wow again
Free Range is back for its annual seven-week run
Free Range, the UK’s largest graduate art, photography, design and fashion show will take over The Old Truman Brewery in London’s Brick Lane for seven weeks, beginning with the invitation-only catwalk shows from 29 May – 7 June, and then the public exhibitions from 31 May – 15 July. Well known to be a good way new graduates can make their mark in the industry, this year’s Free Range, the 13th instalment of the showcase, will feature work from over a hundred courses and more than 3,000 students. Five disciplines will be featured in the free exhibitions: photography and media, design, fashion and textiles, contemporary and fine art, and interior design and architecture. In order to house all of this, the exhibition has been expanded to take up all three floors of the Old Truman Brewery’s F Block. More than 100,000 visitors attended the free exhibitions in 2012, and once again Free Range has collaborated with industry figures, opinion formers and the universities to form a support network once the students have graduated. This year, Free Range will also have a café in the Loading Bay on Dray Walk to facilitate networking. See www.trumanbrewery.com for more information on the exhibitions and how to attend, and www.freerange.org.uk for the ongoing portfolio of participating and former exhibitors.

New from Shutterstock
Not all stock photo sites are created equal, and Shutterstock is capitalising on its strengths with the launch of Offset. This new premium stock photography site features exclusive imagery from photographic professionals, with a focus on high-end content suitable for the glossiest of magazines. In keeping with its exclusive image, Offset was in private beta at the time of going to press, with sign-ups restricted to a guest list of VIP invites (although you can apply for membership once it’s available by visiting

Offset is a brand-new stock photography offering
the website at www.offset.com and entering your details). Offset will run separately from Shutterstock so you’ll need to register for it even if you’re already a Shutterstock user. Meanwhile, Shutterstock suppliers are celebrating ten years of the stock photography brand’s success. With over 25 million images in its banks and 300 million downloads, Shutterstock has paid out a cool $150 million to the photographers who create and sell their stock there. Isn’t it time you signed up?

Canon’s slew of new cameras
The smallest and lightest DSLR in its class is one of the new additions to the range
Canon has released two new DSLR models, the EOS 700D and the EOS 100D which weighs just 407g. Both cameras offer 18-megapixel resolution, and can be supplied with a EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS STM zoom lens, with a closest focusing distance of 0.25m. The EOS 700D has a native ISO range of 100-12,800, enabling you to capture an impressive level of detail even in low light, and with the 5 fps shooting 9-point AF system, photographers can keep their subject in focus, even when they’re on the move. The EOS 100D measures just 116.8 x 90.7 x 69.4mm, even with a 7.7cm touchscreen to view your shots. The EOS 700D costs £629.99 or £759.99 with the lens; the EOS 100D is priced at £579.99 or £709.99 with the lens. Canon has also added two new consumer cameras to its range, the £279 PowerShot SX270 HS and the £299 PowerShot SX280 HS. Both models feature a DIGIC 6 processor and 12.1 megapixels. The SX280 HS also

Cameras

© Dovile Jurkienne – City of Westminster

Free Range is a great way for graduate photographers to get their work seen

comes with integrated Wi-Fi and GPS, so you can easily send images and have them place-stamped with the location they were taken in. See www.canon.co.uk for more on all these exciting new models.

our website at www.dphotographer.co.uk, and if you’ve got a story for us, you can email the DP team at team@dphotographer.co.uk
21 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHER 19

IN FOCUS

announces 2013 winners In other CHIPP news… AFP photographer who died this year among big winners
More snippets of photo news from around the world

Viewbug contests

Visit Viewbug for a chance to win photographic goodies. The image-sharing community is based on regular themed photography competitions. They’re judged by photography pros and prizes include kit from the likes of Epson, Lowepro and many more. Give it a try: www.viewbug.com

© Csaba Daróczi

G-Technology took the opportunity that was NAB to launch a range of new storage devices with photographers in mind. The G-Technology Evolution Series family includes the G-DOCK ev with Thunderbolt, and the G-DRIVE ev and G-DRIVE ev PLUS external hard drives with USB 3.0. There’s also the G-Drive PRO with Thunderbolt.

New G-Technology products launched

Afghan photographer Qais Usyan was awarded a gold in the category of general news at the China International Press Photo Contest 2013. The winning image was a photo of a mother, and her other children, huddling around the body of her five-year-old daughter, reported to have died after she had been raped by a 22-year-old man. It was taken in Kaldar hospital, Afghanistan. Qais Usyan died prematurely this year, aged 25. He had held a post for AFP in Mazar-i-Charif since 2011. Other AFP photographers to win in the awards were Javier Manzano, who took a silver in War and Disaster News, and Dibyangshu Sarkar, who was given an award of excellence in the Art, Culture and Entertainment News section. Manzano’s image was of two Syrian opposition snipers taking up their positions

Qais Usyan’s image took Gold in CHIPP’s General News category

in Aleppo in 2012, and Sarkar’s work was a portfolio about the Hindu festival of Makar Sankranti. CHIPP was set up in 2005 by the China Photojournalists Society in Shenzhen, Guangdong Province. 2013 is the 9th edition of the awards, and photographers from 23 nationalities received 75 prizes in eight categories. Elsewhere in the realm of press photography awards, the World Press Photo award recognised Swedish photojournalist Paul Hansen for his image of a funeral of two boys and their father, killed in an Israeli missile strike in Gaza City.

Aglu releases two new thought-provoking books
miniS4i range boost

Work by Laura Noel and Adam Geary featured in new photobooks
Aglu, the Scottish publisher, has launched two new photobooks, featuring the work of photographer/artist Laura Noel, and Adam Geary. They are both pocket-sized and aim to bring people cutting-edge work at affordable prices. American Laura Noel’s book is entitled Withdrawn, and it explores our relationship with books and the way we use, share and discard them. The second book is called Rising Slowly, by Scottish photographer Adam Geary. It is about mood and the prevailing weather, serving as a gentle reminder that change is always in the air. Geary has published two previous books, Strange Days and The Air was Full of Promises, with Aglu. The company aims to release two new books every four months, and is keen to hear from artists/photographers. See www.aglu.co.uk to buy goods, or to find out more about how to submit your own work for publication.

Two new lenses, developed due to customer demand, have been released by Cooke Optics to join its miniS4i range. The 40mm and 65mm lenses, join the 18, 25, 32, 50, 75, 100 and 135mm focal lengths. Cooke Optics won a 2013 Academy Award® of Merit for its innovation in the design, development and manufacture of motion picture lenses.

KEEP INFORMED: For more news, updates and inside information from the ever-changing world of digital photography, be sure to pay a visit to
18 DIGITAL 20 DIGITALPHOTOGRAPHER PHOTOGRAPHER

DP Investigates

DPInvestigates

Photographers’ rights
Don’t be intimidated by what people believe you are allowed to take photos of. Learn your rights and stick by them
Make sure you don’t stick your lens where it’s not allowed, but don’t worry about where it’s not wanted

W

hile the camera phone has become a common sight, the general public have become wary about people taking photos in certain situations. But legally, you can photograph most people and things, assuming they’re in a public place. David Hoffman (www. hoffmanphotos.com) is one of the founders of EPUK, which has campaigned for the rights of photographers to be fully understood by the police, and security guards in particular. “No permission is needed to photograph anyone but the laws on trespass, privacy and harassment can apply,” explains Hoffman. And while you can take any number of photos – and hold the copyright to them – the ones you can legally print might be another matter. Model releases are required if the image is going to be used for commercial purposes, for instance. “You can, more or less (Official Secrets Act and such is an exception), photograph anything anywhere,” continues Hoffman. “Privacy and defamation law may prevent publication however. If the photographer is on private property then the owner/agent can forbid any activity but the photographer would still own the images taken in breach. Legal proceedings would be

needed to enforce any suppression of the images or obtain damages but the law of trespass allows them to chuck the photographer out there and then.” Things get a little more complicated when it comes to the definitions of public and private spaces. For instance, the public are freely allowed into shopping centres, but they are privately owned. And you might be able to see into your neighbour’s back garden, but you shouldn’t be photographing them, because they have a right to expect privacy there. The law is no different when it comes to children. Hoffman says, “There’s nothing to stop you photographing kids so long as they are not indecent images.” So if people look worried by the photos you’re taking, explain to them what you’re doing. Show them your photos. It’s the same if the police stop you on the grounds that you might be a terrorist. Be honest with them. Be polite and calm, and explain what it is you’re doing and why you have the right to do that. Find out more about your rights and how they relate to different photographic situations at DP photorights.org and www.epuk.org.
Don’t feel pressured by other people when you’re out taking photos. Know the law, and stick to it

our website at www.dphotographer.co.uk, and if you’ve got a story for us, you can email the DP team at team@dphotographer.co.uk
DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHER 21

IN FOCUS
Images such as this make the comparisons with Cartier-Bresson easy to understand. This image was taken not long after Brandt first settled in London

EVENING IN KENWOOd, C.1934

In 1937, Brandt journeyed to the north of England and captured the way of life in the areas he visited, particularly focusing his photographs on miners and coal-searchers

NORTHUMBRIAN MINER AT HIS EVENING MEAL, 1937

Shadow and light
All images © 2013 Bill Brandt Archive Ltd

Bill Brandt’s impressive body of work often gets overlooked, but the Museum of Modern Art’s exhibition of his fascinating photography intends to change all that
22 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHER

Between 6 March and 12 August 2013, the Museum of Modern Art in New York is hosting a stunning exhibition of the work of photographer Bill Brandt (1904-1983). Born in Germany in 1904, by the early 1930s he had settled permanently in London and considered himself British - he even took to claiming that he had been born in London. Such is the breadth of Brandt’s oeuvre that ‘Bill Brandt: Shadow and Light’ will see more than 150 individual works divided into six distinct sections: London in the Thirties; Northern England; World War II; Portraits; Landscapes; and Nudes. The exhibition’s curator, Sarah Meister, explains all the ‘Shadow and Light’ essentials. What is the concept behind the exhibition? ‘Bill Brandt: Shadow and Light’ is conceived as an opportunity to better understand the achievement of this great twentieth-century photographer, whose work is less

well-known than many of his modernist peers. The key to this understanding lies in the expanded consideration of Brandt’s activity during World War II, insistent attention to the evolution of Brandt’s printing style, and a simultaneous embrace of the surrealist-infused ‘atmosphere’ of Brandt’s work in different genres, all of which allow viewers to trace the full trajectory of his career. What was involved in organising the exhibition? The exhibition developed out of a strategic acquisition initiative that began back in 2006, and half of the works on view are drawn from the Museum Collection. Brandt was a priority because most of the prints owned by the Museum at that time had been made for the 1969 retrospective at MoMA, organized by John Szarkowski. It was important, particularly for early work, to find vintage prints that expressed Brandt’s sensibility at the time at which the negatives were exposed, and the hunt for the very best prints was a real challenge. How would you as the curator describe Bill Brandt’s work? Why do you believe it is important and what

DP EXHIBITION SHOWCASE: Are you exhibiting your work? Get in touch at team@dphotographer.co.uk and tell us all the details

Exhibition
BOMBEd REGENCY STAIrCASE, MAYFAIr, C.1942 SEAFOrd, EAST SUSSEX COAST, 1957
Captured with a Superwide Hasselblad, this abstract image formed part of the Perspective of Nudes collection that Brandt published in the early 1960s

Brandt’s work in London during World War II was used by the Ministry of Information as part of the British government’s campaign to bring the US into the conflict

strikes you as unique or radical about it? At the heart of each chapter in Brandt’s multi-faceted career – from the pictures he made of the English social hierarchies and life in London in the 1930s to the astounding reinventions of the female nude he published in 1961 as Perspective of Nudes – is a carefully nurtured ambiguity that has contributed to the enduring fascination with his work. In addition, Brandt’s work suggests a visualisation of British identity in the Twentieth Century – despite the fact that he was born in Hamburg – that uniquely encompasses its social, architectural, literary and cultural history. What are the highlights of the exhibition? The prints themselves, several of which were previously unknown, but all of which are works of exceptional beauty. Brandt’s own appreciation for his vintage prints waxed and waned, and this is the first consideration of his career that so steadfastly pursued the mood and atmosphere unique to each chapter of his achievement. How would you like visitors to MoMA to experience the exhibition? Brandt worked across so many genres and his printing style changed so radically across a nearly fifty-year career that it is tempting to consider his work in distinct silos. My hope is that by providing a broader understanding of his activity during the Second World War, with particular attention to his work for the illustrated magazines, viewers will be able to experience

first-hand his transformation at this pivotal moment, and make connections between his pre- and post-war work. How have you related Brandt’s work to the exhibition space? As the exhibition title suggests, loosely speaking, Brandt’s work begins in the dark, moody, atmospheric shadows of London and northern England in the 1930s, and culminates in the bleached, almost dizzying female forms strewn across the beaches of England and France in the 1950s and 1960s. To parallel this development, I framed each chapter of his career in ever-lighter frame colours, so that as a viewer walks through the exhibition there is a sense of a progressive lightening not only in the images, but also in their presentation. What do you feel Bill Brandt’s work tells us about the history of photography? Brandt’s career puts forward a distinctive image of Britain in the twentieth century, from portraits of the artists and writers who captured their own versions of this subject, to landscapes that evoke the richness of British cultural history that persists in the present, and from discerning observations of the social structure of London in the 1930s, to unforgettable pictures that evoke life in that city during WWII. Perhaps more significant to photography’s history, Brandt and his peers (such as Henri Cartier-Bresson and Walker Evans), in the diversity of their approach, established the creative potential of photography DP based on observation of the world around them.

GET TO KNOW…
www.moma.org Bio: Sarah Meister has worked as a curator at the Museum of Modern Art since 2009. She spent the previous 12 years working as a Curatorial Assistant in the Department of Photography. In addition to the many exhibitions that she has organised, Sarah has also contributed to a number of publications, most recently for the 75th anniversary edition of Walker Evans’s American Photographs, which will be accompanied by an exhibition opening at MoMA in July 2013.

Sarah Meister

Exhibition essentials
Name: Bill Brandt: Shadow and Light When: 6 March - 12 August 2013 Where: The Museum of Modern Art, 11 West 53 Street, New York, NY 10019 Opening hours: Wednesday through Monday, 10:30 am – 5:30 pm; Friday, 10:30 am – 8:00 pm; closed Tuesday. Admission: $25 adults; for concessions, please see website More information: www.moma.org/visit/calendar/exhibitions/1343

about where, when and what photography you’re displaying to the world and you could feature on these pages
DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHER 23

INTERViEW

24 dIGITAL DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHER

Brian Smith

stars
Pulitzer Prize-winning celebrity photographer Brian Smith explains how he captures in-depth portraits of the stars
Brian Smith was tipped for photography stardom at a very young age. While still a college student, an image of his (a shot of New York Yankees’ manager Billy Martin crying at baseball player Thurman Mason’s funeral in 1979) was published in iconic American photographic magazine LIFE. There are photographers out there who, blessed with kicking off their professional careers in a similar situation, would claim that such a moment was entirely by design; a perfectly judged stroke of genius. Smith’s explanation is simpler: “Luck. The more you put yourself in the right situation and work really hard – the luckier you get.” Smith’s make-your-own-luck attitude is ultimately what makes him such a good – and award-winning – photographer. During his high-school years in the 1970s, Smith and his first-ever camera (a Minolta SRT-102) “started shooting sports for the local newspaper and my classmates treated me like I was much cooler than I really was, plus I could sneak out of school any time I was ‘on deadline’.” By 1985 he’d won one of the most prestigious arts prizes in the USA. “I was part of a three-photographer team that won the Pulitzer for photographs of the Los Angeles Olympics. We were going head-to-head with 28 photographers from the LA Times and it’s always more fun to be David than Goliath. We chose to steer clear of the pack; go for shots that no one else was shooting. We decided we’d swing for the fences and if we missed at least we’d go down swinging. Luckily it paid off.” Smith and his team were still shocked at their win though – “sports photography had only won a Pulitzer once before that, so I totally prepared for ‘close but no cigar’.”
© Images by Brian Smith

Shooting

8

Actress Anne Hathaway photographed for The Creative Coalition in New York. This image is featured in Brian’s book Art & Soul. Shot with Brian’s trusty Sony DSLR DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHER 25

ANNE HaThaWaY

INTERViEW
Despite his obvious ability in the medium, Smith’s heart wasn’t in sports photography. He’s said in this magazine before that he “never felt a connection with the people I was photographing” at this stage of his career and that portraiture was and is the genre that is most important to him. “As a sports photographer, you’re shooting athletes with 400 and 600mm lenses and as a photojournalist you don’t want to change the reality of the situation. Either way, you remain detached from your subject. I really prefer the interaction you have with portraiture.” It’s portraiture that Brian Smith is, quite rightly, famous for. These days he works digitally, which has changed his technical approach somewhat since the early days – “I mostly shot colour transparency film, so you’d run clip tests then process the rest of the shoot, pick your selects and be done. Today, you have so many options – which in many ways is great – but with all those options, you can sometimes fall into the trap of tweaking photos to death.” While many pro shooters are evangelists for Canon or Nikon, Smith has his own brand loyalty, and he’s passionate about his chosen Sony DSLR. “If I had to pick one body and lens it would be the Sony A99 and CZ 24-70/2.8. The camera has a great sensor and lens [and] is not only the sharpest zoom I’ve ever used – it covers all the focal lengths I used most for portraits. Of course, I’m not normally restricted to just one body and lens [so] I’ll add in a second A99 with a CZ 85/1.4 or CZ 135/1.8” And with his trusty A99s in hand, Smith shoots some of the warmest and most intimate celebrity portraiture you’re likely to see, because he understands the importance of the connection between a photographer and their subject. His personable manner allows him to bring out the best in his subjects and he’s got some great tales from the studio, particularly of favourite shoots. “Often [it’s] the experience of the shoot that colours my emotions about the photographs. Having an hour with Anne Hathaway was certainly a highlight. As was Sam Jackson showing up unannounced because he’d seen the photos I’d given his friends Kerry Washington and Alfre Woodard.” Samuel L Jackson turning up unexpectedly on your doorstep sounds like one of the scarier moments in a Quentin Tarantino film, but Smith captured a delightfully joyful image that most people wouldn’t associate with the actor who’s best known for playing an assortment of stone-cold killers, a Jedi martyr and a superheroic special agent. “I think often my favourite moments were when I was able to draw something unexpected out of the subject,” Smith says. Smith was shooting this particular collection of celebs for his book Art & Soul, which is a celebration of the arts. It features portraits of a range of celebrities including Hathaway and Jackson alongside their handwritten thoughts on how the arts have affected them. So what effect have the arts had on Brian Smith himself? “I can’t imagine doing anything else – plus I met my wife through the arts, so I wouldn’t have enjoyed my life nearly as much without art!” Smith’s latest book is called Secrets of Great

8

While well-known for his celebrity shots, Brian also shoots other subjects, including burlesque

INGA INGENUE

8
26 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHER

Brian Smith

Richard Branson photographed on his private Island, Necker Island, BVI for a Time magazine story about Virgin Galactic’s Space Ship One

RICHARD BRANSON

DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHER 25 27

© Images by Brian Smith

INTERViEW
KERRY WASHiNGTON
Kerry Washington photographed for The Creative Coalition at Haven House in Beverly Hills, California on February 19, 2009. This image of the ‘Django Unchained’ star also features in Art & Soul

Burlesque dancer Lux La Croix shows some skin in this shot taken from one of Brian’s burlesque projects.

LUX LA CROiX

BEHiND THE SCENES

Behind the scenes as Brian photographs Anne Hathaway. When this shoot was finished the star surprised Brian and his team with a box of cupcakes to share

28 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHER

© Images by Brian Smith

Brian Smith

On seeing Brian’s shots of his friends, A-lister Samuel L Jackson visited Brian’s studio unannounced to be photographed and to contribute to the Art & Soul project 25 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHER 29

SAMUEL L JACKSON

INTERViEW

SHAQUiLLE O’NEAL AND JAMiE FOXX

One of Brian’s favourite celeb-shoot stories is about how he got this shot

30 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHER

Brian Smith
Portrait Photography, and it draws on his 30 years of shooting experience. “People often ask if they could come hang out on a celebrity portrait shoot,” he explains. “Unfortunately that can’t ever happen, so I wanted to give people a behind-the-scenes look at the process that goes into celebrity portrait shoots. It’s a book about the why, not just the how. Portrait photography isn’t about formulas like “Put lights here = this.” It’s about making a connection with the person in front of your lens and communicating with the viewer – that’s what I wanted to share.” So how does a celebrity shoot work? In Brian Smith’s experience, “it usually starts with a concept that might relate to their latest project or else to show off something [about] who they are. But sometimes there’s no concept, the goal might simply be to capture a great face. Either way, you want to have a plan going in. I rarely speak with the subject before the shoot. It’s usually set up with their publicist, manager or assistant, so you try to make certain nothing’s lost in translation. The entire team is really important – from stylist, hair and make-up to assistants. The shoot runs smoothly when everyone is on top of their game.” So how should photographers who want to make it in the celebrity arena get into the game? “There are a lot of ways to do it. Some people start by assisting, others by shooting up-and-coming actors. The key is to develop your style and show that you can manage large personalities.” Smith also recommends
© Images by Brian Smith

Another Art & Soul shot of up-andcoming actor Portia Doubleday, soon to be seen on our screens in the movie reboot of Stephen King’s ‘Carrie’

PORTIA dOUBLEdAY

This shot of actor Don Cheadle was taken for Entertainment Weekly and has also featured in one of Brian’s awardwinning film noir-themed collections

DON CHEAdLE

that you “shoot lots of people – particularly strangers. The more people you get in front of your lens the better and photographing lots of strangers make you more comfortable [with] drawing out personalities quickly and being comfortable doing so.” His ultimate piece of advice? “The best thing to do is to treat stars like they’re regular folks and regular folks like stars.” Of course, everyone gets starstruck sometimes. Brian was “shooting Shaquille O’Neal at the Delano Hotel in Miami Beach. Word got out that Shaq was coming and every ten minutes or so, one of the hotel guests circled past us to see if Shaq was there yet. Nothing unusual about that – except the hotel guest was Jamie Foxx. DP Which proves everyone is affected by fame.”

If you’d like to master the art of shooting portraits full of life, then look no further than Brian’s latest book, Secrets of Great Portrait Photography. It’s packed with insider info. Find it at Brian’s website: www.briansmith.com.

Find out how to shoot like this

DIGITAL DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHER PHOTOGRAPHER 25 31

TECHNIQUES

Ultimate
guide to
Discover the inside secrets of travel photography and learn how to capture memorable shots of people, places and cultures around the world

travel

32 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHER

Travel

M

ost people return from holiday with a memory card full of images, but what elevates them beyond straightforward ‘snaps’ is the approach. Of the professional travel photographers featured here, every single one emphasised the importance of research. These can be the most expensive photographs you’ve ever taken, so you need to plan your time carefully and bring the necessary equipment. It can be tempting to cram in as much kit as you can, especially since travel opens up a vast scope of genres. Take a look at our gear guide to get some ideas of what to bring, but try to stick to the essentials, and your back will thank you later. You’re unlikely to grow bored when you’re composing vistas one moment and food the next.

These images should conjure up sights, sounds and smells, and every place is unique. Set out to capture what it was that made you want to visit and write down thoughts and feelings to help you add descriptions to your photos later. Gaining inspiration is easy, as the local tourist information centre will point you in the direction of popular photo hotspots. Even browsing postcards will reveal the must-see areas. If the primary purpose of your visit is a holiday, however, be content to take it easy in a café or lounging on a beach. You’ll soak up the atmosphere this way and familiarise yourself with the surroundings. Alternatively, if you want to take travel photography further, there are dedicated tours available, such as FR Vision (www.frvision.net). Get a taster in this article, and stow away insider tips for your next journey.

Ostriches silhouetted by the setting sun, near Jack’s Camp, Makgadikgadi Pan, Botswana. Look out for shots you can’t get at home

DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHER 33

© Steve Davey

EXOTIC CAPTURES

TECHNIQUES
Gear guide
AF-S NIKKOR 16-35mm f/4G ED VR
Web: www.nikon.co.uk Price: £880/$1,160

8

A wide-angle lens such as this one enables you to pack a lot more into the frame. They’re perfect for landscapes and portraits, which are two of the biggest genres within travel photography.

Canon EF 70-200mm f/2.8 IS USM

Web: www.canon.co.uk Price: £1,250/$1,700

A telephoto lens is incredibly versatile, reaching subjects such as wildlife and landmarks from a distance. The wider the focal range, the heavier the lens will tend to be, so a lighter second lens is useful.

Joby Gorillapod Flexible Tripod
Web: www.joby.com Price: £20/$20

Tripods can be cumbersome when you’re trekking all day, so invest in a portable lightweight option such as this. Its flexible legs can be wrapped around railings and branches for steady shots.

Lowepro Photo Traveler 150
Web: www.lowepro.com Price: £42/$55

It’s important to choose a purpose-built kit bag in order to get the protection you need. Customisable padding compartments are a bonus, and comfortable straps will ease the strain of heavy kit.

Silicon Power Armor A70

Web: www.silicon-power.com Price: £130/$109

Avoid losing photos by backing them up to a portable hard drive regularly. There are cheaper options, but this one is ideal for travelling, as it’s waterproof and shockproof.

34 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHER

Travel

“Immerse yourself in the culture simply by sitting and watching or joining in with a local tradition or activity”
Kimberley Coole
www.coolephotography.co.uk

Unforgettable experiences
Four of the best cultural events caught on camera
RIO DE JANEIRO CARNIVAL Brazil
This loud and vibrant parade is held in February every year, and is famous worldwide. Street parties and band processions in downtown (Centro) and South Rio (the Zona Sul) provide ample opportunities to get candid portrait shots that are full of character. Try using a long exposure to capture the energy and movement of the samba dancers. If you want to get close to the action you will need tickets. For more info, visit www.rio-carnival.net.

A young girl carrying sticks on her head along the banks of the Yamuna River, located next to the Mehtab Bagh, which is also known as the Moonlight Garden, India

LOCAL CULTURE

It is human nature to be nosey about other people’s lives, and portraits convey bags of information. We want to know what daily life is like, what the dress code is and what people eat, and a good portrait will tell us something about these things. However, unlike monuments and landscapes, people have feelings, and it’s only natural to want to avoid potential conflict. Taking time to swot up on the traditions and customs of a place will help you to avoid offending anyone. Travel photographer Kimberley Coole emphasises the need to never ‘take’ a photo, but to ask permission first instead. “On more than one occasion I have walked into a village to find other tourists and photographers standing over the people, not talking or interacting, not getting to know about their lives and customs, but simply turning the people into objects and getting as many photos as possible,” she says. “Interaction is the key, and I often find that after spending time with people, either chatting, using hand signs or having a cup of tea, they are much happier to be photographed. After getting to know the person a little more they relax, smile and laugh – making a much better photograph.” In some tourist destinations, people ask for money in exchange for a photo, and it’s completely up to you whether you wish to delve into your pockets. It’s worth remembering, though, that some of these places are very poor, and what seems like a little to us could bring a big smile to their face in the photograph. Asking permission is not always possible if you’re shooting a street scene, for example, but be sensitive and move on if someone looks uncomfortable. One way of appearing less intimidating is to ditch bulky equipment in favour of a lighter load and Kimberley only packs a Canon EOS 5D Mark II, a 24-105mm lens, a 16-35mm lens and a HOYA Pro1 Digital Filter for protection. So rather than rely on long lenses to pick people off like a sniper, build up the confidence to approach people instead. “This is often the hardest part, whether you speak the same language or not,” agrees Kimberley. “By simply having the courage to go over and say hello, people will generally attempt to interact with you. The best way of becoming friends is to try and make people laugh, which can be done easily if you don’t speak the same language, as they will find whatever you say amusing!”

NEW YEAR’S EVE Sydney Harbour
The firework display over the iconic landmark is second to none, so practice shooting in low light in advance. Secure your camera to something, whether it’s a nearby wall or a monopod (as it will be busy) and ensure your horizon is straight. Shoot in bulb mode and keep your finger on the shutter button for as long as it takes for the firework to explode.

CHINESE NEW YEAR China
Chinese New Year is the most significant day on the Chinese calendar. It runs from the first day of the lunar month until the 15th, and is celebrated with fireworks, temple visits and street festivals. The fire is meant to drive away evil spirits, and people dress from head to toe in red for the same reason. These vibrant colours make for dynamic photos, and make sure you master the panning technique in preparation for the dragon dance.

RUNNING OF THE BULLS Pamplona, Spain
The Pamplona Bull Run is one of the most tense and exciting traditions around. At 8am every morning from 7-15 July, a rocket is fired to signal to the runners to pray, followed by a second one to announce that the bulls have been released. Switch on the continuous burst mode to capture the action, and book accommodation months in advance so you don’t miss it.

© Kimberley Coole

© Toomas Järvet

DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHER 35

TECHNIQUES

Ruined kasbah of Ait Benhaddou at sunset, with snow-capped mountains behind, Morocco. A familiar scene from photos and movies

ICONIC LANDSCAPES

Is it really a dream job?
Photographer and workshop leader Steve Davey explains exactly what being a professional travel photographer is really like
Name: Steve Davey Bio: Steve leads his own range of travel photography tours to some of the most exotic and photogenic parts of the world, where land arrangements are provided by some of the biggest names in the adventure travel industry. though, are the ones when you are actually out taking pictures, although there are far more of the other days than most people imagine. How do you manage to stand out in such a competitive industry? It is damn hard, but you need good quality work and good ideas. For editorial photographers the ideas are more important than the images in many ways, as they are what get people interested in you in the first place. I also write pretty well, which makes me stand out, as I can research, write and shoot a story. Then, you just have to be good at business. Contact a lot of different outlets from magazines to agencies, and sell them on using you. What are your top tips for capturing landscapes? Light and locations are the key factors to bear in mind. It doesn’t have to be perfect sunlight, but it definitely needs to be atmospheric and dramatic. Rain and storm clouds can be perfect for some subjects as long as it isn’t bland and dull. You wrote the book Unforgettable Places To See Before You Die, but which one location would you tell people to visit and why? India is a great location for photography, and if you are into festivals then there are too many to mention – and all exist on a grand scale. Even a relatively small festival might have 100,000 people turning up. I have travelled a bit recently in the mountain area of Ladakh. Here, the culture and religion are Tibetan Buddhism, and in many ways the culture is more untouched than Tibet, as it doesn’t have the Chinese influence.

© Steve Davey

www.stevedavey.com Can you describe a typical day? It depends; sometimes the days are taken up with self-promotion and marketing, and at other times there is a lot of post-processing and captioning. I also run my own photography tours, so there is a lot of work getting those together and dealing with people. The best days,

36 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHER

Travel

Wonders of the world
The globally famous landmarks that look even better through a viewfinder
MACHU PICCHU Peru
This 15th Century Inca site is absolutely loaded with history, and has the capacity to instil any image with a sense of wonder. Use the golden hours (dawn and dusk), where the light will be at its best, and don’t be deterred if it starts raining, as bad weather will mean that the odds of tourists creeping into your shots is greatly reduced, and stormy clouds are notably renowned for stirring drama in landscape images.

THE PYRAMIDS Egypt
The Great Pyramid of Giza is the only one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World still standing today. By capturing this symbol of dynastic Egypt on camera, you are in the process preserving a piece of history that still incites mystery and wonder today, despite having been built circa 2560 BC. In order to reduce the glare of the sun, attach a polarised filter to your lens. This will also protect it from sand and dust.

EMPIRE STATE BUILDING New York City, USA
We’ve seen King Kong climb it and Godzilla demolish it, and though its breathtaking height has long been surpassed by other structures, it remains the most popular viewpoint in New York. You can capture some stunning Art Deco architecture shots, and a ride to the top reveals an amazing cityscape. Buy a ticket before sunset and bump your ISO for a sky awash with colour and a city illuminated by a million bulbs.

COLOSSEUM Rome, Italy
Rome is brimming with classic structures, but the former Amphitheatre epitomises Italian architecture. Expect to queue for a ticket unless you purchase one beforehand. If you visit in summer, bring bottled water and sunscreen with you, as there is no protection from the burning sun. It can create some beautiful silhouette pictures, though, so try shooting with the sun behind the structure.

© Steve Davey

Cham dancer performing the Black Hat Dance (shana) with a drum in the courtyard of Korzok Gompa at the Korzok Gustor, Lake Tsomoriri, (Ladakh) Jammu & Kashmir, India

LOCAL CULTURE

© Steve Davey

You can also use shots of people to show a sense of scale and context in wide-angle outdoor images. Tourist spots, however, can sometimes be so busy that the composition becomes cluttered, so it’s best to use the early bird approach and arrive before sunrise. This is when you’ll find photographer Steve Davey setting up for a landscape shoot, but he always stays long past the golden hour. “There are never the budgets to only shoot in the first or last few hours of light: you have to make the most of the light throughout the whole day,” he reveals. “What you have to do is temper your expectations, style and subject matter to the light conditions. Indoor markets, interiors and portraits out of direct sunlight can be shot throughout the day, as can food shots and just about anything not in direct sunlight. Obviously, for the great landscapes and cityscapes you need the best light, but you can – and probably should – shoot all through the day.” Landscapes can vary from mountains to deserts, and forests to lakes, so you’ll have to adapt your approach. Aim to capture the essence of a place by focusing on what makes it unique. Prior research

helps, as Google Maps will enable you to visualise being there, while browsing galleries such as Flickr will give you an idea of the vistas a location has to offer. Look for lead-in lines to guide the viewer’s eyes through the image, positioning them either at the corner or the centre of the frame, and use the rule of thirds to aid composition. During your research, you will be likely to come across the must-see monuments, which make for popular photographic subjects that are difficult to create unique images around. So once you’ve taken the obligatory wide-angle shot, get creative by shooting straight into the sun to create a silhouette. If it’s a statue, for example, use an ND filter and a long exposure to blur the movement of the people to give context and narrative to your picture. Think about what the landmark represents and convey information about it. A commemorated war hero will look far more dramatic at sunrise or with stormy clouds looming, for instance. Most importantly it comes down to lighting, as Steve adds, “The main challenge is getting in the right place for good or atmospheric light, so be prepared to revisit. Persistence pays off.” 
DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHER 37

TECHNIQUES
© Steve Davey

Look out for shots that give you a flavour of everyday life

LOCAL LIFE

Wild locations
KENYA East Africa

The best places to ‘hunt’ with your camera
ANDAMAN SEA ISLANDS South-east Asia
If you prefer marine life photographed from an idyllic-looking island, then book a flight to the Andaman Sea islands immediately. To the south lies the Mu Koh Lanta National Marine Park, with rainforests, mangroves and coral reefs. Over 500 species of fish can be found here, as well as endangered sea turtles. Invest in underwater housing for your camera in order to make the most of the numerous shooting opportunities that are available.
© Dan Hartwright

Kenya is a popular destination for capturing the ‘big five’ on camera: lions, elephants, buffalo, rhinos and leopards. It’s also pretty easy to get to, with plenty of major airlines flying there, and there are a number of photographerfriendly safari trips that you can go on. This way, you know that the driver will take his foot off the gas long enough for you to take your photos. A telephoto lens of 300mm or more is essential.
© Dan Hartwright

MADAGASCAR Indian Ocean
This isolated island is full of variety, with over 200,000 known species and about 150,000 that can be found nowhere else. You will find plenty of lemurs, frogs, birds and chameleons (if you can spot them). There are organised tours around the mountainous parks, or alternatively you can hire a vehicle. When framing your shot, go wide and capture the beautiful setting as well as the animals on offer.

GALÁPAGOS ISLANDS West of Ecuador
It was on these islands where animals thrived without fear of predators that Charles Darwin came up with the theory of evolution. There are huge tortoises, blue-footed boobys and large land iguanas among the weird and wonderful wildlife, and you can get away with using a smaller lens since you can get really close. Book early, as peak season (between June and September) fills up fast.

Patience is especially rewarded when it comes to wildlife photography. You can boost your chances of capturing exotic beasts on camera by visiting a sanctuary or heading on safari, but you can’t make them perform on demand. On the positive side, the time spent peering through the viewfinder is far from wasted, as you’ll become familiar with an animal’s habits and possibly be able to predict their behaviour. In any case, you need to keep a safe distance and avoid making any sudden movements. Photographer Dan Hartwright found out the hard way. “Probably my most memorable shot was when an elephant attacked us in Kafue National Park in Zambia,” he recalls. “The guy driving was seriously panicked, so I talked him through reversing away from the onrushing angry bull elephant. What made it worse for him was when I took the wheel and insisted on driving back up to the beast to take photos of it charging at us – several times!” Preparation counts for a lot in this challenging genre, as Dan points out. “Don’t turn up in the rainy season with a 15mm lens and look for leopards! Plan ahead for migrations, seasons, locations, types of wildlife in the region, access times, transport, etc. Unless you are

38 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHER

© Dan Hartwright

Travel

Zebras crossing the road in Lake Nakuru National Park in Kenya

ON THE ROAD

lucky enough to live close to game reserves, you will have to make an expensive trip with limited time.” He recommends recruiting a local photographer to be your guide, as they will know the best locations and what creatures you’re likely to meet. A fast zoom lens is a must-have for wildlife shoots, and pack plenty of memory cards and spare charged batteries, since you’ll probably be far from an electricity port. “If you can afford it, multiple bodies with different lengths,” adds Dan. “Consider using a cropped sensor body for the focal length multiplier, and invest in a bean bag to rest the camera on from the side of a vehicle for steady shooting in lower light.” As for settings, your camera’s burst mode can be really useful for rattling off multiple shots per second. Dan keeps his camera in program mode on a suitable ISO for both the lighting levels and highspeed shooting, and uses servo auto-focus to track a subject. “But always be ready for the unexpected; like zebras running across the road behind you with a storm rolling in,” he says. By being spontaneous and willing to experiment with every sub-genre of travel photography, you’ll return home with a slideshow that no one will groan at.

Secrets of success
Dan Hartwright explains what photographers should expect in the wild
Name: Dan Hartwright Bio: With experience of wildlife photography in over 40 countries, Dan has worked with a large cross-section of photographers and clients across Africa, Asia and Europe.
© Dan Hartwright

www.hartwright.me

How does the wildlife genre compare to other aspects of travel photography? It’s frustrating, expensive and time consuming, but very rewarding when you successfully get ‘that’ shot. The biggest pro is that you are also out seeing game in amazing places, but don’t expect to compete with the National Geographic guys and their $100,000 worth of kit and support vehicles on day one! What advice would you give to a budding travel photographer? Go and try it out for a few weeks. Hire a locally based photographer to plan your trip and take you around to get the best value. If you want to go full time then find a way to relocate close to the wildlife. It takes time on the ground to capture good images – and patience.

What is the secret of a powerful wildlife image? Luck plays a large part, as I’ve been out all day and seen very little to shoot, and other times it’s been amazing. When making a composition, think about the background. Too often I see what would be amazing photos of game if only the person had zoomed out or changed their elevation or depth of field.

DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHER 39

TECHNIQUES

Top travel tips
01 PACK SMARt
Keep your camera kit to a minimum, but make sure to pack spare batteries and memory cards somewhere safe and waterproof. A plug adapter specific to the country you’re visiting should also be stowed away.

02 ASK tHE LOCALS 03 WEAtHER

General tourist information will guide you to the most popular places, but for a true representation of what a place is like talk to the locals. Simply asking ‘What do you do for fun around here?’ may uncover hidden gems. Look up the weather forecasts for the area you’re travelling to and prepare accordingly. Even if there’s a minimal chance of rain, stash a plastic shopping bag in your pocket for back-up camera protection.

04 PROtECt YOUR KIt

Be aware of potential pickpockets, and never leave your equipment unattended. You can deter thieves by covering your camera in masking tape to make it seem less attractive, but always make sure you have sufficient travel insurance.

05 DOCUMENt tHE JOURNEY 06 THINK CREAtIVELY 07 SHOOt RAW

Time spent on a train or in a taxi doesn’t have to be wasted. It’s part of the experience of travelling, so take pictures from the window. Friendly drivers can also make willing portrait subjects and help to build your confidence approaching strangers. Look at the postcards in a souvenir shop, and by all means take the same shot, but then think about the scene creatively and aim to capture something unique. Seek alternative vantage points and play with manual modes.

Most DSLR cameras will give you the option of shooting in RAW, and although this file format is larger than a JPEG, it will capture more information for higher quality images. You’ll stand a better chance of rescuing sub-par exposures later.

COMpOSItION 08 CONSIdER CAREFULLY

Don’t leave valuable composition techniques behind and look for lead-in lines, foreground interest and apply the rule of thirds to strengthen your photos. Shoot at least one wide-angle scene before going in close to give the complete picture.

09 SHOOt At UNSOCIABLE HOURS
Heading out at sunrise will not only provide you with good-quality light to shoot with; it will also enable you to capture shots before the tourists swarm. Look up the sunrise time beforehand, as this will be early in hot countries.

10 TELL A StORY
40 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHER

Your photographs will have the power to trigger memories, so tell a complete story of your trip by documenting sign posts and pointing your camera at your dinner plate, and in the process reveal something about the way of life in a particular place. DP

© Kimberley Coole

TECHNIQUES

The power of PANORAMAS
Discover the professional secrets behind stunning panoramic views
42 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHER

© Ian Rolfe

Panoramas

This is a good example of a scene that’s ideally suited to panoramas – an expansive and sprawling vista that would be difficult to do justice to in a normal photo

CAPTURE THE SCENE

L

et’s face it: panoramas are pretty impressive. There’s something awe-inspiring about seeing, in just one image, an expansive vista that we’d normally have to turn 180 degrees to fully take in with the naked eye. In this way, panoramas have a lot in common with macro images and split-second action-freezing shots; they show us something that’s completely real and accurate, but normally utterly imperceptible to us. Images that show us something that’s beyond the power of our eyes and brains to see have a power that is hard to overlook. What’s more, like macro images and split-second action-freezing shots, panoramas require you to take photographs in a way that’s unique and demands practice if you’ve not attempted them before. Over the next few pages, you’ll discover the secrets behind the techniques that professional shooters use to achieve beautiful, sweeping panoramic images, as well as dispel a few myths you may have heard about the trials and tribulations of shooting panoramas. You’ll see how Photoshop can be used to stitch a dramatic coastal view together, and get some pro tips from a professional photographer and seasoned shooter of panoramic images.

Unfortunately, a lot of photographers never get around to shooting a panorama. This is partly because many assume that they need specialist equipment – as indeed you did before the arrival of digital capture and Photoshop, or that it’s a difficult and timeconsuming process. Let’s start with the good news: if you’ve got a camera, a lens, a tripod and Photoshop, the chances are you already have everything you need to start shooting panoramas. Contrary to what you might have been told, you don’t need complicated, specialist kit to capture a panorama. And now for the not so good news: shooting panoramas does require you to ignore a lot of what you’ve learned about photography. A scene that works wonderfully well for a normal, single-frame image won’t necessarily be ideal for a panorama and vice versa. Because of this, shooting panoramas forces you to look for different things in the environment around you, and you will find it far less easy to make use of compositional devices like lead-in lines and the rule of thirds, at least in-camera. It’s fair to say that composing a panorama is more challenging than a single-frame image, purely because you have a significantly larger physical landscape to

5
01 02 03 04 05

great things about shooting panoramas

Some scenes lend themselves much better to a panorama than a ‘regular’ shot.

You can get much more into the final image than could ever be possible normally, even with an ultra-wide angle lens, which is great for big, dramatic landscape scenes.

You are showing the viewer a much more expansive view than could be seen with the naked eye, so panoramas have a big ‘wow’ factor. Stitching together several frames will produce significantly bigger files than single frames, enabling far bigger prints. Because panoramas need to be stitched together on the computer, you won’t know quite how it’s going to look while you’re still out shooting, so there’s an element of surprise – just like the old days!

8

DIGITAL pHOTOGRApHER 43

TECHNIQUES
Packing for panoramas
Here’s a range of kit you might want to take a closer look at

Hot shoe bubble level

Web: www.manfrotto.co.uk Price: £30/$41

Use this to check how level your tripod is before you begin shooting, which allows you to keep the horizon in a consistent position within the frame.

8 evaluate and pre-visualise with your eyes and brain.
To make matters even more daunting, you cannot press the image review button on your camera and get instant feedback on what you’ve captured like you can when shooting regular images. You may be able to view the individual frames that you’ve captured, but only compact cameras with an auto-stitch feature will allow you to view your finished panorama in-camera. In the days of film this was completely normal, but in the digital age we are not so used to flying blind. One of the most important requirements in terms of kit for panoramas is a lens with as little inherent distortion as possible. Providing that you avoid lenses much wider than around 28mm – particularly zoom lenses – you should be fine in this department. You will also need a sturdy tripod that can be relied upon not to move at the slightest gust of wind and a tripod head that can be panned independently of being tilted. This means that ball-based heads will be tricky to use for panoramas unless they feature a panning capability that doesn’t require you to loosen the actual ball head. Shooting a panorama is much easier when you get everything as level as possible, as this allows you to

© Ian Rolfe

057 Carbon Fiber Tripod 3 Sections

Web: www.manfrotto.co.uk Price: £564.95/$834

This is a lovely tripod that includes a very useful builtin spirit level and is made to last. If you want to splash out even more, a geared version is also available.

PCL-1: Panning Clamp
Web: www.reallyrightstuff.com Price: £152.56/$235 approx

This fits above your tripod head and has a spirit level that, once centred, allows you pan with complete confidence that nothing will go out of square.

keep everything in square as you pan across the scene, and the approach you take will depend entirely on the nature of the equipment that you have available to you. The process for panoramas is a bit more involved than shooting single-frame images, in which a simple bubble level positioned in your camera’s hot shoe – or even the electronic horizon level that many DSLRs and CSCs now boast – will be more than sufficient as a means of getting a level horizon. With panoramas, it helps enormously to get the tripod itself – without taking the head into account – level. This is obviously easiest to do with a tripod that has its own spirit level, but relatively few tripods have this feature, so there’s a good chance that your model doesn’t. Instead, you can simply remove the head and position a bubble level on the tripod to ensure that the plate at the top is completely level. If it isn’t level, you might find that your image will go out of square as you pan the tripod head. Many pan and tilt heads and ball heads do have a bubble level in, and though you may begin with this perfectly centred, if the tripod itself is uneven you may notice that the bubble level in your tripod head will creep out of the centre position as you pan. 8

AF-S NIKKOR 2470mm f2.8G ED
Web: www.nikon.co.uk Price: £1,565.99/$1,889.95

A high-quality standard zoom lens is ideal for shooting panoramas, but don’t stray too near to the extreme wide-end if you want to avoid image distortion.

Adobe Photoshop CS6

Web: www.adobe.com Price: £660.51/$699

The automated Photomerge function in Photoshop is what the pros use to stitch their panoramas together, and if you’re serious about your photography this is a must-have.

Manfrotto 303SPH Panoramic Head
Web: www.manfrotto.co.uk Price: £569.95/$745

This is a do-everything head that allows for level panning and the use of the no-parallax point. It isn’t the cheapest bit of kit, so it’s not for everyone.

44 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHER

Panoramas

© Ian Rolfe

© Ian Rolfe

Panoramas lend themselves to particular kinds of scene, especially those that would be hard to do justice to in a normal shot. Different frames stitched together allow the scene to be presented as one image.

CHOICE OF SUBJECT

DIGITAL pHOTOGRApHER 45

TECHNIQUES
Professional panoramas

8

An alternative to getting your tripod legs level is to use something called a panning clamp positioned on top of your tripod head. Get the bubble level in this centred, and use the clamp to pan without the risk of changes to how level everything is. Another thing that you need to have consistent across all the individual frames you shoot is your exposure. Naturally, this means shooting in Manual exposure mode (M), but it’s vital that you take into account the full exposure range across which you will be shooting. Depending both on the time of day, weather conditions and location, there might be quite a high dynamic range across the scene that you will be ultimately turn into your stitched panorama. For this reason, first scan the scene with your camera in order to see how the required exposure changes. You might find that one end of your panorama needs 1/125sec at f11, while the other end of your panorama is brighter and needs 1/250sec at f11. The best option in this situation is to compromise and shoot the entire sequence of images at 1/180sec at f11. Evenly lit scenes without strong sunlight will cause you less exposure problems. Lastly, remember to shoot in RAW for the best quality images and to choose the best white balance to apply to all the images via your editing software. 8

Panoramic pro Ian Rolfe talks about getting the ultimate wide views
Name: Ian Rolfe Bio: Based in his native Victoria, Australia, Ian Rolfe is a professional landscape photographer and indefatigable photography workshop leader. He has been shooting panoramas for years now, and knows just how to give them the maximum impact. www.ianrolfelightscapes.com What do you enjoy about shooting panoramas? The panoramic format can tell the whole story as a single image. Many of the landscapes I like as a photographer lend themselves to this format. Here in Australia, it was very popular among professional outdoor photographers generally, as we have vast scenery both within the landscape and the coastlines. Some Aussie professionals have done very well out of this format: Peter Lik, Ken Duncan, Michael Seebeck and Nick Rains are just a few that come to mind. How do you go about shooting a panorama and what are your top tips for a great shot? Obviously, I always use a tripod and set up the camera on the tripod using a spirit level. I pan the scene before taking the images just in case I need to modify or adjust anything to get it level. I always set my camera up in portrait format. Though it will take more shots to cover the same area, you will have less edge distortion and therefore a better-looking image. I also ensure that there’s a 30 per cent overlap as I pan between each frame. I meter for the middle image, set the camera to manual and use that exposure for the sequence. Using a nodal head is not generally necessary.

46 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHER

Panoramas

When the sun has yet to rise, you will probably find that your meter reading from one end of the scene to the other is fairly even and consistent, which makes life easier

EARLY MORNING

During the day, you might find that exposing the entire scene successfully is more challenging. The EV range within each individual frame will be wider, as it will be across the panorama

NeAR MIDDAY

Your exposures will need to be longer at the end of the day, and the lower light levels may make it harder to be certain that you have overlapped each frame sufficiently

DUSK

DIGITAL pHOTOGRApHER 47

© All Images: Ian Rolfe

TECHNIQUES
8

Try stitching frames together vertically to produce a vertical panorama (or vertorama)

VErtICaLS

Top tips for great panos
01 Avoid confusion 02 Stay level
Take a shot of your hand or lens cap at the beginning and end of your sequence of images to allow you to see where each sequence of images starts and finishes.

Photomerge will find things a lot easier – and produce better results – if you manage to keep the horizon’s position consistent across your exposures. Autofocus on a suitable spot within your scene and then switch to manual focus mode before you commence shooting. As with all forms of photography, RAW mode will give your panoramas the highest possible quality. It will also allow you to effectively apply the white balance across all the frames. Remember to overlap the images you shoot by around a third. This will make life a lot easier for Photoshop’s Photomerge function.

03 Manual focus

04 Capture in RAW 05 Overlap

06 See things differently 07 Pan with care
As you pan across your scene, take care not to nudge your tripod and slightly alter its position, as even a mild movement could be enough to throw everything out and ruin you.

You can’t approach panoramas in the exact same way as regular landscape shots, so be prepared to practice and don’t be disheartened if your first few attempts don’t work out.

Steer clear of wild-angle lenses – particularly fisheye lenses – as these produce far too much distortion (not too mention the risk of vignetting) for shooting high-quality panoramas. Most pros put their camera into portrait mode to shoot panoramas. It takes a few extra shots to complete your panorama – particularly wide panoramas – but it’s worth it for the increased image quality that is produced as a result.

08 Avoid distortion

09 Use portrait mode 10 Go vertical

DP

48 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHER

The traditional compositional principles of landscape photography still count, as the eye needs to be drawn up through the image

CompoSItIoN

© All Images: Ian Rolfe

Consider shooting a vertical panorama. These can be dramatic and highly effective when teamed with the right sort of scenery.

SPECIAL OFFER
FOR USA READERS

Subscribe today

3free!
issues
*

and get
• Subscribe today and pay just $128 for 13 issues* • Get each issue for as little as $9.85 (usually $12.99) • Receive the magazine before it appears in stores • Never miss an issue • Money-back guarantee on any unmailed issues

SUBSCRIBER BENEFITS

US n o N ders rea n to tur e 96 pag

To order securely online, visit the website below and enter the offer code USA

www.imaginesubs.co.uk/dph
*Terms and conditions

To order by phone, call the number below and quote the offer code USA +44 (0)1795 592862

This is a US subscription offer. You will actually be charged £80 sterling for an annual subscription. This is equivalent to $128 at the time of writing. Exchange rate may vary. Your subscription starts from the next available issue and will run for 13 issues. This offer expires 31 August 2013. *3 free issues refers to the USA newsstand price of $12.99 for 13 issues being $168.87, compared with $128 for a subscription.

TECHNIQUES

How to shoot your own panorama
The line of rocks on the left-hand side is intended to mirror the angle of the arch on the right-hand side

FRAMING

This is a far wider scene that could ever be captured in a single frame, and is formed of several individual shots

FIttING IN

8

On the level When shooting single frame images, you normally just worry about getting the camera itself 1 level with the Earth’s true horizon but, when shooting a

panorama, you need to ensure that the tripod itself is level. If your tripod doesn’t have a spirit level (and most don’t), use a hot shoe bubble level like this.

Portrait format Although not vital, it is probably best to set your camera up in portrait format. 2 Although your finished panorama will consist of more

individual frames than it would if you simply use the landscape format, the image quality will be improved by shooting in portrait format.

Pan lock One capability that you need your tripod head to have for shooting panoramas is a standalone 3 pan motion that allows you to pan without having to tilt the camera. Obviously, pan and tilt heads are designed to do just that, but not all ball heads or pistol grip heads allow for this.

50 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHER

Panoramas
SCENERY EXPOSED

Each individual exposure was 20 seconds long. This was done to capture movement in the clouds and soften the sea

Focusing Focus just as you would if you were shooting Exposure Exposure must be consistent across all the single-frame images, and then set the camera into frames you shoot. You can either base the exposure 4 5 manual focus mode lest autofocus starts kicking in just on the correct exposure for the centre of the panorama as you pan across the scene, as inconsistent focusing can – and often does – have the effect of ruining the final panorama.

or meter each end of the scene and find a compromise between the two. Either way, you must set your camera to Manual mode (M).

30 per cent overlap Make sure that there is an overlap of approximately one third as you pan. An 6 easy mistake to make when shooting panoramas for the

first time is to start the next frame right where the previous one left off – doing this will leave your software with too difficult a task to perform. DIGITAL pHOTOGRApHER 51

8

TECHNIQUES
8

Stitch your panorama together
Photoshop’s Photomerge feature makes stitching your panorama together an easier task

White balance You can skip this step if you set your camera’s white balance to daylight or cloudy, but if you 1 used auto white balance you’ll need to make sure that all your RAW files have the same white balance. Ensure that you synchronise any adjustments you make to any of the image settings across all of your individual frames.

Export When you’ve made any universal processing adjustments across your images, export them to a 2 new folder that you can easily locate as 8-bit TIFF files.

Remember that the Photomerge function in Photoshop takes a bit of fair chunk of CPU power, so you won’t want to work with 16-bit files when it comes to that stage.

“To make sure your RAW files have the same white balance, synchronise any adjustments you make to any of the image settings across all of your individual frames”

Automated stitching Fortunately, Photoshop has a very handy built-in function for stitching together several frames into one panoramic image. It’s called Photomerge, 3 and can be found by going to File>Automate>Photomerge. This feature will save you the trauma of attempting to blend multiple frames together manually.

Photomerge Considering that it performs such a complex task, the Photomerge dialog box is surprisingly easy to use, with fewer confusing options and complex commands 4 than you might be expecting – and the chances are that there’s very little you’ll need to change.

Settings Blend Images Together 6 should already be

Find your folder It’s time to select the source files – the folder that we created earlier. Click on the Use menu and change this to Folder. 5 Now, click Browse and navigate to your folder of TIFF files that you made

earlier, and then simply select Open. You’ll now see your individual frames presented in a list in the centre of the dialog box.

ticked – if for any reason it isn’t, change it now. If you’ve avoided using a wide-angle lens, you shouldn’t need to worry about ticking Vignette Removal or Geometric Distortion Correction. The majority of the time you should be able to leave the Layout set to Auto, but there’s nothing to stop you rejecting the result Photomerge produces and trying a different setting.

52 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHER

Panoramas

Processing time Don’t be too surprised if Photoshop takes quite some time to perform the Photomerge 7 process. Depending on the file sizes, it may be time to make a coffee or nip to the toilet. When it’s finished, your panorama will be presented as a layered file.

Flatten the layers You will probably want to flatten your panorama quick smart before you go any further, as having a layered file this big 8 open in Photoshop can slow things down considerably. To do this, go to

Layer>Flatten Image. Then grab the Crop Tool (C) and get rid of the border, but don’t crop in too tightly just yet.

Get artistic Now you can perform any editing tasks that you wish to on the image, such as enhancing contrast, using the healing brush, or converting your panorama to black 9 and white. Take the time to be precise about your edits; perfectionism at this stage means a perfect panorama when you’ve finished.

“You will probably want to flatten your panorama, as having a file this big open in Photoshop can slow things down”

Take a look at these potentially perplexing pieces of kit
Nodal heads – an umbrella term that encompasses products that may be marketed as nodal brackets, nodal slides or panoramic heads – are used to find the ‘no-parallax point’ (‘nodal point’ isn’t technically correct) of a specific focal length on a specific lens. Keep in mind that a panning clamp does not allow you to find the no-parallax point; they’re designed purely to allow you to pan while keeping everything level. Parallax distortion basically means that objects in the near and far distance appear to change position in relation to each other as the viewing perspective changes. Hold out your thumb and close one eye. Turn your head from side to side slightly or open and close each eye repeatedly. Your thumb will appear to change position in relation to the background. This is parallax distortion in action. Do I need a nodal head? The short answer is ‘Probably not’. The big problem is that you need to manually work out the no-parallax point for the lens/focal length combinations that you wish to use. For this reason, a lot of pro photographers don’t worry about finding the no-parallax point for all their lenses. Mark Bauer explains it like this: “Unless you’re shooting panoramas all the time, it’s probably not worth going to the cost and trouble of using a dedicated panoramic head. Good stitching programs, such as the one in Photoshop, do a great job of correcting distortion and, unless you have something very close in the foreground, you won’t have any problems with parallax error.”

Nodal heads

Crop and save Time to finish the panorama with a final crop – and then you can go ahead and save the file. Make sure that you save a big, high-res version (panoramas are an odd-sized format so you need plenty of 10 wiggle room to be able to print them at a decent size). Save a smaller, lower-res version for ease of use too.

DIGITAL pHOTOGRApHER 53

TECHNIQUES

© Albert Palmer

54 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHER

Wedding photos

WeDDinG
phOtOs
From classic formal poses to fresh new styles, discover how to make your next wedding shoot go without a hitch

shOOt yOuR best-eVeR

T

he wedding season is upon us, and the sound of church bells, classic car engines and camera shutters are beginning to fill the air. It’s undoubtedly one of the busiest times of year for wedding photographers, with most having been booked up nearly a year in advance. It’s also one of the most pressure-filled jobs in the industry. Capturing a couple’s wedding day requires a calm, cool head and the ability to make split-second decisions that’ll result in you getting ‘the shot’. Professional wedding photographer Lorna Millburn (www.storyweddingphotography.co.uk) first got into wedding photography after shooting one as a favour for a friend, and she hasn’t looked back since. She says, “Unexpected things happen on every job, which is why it is so important to pay a

professional to capture your day. Years of experience has enabled me to find quick solutions to challenging weather conditions, difficult lighting situations and confined spaces, all the while being encouraging and enthusiastic to the crowd.” The ability to work with people and deal with difficult clients alongside the good is essential. Albert Palmer (www.albertpalmerphotography. com) has been shooting weddings professionally for a few years. He says, “No two couples are the same, and I aim to capture their different personalities. But by the same token, most weddings follow a similar pattern. Primarily, I’m there to capture the atmosphere and the emotion. Everyone is excited to be getting married. They are totally in love with their partner, and it’s quite possibly the most memorable day of someone’s life.” 8

Posed, cheesy group shots are out and reportage, relaxed style images are in, but styles always change

WEDDING STYLES

DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHER 55

TECHNIQUES
8
Meeting with the couple prior to the big day can be a valuable part of the preparation process. It’s also a good time to discuss locations, group shots and any other images that are important to the bride and groom. Lorna says, “I think that building a good relationship with people before the big day is the foundation to creating great photos. I often meet couples, and there’s always lots of correspondence. We discuss the location of their wedding and the opportunities and restrictions involved. I get to know their characters a bit, and think about settings, poses and little ideas that reflect them.” She adds, “For me, being a good wedding photographer is all about relating to and getting on with your subjects. A successful portrait is always a two-way thing. Weddings can be chaotic and emotional, and you have to know when to step in and organise people, but equally when to back off and give people space.” Weddings can start early, and many photographers choose to include photographing the bridal preparation as part of their packages. The early stages of the day are an excellent time to capture the mounting excitement among the bride, bridesmaids and family members. Shots like these are also great for building up a narrative for the final wedding album. Lorna says, “Bridal preparations are your first point of contact with close family and friends of the couple. I take the time to chat and get to know people before getting my camera out. I will take lots of candids, details and perhaps a few composed ones if there’s time. My main focus is building a rapport at this point.” Use the time wisely to wander off and photograph the wedding shoes, bouquet and buttonholes, too. Some brides may even be getting ready in their childhood homes, which can offer even better personal photo opportunities. Weddings can be unpredictable, so always be as prepared as possible beforehand. Albert says, “Wedding schedules are sometimes as predictable as the British weather! I print multiple copies of the schedule and add another copy to Dropbox, which I can access on my iPhone. I check out the venue on Google Maps and my satnav so I know exactly where it is and how to get there. Lastly, I aim to arrive with plenty of time to spare just so I can familiarise myself with the location.” It’s rare for wedding photographers to visit the venue prior to the wedding day unless, of course, they’ve photographed an occasion there before. Albert points out, “It doesn’t really make a difference, as I’m there to capture the emotion and the people. I’m experienced enough to know what settings to use in any given lighting situation.” 8

“Weddings can be chaotic and emotional, and you have to know when to step in and organise people, but equally when to back off and give people space”

Break up the wedding album by adding images that show the extra details, such as the wedding dress, bride’s shoes and table designs

THE DRESS SHOt

Put time aside to photograph the newlyweds alone. Keep them at ease by offering some posing suggestions, and they’ll soon relax

GEt tOgEtHER

Details are important
Name: Lorna Milburn Bio: Alongside running Story Wedding Photography, Lorna Milburn is a portrait photographer whose clients include The Observer, The Sunday © Lorna Millburn Times, Music Concierge, Swire Hotels and Cooper Bikes. For more info on any of her work please visit: www.storyweddingphotography.co.uk Is there one shot in particular that you always aim to capture during the wedding? Of course. There are many key shots that my clients will be looking for and are a must, such as walking down the aisle, the first kiss and the first dance. Personally, I am always interested in that emotive

Lorna Millburn points out the importance of capturing the smaller details of the day
couple shot, catching a tender moment that is beautiful and true to the people you are working with. How important is it to photograph the details, and what are your top tips for doing this? Details are important; couples spend care and attention in selecting everything, so I want to record it all. They are also crucial in ‘breaking up’ the people shots in album design. I take these throughout the day, as sometimes a photo of the dad holding the bouquet when the bride fixes her dress is more apt than the one I took in the morning of it by a window. 1 Be imaginative, and compose little scenes. 2 Make each shot reveal something about that particular wedding; if the style of the wedding is vintage, photograph the rings on a tapestry cushion. 3 Open your eyes; if the cat is sitting on the veil, photograph it – a bit of humour is always good.

56 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHER

Secrets of successful wedding shoots

DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHER 57

© All images Lorna Milburn

TECHNIQUES

FRESH APPROACH

Familiarise yourself with the venue and look out better vantage points

Don’t be afraid to open up your aperture. Noise can add to the aesthetic of an image in black and white 58 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHER

LOW lIGHt

Wedding photos
8
A good understanding of the kit you’re using is essential. Lorna says, “Good lenses with wide apertures certainly help. Bounce flash where you can and look for reflectors to bounce your flash off. Consider every angle of the room – I might bounce a flash on one side and use window light on the other.” Be wary of using flash during ceremonies, however. Albert says, “The biggest tip I have is to make friends with the officiant as soon as possible. Make it clear you’re there to capture a few discreet photographs and keep your movement to a minimum. I try to stand in the top left-hand corner so I can clearly see the bride, but also get a few cheeky images of the groom’s reaction. I then move over to the right so I can get a better view of the bride, and also the friends and family in the front rows.” He adds, “Sometimes I move to the bottom of the aisle if the couple are having readings, as it’s often a more natural view of the first kiss.” Use wide apertures and higher ISOs to deal with low light. You can always convert grainier images to black and white later for what can appear to be an intentionally classic style. Albert says, “I find that using the latest generation of DSLRs and prime lenses means I’ve not yet had a situation that can’t be photographed. If I need to nudge the ISO up, so be it.” Expect to be on your feet throughout the day. Avoid lugging excess amounts of kit around by packing only the essentials. Albert remarks, “I pack bananas, Berocca, chocolate buttons and Haribo. Keeping my sugar levels up and staying hydrated is important. Looking after myself is a big deal, and I know many wedding photographers who suffer from pounding headaches because our job is surprisingly intense and physical. Camera-wise, I love working with the 35mm, 45mm tilt-shift and 50mm lenses. I often use an 85mm for detail images and a 135mm 8 in churches.”

Take a discreet approach to shooting, and you’ll be able to capture much more natural shots

NATURAL RESULTS

Working with the couple
Name: Albert Palmer Bio: “My photographs are much more than a documentary of the day; they have life and energy. They let you remember the events of the day, but also remind you of how you felt. They have © Albert Palmer value well beyond what you pay for them. Put simply, my aim is to create the most beautiful story of your day; a love story. “ www.albertpalmerphotography.com Have you ever altered the way you shoot to suit your clients? When I first started out I decided I wanted to take photographs that best represent the couple and the vibe of their day. People seem to hire my because of this.

Wedding photographer Albert Palmer discusses the importance of pleasing your clients and getting the all-important couple shots
They want photographs that are a little bit different; a little bit more personal. They don’t expect me to walk in and set up the same ten poses I do for every wedding. I try to use my instinct and capture what happens. There’s no formula; no rules. I don’t offer silver, gold and platinum packages; I’m there for the whole day. I’ve never been to a wedding that started at the ceremony and finished at the end of the speeches; so many moments happen outside of that small time frame. How do you prepare prior to a wedding? I don’t do all that much to prepare for a wedding. Sure, I ask the couple for a schedule and check the timings, and I charge my batteries and check my equipment. But for me, keeping an open mind is a big part of how I work. I try not to form ideas about what might happen. Part of this is because I’m there to capture the couple’s day – not impose my own judgements about what should or shouldn’t happen at a particular time. It’s their wedding day, not my photo shoot. I always love finding out what is most important to the couple, whether it be the ceremony, relaxing with friends after the ceremony or sharing a moment together during the first dance. How much time do you take out during the wedding to photograph the couple alone, and what are your top tips for doing this? I try to have at least 20 minutes with the couple to take some special images of them both. The golden hour is the most glorious time for this, and helps make magical images. 1 Take the couple somewhere private, away from other guests, where they can share a moment alone. 2 Give them space when necessary. 3 Be very aware of your own body language.

© All images Albert Palmer

DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHER 59

TECHNIQUES

“I’m there to capture the couple’s day. It’s their wedding day, not my photo shoot”

© Albert Palmer

CAPtURE AtmOSPHERE

Expect to be on your feet, so ensure you have comfortable shoes

Wedding edits
What’s important when editing your shots, and how can you make them stand out?
The wedding day may have ended, but your job won’t have. Editing hundreds of shots from the occasion is all part of the process. The first step is to ensure you’ve invested in good quality software that will enable you to organise multiple files and edit images in batches. You can use the likes of Photoshop to develop a signature editing style. Look into adjusting colourways to create a dreamy effect, add filters for more creativity or convert your shots to monochrome. Most programs also enable you to save an editing process as an action, which you can apply to images in bulk. It’s great for saving time and ensuring shots look uniform . Developing a recognisable style will also help to boost your business, as your portfolio will appear more focused and professional as a result. Always remember, however, that editing can make a good shot look great, but it won’t rescue the bad.

8

If you’ve taken a discreet approach to shooting, you’ll find it easier to capture honest and relaxed moments. Lorna says, “Most of my day is spent in the background capturing events. I am always anticipating moments of humour, excitement and joy – you have to be eagle-eyed and be ready to swoop the moment people clink glasses. The final picks are always of the moments between moments, when the couple think you have stopped shooting and relax.” Albert adds, “Weddings are full of emotion, and it can happen anywhere and at any time. I find these small moments make up the day. Be brave and fearless enough to capture them.” The after-party is a great time to focus on candid captures, as you’ll find newlyweds and guests really begin to unwind. Albert says, “The after-party is always lots of fun. While I’m more of an observer, this is the time to enjoy the music and capture the atmosphere. If there’s time I might try to grab a ‘night shot’ of the couple, then find a good ending image.” Although wedding photography can be pretty intense, it’s also incredibly rewarding, as Albert points out. “From the people I meet and the friends I have made, I’m really proud of what I do. Attending weddings gives me a constant reminder about how beautiful life is and how important the people around us are. It’s also proof that if you love something DP and work hard, you can achieve anything.”
60 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHER

Straight out of camera

Colour edit

Monochrome conversion

Everything You Need to Realize Your Photographic Vision

t ’ n o d p! u o sho y y d to d n n o a a h , , s P s P i i d h d h t t e e l l e e l n n A n A n e e v ev e

All you’ve got to do is take great pictures and then make them even better using Perfect Photo Suite 7! With brand new Perfect Black and White, new versions of Perfect Portrait, Perfect Effects, Perfect Resize and the amazing Perfect Layers (oh and the new Perfect Brush!) you decide what you want to do and where you want to work ...Photoshop, Lightroom, Aperture or Photoshop Elements and of course stand-alone

call us for our latest reader offer: 01604 881735

KIT BAG

THE BEST TOUGH COMPACTS
Waterproof, shockproof, dustproof, freezeproof and crushproof. But which of these compacts has brains as well as brawn?

Words by Hayley Paterek

8
62 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHER

Group test

A

compact, let alone a ‘tough’ compact, is never going to rival your prized DSLR teamed with your favourite lens as the go-to photographic weapon of choice, but this breed of super-durable, pocketable cameras are a great back-up for when the terrain is slightly more inhospitable and perilous. The beauty of ‘tough’ compact cameras is that they claim to be virtually indestructible; freezeproof, waterproof and shockproof is something too tempting not to test, and they can be used quite nonchalantly in environments we wouldn’t dream of introducing our premier kit to, such as oceans, rivers and pools, frozen tundra, muddy mountains and even the hands of our tantrum-prone toddlers. While resistance to moisture, low temperatures and fractures is impressive, today’s generation of tough compacts boast several new feature additions compared to the brood of original tough units launched over half a decade ago. It’s commonplace for cameras to boast electronic compasses, GPS

and Wi-Fi image transfer, as well as being dustproof and, in some cases, crushproof. Also gone with the times are the clunky, ugly plastic-shrouded shells. Contemporary tough cameras either clone the appearance of their sleek and stylish brand counterparts, or offer a trendy coloured chassis. All the main brands offer a hardened version of their traditional compacts, and as such prices are kept realistic across the market, with most averaging around the £350 mark. Thanks to their ethos for adventure and adrenaline the pocket shooters are a fantastic buy for a range of demographics from thrillseeking outdoor enthusiasts to the holidaying family man or woman. This group test unites four rival tough compacts to discover which is the hardest nut to crack and which is the best performer. 8

DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHER 63

KIT BAG

Offers a 12.1 MP HS system, 28mm wide angle 5 x optical zoom, intelligent IS, GPS, 3” PureColor II LCD, Full HD movies, 32 scenes plus special movie modes and dedicated underwater functions

Canon D20
Boasting a 5 x optical zoom and Canon’s HS system, as well as its tough damage proof shell, can the PowerShot D20 beat the competition?
SRP: £349/$349
Website: www.canon.co.uk

Although the Canon D20 produced strong underwater shots, an apparent stunted dynamic range impacted the overall quality of its images

DYNAMIC RANGE

Following in the footsteps of Canon’s one and only underwater compact, the bubble-like D10, the D20 looks to be a sleeker, sharper and sturdier shooter. Although the unit is waterproof to 10m, shockproof from falls of 1.5m or less, and is freezeproof to -10 degrees centigrade, compared to the other compacts in this group test, the D20 brings home the least, beaten by water depth and shock height. The body of the D20 is stylised with a fin-like edge with a brushed-metal front panel and bold, coloured buttons. It feels as durable as its counterparts and, in the tests we performed on it, it withstood a good beating, dunking and freezing. However, unlike the other three, the D20 only had one lock to secure the card and battery compartment. The screen is viewable from most angles in and out of water and, along with the Nikon AW110, offers one of the brightest, clearest screens in this review. There are many ways in which handling the D20 is enjoyable: For example the brand’s novel tap and tilt is helpful for scrolling through images, there is no apparent shutter lag and its ability to correctly select the right scene in Auto (regardless of subject) is great for on-the-go shooters. Image quality was a tad disappointing, mainly because it had an obvious tendency to underexpose and its dynamic range was somewhat lacking, culminating in washed out colours and details. Noise becomes an issue at ISO 400 which is comparatively very low. The AF struggles in macro mode, with small-scale subjects and moving subjects in low light. One of its saving graces was that it produced the best quality of results underwater.
64 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHER

Group test

The colourful Pentax WG-3 GPS offers a handsome selection of features and is unquestionably tough, yet its poor handling tends to let it down

Whilst the WG-3 GPS auto meter does well, it did favour the highlights of an image resulting in many underexposed frames

EXPOSURe

Pentax WG-3 GPS
As well as being dustproof, shockproof, freezeproof and waterproof, the Pentax WG-3 GPS is said to be crushproof to upto 100kg
SRP: £340/$350
Website: www.pentax.co.uk The slightly garish Pentax WG-3 GPS delights photographers with a 16 MP 1/2.3” CMOS sensor. It has a fast f2.0 lens, an equivalent focal range of 25-100mm and an electronic compass; is dustproof, waterproof to 14m, shockproof from heights of 2m, freezeproof to -10 degrees centigrade, and, unlike some of its competitors - it’s crushproof to 100kg which means it can withstand the weight of more than one person. Design-wise the colours will either dazzle or deter you. The unit is certainly as hard as it looks, coming away from our drop tests unscathed and performing on par with its untested self after being frozen and submerged. Disappointingly, however, despite seemingly having one of the strongest AF assist lamps of the group, the WG-3 GPS struggles to lock focus in the majority of scenarios, including well lit conditions, plus macro shots were disturbingly difficult to capture and underwater shooting was extremely troublesome to perfect. In fact, against the other cameras in this group test, the Pentax was least effective underwater. The image quality achieved here was fairly hit and miss as the camera’s meter appeared to be slightly off kilter, with a tendency to underexpose. When it nailed the correct exposure, image detail was relatively sharp and colour balance on point. With one of the widest sensitivity ranges on offer here, we’re pleased that noise didn’t become an issue at around ISO 800, levelling out towards 3200 and relatively unusable when it topped out at ISO 6400. DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHER 65

KIT BAG

Its aesthetics are more conservative than the Canon and Pentax, with a coloured decorative ring around the lens, then block colouring on the body in red (and a black ring) or black (with a red ring)

Olympus Stylus TG-2
SRP: £350/$380

Despite some issues with the AF, the Olympus TG-2 produces images that are fairly well metered and resonate with an accurate colour balance

FOCUSING

The Stylus TG-2 gets set to excite macro fans with its Microscope mode offering 14x magnification, but is it quantity over quality here?
Website: www.olympus.co.uk Olympus holds a reputation for producing some of the most innovative tough compacts around. The new Stylus TG-2 looks to be no different with its dustproofing, shockproofing to 2m, freezeproofing to -10 centigrade and crushproofing to 100kg, and slips past its Pentax rival offering an extra metre waterproofing (15m). It dons GPS like all of its competitors, but also includes an electronic compass and FlashAir card compatibility for wireless image transfer. As well as boasting tough features, it looks reassuringly rugged as the manufacturer has taken steps to ensure all of its compartments can be securely sealed with double locks. The mode dial with the aperture priority sends a message that this isn’t just a run-of-the-mill point-and-shoots. Handling the TG-2 is fairly easy going, with quick responsive times in most situations. However low-lit environments commonly confused the AF; it struggled considerably latching onto subjects underwater and super macro mode was so unsuccessful that users might as well stick the regular macro mode. What’s more, out of all the screens, the TG-2 was arguably one of the least effective performers, suffering from screen glare from many angles and was almost impossible to view when looking down underwater. In terms of image quality we see a relation to that produced by other non-tough Olympus compacts. Noise didn’t plague images until ISO 800 and chromatic aberrations weren’t apparent unless in close up high contrast scenes. The camera’s meter appeared to handle exposure better than Canon and – in some instances – the Pentax.

66 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHER

Group test

“Out of all the cameras reviewed here, the Nikon was actually the easiest to handle”

Nikon’s offering eschews the more garish looks of its rivals, opting for a toned-down body

Nikon Coolpix AW 110
With its classical looks you could be forgiven for thinking this Nikon was in the wrong group test, yet it matches and outclasses its rivals
SRP: £330/$350
Website: www.europe-nikon.com The only giveaway that this Nikon AW110 is as tough as it claims is the durable lock wheel that protects the card and battery compartment. Otherwise it adopts the same shape and form as its Coolpix brand brothers. Nikon has seen fit to cram as much tech inside the compact as it can take, so we see GPS that incorporates nearly two million points of interest, a world map feature, electronic compass, Wi-Fi capabilities, an altimeter (altitude), water depth gauge, and even a barometer. Out of all the cameras we reviewed here it is fair to say the Nikon was actually the easiest to handle. Its screen is viewable from nearly all angles (even underwater), plus it focused quickly and accurately in most situations including low-light, macros and underwater. That said, the AW110 has been engineered as an easy-to-use point-andshoot, with not even a Program mode to tempt users to progress their shooting skills, but it includes a palette of creative effects and filters which makes it really easy to use. Despite a few issues with slight overexposure and loss of detail in a handful of cases (mainly at the telephoto end of the focal range or in low light), the AW110 turns in a stellar performance. Colour balance, however, isn’t as precise as the Olympus. Plus there’s a degree of softening towards the edges and the results gained with the digital zoom were widely unusable. Noise performance is rather good, with captures failing to show disruption until ISO 800 and overall the image quality is good for a camera of this price.

Reviewing our test shots up close you’ll see sharp and high-quality results with all images well exposed and suitably saturated

PIN-SHARP CAPTURES

DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHER 67

KIT BAG

INNOVATION AWARD

Pentax WG-3 Canon PowerShot D20 GPS
Technical data
Price £349/$349 Megapixels (effective) 12.1M ISO sensitivity A,100, 200, 400, 800, 1600, 3200 Exposure modes Auto, P, 32 scene modes Metering options CW, S, E Weight 228g (with batteries and card) Dimensions 58 x 102 x 33.5mm LCD 3” Viewfinder: PureColor II LCD, 461k dots

Olympus Stylus Nikon Coolpix TG-2 AW 110
Technical data
Price £350/$380 Megapixels (effective) 12MP ISO sensitivity A, 100, 200, 400, 800, 1600, 3200, 6400 Exposure modes Auto, P, A, 23 scene modes Metering options ESP, S Weight 230g with batteries Dimensions 111.5 x 66.5 x 29.1mm LCD 3” Viewfinder: OLED, 610k dots

Technical data
Price £340/$350 Megapixels (effective) 16MP ISO sensitivity A, 125, 200, 400, 800, 1600, 3200, 6400 Exposure modes Auto, P, 21 scene modes Metering options MS, CW, S Weight 239g (without batteries and SD card) Dimensions 64.5 x 125 x 32mm LCD 3” Viewfinder: TFT colour LCD, 460k dots

Technical data
Price £330/$350 Megapixels (effective) 16MP ISO sensitivity A, 125, 200, 400, 800, 1600, 3200 Exposure modes Auto, 19 scene modes Metering options CW, S, M Weight 193g (with battery and card) Dimensions 110.1 x 65.3 x 24.5mm LCD 3” Viewfinder: OLED 614k dots

Summary
Features
■ The Canon D20 is somewhat lacking in the feature department, with only its Tap and Tilt technology

Summary
7/10 Features
■ With a slightly better stocked arsenal than the Canon D20, its clock and dustproofing feature help to elevate it

Summary
8/10 Features
■ Boasting a Microscope mode, exciting movie capture options and an AP mode, the TG-2 has an impressive feature set

Summary
9/10 Features
■ The Nikon arguably has the most to offer with its World map, depth gauge, altimeter and even a barometer

10/10

Build quality

■ In terms of fending off damage from being dropped into water, the Canon D20 is the least resistant but isn’t crushproof

7/10

Build quality

■ Pipped to the post by Olympus and Nikon in terms of best resistance stats, but its rugged shell and crush-proofing helps

8/10

Build quality

■ On paper the Olympus TG-2 looks to be one of the hardest nuts to crack, compared to the others

9/10

Build quality

■ Just nudging past the Olympus TG-2, the AW110 allows divers to delve three metres deeper, but lacks crushproofing

9/10

Handling

■ The D20 is easy to use thanks to the button layout and menus, which are both logical and accessible

7/10

Handling

■ One of the disappointing points about the Pentax WG-3 GPS is its persistence refusal to focus

6/10

Handling

■ The TG-2 is no worse to handle than the Pentax model but its issues with AF mean it wasn’t as easy as the Nikon or Canon

6/10

Handling

■ Easily one of the most responsive models in this test. It is aimed at people who just want to shoot on the go

9/10

Quality of results

■ Although it performs well underwater, the D20 failed to live up to Canon’s high quality standard in comparison to other less expensive compacts in its line up

7/10

Quality of results

■ Despite a few niggles with exposure, the image quality achieved from the Pentax was rather satisfactory, particularly in its handling of noise

7/10

Quality of results

■ When the AF was successful, colours were accurate and exposure was balanced. Images taken in even light are sharp and there isn’t an issue with noise until ISO 800

7/10

Quality of results

■ With strong results above and below the water, the camera exposes well, handles noise deftly and produces a higher dynamic range than the others

8/10

Value for money

■ The second most expensive of our test posse, yet the D20 doesn’t offer picture perfect quality and fails to match its peers

6/10

Value for money

■ The WG-3 GPS failed to impress. It’s probably a great camera for someone who drops or stands on their camera a lot

7/10

Value for money

■ The TG-2 is the most expensive of the group and as such we were expecting big things, but it might just have fallen short

7/10

Value for money

■ The cheapest of our quartet the AW110’s ease of handling, features and strong images make it a fantastic buy

9/10

A fantastic camera for using under water, but for an everyday or compact for cold or muddy terrains, consumers would do better to look elsewhere

68 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHER

7/10

Not the easiest to shoot with and its image quality is only average, yet its tough shell will be reassuring for accident-prone outdoor enthusiasts

7/10 8/10 9/10

Stocking great technology such as the 12-Megapixel BSI CMOS sensor and an impressive list of features means the TG-2 offers more than a regular compact

Its looks, technology and image results mean the AW110 would be a great everyday compact. It can also withstand punishment from a range of factors. You’re sold!

Learn in style

The Series

TM

Discover more with the Book series’ expert, accessible tutorials for iPad, iPhone, Mac, Android, Photoshop, Windows and more
Print edition available at www.imagineshop.co.uk Digital edition available at www.greatdigitalmags.com
Available on the following platforms

BUY YOUR COPY TODAY
facebook.com/ImagineBookazines

twitter.com/Books_Imagine

KIT BAG
The new Nikon D7100 includes a 24.1-megapixel DX-format sensor and a range of other great features

Nikon D7100
SRP: £1,100/£1,300 (body only)
As the affordable full-frame DSLR market continues to take shape, many would assume that the demand for high-end DX-format DSLRs, like Nikon’s new D7100, would begin to decrease. But as proven by the release of its latest model, this is simply not the case. The D7100 is still expected to be a big contender in the aspiring-enthusiast market. We put the latest release to the test this issue to see what’s on offer, and to find out whether it really has what it takes to stand out. Released as an update to the popular D7000 model, which incidentally is remaining a part of the Nikon line-up, the new camera comes packed full of fantastic features, which secures its position among the top DX-format DSLRs in the Nikon range. Three years on from the original D7000’s release, Nikon has not only developed the design but also added in a few extras that promise better camera performance, handling and quality. Some of the D7100’s key features include a generous 24.1-megapixel (APS-C sized) CMOS sensor – minus an optical low-pass filter; full 1080p HD movie

Nikon’s latest DX-format DSLR is put to the test to see how it stands in a changing and enthusiast market
record mode with 30/25/24fps, an extensive ISO range between 100-25600 and up to 51-AF points. The megapixel-packed sensor is undoubtedly one of the highlights and the lack of optical low-pass filter, otherwise known as an anti-aliasing filter, is an added bonus. In fact, the removal of the filter is designed to deliver better resolution images that are much sharper and more detailed straight out of camera. With up to 24.1 effective megapixels also available, you’ll find that the D7100 doesn’t disappoint when it comes to image quality. We tested the camera under a range of conditions and

INDETAIL 4Features
CMOS SENSOR
Words by Hayley Paterek

The D7100 houses an impressive 24.1-MP DXformat CMOS sensor minus an optical low-pass filter, which ensures shots appear much sharper and more detailed.

EXPEED 3

1080P HD VidEO

There’s also an EXPEED 3 engine on board, which is responsible for ensuring sharpness, noise reduction, vibrant colour tones and highspeed shooting.

Experimental videographers will appreciate the full 1080p HD video mode which enables you to shoot at various frame rates, including 30/25/24fps.

CaMERa cOMMENtS: Nikon’s new DX-format DSLR offers a great range of features, including a 24.1-MP sensor and full 1080p HD video mode,
70 DIGITal PHOTOGraPHEr

Nikon D7100

The D7100 has some fantastic focusing modes and is capable of capturing fine detail in your subjects when you’re working up close

The camera’s lightweight, weathersealed design makes it an ideal outdoor shooter, which is always ready to face the elements

“Comes packed full of fantastic features, which secures its position among the top DX-format DSLRs in the Nikon range”
found that its performance never faltered. On review of our RAW and JPEG file test shots, we were pleased to see that the lack of optical low-pass filter and the featured EXPEED 3 image processor, delivered good levels of sharpness and detail throughout our captures. Colours were also realistically reproduced, although perhaps a little cool at times. We also found that the D7100 does a great job at metering the light and adapting to changing conditions, as all our exposures appear well balanced. The camera also excelled in challenging low-light scenarios, thanks to the generous ISO offering. Noise levels are kept low and we were still impressed by the image quality of captures taken with settings upwards of ISO 3200. Like all conventional DSLRs, the D7100 comes with full manual control and auto settings. In addition to this, there’s a new effects shooting mode that now features on the mode dial. Exploring this setting you’ll find seven different filters that can be used when capturing both stills and video, including miniature effect, selective colour, silhouette, high key, low key, colour sketch and night vision. Ideal for creative types and step-up users, this mode enables you to capture fun and artistic images instantly in camera. Users who are also keen to embrace DSLR video modes will be impressed by the D7100’s offering, which has seen some useful improvements since the previous D7000 model. This includes more frames per second in full HD, a stereo mic and headphone jack. It’s also possible to manually control exposure and autofocus while filming. What’s more, users can capture up to 20 minutes of footage at a time and record full 1080p HD video in 30/25/24fps. On test, we found the video function to be a good performer

On the disc Test shots

Check out the Nikon’s results now!

and pretty easy to use. The movie record button also now appears on the top-plate, making access to video recording much quicker and easier. When reviewing our footage, we found video files appeared clear in quality, adequately exposed and with good levels of sound. To ensure there’s enough space for both video and image file capture, the D7100 also comes with a dual-SD card slot. You can opt to use both when you’re shooting or alternatively, assign one to record overflow. When it comes to build and design, the D7100 is great for the outdoors. Ready to face the elements, the camera’s magnesium alloy body is both weather resistant and dust-proof. It’s also relatively lightweight, which makes it a great companion on longer shoots. The D7100’s new and slightly more simplified design also means that the interface and button layout is easier to navigate, and you’ll find being able to 

FAST FOCUSING

The D7100 features 51-focus points, which includes 15 cross-type sensors, ensuring super-fast autofocus settings that are incredibly accurate.

DESIGN STRENGTH

The camera offers a strong, durable design that is weather-sealed and dustproof. The button layout is also easy to navigate so you can adjust exposure settings easily on the go.

NEW MODES

Explore the camera’s new mode dial setting effects to get instant artistic results when you’re shooting still images or video. There are up to seven different filters.

which makes it an ideal second shooter or companion for enthusiast level consumers. Let us know what you think of it: tweet @DPhotographer
DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHER 71

KIT BAG
8
change settings quickly on a shoot is pleasing. The camera’s mode dial also features a new locking system, which helps to prevent you from accidentally switching out of the current mode you’re shooting in. There’s also an extended grip on the back for better handling. On test we found the D7100 to be a high-end performer as promised. It’s got a quick start up time and it’s ready to shoot in a matter of seconds. The 51-point autofocus system, which includes 15 crosstype sensors, also ensures focus is fast and subjects are identified quickly within the frame. There are plenty of great features packed in too, which make the D7100 versatile and fantastic for exploring all photographic genres. Overall we were really impressed by the D7100’s image quality, handling, features and design. At almost £700 cheaper than Nikon’s new affordable full-frame, the D600, the fact that the D7100 is only DX-format can easily be overlooked here. File sizes may not be quite as large in this camera but quality in all areas is still very much assured. Existing Nikon users who have already invested their hard-earned money into DX lenses will also be reassured to know that the camera giant still intends to expand and develop the high-end DX-format market. Suffice to say, Nikon has developed a worthy contender that can rival the competition, and to some extent, DP its bigger full-frame brothers.

“With up to 24.1 effective megapixels also available, you’ll find that the D7100 doesn’t disappoint when it comes to image quality”
You can rotate the dial at the base of the mode dial to select between single capture and continuous capture modes

The D7100 is fantastic at accurately metering the light even when you’re shooting under mixed or low light conditions

CaPtURE SPEED

With a simplified button layout it’s easy to navigate through the menu settings and camera controls The D7100 comes with a 1,229K-dot 3.2inch wide-angle LCD screen for impressive live view and playback

CONtROLS

LCD

INDETAIL 4Test shots
FiLtER EFFECtS
Switch your mode dial over to the effects setting and choose one of the filter effects to enhance your images. You’ll find filters such as miniature and night vision.

CLOSE UP

Zooming up close to test shots, you’ll notice images appear incredibly detailed and edges are also sharp. There’s also very little noise present.

MEtERiNg tHE LigHt
You’ll find that the D7100 does a great job with light and balancing exposures, even in difficult conditions. The auto shoot modes are also incredibly accurate.

WE waNt YOUR REViEwS/EXaMiNE tHE EViDENCE: Have you had a chance to get hands-on with the new Nikon D7100? If you have and
72 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHER

Nikon D7100
Technical data
Model Price Web Phone Megapixels (effective) Max resolution Sensor information Lens data Zoom Focus/macro Shutter speed ISO sensitivity Exposure modes Metering options Flash modes Connectivity Weight Dimensions Batteries Storage LCD Viewfinder: Nikon D7100 £1,100/$1,300 www.nikon.com 0330 123 0932 24.1-MP 6,000 x 4,000 23.5 x 15.6mm CMOS By lens By lens By lens 1/8000-30s A, 100-6400 Auto, P, A, S, M, Scene, special effects CW, S, Matrix A, RE, SS, FF, RC USB, HDMI mini 765g with battery 135.5 x 106.5 x 76mm Li-ion SD, SDHC, SDXC 3.2” Optical

Verdict
Features
■ The camera is packed full of great features, including a 24.1-megapixel sensor, full 1080p HD video mode, in-built filter effects and an extensive ISO range

9/10

Build quality

■ The D7100 is hard wearing, which is ideal for everyday shoots. It’s also built to withstand the elements and has a water-resistant and dust-proof magnesium alloy design

8/10

Handling
The camera has a familiar layout and quick start up time so you’ll be ready to frame and shoot in just a matter of seconds The D7100’s 24.1MP sensor produces fantastic quality images and interprets colours realistically too

■ Thanks to a simplified design, the camera offers great handling. Button layout is also easy to navigate while on the go, so changing settings is quick and efficient

9/10

Quality of results

■ The camera’s generous megapixel amount and lack of optical low-pass filter mean that image quality is impressive – captures are suitably sharp and detailed

9/10

Value for money

■ The D7100 is competitively priced and offers a fantastic range of features, which makes it a worthy purchase that’s certainly value for money

8/10

Score
The D7100 proves there’s still a place in the market for high-end DSLRs. Overall it proved to be a fantastic performer that can rival pro models

9/10
DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHER 73

COLOUR CONTROL

On our test shots, all colours appear to have been realistically reproduced and are suitably saturated and vibrant. You may warm up a few in Photoshop.

SPEEDY SUBJECTS

The camera does a great job at keeping up with speedy subjects thanks to an advanced autofocus system and the option to shoot in burst mode, capturing up to 6fps.

NOISE LEVELS

The D7100 is a proven low-light performer that offers an advanced ISO range. We found fantastic image quality even in high ISO settings, with very little noise.

have something to say about it, we want to know. Send us your views, opinions and comments to www.dphotograher.co.uk/forum

KIT BAG
The control wheel lets you easily switch between settings

There’s a switch on the side that lets you change between types of focus

Fujifilm FinePix HS50EXR
SRP: £450/$550 (body only)
The most recent battle among camera manufacturers seems to be for the biggest zoom lens, and Fujifilm has thrown its hat into the ring with the FinePix HS50EXR’s massive 42x optical zoom. It may not have reached the lengths of Canon’s 50x zoom on the SX50 but this is still a huge feat considering its relatively compact body. With a 1cm minimum focusing distance and an 84x digital zoom on top of this, it’s an incredibly versatile model – to have this range you’d normally need to carry around several lenses, making this a great second shooter for DSLR users looking for something a bit more compact. The optical image stabilisation onboard keeps shots relatively sharp, meaning that you can handhold easily at longer lengths, but images do begin to blur at full telephoto. The maximum aperture ranges from f2.8 at wide angle and f5.6 at telephoto, which is adequate. If a constant aperture is important to you, though, you may want to look at the Panasonic DMC-FZ200 with its still versatile 24x zoom and f2.8 constant aperture.

With a huge zoom, this seems like the perfect travel camera, but do the rest of the features make it worth you splashing the cash?
As well as its larger zoom, the HS50EXR houses a ½-inch 16-megapixel EXR-CMOS II sensor with EXR Processor II, which claims to have twice the speed of the previous EXR processor. Improving upon its predecessor, the HS30EXR, it now incorporates phase detection into its focusing system, boasting 0.05 second focusing speed at wide angle lengths. At the telephoto end it can take a while to find its focus and continuous autofocus doesn’t always keep up with fast-moving subjects, but overall the focusing was impressively fast and accurate too. As well as full

INDETAIL 4Features
SUPER MacRO
Words by Amy Squibb

The HS50EXR pushes its super zoom feature as its major USP, but it also performs well when it gets up close to its subject, with macro and super macro modes on offer.

SUPER ZOOM caPabilitiES

The 42x optical zoom is this camera’s standout feature. You operate it using the zoom barrel for precise control. There is a manual focus ring too.

The HS50EXR can shoot at 12,800 ISO at a smaller res, with 3,200 being its highest full-res level. It handles noise well until ISO 1,600 when grain starts to appear.

ISO

CaMERa cOMMENtS: Have you tried out the Fujifilm FinePix HS50EXR? Do you think that a super zoom can ever stand up to a DSLR packing a
74 DIGItAL phOtOGrApher

Fujifilm FinePix HS50EXR
Technical data
Model Price Web Phone Megapixels (effective) Max resolution Sensor information Lens data Zoom Focus/macro Shutter speed ISO sensitivity Exposure modes Metering options Flash modes Connectivity Weight Dimensions Batteries Storage LCD Viewfinder: Fujifilm FinePix HS50EXR £450/$550 www.fujifilm.eu/uk 01234 572 000 16-MP 4,992 x 3,329 1/2-inch EXR CMOS II F2.8-F11 (wide) F5.6-F11(telephoto) 42x optical 24-1000mm equivalent, 84x digital zoom 2000mm equivalent 45cm-inf/1cm-1m 30sec-1/4000sec 100, 200, 400, 800, 1,600, 6,400 (image size medium), 1,2800 (image size small) Auto, EXR, P, A, S, M, Panorama, Advanced Multi, Spot, Average A, RE, Fon, Foff, SS USB 2.0, HDMI mini, AV 808g 134.9 x 101.3 x 145.9mm Li-ion SD, SDHC, SDHX (UHS-1), Eye-Fi, 25MB int 3 inches Electronic, 920K pixels

Images tended to be undersaturated, but if you switch the Film Simulation to Velvia you can chose to have more vibrant images

“Its grip makes it comfortable to hold and it’s light enough to use one-handed, even when the lens is extended all the way”
manual controls and RAW shooting, here we have 1080p full HD video recording at 60fps (double that of its predecessor) and you can record stills while shooting your movie. Other handy features include an electronic level so you can line up the horizon and MF assist for accurate focusing during macro shooting. You can also mark images you want to upload to sites like Facebook but there’s no Wi-Fi options or GPS. The design is very similar to its predecessor but that’s no bad thing. Its large grip makes it comfortable to hold and it’s light enough to use one-handed, even when the lens is extended all the way. You’d expect it to be front-heavy when fully extended but this isn’t the case. The build-quality does let it down, though, with a very plastic feel and some parts feel flimsy, such as the memory card door and the plastic shutter release. The zoom has a rubberised grip but operating it isn’t as smooth as it could be. The in-built flash does rise nice and far away from the body, though, which helps avoid red-eye and there’s a hot shoe so you can attach other accessories such as an external stereo mic or flashgun. A great feature of this camera is its LCD screen which flips all the way out for awkward angles or self-portraits and the electronic viewfinder which will help you to take shots on a sunny day. The small 920K viewfinder is nice and clear, and it automatically switches on when you put your eye to it. This can be a bit sensitive but is an extremely useful feature that can help save vital seconds when shooting. The images we took when testing the camera were generally of a good quality considering the sensor size, but Canon’s SX50 trumps Fujifilm’s efforts in many respects, producing much more vibrant images. Overall photos from the HS50EXR were undersaturated, plus a little on the soft side. The camera had a slight lean towards overexposure in a variety of shooting and metering modes but it handled noise fairly well, with little grain until ISO 1,600. The white balance was also true to life and images were rich in detail. Despite a few drawbacks, the HS50EXR is still a great little camera for those wanting the versatility of a superzoom. In terms of image quality, its small sensor means it’s not one for serious shooters as a replacement for their DSLR, but it’s a great second shooter for when you don’t want to take a large amount of kit with you. It’s an all-rounder, and one that has plenty of features to suit any scenario you throw at it.

Verdict
Features
■ It’s lacking Wi-Fi and GPS, two features a lot of cameras come stocked with now for easy sharing, but its quick focusing, flip-out LCD and massive zoom more than make up for that

8/10

Build quality

■ Its plastic construction and flimsy memory card door detract from what is otherwise a sturdy product, with nice rubberised grips for easy handling

6/10

Handling

■ The large grip on the front gives you a good purchase on the camera and it’s not front heavy. It’s easy to navigate the menus and the most used functions are accessible

8/10

Quality of results

■ Images were generally of a good quality, but tended to be undersaturated, sometimes soft and often slightly overexposed. Details were clear and white balance was accurate, though

6/10

Value for money

■ For the versatility of this camera it’s worth the money, and there are plenty of features packed in that will help you take great shots. We’d have hoped the image quality would be slightly higher for this price point, though

6/10

Score
A great second shooter with extreme flexibility but it’s up against some strong competition

7/10
ADVANCED MODE
The HS50EXR has plenty of filters in Advanced Mode to add creative effects, but it also enhances clarity in low light or merges exposures for you.
DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHER 75

FAST SHOOTING

Improving upon its predecessors’ 8fps, the HS50EXR can shoot 11fps at fullresolution and 16fps at small or medium picture quality.

FILM SIMULATION

Fujifilm has a rich history in film, so it’s a nice touch that there are picture modes that simulate classic film looks. Options such as Provia and Astia give you a variety of styles.

telephoto lens? Tell us what you think by visiting www.facebook.com/DigitalPhotographerUK and sharing your thoughts

KIT BAG
Smaller and lighter than its predecessor (although still heavy) and with enhanced mechanical construction this is a welldesigned but expensive lens

BUILD QUALITY

Canon EF 24-70mm f/2.8L II USM
Canon’s update to its standard zoom brings plenty of user benefits as well as a hefty price increase
With somewhat quirky handling and the introduction of newer, better performing models from rivals, Canon’s pro-grade standard EF 2470mm f/2.8L has been completely redesigned. The result is a lens with a conventional zoom ring that extends when increasing focal length (bizarrely, the original worked in reverse), along with the image quality to match that of fixed focal length lenses. It’s not just the optical quality that has been improved either. The mechanical construction has been enhanced in line with the increased use seen in digital cameras over the more sedate or controlled use required during the days of film. Although smaller and much lighter than its predecessor this is still a large and heavy lens. The handling is good, very good actually. AF is fast and smooth and the manual focus action is excellent like it always is with Canon L-series lenses. But, like so many zoom lenses these days, the zoom ring has a ramping action when changing from the longer end to around mid-way. While this helps prevent the extending barrel from collapsing when pointing the lens upward, it can be a bit wearisome throughout the day. In all other respects though this lens can’t really be faulted. There’s a little distortion at the wide end and some lateral chromatic aberration as well if you look closely in the corners at wider apertures, but both are easy to remove in software, such as Adobe Lightroom 4. As for sharpness, this lens delivers in spades. Most zooms are on the weak side wide open and sharpness falls as you zoom through the range to the longer focal lengths. Not so with this lens. The resolution is excellent, though you start to lose sharpness at f/16 due to diffraction, but that’s expected. Apart from that you can use this lens at any aperture you want, for whatever creative effect, and not to have to worry.
76 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHER

SRP: £2,100/$2,300

On the disc Test shots

Check out our reviewer’s results now!

Technical data
Canon EF 24-70mm f/2.8L II USM Price £2,100 /$2,300 (SRP) Web www.canon.co.uk Phone 01737 220 000 Elements/construction 18 / 13 Angle of view 74-29 ° (horizontal) Max aperture f 2.8 Min aperture f 22 Min focus distance 0.38m Mount Canon EF Filter size 82mm Length 113mm Diameter 88.5mm Weight 805g Manufacturer Model

Summary
The price tag is asking a lot but outstanding optical performance, coupled with excellent build quality mean it’s justified over the long term

9/10

Words by Kevin Carter

Lenses

M.Zuiko Digital ED 60mm f2.8 Macro
Olympus continues to add high-quality primes to its micro four thirds system
SRP: £449/$499
Olympus is rather good at making macro lenses, the fast ZD 50mm f/2 ED Macro for the DSLR oriented E-system has an enviable reputation and this new addition to the PEN and OM-D range must surely follow suit. Unlike that particular lens, this new model goes to 1:1 for micro four thirds, equivalent to 2x life-size magnification on a 35mm camera. However, that and the tele-centric design makes it a rather stretched, slightly ungainly-looking lens. On the plus side, there’s no barrel extension during focusing and the extra length allows a clearly labelled linear focusing scale with corresponding magnification scale. There’s also room for a rotary four-stage focus-limiter switch but it’s still a little fiddly. Optically, this lens is outstanding with almost none of the difficult-to-remove fringing seen on high-contrast edges, and excellent sharpness across the image frame, until f/8, where diffraction starts to take effect.

Looks unwieldy , although it is a smaller design, but compensates for its look and feel with fantastic macro imaging power

MACRO MARVEL

Technical data
Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 60mm f2.8 Macro Price £449/$499 Web www.olympus.co.uk Phone 00800 6710 830 Elements/construction 13 / 10 Angle of view 17° (horizontal) Max aperture f2.8 Min aperture f22 Min focus distance 0.19m Mount Micro Four Thirds  (Panasonic/Olympus) Filter size 46mm Length 82mm Diameter 56mm Weight 185g Manufacturer Model

Summary
The Olympus 60mm f2.8 Macro delivers excellent results, and at a lower price than the Panasonic 45mm /10

9

This Nikon 1 system lens performs at a good speed and offers better-thanaverage imaging quality although some other Nikon models may impress more

SUPER SPEED

Technical data

1 Nikkor 18.5mm f1.8
SRP: £179/$187

Nikon’s 1 system continues to expand at a fair pace. Check out the new 50mm equivalent
When the Nikon 1 system was first introduced, the firm was criticised a little for not offering any lenses with even a moderately ‘fast’ maximum aperture. With such a physically small sensor there’s little control over depth of field and although the cameras employ both CD- and PD-AF, autofocus operation could be improved with ‘faster’ lenses. With a 2.7x crop factor, this lens on a Nikon 1 body is the equivalent of a 50mm f/1.8. With its ‘normal’ perspective and reasonably fast maximum aperture this tiny little lens is an attractive alternative to standard zooms. No focus control ring on the lens means this isn’t an easy lens to handle for critical manual focusing but autofocus is fast even when light levels tumble. As for image quality, the lens is sharp and there’s only marginal fringing and lateral chromatic aberration, but it isn’t up to the same DP standards as the cheaper F-mount version.

Manufacturer Model Price Web Phone Elements/construction Angle of view Max aperture Min aperture Min focus distance Mount Filter size Length Diameter Weight

Nikon 1 Nikkor 18.5mm f1.8 £179/$ 187 www.nikon.co.uk 0871200 1964 8/6 39.6° (horizontal) f/1.8 f/11 0.2m 1 Nikkor 40.5mm 36mm 56mm 72g

Summary
Image quality is good enough but not great and the price is higher than the superior F-mount version /10

7

DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHER 77

KIT BAG

ACCESSORIES
A collection of the best fun-yet-functional accessories out there for photographers
Lensbaby Composer Pro
Website: www.lensbaby.co.uk Price: £245.42/$300

Lensbaby lenses have become very popular in recent years, offering photographers the ability to create impressive shallow depth of field and selective focus effects in-camera. The Composer Pro model featured ships with the Double Glass Optic, but can also be purchased – at a higher price – with the Sweet 35 Optic.

Breffo Adventure Camera Kit
Website: www.breffo.com Price: £20/$20

Blogging for Photographers – Jolie O’Dell
Website: www.ilex-press.com Price: £12.99/$24.95

If you like the idea of the Helmet Camera Mount but want to attach your camera to a surface that’s not as level or even, the Breffo Adventure Camera Kit is for you. It’s basically a rubber spider with eight legs that can be bent, twisted and hooked around anything you want. It’s certainly very strong and adaptable, so it’s ideal to work well with most compact cameras.

Succeeding as a photographer in the modern age is often as much about your mastery of social networking and media as it is about your skill with a camera. This excellent book by Jolie O’Dell talks you through everything you need to about blogging. Photographers should devour it from cover to cover.

Sun Position Compass
Website:

www.flight-logistics.com Price: £21.20/$37.80 *XE While there are apps around that can tell you sunrise and sunset positions at various points of the year, these naturally rely on a phone signal that, sadly, you do not always have when you are stood in a fairly remote location with your camera. There’s also something rather satisfying about working these things out in the ‘old-school’ way.
78 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHER

Accessories
PocketWizard PlusX
Website: www.pocketwizard.com Price: £89.99/$99 (per unit)

The recently released PlusX is the latest in the PocketWizard line and may just be the best yet. If you don’t require the 32 channels and LCD of the Plus III model, the PlusX is the transceiver for you, offering 10 channels and compatible with all other PocketWizard models. Very impressive indeed.

Gitzo Tripod Leg Warmers
Website: www.gitzo.co.uk Price: £43.95/$65

Digital Image Editing & Special Effects – Michael Freeman
Website: www.ilex-press.com Price: £9.99/$24.95

Carrying and handling a tripod in cold weather is not always a pleasant experience, and getting a good grip for adjusting the legs isn’t always easy. Why not get your tripod some lovely leg warmers? The ones we’ve picked out here are by Gitzo and fit their Series 1 and 2 tripods, but other versions are available at comparable prices.

It’s important to keep your Photoshop skills up to speed, and even seasoned image editors can benefit from a quick refresh and a dash of revision, so straightforward and easy to follow books like this are well worth a place on your shelf.

Camera Demon – Helmet Camera Mount
Website: www.proporta.co.uk Price: £24.95/$33.95

Naturally, this includes neither a camera nor a helmet, but this mount does allow you to attach your preexisting camera to your pre-existing helmet – or indeed anything at all, in theory – and take all kinds of photos that you wouldn’t normally be able to take. Hours of fun to be had!

The White Balance Lens Cap
Website: www.photojojo.com Price: £ 42.50/$65 (77mm thread version)

Lens caps are good at protecting your lens, but they don’t do a lot else for you – unless you upgrade to this one, that is! Normally, taking a photo with the lens cap on is a classic mistake but with The White Balance Lens Cap that’s the whole idea. Use your camera’s custom White Balance mode and take a quick photo with the cap in place and the correct WB reading is measured. You can even switch between neutral and warm white balance domes.

Halcon Traveller
Website: www.paramo.co.uk Price: £130 / ($199 approx)

Retro Canvas DSLR Camera Bag with EVA Protective Case
Website: www.lovecases.co.uk Price: £29.95/$45.85 *XE

This beautiful bag is ideal for an average size DSLR and lens, making it perfect for use during shoots when there’s no need to carry masses of kit around with you. This is just the sort of bag you need for street photography. It’s got a really impressive, well-made feel to it. Highly recommended for men and women alike..

Paramo has launched a new coat with 12 pockets and two further compartments, perfect for photographers and wildlife fans. The Halcon Traveller is made of Nikwax Cotton+ fabric, ensuring it’s durable, lightweight and quick drying. It is on the pricier side, but it’ll last for years and keep you and your kit snug and secure on outdoor shoots.

DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHER 79

KIT BAG
You can use the suite to easily and quickly create attractive, creative borders for your images, which can really add the ideal finishing touch to your work

BORDERS

AUTOMATE AccESS

The plug-ins in the suite are easily accessed via Photoshop’s File>Automate menu and are quick to load

When working in Perfect Effects 4, you can gradually ‘stack’ the adjustments you make, allowing for a high degree of flexibility

COMPLETE cONTROL

Perfect Photo Suite 7
Photoshop has immense capabilities, and experienced image editors are able to carry out astonishingly complex adjustments and create stunning effects without recourse to plug-ins. Not every photographer is a Photoshop guru, but they still want to be able to create impressive effects with their images that look convincing and professional. Perfect Photo Suite 7 is among a clutch of programs designed to suit the needs of photographers who don’t have the experience or inclination to create every effect from scratch in Photoshop. As the name suggests, Perfect Photo Suite 7 comprises a range of individual programs: Perfect B&W; Perfect Portrait 2; Perfect Layers 3 (for editing layers without recourse to Photoshop); Perfect Effects 4; Perfect Mask 5.2; Perfect Resize 7.5; and FocalPoint 2. Each is available individually, but when purchased as an entire suite, you’ve got immediate access to an incredibly powerful range of tools. Within Photoshop, the software installs into Photoshop’s File>Automate menu,
80 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHER

Can one piece of software handle almost all your image processing and effects needs? Perfect Photo Suite 7 aims to do just that
SRP: From £196.40/$299.95 (Premium Edition) OS: Mac OS X 10.6 or later, Windows Vista or later (XP is not supported)
and there’s the option to view an introductory video immediately after installation. Similarly, when you first use each of the applications, helpful pointers appear to explain key tools within the interface. Touches like this make a big difference to the user experience. Even without this though, each program is simple to use and you can get very impressive results in no time at all. We were particularly taken with Perfect B&W, which has a dazzling array of presets and effects, and Perfect Effects 4 is similarly comprehensive and highly capable. Meanwhile, Perfect Resize 7.5 offers an ideal solution for producing topquality file enlargements with the absolute minimum of quality loss; better still, the range of presets makes something that could be confusing for beginners simple and straightforward. In our tests, Perfect Mask 5.2 seemed slightly less immediately easy and effective than the equivalent function in Tiffen’s Dfx suite, but this might just take DP a little getting used to. www.ononesoftware.com

Summary
Ease of use Value for money Features Quality of results 9/10 8/10 9/10 9/10

An excellent collection of apps well worth investigating. Due to be upgraded to version 7.5 at no cost to existing users of version 7

9/10

Words by Matt Bennett

Software reviews

Beauty Box Photo 3.0 is capable of excellent – and fast – results. It could be a formidable tool The Presets menu doesn’t really add anything extra to the plug-in, and in some respects cheapens it slightly

INITIAL RESULTS

Apps
Perfect B&W for iPhone and iPad
Price: £1.49 (tbc)/$1.99 OS: iOS 6

PRESETS

Beauty Box Photo 3.0
Fast, intuitive skin retouching – how does Beauty Box shape up to the competition?
SRP: £65/$99 (approx) OS: Windows XP or later/Mac OS X 10.5 or later
Beauty Box Photo 3.0 loads quickly and without fuss, and its algorithms immediately calculated a mask and performed a good-to-excellent (depending on the nature of the model’s skin and the lighting in the image), beauty retouch without any need for us to tell the software where the model’s face begins and ends. In this way, Beauty Box Photo 3.0 is excellent. Our model’s skin was improved fairly significantly in relatively little time; the manufacturer’s claim that you can “lose 10 years in 1 minute” isn’t complete hyperbole. It’s when you want to take the software further – and take more control yourself – that things come undone slightly. There are no dialogue boxes to hold your hand, and no help menu. Making adjustments to the mask doesn’t feel very intuitive, and while you can save snapshots as you go, there’s no option for split-screen or side-by-side viewing, which is rather limiting. The absence of quick edit brushes is disappointing too. DP www.digitalanarchy.com

Perfect B&W is a standout feature in onOne’s Perfect Photo Suite 7, so it’s great to see a highly affordable iPhone and iPad version being made available – although the UK price had yet to be confirmed at the time of going to press. This app will enable you to create beautiful monochrome shots on the run.

Summary
Ease of use Value for money Features Quality of results 7/10 7/10 6/10 8/10

Beauty Box Photo 3.0 seems short on features and usability at this price, especially when you consider it only deals with skin blemishes and doesn’t /10 do any sculpting work

7

Nik Collection

Control Points allow precise localised adjustments to be made with incredible speed

CONTROL POINTS

Now consolidated into one affordable package, how do the Nik plug-ins shape up against their rivals?
SRP: £99/$149 OS: Mac OS X 10.6.8 or later, Windows Vista or later

BeFunky Photo Editor
varies with device

Price: Free OS: iOS 4.3 or later. Android

If you want a comprehensive set of tools for your iPhone, iPad or Android device, BeFunky Photo Editor has plenty to offer, with editable effects, photo frames and simple sharing capabilities. It also enables you to add text to your pictures.

Vintique
are excellent, well implemented and simple to use. However, the strongest member of the team in our view is Nik Silver Efex Pro 2, which has become something of a favourite among dedicated fans of black and white photography, and is arguably worth the entrance fee alone. The selective adjustments that are possible with the intuitive and easy to use Control Points make achieving superb black and white conversions simple. DP www.niksoftware.com

Though the well-established, individual plug-ins, which include Color Efex Pro 4 and Sharpener Pro 3, are now only available as part of the full Nik Collection, the new bundled price is 70% less than it was previously, which is great news. Color Efex Pro 4 is similar to Perfect Effects 4 in Perfect Photo Suite 7, while HDR Efex Pro 2 offers an alternative to Photomatix Pro for merging differently exposed frames into a single image. In fact, all the tools in the Nik Collection

Summary
Ease of use Value for money Features Quality of results 9/10 10/10 9/10 9/10

2.2 and higher

Price: £0.69/$0.99 OS: iOS 5.1 or later. Android

For your money, the range of tools at your fingertips is mightily impressive – and Nik Silver Efex Pro 2 still remains the cream of the black and white /10 converting crop

9

Everyone loves vintage and retro effects, as is evident from the popularity of Instagram and the multitude of apps available to create sepia and cross-processed effects. Vintique is one such example, containing 32 Vintage Filters and 25 Retro Filters, but you can tweak the contrast, vibrancy and colour temperature to produce your own. You can then upload the results to Instagram, Facebook and Twitter.

DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHER 81

IMAGE EDITING

Smooth skin
Y
ou’ll find a huge selection of skinsmoothing techniques online, but many of these will leave you with an undesirable final outcome. If you want a professional final look for your images, then there’s no cutting corners – you’ll have to roll up your sleeves and clear away unwanted artefacts before you start smoothing. The best way to tackle this type of retouching is to start by simply flagging the artefacts that you want amended. This is as simple as creating a new layer and adding annotations, much like you might do when sketching using a pen and paper. In this tutorial you’ll learn how to double-confirm areas using your Photoshop Channels as blemish maps. Only once this is complete can you begin to apply your healing tools. The skin-smoothing is still a long way off, but you just can’t just hide blemishes and this is what leads to overly fake looks. Instead, use the prompts first to target and lift all of the imperfections. Discover how to do this using the Spot Healing Brush and Patch tools. You’ll notice

We show you how to perfect skin in your snaps, by combining three easy techniques using some of Photoshop’s standard tool sets
that there’s not a Clone Stamp tool in sight, as our final aim is to make singular and not frequent re-samples of skin areas. Once the healing is complete, we can then start softening the skin. This is a case of removing contour and contour is an effect of hard lighting. So here you’ll finish with editing lighting effects that will effectively even and smoothen the skin. Small measures have a big impact on believable looks, which is what you’re DP aiming for in this tutorial.

Add annotations Start by creating a new layer and select Channels panel Hide the anno layer. Activate the Channel map Activate the Rectangle Marquee tool and the Pencil tool from the Tool Bar. Use this to mark out 1 Channels panel and duplicate the Blue Channel select the duplicate Blue channel. Now copy and paste 2 3 any discreet as well as noticable blemishes that you need (Ctrl+click). Press Cmd/Ctrl+L to activate the Levels dialog (Cmd/Ctrl+C; Cmd/Ctrl+V) into your Layer stack, placing to address. This is an important step as it will serve as a reminder of what needs fixing. box. Pull the Shadow and Highlight sliders closer to the midtone (middle) slider to create an increase in exposure.

this beneath the anno layer. You can use this along with your annotations to pinpoint blemishes for editing.

What to target Activate the model layer, using the Spot Healing Brush Now it’s time for the close-up Noticeable directions Duplicate the model layer and get Channel map layer as a guide. Make sure to match 5 work, so zoom in at 200%. Select the Spot Healing rid of eye bags and any glaring texture mismatches with 4 6 application with the direction of the blemishes to match the Brush and activate the Brush picker menu from the options the Patch tool. Now decrease the Opacity of the duplicate overhead. Set brush Hardness to 50%. Now you can start to amend the blemishes. skin. This can take a while, so turn the Channel map layer on and off to check that you’re making good progress. model layer to show through a little eye-bag detail. This creates a realistic, believable look.

Words by Adam Smith

Add Curves The annotations are there as a final reference, serving as a reminder for you to fix all the 7 key areas. Make a selection like in our example, using the

Rectangle Marquee tool. After you have done this, apply a Curves adjustment layer.

Blend If option Your selection acts as a visual guide. Paint out contour Activate the Curves Layer Mask Raise your Curve to blow out highlights, then activate and press Shift+F5. Fill it with black then select a soft, 8 9 Layer>Layer Style>Blending Options. Hold Alt and split the 30% Opacity white brush. Apply this to the mask to show Blend If>This Layer highlights slider, dragging it into the middle of the slide bar. through effects and soften contours. This smoothes the skin and creates a natural look that still shows pores.

82 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHER

Smooth skin

Before

After
The skin has been cleaned and image lighting has been edited to create smooth, clear and perfect skin DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHER 83

IMAGE EDITING

Use Photoshop’s colour adjustments and layer mask functionality to create a believable scene

Create aerial perspective
hoto compositing needn’t be scary or difficult once you know how to do it. To prove it, we’re going to show you how you can build a realistic aerial perspective using images of mountain vistas. Of course there are always rules to start with and these mostly determine the believability of your image. For example, never mismatch image resolutions. Fuzzy edges in your midground will stick out like a sore thumb. Also be mindful of lighting. You may have to work from several similar stock images, not shot from the same shoot at the same time. Even before you can think of editing, make sure you match the direction of shadows and highlights in all your photo layers as your final image won’t look believable without it. After this is done, you’ll have plenty of time to get down to the fun stuff. Photoshop is the ideal resource to solve all your comping and colour grading conundrums. Here we show you the fastest way to remove elements from their backgrounds, to be stacked in the Layers panel. This important step should always be the starting point and blueprint for your composites, so make sure you pay special attention to this. After this is done, you’ll start to colour grade using Photoshop’s powerful colour adjustment tools. Learn how to target and affect specific layers, how to control highlight and shadow as well as create new colour casts. You can also create a mist effect using the free Photoshop brushes you’ll find on the web. On our disc you’ll find the images used in this tutorial. Once you have finished with this tutorial, you will have a better understanding of what it takes to create a simple, yet realistic, aerial perspective in absolutely no time at all!

P

Extract the skyline Cmd/Ctrl click the copy channel Start image Our start image is the foundation of every Select the sky Activate the Channel panel; duplicate other effect applied, so it must be believable. Working your Blue channel. Activate only your Blue copy channel, 3 thumbnail, then activate the Layers panel. Hold Alt/Opt, 1 2 adding an inverted layer mask, extracting the skyline. Copy with a series of shots from one location is useful for apply Levels and pull the highlight and shadow sliders matching image elements. If that’s not doable, try using mountain stock with a simpler perspective, shot face on. together. Apply the Dodge tool, set Highlights to the sky. Apply the Burn tool, set to Midtones, to your mountains. and paste in a new clouds layer behind our masked layer, which is more suited to the lighting we want to achieve.

Words by Adam Smith

Refine your edges Cmd/Ctrl click the layer mask Delete interfering elements Our new skyline is heavy thumbnail and activate the Marquee tool, selecting 5 with clouds. This means that the lighting of objects 4 Refine Edge from the options above. We’ve set a Radius of would be darker. The mountain that is highlighted in the distance, due to the clear sunny day of the original skyline, sticks out like a sore thumb. Select and mask this out. 2px, Contrast at 10%, Shift Edge at 29% and Amount at 50%. These values may vary from image to image.

Comp in new mountains Use the techniques learnt in steps 1 to 3 to select. Copy and paste new mountain 6 layers in behind your original layer, in front of your cloud layer. Ctrl click each new individual mountain layer, choosing Convert to Smart Object each time.

84 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHER

Create aerial perspective

Before

After
Work with layer masks, colour adjustments and custom brushes to create the final look

Work with Smart Objects Now you can apply Gaussian Colour grading Clip individual Curves layers to each Blur filter effects to your layer. This will be added as 7 mountain layer. Pull up both Red and Green curves, 8 Smart Filters, which can be accessed and edited at any time. drop the Blue curve, matching the existing tones in the Apply higher blur amounts to the furthest elements, lower amounts to those in the midground.

original image. Don’t drop the Blue curve for the furthest layer, so it retains a bluer cast influenced by our sky’s light.

Special effects Clip Selective Color layers, tweaking Whites and Neutrals settings to correct exposure. 9 Increase the Blacks slider for both to soften highlights. Add layer masks to mountain layers and apply a mist brush to create mist effects.

DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHER 85

IMAGE EDITING

Rescue flat and dull city shots by adjusting your composition and exposure in Photoshop
hooting in the city provides plenty of opportunity to take stunning images, whether you capture interesting architecture, candid street portraits or breathtaking cityscapes. However, the latter can come with its own set of problems, as flat landscape shots are a common issue that are difficult to avoid. Finding a good viewpoint to take your cityscape shot from can be tricky as this will determine the final composition of your photograph. Think long and hard about the best vantage point for shooting your cityscape. If possible, try out a few, so you have options at hand to work with later. Often you are forced to shoot from a great distance, leaving you with a sparse composition. Conversely, shooting from too close doesn’t give you a dynamic picture, so make sure you position yourself at the right spot to capture every element there is to your image.

Enhance your cityscapes
S
The weather could also be a problem, as unless you live in or around the city, you may not be able to pick and choose the best day to travel in and take your photos. If you are shooting on a bright sunny day, you might be left with an expanse of plain blue sky that adds nothing to your shot. Plus, unless you have an ND Grad filter on hand, it can be difficult to correctly expose the foreground without getting a blown-out sky. Warm weather can also create a haze on the horizon, resulting in a loss of detail in the main focal point of your shot. Likewise, overcast conditions can result in a loss of detail and an underexposed image. Luckily, there are some quick and easy tweaks you can make in post-production to breathe live into your dull images. In this tutorial you’ll learn how to recompose your photo, boost the colours and rescue lost detail in Photoshop. Follow these simple steps to discover how to get a more dynamic cityscape.

Straighten the horizon To correct a wonky horizon, go Create a duplicate layer In Adobe Photoshop, open up Recompose To get rid of unnecessary empty space to Edit>Free Transform and move your cursor to the your image and then double click on the Background 2 1 in your photo, select the Crop tool. Resize the 3 side of your image. When the curved arrows appear, drag layer in the Layers palette to unlock it. Next go to highlighted box to select the area of your photo you want Layer>Duplicate Layer. Rename the layer if you wish, and then click OK. your image to rotate and straighten it. When you are done, click on the tick.

to keep. Use the gridlines to help you position the horizon exactly on the bottom line.

Words by Joanna Stass

Adjust levels Go to Image>Adjustments>Levels and Control curves Now go to Lighten the shadows Adjusting the levels then use the black dropper to sample an area of black Image>Adjustments>Curves and again select the black 4 5 and curves may have darkened your image 6 in your image. This will automatically adjust your levels. But dropper to sample a black area of your photo. The colours slightly. To rescue the detail lost in the shadows, go to if you are not happy with the results, move the Midtones slider to do it manually. will instantly correct, but again, if you want different results, adjust the Curves palette yourself until you are happy. Image>Adjustments>Shadows/Highlights and move the Shadows slider to brighten your shot.

86 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHER

Enhance your cityscapes

Before

After
Creating a more dynamic composition and giving colours a boost will add depth and interest to your cityscape

Sharpen up A hazy day may leave your city skyline looking a little soft. Select the Filter tab, choose 7 Sharpen>Unsharp Mask and then adjust the amount and radius until you have achieved your desired results in the preview box. Then click OK.

Colour burn If the skyline is still hazy, select the Brush Gradient layer To darken the sky, add a new tool and choose Color Burn as the Mode. Use a low adjustment layer in the Layers palette and select 8 9 Opacity and select your brush size. Now carefully use the Gradient from the menu. Alter the direction of your gradient brush over the hazy areas. This will darken them and help accentuate its detail. and, in the Gradient Editor, choose a Neutral Density preset, selecting the strength of your choice.

DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHER 87

HELPDESK

Helpdesk

Matt Bennett on creating balanced compositions, contrast and drama

Before

After
Selecting the huts in the foreground and performing a few simple steps in Photoshop gives this image the impact it deserves to have

Balance the foreground
I took this shortly after a storm rolled over Southwold on a day out with the family. I was hoping some sunlight would light them (the huts) up, but it broke through the rain further along the beach, which seemed to work well. I’ve processed it in Lightroom and corrected some distortion in Photoshop. I like the drama of it, but I’m not sure if I’ve got the exposure quite right. Lee Acaster
88 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHER

Congratulations, Lee, on capturing an atmospheric image, which highlights what a difference the right lighting conditions can make. However, you don’t want the beach huts along the foreground to be underexposed. You’ve exposed the sky and have therefore ended up with a foreground that’s too dark and slightly muddy. But this is easy to fix in Photoshop. Go to Image>Adjustments>Levels and ensure that the

Helpdesk
OF THE BEST

THE GRADIENT TOOL
Though easily overlooked, the Gradient Tool is the best option for selectively adjusting images. Apart from this, it is also extremely handy for use on Layer Masks.

THE DODGE TOOL
If you need to quickly brighten up a specific area of an image (such as eyes or teeth) look no further than the Dodge Tool. It is sharp, precise and very convenient.

SCREEN BLEND MODE
Use the Screen blend mode to quickly double the brightness of an image by simply duplicating the layer and then selecting Screen from the blending mode menu.

BRIGHTEN SOMETHING UP IN PHOTOSHOP

THIS ISSUE:

Boost contrast
I took this photo when photographing my school’s production of Jesus Christ Superstar. I love the emotion of the actor in the photo, but it’s just missing the ‘wow factor’ I was looking for, almost like he blends into the background slightly. I’d love some critique on this image. Any ideas? Thanks! Ben Warburton This is a very strong performance image, Ben. We understand that you have already cropped most of the images you took, but you need to go a little further in Photoshop. We can see what you mean about the actor blending into the background, but the chief issue is that the black and white presentation you’ve gone for is rather flat. It’s simple to enhance an image like this with some split-toning, contrast enhancement and one or two other quick effects. To achieve a splittoned look, first create a Color Balance adjustment layer and select the Shadows from the drop-down menu. Push the colour towards cyan and blue. Now create a second Color Balance adjustment layer, select Highlights, and push the colour towards red and yellow. As this is a fairly dark image, you could also try doing this for the Midtones using the same Color Balance adjustment layer. To make this process a bit easier to follow, we’ve broken it down into simple steps here.

After
Some fairly simple toning and contrast work in Photoshop has made this image look much more impressive.

Step 1 Create a Color Balance adjustment layer for the Shadows and a second for the Highlights. Use the sliders to cool the Shadows and warm the Highlights. You could also try warming the Midtones.

Before

Step 2 Double-click on your second adjustment layer. Go to the ‘This Layer’ slider and hold the alt key to split the triangle and drag the two halves apart as shown in the example here.

histogram is correctly spread across the Input section. Ensure that the third slider is right at the edge of the histogram. Drag the middle slider to the left to brighten the image overall. Now use the Lasso Tool (L) to make a selection of the foreground area and go to Select>Refine Edge to feather your selection. Try around 150-200 pixels. Press Cmd/Crtl+M to call up the Curves. Drag the middle of the diagonal line upwards and slightly to the left. Finally, use the same selection and go to Cmd/Ctrl+B, and push the colour slightly towards Red and Yellow. Job done!

Step 4 Press (G); select the foreground to background preset, a Radial Gradient with Screen mode and 25% Opacity. Check Reverse, now drag across the image in front of the actor to create a spotlight effect.

Step 3 The image now requires a contrast enhancement to give it the impact it currently lacks. Use Photoshop’s Curves (Cmd/Ctrl+M) and create a slight s-shape, then press (D) to reset your colour palette.

DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHER 89

HELPDESK

CAREER ADVICE
Need to get social media savvy quickly? Rachael D’Cruze lends a helping hand

LinkedIn credentials
I’m by no means a social media whizz, but I’m not in the dark ages either – I use Facebook and Twitter for my photography business, as well as Flickr and 500px. However, I simply don’t understand LinkedIn. I wondered if you could please explain to me how it could help my business and how I can grow my account and business with it? William Purnell When you’re used to Facebook, Twitter, and Google+, LinkedIn can seem like a slightly strange concept but that’s because unlike the others, it’s been designated specifically for business professionals – use it as a social platform for your photography business. LinkedIn allows you to market yourself as a reputable professional and make connections with other professionals who can vouch for your skills and help you make new business contacts. Remember you can’t beat word-of-mouth marketing, so connecting with the right people is particularly beneficial to your business – you can easily get introduced, or noticed by photo editors, art buyers, graphic designers and book editors on LinkedIn. To grow your photography business through LinkedIn, you need to put in a little effort, as you would expect. Start by building your credibility by receiving recommendations from your contacts – encourage this by taking the time to recommend others. Get involved with the LinkedIn community via the LinkedIn Answers feature – contributing to conversations boosts your credibility and will encourage people to add you to their network. Try adding some apps to your profile to make yourself stand out – link your blog to your profile, sync your tweets and add SlideShare to show off some of your work. Something that you do need to remember though is not to spam potential contacts with LinkedIn connection invitations. Introduce yourself to a potential new contact first (by phone, email or face-to-face) before sending them an invitation to connect to your LinkedIn network. Many pros get loads of connection request emails every day and they can get annoying after a while!

Understanding Twitter
To date I’ve concentrated only on social media where I can share my images – mainly Facebook, but I do use other platforms too. However other photographers really rave about Twitter and how they’ve got work through it. To be honest I’m confused – I have a profile but am not sure who to follow and what I’m actually supposed to be achieving with my tweets… help! Carly Mills You get just 140 characters per tweet on Twitter – no wonder it’s confusing! Your best bet is to stop comparing Twitter to other social media platforms – this micro blogging site has its own rules. Your friends are right, Carly, it’s perfectly feasible to get work and build your business through Twitter. What are you supposed to be doing on Twitter? In a nutshell: interacting. Twitter won’t work for you unless you engage others so be interesting, let your personality shine, talk about what you’re doing and planning, ask questions, get feedback on your work (you can tweet photos) and chat about industry issues and news. You’ll soon have new followers, mentions and retweets galore! As a photographer who wants to grow their business, when it comes to who to follow, your first ports of call should be anyone you’ve worked with to date, anyone you specifically want to connect with and industry chiefs – magazines, personalities, bloggers, big name pros… as soon as these people start interacting with you more followers will come flooding in and you’ll start attracting new clients and make sure you’re fresh in peoples’ minds.

Twitter is great for reaching real people, rather than Facebook-style fan pages

Media measuring
I use social media a lot to promote my work. I must admit that although I enjoy it, it does swallow a fair chunk of my time at my desk. I’m sometimes left wondering if my posts, tweets and general interaction have any influence over other people. Is there a service I could use to measure this – I don’t mind if there is a charge. Jake Hall if others trust your opinions, what topics are you the most influential on and how you compare with your peers. The sign-up process is easy and allows you to add all of your social media, so you know your results are accurate. Your Klout Score measures your online influence on a scale of 1 to 100, but the average score is actually 20, not 50 – bear that in mind when you get yours. If it’s not at a level you’d like, then you can You’re in luck, Jake – we know of just the service for you look at your different social sites and discover which and it’s free too! Sign up for a Klout account at www. ones you’re performing best on and which ones need klout.com. Klout measures your influence based on your a bit more attention. This kind of granular information ability to drive action in social networks, and provides is great for helping you to figure out which markets you with an updated Klout Score each morning to help you should be aiming your work at and what kind of you better understand your social media power. That is strategies will help you to engage them.

LinkedIn has a great user interface – you’ll find incorporating it into your daily workflow a cinch

Klout lets you discover how much online influence you have from your combined social media networks

GOT a QUESTiON? Get in touch with us at team@dphotographer.co.uk to submit your career-related questions. Whether you are just
90 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHER

Career advice

Rachael D’Cruze discusses why all photographers should take their social media presence seriously

BIG Question?
Just as the digital revolution was painful for some photographers, it still happened – technology advanced and the way we all work changed forever. It stands to reason then that our new digital world of photography would gel rather nicely with the internet, so nicely in fact that we are in the midst of our next revolution – the social media photography revolution. In this exciting next chapter of photography’s history, we are all able to employ social media to promote our photography, services we offer, products we sell as well as to engage others through the sharing of our work, ideas and experiences. The danger with the social media photography revolution is to write it off as a fad – the internet is going nowhere! If you don’t embrace social media you’ll quickly find yourself being sidelined by social media savvy peers – people now expect to be able to find their perfect wedding photographer on Facebook and art directors expect advertising photographers to have a LinkedIn account. To deny yourself the opportunity to reach people and let others reach you via social media is the equivalent of going to see the aurora borealis DP and not bothering to take your camera.

Media hub

I often feel like I’m drowning in a sea of social media! There are so many different platforms (I’m on all of them) and I can see that they all benefit my business in different ways. However, I simply can’t afford the time any more – ironic really as it’s through these services that I’ve become more busy. I don’t want to have to streamline my social media presence, rather I’m looking for a way to get everything in one place – is there any way of doing this?
Michael Mannering

HootSuite account is free but if you upgrade to the Pro version you get scheduling, geo-targeting, analytics and measurement tools as well. Get going by setting up an account at hootsuite.com/dashboard.

Great to hear that social media has boosted your business Michael! Social media can indeed take up quite a lot of time, especially if you’re logging in and out of different applications. You need to set yourself up a HootSuite account – this will let you organise and keep track of your various social networks. You can have all your different accounts including Tumblr, Flickr, Facebook, Twitter, WordPress and more all in their own separate space within your HootSuite dashboard. With everything in one place you can make simultaneous updates and keep track of what’s going on all the different platforms you’re involved with. A basic

HootSuite lets you manage all of your social media accounts from one central dashboard

starting out as a pro photographer or your business needs a boost, the Digital Photographer team are on hand with the best advice
DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHER 91

© Teodora Vlaicu

The

You’d be foolish not to take the social media photography revolution seriously – remember everyone said the digital revolution was just a fad…

Southampton
DigitalSuperstore
CANON EOS 7D
BODY ONLY

11 CIVIC CENTRE RD, SOUTHAMPTON SO14 7FJ
TOP 5 DSLR DEALS
Professional Imaging Partner

CANON EOS 600D
& 18-55MM IS LENS

£
NEW LOW PRICE

£

trade-up for only...

and your 400D & 18-55 lens

449 † £360
.99
inc.

trade-up for only...

& your 50D body inc. cashback

969.99* † £790

C

£80CK ASHBA
inc. n Cano13 from31 /05/
ends

TOP LENSES
EF 8-15MM
F/4L Fish-eye USM
*INC. £155 CASHBACK

CANON EOS 1DX
BODY ONLY

£

944.99* 969.99*
.99* .99*

EF 16-35MM
F/2.8L II USM
*INC. £160 CASHBACK

£

NEW LOW PRICE

CANON EOS 6D
BODY ONLY

* AFTER CASHBACK. IN-STORE PRICE £1049.99
inc.

F/4L USM

EF 17-40MM

CANON EOS 60D
CANON EOS PRO HIRE available – phone or call in for latest stock/price details.
BODY ONLY

£

trade-up for only...

& your 40D body inc. cashback

549.99* £65 † £400
fr

100 £ CK .99* C ASHBA £1499
trade-up for only...

*INC £80 CASHBACK

£

519

£4849

.99

CANON EOS 100D
& 18-55MM IS STM SRP £699.99 NEW!
CK HBA CA S non om Ca
fr
/07/13 ends 31

EF 24-70MM
F/2.8L USM
*INC £235 CASHBACK

CK HBA CA S non om Ca
/05/13 ends 31

† £ & your 5D Mk I inc. cashback .99*

1250

from31/05/13
ends

Canon

£

EF 24-105MM
F/2.8L IS II USM

F/4L IS USM WHITE BOX

1514 .99 £729

£40
inc.

£Phone

WE PAY CASH
for good quality camera equipment visit your local LCE store now!

* AFTER CASHBACK. IN-STORE PRICE £614.99

CANON EOS 5D Mk III
BODY ONLY

* AFTER CASHBACK. IN-STORE PRICE £1599.99

EF 70-200MM
*INC £235 CASHBACK

£

CANON EOS 700D
& 18-55MM STM IS LENS NEW! SRP £749.99

£

£

Phone

C

£50CK ASHBA
from31/07/13
ends

trade-up only...

Canon

& your 5D Mk II inc. cashback

2199 † £1575

0 £16A CK CASHB
n Cano13 from31 /05/
ends

inc.

EF 100-400MM
F/4.5-5.6L IS USM

1564.99* .99 £1199 619.99* £ 1299.99
£

CANON EOS M
& 18-55MM IS EF-M
Compact System Camera.

C

£50CK ASHBA
n Cano from31 /07/13
ends

EF 100MM

£399

.99*

F/2.8L IS Macro

*INC £80 CASHBACK

* AFTER CASHBACK. IN-STORE PRICE £449.99

EF 24-70MM
F/4 L IS USM

EOS M & 22MM LENS + EF ADAPTER - £549.99*

* AFTER CASHBACK. IN-STORE PRICE £2359.99

* AFTER CASHBACK. IN-STORE PRICE £599.99

NIKON D3100

TOP 5 DSLR DEALS
.99*
C

NIKON D7000
BODY

& 18-55MM IS VR LENS

£

trade-up for only...

& D40 & 18-55 inc. cashback

309 † £230 359 † £260
.99*

£30CK ASHBA
inc. Nikon from31 /05/13
ends

£

trade-up for only...

& your D90 body inc. cashback

539.99* † £370 1299.99* † £1070
& D300 Body inc. cashback

0 £10A CK CASHB
inc. Nikon from31 /05/13
ends

TOP LENSES
70-300MM VR
AF-S F/4.5-5.6

NIKON D3200
& 18-55MM VR LENS
C

* AFTER CASHBACK. IN-STORE PRICE £639.99

WARRANTY
on all Nikon DSLR bodies, DSLR kit lenses & CoolPix compacts (requires registration).

2 YEAR

NIKON D5100

* AFTER CASHBACK. IN-STORE PRICE £339.99

NIKON D600
BODY ONLY

& 18-55MM IS VR LENS

£

trade-up for only...

CA S on om Nik
fr

0 £4 HBACK
inc.
/05/13 ends 31

£

CA om Nikon
fr

50 1 £S HBACK
inc.
/05/13 ends 31

trade-up only...

* AFTER CASHBACK. IN-STORE PRICE £1449.99

429.99 24–70MM AF-S .99 £1269 F/2.8G ED 70–200MM AF-S .99 £1599 F/2.8G ED VR II 70–200MM AF-S .99 F/4 VR SRP £1172.99 £1099 18–300MM AF-S .99 £699 F/3.5-5.6 VR 80-400MM AF-S F/4.5-5.6 VR NEW! £Phone 200-400MM F/4 .99 £4949 VR II AF-S ED G
£

£40CK ASHBA
Nikon from31 /05/13
ends

inc.

NOW ONLY .99*

£399

* AFTER CASHBACK

NIKON D5200
& 18-55MM VR LENS
SRP £820

C

£50CK ASHBA
Nikon from31 /05/13
ends

inc.

£

* AFTER CASHBACK

649.99*

NIKON D4
BODY
16.2MP full-frame pro DSLR.

C AN FIN ble availa

0% E
/06/13 ends 31

& D3000 + 18-55 inc. cashback

* AFTER CASHBACK. IN-STORE PRICE £399.99

NIKON D800
BODY ONLY

BUY NOW PAY LATER!
0% deferred finance
(on many items if balance paid within 12 months!) Subject to status, 20% min. deposit, £15 settlement fee payable. Phone for details (instore customers only).

LEASE RENTAL

of equipment now available to Professional photographers & Businesses

SRP £1099.99

NIKON D7100 BODY ONLY

£

£

Phone

NEW
NEW LOW S PRICE

D800E BODY
SRP £2899.99

1949

.99

£

4249.99

NIKON D300s BODY ONLY
SRP £1099.99 - £899.99

£Phone
NEW LOW S PRICE

NIKON COOLPIX A

NEW! (SRP £999.99) - £PHONE

X-PRO 1, X-E1 & XF LENSES
£ NEW! X100s & X20 Now in stock! £

Phone

LUMIX DMC-GH3
& 12-35MM F2.8 ASPH POWER OIS LENS

CYBER

20 HX ONLY

SHOT

DSLR Studio Zone
Studio Flash k its, Backdrops, Reflectors etc. Wide range stocked.

Phone
18-270mm VC PZD Di II f/3.5-6.3 SUPERZOOM

£

trade-up for only

HIGH QUALITY USED

FREE N O TAMR ER T UV FIL TH WOR 9 £39.9

55-200mm Di II MACRO ZOOM
(Canon fit only)

£

399.99

& your EOS 5D Mk I BODY

1849.99 99 £1599
999.99 .99 £239 .99 £249 .99 £279
£

9 £199.9

OM-D E-M5
Alpha 99 body Alpha 77 + 16-50mm F/2.8 Alpha 65 + 18-55mm New! Alpha 58+18-55mm NEX-7 + 18-55mm OSS NEX-6 +16-50mm PZ Cybershot RX100 Cybershot HX300

LUMIX GH3 BODY ONLY - NOW ONLY £1149.99

& 12-50MM LENS

TOP GH3 ACCESSORIES
35-100MM
F/2.8 X POWER OIS ZOOM

PEN E-PL5

& 14-42MM LENS

NEW LOW S PRICE

PEN E-PM2

& 14-42MM LENS
+ 40-150mm Portrait Zoom Kit Limited Stocks

ONLY £99.99

EQUIPMENT

Use our Secondhand Search Tool online at:
www.LCEgroup.co.uk

D LIMITE S STOCK

BGGH3

PORTRAIT BATTERY GRIP

MANFROTTO 190X PROB & 496RC2 HEAD

FL360LE MS2

FLASHGUN/MOVIE LIGHT STEREO MICROPHONE

CALL FOR LATEST DEALS & PRICES!

CALL FOR LATEST DEALS & PRICES!

£

149.99

LUMIX G5, G3 & lenses in stock – £Phone

10 High St, Southampton SO14 2DH Call 02380 335363

FAST COURIER MAIL ORDER Next day delivery available from all LCE branches. Postage & Insurance £4.99 for most items.

e-mail: southampton.civic@LCEgroup.co.uk www.LCEgroup.co.uk Open 9am-5.30pm Monday-Saturday, 11am-4pm Sunday Manager – Matthew Sanders - BA (Hons) Photography
E & O E. Subject to availability. Some images are for illustrative purposes only. Trade-Up deals are examples only and assume equipment part-exchanged in very good condition, full working order, etc. & including all standard accessories.

MAIL ORDER HOTLINE: 023 8063 2629

FIRST FOR USED PHOTOGR APHIC EQUIPMENT

BUY AT A BETTER PRICE SELL WITHOUT RISK OR HASSLE

www.mpbphotographic.co.uk 0845 459 0101
5 STAR REVIEWS

99%

Trade in your used equipment for cash or an upgrade!
Sell or part exchange hassle-free with the leading online retailer of used Canon & Nikon equipment in the UK and Europe. We’ll give you a competitive quote on your gear within one working day.
Looking to buy?
We are a specialist dealer in quality used gear, with a focus on Canon and Nikon products. We have a huge range of used equipment at fantastic prices, all of which come with a six month warranty and next working day delivery.

Looking to sell or upgrade?

We buy most modern photographic equipment, including cameras, lenses, flashguns, tripods and more. Just tell us what you have and we’ll give you a competitive quote within one working day. If you’re happy with it, we’ll arrange courier collection free of charge. You can also part exchange your used gear for new equipment with us; we’ll arrange free collection on a suitable day and throw in free delivery on your new item!

@mpbphotographic /mpbphotographic /+mpbphotographic

www.mpbphotographic.co.uk/sell
0845 459 0101

F I L L I N O U R S I M P L E O N L I N E F O R M AT:

GO STRAIGHT TO OUR SELL FORM AND GET A QUOTE

IMAGE IS EVERYTHING www.advancedphotoshop.co.uk

Available from all good newsagents and supermarkets

ON SALE NOW > Master polygons > 22 fantasy art tips > Creative retouching
RETOUCHING DIGITAL PAINTING PHOTOMANIPULATION GRAPHICAL ART EXPERT TRICKS

Print edition available at www.imagineshop.co.uk Digital edition available at www.greatdigitalmags.com
Available on the following platforms

BUY YOUR ISSUE TODAY
facebook.com/AdvancedPhotoshop

twitter.com/advancedpshop

NEXT ISSUE The latest kit reviews, industry news
and tutorials to improve your skills

Issue 136 is on sale

6 June 2013
INCLUDES

• Professional shooting advice • How to achieve stylised effects Practical tips for shooting seascapes •

suMMeR lAndscAPes
Digital editions available at

sHOOt

Capture and edit evocative scenic shots of landscapes and sea

✔YES! I would like to subscribe to Digital Photographer ■
Your details
Title Surname Address First name

Postcode Telephone number Mobile number Email address

Country

Please complete your email address to receive news and special offers from us

Direct Debit payment ■ UK Direct Debit payment
– only £21 every six issues (save 30%)
Instruction to your Bank or Building Society to pay by Direct Debit
Please fill in the form and send it to: Imagine Publishing Limited, 800 Guillat Avenue, Kent Science Park, Sittingbourne, Kent, ME9 8GU
Name and full postal address of your Bank or Building Society

Originator’s Identification Number Bank/Building Society

To: The Manager Address

5

0

1

8

8

4

Reference Number

Postcode Name(s) of account holder(s)

Instructions to your Bank or Building Society Please pay Imagine Publishing Limited Direct Debits from the account detailed in this instruction subject to the safeguards assured by the Direct Debit guarantee. I understand that this instruction may remain with Imagine Publishing Limited and, if so, details will be passed on electronically to my Bank/Building Society
Signature(s)

Branch sort code

Bank/Building Society account number

Date

Banks and Building Societies may not accept Direct Debit instructions for some types of account

A6 instruction form

Payment details 13-ISSUE SUBSCRIPTION ONLY
■ UK – £52.00 (Save 20%) ■ Europe – £70.00 ■ World – £80.00
Cheque

■ I enclose a cheque for £
(made payable to Imagine Publishing Ltd)

Credit/Debit Card

■ Visa
Card number

■ Mastercard

■ Amex

■ Maestro
Expiry date

Security number Issue number Signed Date Code: PAG135

■■■

(last three digits on the strip at the back of the card)

■■ (if Maestro)

084407 8 8 4 cribe 8 or subs line
on

w o N l Cal 4

■ Tick this box if you do not wish to receive any promotional material from Imagine Publishing Ltd ■ Tick this box if you do not wish to receive promotional material from other companies Terms & Conditions apply. We publish 13 issues a year, your subscription will start from the next available issue unless otherwise indicated. Direct Debit guarantee details available on request. This offer expires without notice. I would like my subscription to start from issue:

Return this form to: Digital Photographer Subscriptions, 800 Guillat Avenue, Kent Science Park, Sittingbourne, Kent ME9 8GU or email it to digitalphotographer@servicehelpline.co.uk.

To manage your subscriber account visit www.imaginesubs.co.uk & enter your subscriber ID

Start a Direct Debit today from just £21 every six issues and save over £19 a year

BACK ISSUES

Complete your collection

Complete your collection for only £5.00 per issue by calling 01202 586200 or shop direct online at our eShop at: www.imagineshop.co.uk

Subscribe &

Exclusive subscriber benefits
• Save 30% on the cover price • Free CD every issue • Delivered to your door

3O%
Please complete and post the form to: Digital Photographer Subscriptions 800 Guillat Avenue Kent Science Park Sittingbourne ME9 8GU
Alternatively, you can scan and email the form to:

SA VE

THREE EASY WAYS TO SUBSCRIBE 3. Post or email 1. Online
www.imaginesubs.co.uk/dph
and enter code PAG135

2. Telephone

0844 848 8407
Overseas: +44 (0) 1795 592 862 and quote code PAG135

digitalphotographer@servicehelpline.co.uk

Canon EOS 100D
NEW

Latest Cameras At MIFSUD
Truly compact 25% smaller and 28% lighter than other EOS DSLRs. 18MP APS-C sensor with Digic 5 processor.

Canon EOS 700D
NEW

18MP CMOS sensor. 9-point cross-type AF sensor. 3-inch 1.04m-dot vari-angle LCD screen. Full HD video mode.

EOS 100D body c/w 18-55mm STM

Nikon - the NEW D7100
D7100 body

£569 £699

EOS 700D body c/w 18-55mm STM

£619 £749

£997 |

c/w 18-105mm VR

£1299

NEW

More new equipment is listed in our ad elsewhere in this issue, or see web www.mifsuds.com

BUT WE STILL WANT YOUR EQUIPMENT!
CANON - NIKON - PENTAX - SONY PANASONIC - LEICA - OLYMPUS MINOLTA - CONTAX BRONICA - ETRS, SQ, GS & RF FUJI, HASSELBLAD, MAMIYA - 645, RB, RZ, 6/7, TLR PENTAX - 645MF / AF, 6X7 LARGE FORMAT STUDIO EQUIPMENT ETC.
In the first instance please email details to info@mifsuds.com 27-29, Bolton Street, Brixham. Devon. TQ5 9BZ. Tel: 01803 852 400 Web: www.mifsuds.com

We may be the best stocked dealer in the West Country
PART EXCHANGE

BUY FOR CASH COMMISSION SELL Collection can be arranged

Photo © Paul Rudman

FAMILY RUN SINCE 1954
U.K. Stock ONLY

U.K. Stock Only

01803 852400
27-29, Bolton Street, Brixham. Devon. TQ5 9BZ.

Mail Order :

MIFSUDS ARE CANON PROFESSIONAL STOCKISTS
24 F3.5 L TSE MKII . . . . . . . . £1599 24-70 F2.8 L II USM. . . . . . . . . . £1749 24-70 F4 L IS U. . . . . . . . . . . . . . £1299 24-70 F4 L IS U unboxed . . . . . £1249 24-105 F4 L IS USM unboxed . . . . . £677 28 F1.8 USM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .£354 28 F2.8 IS U . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . £569 35 F1.4 L USM . . . . . . . . . . . . £1067 35 F2 IS USM. . . . . . . . . . . . . . £729 35 F2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . £189 40 F2.8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . £159 50 F1.2 L USM . . . . . . . . . . . . £1169 50 F1.4 U . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . £269 50 F1.8 II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . £87 65 F2.8 MPE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . £799 70-200 F2.8 IS USM LII . . . . . . . £1829 70-200 F2.8 non IS L USM . . . . . . . . £939 70-200 F4 L IS USM. . . . . . . . . £869 70-200 F4 L USM . . . . . . . . . . . £479 70-300 F4/5.6 L IS USM. . . . . . . £1129 70-300 F4.5/5.6 IS USM . . . . . £419 85 F1.2 L II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . £1599 85 F1.8 USM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . £299 100 F2.8 IS L USM Macro . . . . £689 100 F2.8 Macro USM . . . . . . . . . . . £429 100-400 F4.5/5.6 IS L USM . . . . £1177 135 F2 L USM . . . . . . . . . . . . . £889 180 F3.5 L USM Macro . . . . . £1149 200 F2 L IS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . £4499 200 F2.8 II L USM . . . . . . . . . . £597 300 F2.8 LII IS USM. . . . . . . . £4999 300 F4 L IS USM . . . . . . . . . . £1089 400 F2.8 IS L II USM . . . . . . . £8199 400 F4 IS U DO . . . . . . . . . . . £4999 400 F5.6 L USM . . . . . . . . . . . £1039 500 F4 IS LII USM . . . . . . . . . £7699 600 F4 IS LII USM . . . . . . . . . . £10499 Ext tube 12II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . £79 Ext tube 25II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . £129 1.4x III or 2x III converter ea . . . £399 FLASH & ACCESSORIES Angle finder C. . . . . . . . . . . . . . £219 BG-E5 grip (450D) . . . . . . . . . . . . £107 BG-E6 grip (5D MKII) . . . . . . . . . . £187 BG-E7 grip (7D) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . £139 BG-E8 grip (550D) . . . . . . . . . . . . £115 BG-E9 grip (60D) . . . . . . . . . . . £129 BG-E11 grip (5D MKIII) . . . . . . £277 BG-E13 grip (6D) . . . . . . . . . . . £249 LP-E4 . . . £159 LP-E6 . . . . . . . £80 MR 14EX Ringlight . . . . . . . . . . £469 MT-24EX. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . £789 320EX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .£185 430 EX II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .£219 600EX RT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .£459 CP-E4 compact battery pack . . . . . .£149 Off camera shoe cord OC-E3. . . . . . .£59 LC5 Wireless set . . . . . . . . . . . £449 GP-E2 GPS receiver . . . . . . . . £299 RS-80N3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . £49 ST-E3 Transmitter . . . . . . . . . . £309 ST-E2 Transmitter . . . . . . . . . . £239 TC-80N3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . £149

www.mifsuds.com

Email - info@mifsuds.com

MON - FRI 8am - 7pm,
SAT 9am - 5pm, SUN 10am - 1pm. SHOP OPEN MON - SAT 9am - 5pm, SUN 10am - 1pm.

PHONE LINES OPEN

100D body 100D + 18-55 STM 700D body 700D + 18-55 STM
U.K. Stock ONLY

1DX body . . . . . . . . . . . £4849 5D MKIII body. . . . . . . . £2315 5D MKIII + 24-105 IS . . £2959 6D body . . . . . . . . . . . . £1497 6D + 24-105 IS . . . . . . . £2149 6D + 24-70 F4 IS . . . . . £2749 650D body . . . . . . . . . . . £515 650D + 18-55 IS II . . . . . £569 650D + 18-135 IS STM . £829 600D + 18-135 IS . . . . . . £599

EOS DSLRS

£569

£699 £619 £749

NEW! NEW!

COMPACT CAMERAS G1X . . . . . . . . . £469 G15 . . . £399 SX50 . . . . . . . . £369 EF-S NON FULL FRAME LENSES 10-22 F3.5/4.5 USM . . . . . . . . . £614 15-85 F3.5/5.6 IS U no box . . . £549 17-55 F2.8 IS USM . . . . . . . . . . . . £769 18-55 F3.5/5.6 IS unboxed. . . . £129 18-135 F3.5/5.6 IS STM. . . . . . £319 18-135 F3.5/5.6 IS U no box . . . £249 60 F2.8 Macro USM . . . . . . . . . £339 EF LENSES 8-15 F4 L USM Fisheye . . . . . £1079 14 F2.8 LII . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . £1769 16-35 F2.8 MKII L USM . . . . . .£1119 17 F4 TSE L . . . . . . . . . . . . . . £1847 17-40 F4 USM L. . . . . . . . . . . . £599 20 F2.8 USM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . £377 24 F1.4 L II USM . . . . . . . . . . £1189 24 F2.8 IS U . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . £577 24 F2.8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . £347

D7100 body £997 D7100 + NEW! 18-105 VR £1179

DIGITAL SLRS D4 body . . . . . . . . . . . . . £4249 D800 body . . . . . . . . . . . £1929 D800E body . . . . . . . . . . £2349 D600 body . . . . . . . . . . . £1439 D7000 body . . . . . . . . . . . £639 D7000 + 18-105 VR . . . . . £799 D5200 body . . . . . . . . . . . £639 D5200 + 18-55 VR . . . . . . £679 D5200 + 18-105 VR . . . . . £799 D3200 body . . . . . . . . . . . £384 D3200 + 18-55 VR . . . . . . £429

MIFSUDS ARE NIKON PROFESSIONAL DEALERS
18-55 F3.5/5.6 VR . . . . . . . . . . . £99 20 F2.8 AF-D . . . . . . . . . . . . . . £489 24 F1.4 AFS G . . . . . . . . . . . . £1589 24 F3.5 PCE. . . . . . . . . . . . . . £1499 24-70 F2.8 G ED AFS . . . . . . £1239 24-85 F3.5/4.5 G ED VR . . . . . £429 24-120 F4 G ED VR . . . . . . . . . £849 28 F1.8 AF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . £519 28-300 F3.5/5.6 G ED VR . . . . £659 35 F1.4 G . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . £1399 35 F2 AF-D . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . £289 50 F1.4 AF-S G . . . . . . . . . . . . £279 50 F1.8 G . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . £169 50 F1.8 AF-D . . . . . . . . . . . . . . £129 60 F2.8 AFS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . £429 70-200 F2.8 VRII . . . . . . . . . . £1599 70-200 F4 G ED VR . . . . . . . . £1029 70-300 F4.5/5.6 VR . . . . . . . . . £418 80-400 F4.5/5.6 VR AF G. . . . £2449 85 F1.4 AFS G . . . . . . . . . . . . £1175 85 F1.8 AFS G . . . . . . . . . . . . . £377 105 F2.8 VR Macro . . . . . . . . . £629 200 F2 G VR II . . . . . . . . . . . . £3877 200-400 F4 VR II . . . . . . . . . . £4997 300 F2.8 AFS G VR II . . . . . . . £4189 300 F4 AF-S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . £1049 400 F2.8 AFS VR II . . . . . . . . £6555 500 F4 AFS VR II . . . . . . . . . . £5997 600 F4 AFS VR II . . . . . . . . . . £7199 800 F5.6 AFS VR . . . . . . . . . £15599 TC14EII converter . . . . . . . . . . . .£329 TC17EII converter . . . . . . . . . . . £329 TC20EIII converter . . . . . . . . . . £389 FLASH & ACCESSORIES GP-1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . £199 MBD15 (D7100) . . . . . . . . . . . . £279 MBD14 (D600) . . . . . . . . . . . . . £239 MBD12 Grip (D800/E) . . . . . . . £289

U.K. Stock ONLY

WANTED
U.K. Stock ONLY
50-150 F2.8 DC MKII . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . £799 50-500 F4/5.6 OS HSM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . £999 70-200 F2.8 EX DG OS . . . . . . . . . . . . . £879 70-300 4.5/5.6 APO DG Mac . . . . . . . . . £149 85 F1.4 EX DG HSM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . £669 105 F2.8 EX DG OS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . £549 120-300 F2.8 DG OS HSM . . . . . . . . . £3599 120-400 F4.5/5.6 APO OS . . . . . . . . . . . . £629 150 F2.8 EX DG OS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . £699 150-500 F5/6.3 DG OS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . £749 180 F2.8 EX DG OS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . £1299 1.4x EX DG converter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . £189 2x EX DG converter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . £219 EM140DG Macro ringflash . . . . . . . . . . . £349

COMPACT CAMERAS AW110 . . . . . £289 P520 . . . . £349 S9500 . . . . . £279 P7700 . . . £389 DIGITAL ONLY LENSES 10.5 F2.8 DX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . £549 10-24 F3.5/4.5 G AFS DX . . . . £629 16-85 F3.5/5.6 AFS VR DX . . . £469 18-105 F/3.5-5.6G ED VR . . . . . . £169 18-300 F3.5/5.6 G ED VR DX . . . £669 35 F1.8 G DX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . £169 40 F2.8 AFS G DX . . . . . . . . . . £189 55-300 F4.5/5.6 G VR DX . . . . £289 85 F3.5 G VR DX . . . . . . . . . . . £399 LENSES 14 F2.8 AFD . . . . . . . . . . . . . £1299 14-24 F2.8 G ED AF-S . . . . . . £1337 16 F2.8 AF-D Fisheye . . . . . . . £699 16-35 F4 AFS VR . . . . . . . . . . . £829 18-35 F3.5/4.5 G AFS . . . . . . . £669

We want your good quality cameras and lenses

BUY FOR CASH OR COMMISSION SALE
contact us at info@mifsuds.com or ring 01803 852400
7-14mm F4 ......................... £949 8mm F3.5 ........................... £549 12-35mm f2.8 ..................... £849 14-42mm F3.5/5.6 OIS X ... £350 14-140mm F4/5.8 OIS ........ £579 20mm F1.7 ......................... £269 25mm F1.4 DG ................... £439 35-100 F2.8 Power OIS X .... £999 45mm F2.8 OIS .................. £549 45-150 F4/5.6 OIS .............. £259 45-175mm F4/5.6 OIS X .... £319 45-200mm F4/5.6 OIS ........ £269 100-300mm F4/5.6 OIS ...... £419 LFV2 Viewfinder ................. £199 FL220E Flash ......................£115 FL360E Flash ..................... £187 FL500E Flash ..................... £347 LX7 Quality Compact ......... £349 FZ-200 Camera .................. £399 FZ-150 Camera .................. £259 TZ-40 Compact Camera..... £299

WE PART EXCHANGE
Collection can be arranged.
X100s .............. £997 X20 .................. £479 X-Pro 1 body.. £1049 X-E1 + 18-55 f2.8/4 OIS ........ £899 X-E1 body ........ £599 14mm f2.8 XF .. £689

MBD11 Grip (D7000) . . . . . . . . £229 MBD10 Grip (D300/D700) . . . . £219 DR-5 Angle finder . . . . . . . . . . . . . £229 DR-6 Angle finder . . . . . . . . . . . . . £229 SBR200 Wireless rem S/Lite .. . £199 SBR1 ringflash . . . . . . . . . . . . . £389 SBR1CI ringflash/command . . . £579 SB-700 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . £239 SB-910 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . £349 SC-28 . . . . £59 SC-29 . . . . . . . £69 SU-800 flash slave no box . . . . £199 MC36 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . £129 MC30 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . £69 EN-EL3E . .£67 ENEL4A. . . . . . £89 EN-EL15 . .£59 EN-EL18. . . . . £99 ME-1 Stereo Microphone . . . . . £109 WT-5 Wireless trans for D4 . . . £399 WU-1a Wireless adapt D3200 .. . £55 NX Capture 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . £169

MIFSUDS ARE SIGMA PRO LENS STOCKISTS
8-16 F4.5/5.6 DC HSM NAF only . . . . . . £479 10-20 F3.5 EX DC HSM. . . . . . . . . . . . . £459 10-20 F4/5.6 EX DC. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . £369 12-24 F4.5/5.6 EX DG Mac MKII . . . . . . . £669 17-50 F2.8 EX DC OS HSM . . . . . . . . . £499 17-70 F2.8/4.5 DC OS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . £299 18-50 F2.8/4 DC OS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . £169 18-250 F3.5/6.3 DC OS Macro . . . . . . . £389 18-250 F3.5/6.3 DC OS NAF only . . . . . . . .£299 24-70 F2.8 EX IF DG HSM. . . . . . . . . . . £589 30 F1.4 EX DC HSM NAF only . . . . . . . £299 35 F1.4 DG HSM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . £769 50 F1.4 EX DG CAF/NAF only. . . . . . . . £347 50 F2.8 EX DG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . £269

Micro 4/3rds system

3 YEAR WARRANTY ALL LENSES

GH3 body only £1179

X System Cameras & Lenses

GH3 + 12-35mm .................£1969 GH3 + 14-140mm ...............£1569 G5 + 14-42mm X ..................£619 G5 + 14-42mm ......................£499 G5 body ................................£469 GX1 + 14-42mm X ................£529 GX1 + 14-42mm ...................£429 GX1 body..............................£349 GF5 + 14-42mm X ................£479 GF5 + 14-42mm....................£379 GF5 body ..............................£299

18mm f2 XF ..... £419 18-55mm f2.8/4 OIS XF ... £499 35mm f1.4 XF .. £419 60mm f2.4 XF .. £459 EF X20 flash .... £189 EF42 flash ....... £199

Gitzo Clothing

Photofleece M/L/XXL........... £99 Four Seasons Jacket M ..... £99

10-24mm F3.5/4.5 DiII ............................... £349 18-270mm f3.5/6.3 Di II VC PZD.................. £347 60mm f2 Di macro NAF ............................... £299 70-200mm F28 Di VC USD...................... £1349 70-300mm F4/5.6 Di VC USD.................... £299 90mm f2.8 Di Macro.................................. £347 Kenko auto extension tube set ............... £149 Kenko Pro 300 1.4x DG ............................ £199 Kenko Pro 300 2x DG ............................... £199

Tamron & Kenko Lenses

Family Run Pro Dealership with Friendly, Knowledgeable Staff. Open 7 days per week. Prices inc VAT. P&P Extra. E&OE.
We are happy to reserve new & used stock for customers planning to visit. Prices are based on current stock at time of compilation April 16th 2013. Prices are subject to change without notice so please check availability to avoid disappointment. We keep the website updated daily (Mon-Fri) - latest prices on-line. E&OE.

Photo © Paul Rudman

Please follow us on

QUALITY USED EQUIPMENT. See website for full list. Call us for condition and to buy secondhand stock. 3 Month warranty on most secondhand.
5x4 USED Cambo Wide Super Angulon 65 F5.6 kit see web ..............£1499 chneider Sup Ang 90 F8........ £299 Polaroid back....................... £49 Toyo 6x7 RFH.................... £129 Toyo quick roll slider .......... £199 Fidelity double dark sl ea .... £15 BRONICA ETRS 645 USED ETRSi body ....................... £139 40 F4 PE ........................... £179 50 F2.8 PE ........................ £199 100 F4 PE ......................... £229 105 F4.5 PE Macro ........... £369 135 F4 PE ......................... £249 150 F3.5 E ........................... £89 150 F3.5 PE M- Box .......... £149 200 F4.5 PE ...................... £179 500 F8 EII .......................... £449 2x extender E .................... £139 E14 ext tube ........................ £49 120 RFH .............................. £69 Polaroid Back ...................... £29 Rotary prism ...................... £149 AEIII Prism ........................ £179 AEII Prism ........................... £89 WLF...£49 Plain Prism E .... £39 Angle viewfinder E............. £179 Winder EII.......................... £199 Winder ................................. £79 M bracket............................. £69 Speed Grip E ....................... £49 Tripod adapter E .................. £59 Metz SCA 386 ..................... £49 BRONICA SQ 6x6 USED SQB + 80 + RFH ............... £349 40 F4 PS ........................... £399 50 F3.5 PS ........................ £199 50 F3.5 S ............................. £99 65 F4 PS Boxed ................ £149 110 F4 PS Macro........ £279/399 135 F4 PS M- .................... £249 150 F3.5 S ........................... £79 150 F4 PS .................. £149/199 200 F4.5 PS M- box .......... £199 2x PS converter M- ........... £219 Polaroid back....................... £49 120 RFH .............................. £79 135N back ........................... £99 Waist level finder ................. £69 Plain Prism S Boxed ........... £79 AE Prism Early .................... £99 ME Prism Finder.................. £99 Metz SCA 386 ..................... £49 Lens Hood 65-80 ................. £20 Pro shade S box.................. £49 Motorwinder ....................... £199 Speed grip S........................ £99 BRONICA GS 6x7 USED 150 F4 PG M-.................... £129 G18 Ext Tube box ............... £69 Polaroid Back ...................... £39 Speed Grip ......................... £89 AE Prism Finder G ............ £129 AE Rotary Prism ................ £169 CANON DIGITAL AF USED 1DS MKI body box ............ £499 1D MKIV body M- box ..... £2999 1D MKIV body ................. £2699 1D MKIII body.................... £899 1D MKII body..................... £399 7D body box ............... £749/799 5D MK I body .................... £499 60D body M- box ............... £439 40D body.............................. £299 30D body ............................. £199 20D body.............................. £149 500D body............................ £279 450D body............................ £249 400D body............................ £149 BG-E2N .................................. £49 BG-E3.......£39 BG-ED3 ....... £39 BG-E4 (5D MKI) .................... £69 BG-E6 box (5D MKII) .......... £129 BG-E7 box..£99 BG-E8 ........ £89 BG-E11 M- box .................... £239 G11 compact box................. £249 G10 compact ....................... £199 G1X compact ....................... £349 SX30 compact box .............. £179 SX1 IS compact M- box ...... £139 S3 IS compact ....................... £69 CANON AF USED EOS 1n RS body ............... £349 EOS 3 + PB-E2 ................. £169 EOS 3 body .................. £79/199 EOS 5 body ......................... £39 EOS 300/500 body ea ......... £20 EOS 50E body..................... £20 8-15 F4 L M- box ............... £999 17-85 F4/5.6 IS U .............. £199 18-55 F3.5/5.6 IS EFS ........ £99 18-55 F3.5/5.6 EFS................. £69 18-135 F3.5/5.6 IS ................£239 24 F1.4 L MKI M- box ..........£799 24-70 F2.8 L MKI M- ...........£1099 24-105 F4 IS U L box............£649 24-105 F4 L ..........................£699 28 F1.8 U M- box ..................£299 28 F2.8 IS U M- box..............£499 28-90 F4/5.6 UII ...................... £89 28-135 F3.5/5.6 IS U M- .......£249 28-300 F3.5/5.6 L IS box .....£1699 35 F2 box...............................£159 35-70 F3.5/4.5 ......................... £69 50 F1.4 U M- ..................... £249 55-200 F4/5.6 UII ................ £69 55-250 F4/5.6 IS EFS ....... £139 70-200 F2.8 IS L MKI M- ......£1099 70-200 F4 U L Mint box..... £439 70-200 F4 U L ................... £379 70-300 F4/5.6 IS U ............ £299 75-300 F4.5/5.6 U ............... £99 80-200 F4.5/5.l6 II ............... £49 100 F2.8 IS U L M- ............ £619 100 F2.8 U M- ................... £349 100-400 F4.5/5.6 L ............ £999 300 F4 IS U L ........................ £799 400 F4 DO ........................ £3699 500 F4 IS L U .................... £4999 1.4x conv MKIII M- .............. £349 1.4x conv MKII .................... £279 2x ext MKII .......................... £199 2x extender MKI .................. £169 Teleplus 2x DG conv ........... £89 NCE2 charger...................... £99 BP-200 grip ......................... £20 BP-50 grip ........................... £29 LC-5 wireless kit ................ £179 LC-4 wireless kit .................£119 Angle finder C.....................£119 SIGMA CAF USED 8-16 F4.5/5.6 DC M- ......... £479 15-30 F3.5/4.5 EX ............. £199 17-50 F2.8 DG OS ................£379 18-125 F38/5.6 DC OS.........£199 18-125 F38/5.6 DC ................. £99 105 F2.8 EX DG.................. £319 120-300 F2.8 EX DG HSM.......£999 120-400 F4/5.6 DG OS box ..... £529 135-400 F4.5/5.6 ...................£299 150 F2.8 EX DG box ............£429 150-500 F5/6.3 OS box ........£599 170-500 F5/6.3 ......................£399 500 F4.5 EX DG HSM ........£2699 2x conv EX DG .....................£159 OTHER CAF USED TAM 17-50 F2.8 XR Di .........£249 TAM 18-250 F3.5/6.3 ............£199 TAM 18-270 VC DiII PZD .....£299 TAM 19-35 F3.5/4.5 ................ £99 TAM 24-135 F3.5/5.6 box .....£169 TAM 28-300 F3.5/6.3 VC......£299 TAM 28-300 F3.5/6.3 Di........£199 TAM 55-200 F4/5.6 ................. £49 TAM 70-300 F4/5.6 ................. £79 TAM 90 F2.8 ............... £219/269 TAM 200-500 F5/6.3 Di....... £439 TOK 100 F2.8 ATX M- ....... £329 VIV 19-35 F3.5/4.5 .............. £69 Teleplus 2x VG .................... £89 Kenko Pro 300 1.4x DG X...... £149 Kenko Pro 300 2x DG X.... £149 Kenko Pro 300 2x DG ........£119 Kenko ext tube set Mint......£119 CANON FLASH USED 270EX box ........................... £99 430EX box ......................... £139 430EX II............................. £169 580EX box ......................... £269 580EXII box M-.................. £339 MR-14EX ........................... £349 ML-3 ring not digital............. £89 Sigma EM140G ring .......... £199 CANON MF FD USED T90 Body ............................. £99 A1 body ........................ £79/179 AE1 body blk/chr ................. £49 AE1-P chrome body ............ £69 AV1 chr body ....................... £49 35-70 F3.5/4.5 ..................... £39 35-105 F3.5 ......................... £99 35-105 F3.5/4.5 ................... £79 50 F3.5 Macro ..................... £89 50 F3.5 Mac + Tube ...........£119 70-210 F4 ............................ £69 85 F1.2 L ........................... £499 100 F2.8 .............................. £99 100 F4 Macro + tube ......... £299 100-300 F5.6 ....................... £99 135 F3.5...£29 200 F4 ........ £49 2X A Extender...................... £99 2X B Extender ..................... £69 TOK 60-300 F4/5.6.............. £69 Winder A .............................. £29 Angle finder B ...................... £69 AE power winder FN ........... £79 AE motor drive FN + battery pack.................... £149 Auto bellows ...................... £129 CANON FLASH USED 199A.......£59 244T ............. £29 299T.......£49 300TL ........... £49 CONTAX RF USED G2 body Titanium box ....... £399 28 F2.8 Titanium................ £299 35-70 F3.5/5.6 tit box ........ £399 90 F2.8 Titanium................ £299 TLA200 Titanium ................. £69 TLA30 Flash ........................ £29 FUJI DIGITAL USED S5 body box ...................... £299 S3 body box ...................... £199 X-E1 body Mint box ........... £579 X100 silver box .................. £399 XS1 M- box........................ £299 HS10 box............................. £99 60 F2.4 XF R M- box......... £379 FUJI 35MM USED Screw & bayonet SEE WEB FUJI MED FORMAT USED GX617 + 90 + VF + CF box.......................... £2499 180 F6.7 GX680 box ....... £1349 250 F5.6 GX680 ................ £199 Fuji Strobe GA ..................... £99 Bracket GA .......................... £99 GA645Zi M- box ................ £599 GA645 M- .......................... £399 GSW690 MKIII M- box ...... £799 GITZO USED TRIPOD HEADS G1077M ............................. £139 G1178M ............................... £79 G2180 ................................ £129 G2272M ............................. £149 G2780FQR green .............. £149 GH1720FQR...................... £139 GH1720QR ........................ £149 GH1780FQR...................... £129 GH1780QR ........................ £149 GH2750 ............................. £139 GH2750QR ........................ £139 GH2780QR ........................ £199 GH2781T ............................. £99 GH2781TQR........................ £99 GH3780QR ........................ £199 GH5380SQR ..................... £179 TRIPOD LEGS G1348 II............................. £249 GT0531.............................. £199 GT1840C ........................... £199 GT2341L............................ £199 GT2531.............................. £279 GT2531EX ......................... £359 GT2532S ........................... £339 GT2540FT ........................ £POA GT2540T ........................... £279 GT2540F ........................... £399 GT2540FL ......................... £429 GT2540LLVL...................... £399 GT2541EX ......................... £339 GT2542S ........................... £379 GT3320BS ......................... £199 GT3330.............................. £249 GT4552TS ......................... £479 GT4552GTS ...................... £499 HASSELBLAD XPAN USED XPan II + 45 F4 box .............£1499 XPan I + 45 F4........................ £799 30 F5.6 M- box......................£1799 90 F4........................................£299 HASSELBLAD 6x6 USED SWCM + VF ....................... £1199 903SWC + viewfinder ........£1899 203FE chrome body .......... £999 503CXI chrome body......... £499 500CM + 80CF F2.8 + A12 blk/chr ......................£699 500CM body ...................... £199 PM90 Prism ....................... £199 PME Prism box .................. £149 45 Prism late .................... £149 WLF early ............................ £49 A12 latest blk/chr ............... £199 A12 late blk/chr.................. £149 E12 blk .............................. £249 Polaroid 100 back box......... £69 503CW winder box ............ £249 40 F4 early ........................ £699 50 F2.8 FE M- ................... £699 50 F4 black T* ................... £299 250 F4 FE M- box ............. £649 50 F2.8 CE M- box ............ £699 50 F4 CF FLE.................... £699 50 F4 CF ........................... £499 50 F4 black T* ................... £299 80 F2.8 CF M- ................... £499 120 F4 CF ......................... £599 120 F5.6 chr ...................... £199 150 F4 chr ......................... £169 150 F4 CFI ........................ £549 150 F4 CF ......................... £349 150 F4 blk T* ..................... £199 160 F4.8 CB M- box .......... £399 Vivitar 2x conv ..................... £69 LEICA DIGITAL USED Digilux 3 box ....................... £499 LEICA M/COMPACT USED IIIg + 5cm f2 + erc ............. £999 M4P chr body .................... £699 M3 chr d/wind + ERC ....... £699 21 F2.8 blk ASP M- box ....... £1999 28 F2.8 M- box .................. £899 35 F2 blk ASP M- box ..... £1599 50 F1.4 blk M- box .......... £1899 CF Flash .............................. £69 SF20 Flash .......................... £79 LEICA SLR USED R4 body chr ...........................£149 LIGHTMETERS USED Gossen Lunasix III............... £79 Minolta Flashmeter V ........ £179 LOWEPRO USED Lens Trekker 600AW ........... £99 Dryzone 200 yellow/blk ..... £179 Pro Trekker AW ................... £99 MAMIYA 645 AF USED 645 + 80 + 120 RFH ......... £499 55 F2.8 AFD M- box .......... £399 55-110 F4.5 M- box ........... £599 MAMIYA 645 USED 645 Pro + 80 F2.8 N + 120 RFH + Prism ............ £349 645 Pro TL + 80 + RFH + plain Prism ...................... £349 645 Pro TL inc 80 F2.8 N + AE Prism + Pro Winder ...................£449 645 Pro TL Body ............... £199 645E body ......................... £169 45 F2.8 N M- Box .............. £179 50 F4 shift.......................... £399 55 F2.8 N............................. £99 55-110 F4.5 ....................... £249 70 2.8 C leaf ........................ £99 105-210 F4.5 ULD C.............£249 110 F2.8 N ........................... £99 110 F2.8 C ........................... £79 120 F4 Macro M- .............. £399 150 F3.5 N........................... £99 210 F4 N M- ...................... £129 300 F5.6 N ULD-C M- ....... £199 Ext Tube 1, 2, 3S each........ £29 Teleplus/Viv 2x conv ea ....... £49 FE401 AE Prism box ......... £179 AE Prism 645 Super .......... £129 Plain Prism (645 Super) ...... £69 WLF (Super/Pro TL) ............ £69 Polaroid Back HP401 .......... £39 Polaroid back....................... £39 120 Insert ............................ £20 HA401 120 RFH Box........... £49 120 Back..£39 Winder ........ £79 MAMIYA TLR 6x6 USED C330 S B/O + WLF............ £299 C330 F Body + WLF .......... £149 65 F3.5 box late ................. £199 135 F4.5 late box ............... £169 180 F4.5 ............................ £169 Paramender ......................... £89 CDS Mag Hood box........... £129 MAMIYA 7 RF 6x7 USED 7II body.............................. £849 7I body............................... £449 50 F4.5 L + VF .................. £849 65 F4 box .......................... £599 80 F4 box .......................... £599 150 F4.5 M- ....................... £449 210 F8 + VF box M- .......... £599 Polarising filter ....................£110 Panoramic kit....................... £49 MAMIYA RB 6x7 USED Pro Sd + 90 F3.5 KL + 120 RFH ......................... £649 Pro SD + 127 KL + RFH + WLF .................... £599 Pro S body......................... £149 Pro S body scruffy ............... £99 Prism early .......................... £99 WLF.....£79 Chimney .......... £69 120 645V back .................. £149 120/220 6x8 motor ............ £149 Pro S Polaroid back ............ £49 Pro SD Polaroid back .......... £69 50 F4.5 C........................... £269 180 F4.5 KL M-.................. £249 180 F4.5 C........................... £99 250 F4.5 KL M- box ..............£249 45mm tube SD M-................... £99 Ext tube 2................................. £69 MAMIYA RZ 6x7 USED RZ67 Pro II + 90 + RFH ...... £649 RZ67 Pro II + 90 + RFH ...... £499 RZ67 Pro II + 110 + RFH..... £499 RZ Pro + 90 + 120 RFH .... £399 RZ Pro II body ................... £299 RZ Pro body ...................... £149 50 F4.5 W M- .................... £269 50 F4.5 ULD M- box .......... £699 65 f4 M- box ...................... £329 75 F4.5 shift M- ................. £549 140 f4.5 W M- Macro......... £349 180 F4.5 M- ....................... £179 No 1 or No 2 ext tube ea..... £69 FE701 Prism AE ................ £249 AE Prism early ..................... £99 Pro II Polaroid back ............. £69 120 back Pro II .................... £99 120 back Pro 1 .................... £39 Pro shade ............................ £49 Pro AE hood .......................£119 METZ USED 45CL4D mint box unused ..... £279 45CL4 AA battery ................ £59 45CL1 AA battery ................ £45 MINOLTA/SONY DIGITAL USED Sony A550 body box........... £349 Sony A350 body.................. £179 Sony A200 body.................. £199 Sony A100 body box.............£149 HVL-F32X ................................ £99 HVL-F36AM Flash.................£129 Sony RLAM ringlight ........... £219 Sigma EF530DG Super ........ £99 Minolta VC7D grip................. £99 MINOLTA/SONY AF USED Dynax 7xi body .................... £49 Dynax 5 body box ............... £39 Dynax 700Si + VC700 ......... £69 Dynax 700Si body ............... £49 Dynax 600Si ........................ £69 Dynax 505Si OR Super ea ..... £29 Dynax 404Si body ................. £29 24-105 F3.5/4.5 ................. £149 28 F2.8 ................................ £89 28-105 F3.5/4.5 ................... £99 35-70 F4 .............................. £69 35-105 F3.5/4.5 Macro ........ £99 35-105 F3.5/4.5 M- .............. £99 50 F1.7..................................... £79 50 F2.8 Macro .......................£199 70-210 F4 ................................ £99 70-210 F4.5/5.6 ....................... £69 75-300 F4.5/5.6 ....................... £89 100-300 F4/5.6 ......................£129 SONY LENSES USED 18-70 F3.5/5.6 DT ................... £69 24-70 F2.8 box .................... £1199 30 F2.8 SAM ....................... £119 70-30 F4.5/5.6 G SSM..........£579 75-300 F4.5/5.6 ..................... £119 135 F1.8 ZA M- box ..............£999 SIGMA MIN/SONY AF USED 17-35 F2.8 EX ..................... £149 18 F3.5 box ......................... £129 18-35 F3.5/4.5....................... £69 21-35 F3.5/4.2..................... £129 50 F1.4 EX DG M- box ....... £269 55-200 F4/5.6........................ £69 70 F2.8 EX DG......................£279 600 F8 ............................... £349 1.4x EX DG conv............... £149 1.4x EX conv ......................£119 2x EX DG conv M- box ..... £149 TAM 28-75 XR Di box ....... £229 TAM 90 f2.8 ....................... £199 TAM 180 F3.5 M-....................£439 TOK 11-16 F2.8 ATX Pro....... £379 VIV 19-35 F3.5/4.5 .............. £69 VIV 100-400 F4.5/6.7 ........ £149 Teleplus 1.4x conv ............... £69 Teleplus 2x conv .................. £99 Jessops ext tubes................ £69 Kenko 1.4x Pro 300DG ..... £149 Sony angle finder ................ £89 VC-9 (Dynax 9) M- box ..... £129 VC700 (700/800Si) .............. £29 VC600 (600Si) ..................... £29 VC-7 (Dynax 7).................... £69 Min 3600HSD Flash ............ £79 Min 5200i ............................. £49 Min 5400HS......................... £69 NIKON DIGITAL AF USED D4 body M- ...................... £3699 D3X body box ......... £2699/2999 D3S body box .................. £2899 D3 body ........................... £1499 D2X body box .................... £499 D800E body M- box ........ £1999 D800 body M- box ........... £1699 D700 body ................ £999/1349 D300s body M- .................. £649 D300 body .................. £399/499 D200 body box .................. £299 D7000 body M- .................. £449 D90 body box .................... £279 D80 body ........................... £199 D40 body ........................... £129 D5100 body M- .................. £249 D5000 body M- .................. £199 D3200 body red M- ........... £269 D3100 body M- .................. £199 D3000 body M- box ........... £139 D100 body box .................. £149 EH-6 mains charger ............ £59 MBD-10 box ................. £99/149 MBD-11 M- box ................. £189 MBD-11.............................. £139 MBD-80 box ........................ £89 MBD-200 box ...................... £69 Coolpix P7000 ................... £169 Coolpix P100 ..................... £149 LS5000 neg scanner...........£1349 NIKON AF USED F6 body M- box ................. £849 F5 body M- box ................. £499 F5 body box....................... £299 F5 body scruffy .................. £199 F4 body box....................... £249 F4S body ........................... £149 F100 + MB-15 ................... £149 F80 body black .................... £69 F90X/F801/801s body ea .... £49 F55 or F601 body each ....... £29 10-24 F3.5/4.5 M- box..........£549 12-24 F4 AFS DX M-............£599 14-24 F2.8 AFS M- box...... £1199 16-35 F4 AFS VR .................£749 17-35 F2.8 AFS M- box........£949 17-55 F2.8 AFS DX ..............£749 18-35 F3.5/4.5 AFD ..............£249 18-55 F3.5/5.6 VR M-............. £99 18-55 F3.5/5.6 ........................ £79 18-70 F3.5/4.5 DX ................£149 18-105 F3.5/5.6 VR .............. £149 18-135 F3.5/5.6 AFS ............£149 18-200 F3.5/6.3 VR II M- ..... £449 18-200 F3.5/6.3 VR box ....... £299 18-300 F3.5/5.6 VR M- ........£579 20 F2.8 AFD M- box .............£429 24 F1.4 AFS M- box ...........£1299 24 F2.8 AFD .........................£319 24 F3.5 PCE M-..................£1099 24-70 F2.8 AFS M- .............£1099 24-85 F3.5/4.5 G ..................£229 24-120 F4 VR M-..................£749 24-120 F3.5/5.6 VR ..............£299 24-120 F3.5/5.6 D ................£149 28 F2.8 AF N ........................ £119 28-70 F3.5/4.5 AFD................. £89 28-80 F3.5/5.6 G ..................... £49 28-100 F3.5/5.6 G ................... £49 28-105 F3.5/4.5 AFD.............£169 28-200 F3.5/5.6 G .................£149 28-300 F3.5/5.6 VR M- box ...... £579 35 F1.8 AF G .........................£139 40 F2.8 AF DX.......................£159 50 F1.4 AFS ..........................£239 50 F1.4 AFD box ...................£199 50 F1.8 AF G .........................£139 50 F1.8 AFD ............................ £99 55-200 F4/5.6 AFS VR .........£129 55-200 F4/5.6 AFS .................. £79 55-300 F4.5/5.6 VR...............£249 60 F2.8 AFS micro ................£339 60 F2.8 AFD micro ................£299 70-200 F2.8 VRII .................£1399 70-200 F2.8 VRI ....................£999 70-210 F4/5.6 ...................... £99 70-300 F4.5/5.6 VR ........... £439 70-300 F4.5/5.6 AFD ......... £149 75-300 F4/5.6 ...................... £79 80-200 F2.8 AFN M-.......... £799 80-200 F2.8 AFS ............... £699 80-200 F2.8 early .............. £299 80-400 F4.5/5.6 VR ........... £799 85 F1.8 AFD ...................... £239 85 F3.5 DX VR M- ............. £339 105 F2.8 AFS VR .............. £539 180 F2.8 AFD M- box ........ £449 200-400 F4 AFS VRI ....... £3499 200-400 F4 VRII M-......... £4499 300 F2.8 AFS VRII M- ..... £3499 300 F2.8 AFS VRI ........... £3199 300 F2.8 AFS VRI scruffy......£2899 300 F4 AFS M- .................. £879 500 F4 AFS VR ............... £4499 600 F4 AFS VR M- .......... £6299 TC17EII M- box ................. £259 TC20E ............................... £199 TC20EII ............................. £199 SIGMA NAF USED 12-24 F4/5.6 EX DG.......... £399 15-30 F3.5/4.5 EX DG....... £199 17-35 F2.8/4 EX DG.......... £199 17-50 F2.8 EX DC ............. £379 17-70 F2.8/4.5 DC ............. £149 18-50 F2.8 EX DC ............. £199 18-125 F3.8/5.6 DC OS .... £199 18-125 F3.8/5.6 DC ............. £99 18-200 F3.5/6.3 Dc............ £219 24-70 F2.8 EX DG .........£249/349 28-200 F3.5/5.6 .....................£129 28-300 F3.5/6.3 ....................... £99 30 F1.4 EX DC box...............£249 50-500 F4/6.3 DG OS ..........£779 50-500 F4/6.3 EX DG ..........£599 50-500 F4/6.3 EX .................£499 55-200 F4/5.6 DC Mint ...........£49 70-200 F2.8 EX DG ..............£429 70-300 F4/5.6 APO Mac ......... £99 100-300 F4 EX DG M-..........£599 150 f2.8 EX DG box..............£429 150-500 F5/6.3 EX DG OS ...... £599 170-500 F5/6.3 ......................£379 500 F4.5 EX DG HSM ........£2899 1.4x EX DG M- ......................£149 2x EX DG conv .....................£159 1.4x EX conv ........................... £99 2X EX conv............................£109 TAMRON NAF USED 18-200 F3.5/6.3 DiII ..............£149 18-250 F3.5/6.3 DiII box .......£199 24-70 F2.8 Di VC M- box......£699 28-200 XR Di mint box ......... £119 55-200 F4/5.6 DiII ................... £49 70-300 F4/5.6 .....................£69/89 90 F2.8...................................£219 TOK 12-24 F4 ATX M- ....... £379 TOK 28-70 F2.8 Pro SV .... £199 Teleplus Pro 300DGX 2x .......... £149 FLASH / ACCESSORIES USED DW-30 (WLF for F5) ..............£139 SB-24.......£49 SB-25.............. £69 SB-26.......£69 SB-27.............. £49 SB-28.......£69 SB-28DX ........ £69 SB-29.......£99 SB-30 ............. £49 SB-50DX.................................. £49 SB-80DX.................................. £69 SB-400 ..................................... £89 SB-700 M- box ......................£199 SB-800 ............................£199/249 SB-900 M- box ......................£269 SB-910 M- .............................£299 SD-8A.......£99 SD-8 box ....... £69 SB-N5 M- ................................. £59 MB-10 (F90X) .......................... £29 MB-15 (F100) .......................... £49 MB-40 fits F6 M- box ............£179 MC-30......£49 MC-36 ............ £99 ML-3 remote M- box .............£169 WT-2 box ................................. £99 NIKON MF USED F2 + DP-1 blk .................... £199 F3T body blk M- box ......... £699 F3HP body......................... £299 F3 body ........................ £99/199 FA body chr M- .................. £299 FE-2 body chr ............. £199/299 FM body chr ........................ £99 FM2n body chr .................. £199 FM2n body blk ................... £169 FM2 body chr .................... £149 FT3 body blk...................... £129 F301 body ........................... £39 24 F2.8 AI .......................... £199 28 F3.5 AI ............................ £99 35 F2 AIS........................... £199 35-70 F3.3/4.5 AIS .............. £99 35-105 F3.5/4.5 AIS .......... £149 36-72 Series E..................... £79 43-86 F3.5 AI ....................... £69 50 F1.2 AIS........................ £399 50 F1.4 AI .......................... £149 50 F1.8 AIS.......................... £89 50 F1.8 AIS pancake ......... £139 85 F2 AI ............................. £149 105 F2.8 micro M- box ...... £349 105 F2.5 AIS...................... £149 135 F2.8 AIS...................... £149 180 F2.8 AIS M- ................ £399 500 F8 late mirror .............. £399 TC14A OR TC14B ea ........ £149 TC16A....£99 TC200 .......... £59 MD-12 winder .......................... £49 SB-15................................... £39 SB-17 (fit F3) ....................... £49 DR-3 angle finder ................ £69 DW-4 (fit F3) ...................... £149 NOBLEX USED 135UC ............................... £449 OLYMPUS DIGITAL USED E1 + 14-42......................... £199 E510 body ......................... £179 E500 body ......................... £149 E410 +14-42 ...................... £199 E300 body ......................... £149 14-42 F3.5/5.6 ..................... £79 14-45 F3.5/5.6 ................... £169 35 F3.5 .............................. £139 40-150 F3.5/4.5 ................... £79 40-150 F4/5.6 ...................... £79 50 F2 Macro ...................... £349 70-300 F4/5.6 .................... £249 FL-50 flash ........................ £149 HLD3 grip fit E300 ............... £49 Sigma 10-20 F4/5.6 DC .... £259 Pen E-P3 body M- box ...... £279 Pen E-P3 + 14-42.............. £429 Pen E-PL3 + 14-150.......... £599 Pen E-PL2 + 14-42............ £249 12-50 F3.5/6.3 EZ M- ........ £199 14-150 F4/5.6 .................... £349 17 F2.8 .............................. £129 VF-2 viewfinder ................. £129 FL-14 Flash ......................... £59 Optical finder VF1................ £59 MCON-P01 .......................... £59 OLYMPUS MF OM USED OM-4 body blk ................... £139 OM-2SP body .................... £149 OM-2N chr body ................. £129 OM-10 chr or blk body ea ..... £49 21 F3.5...£249 24 F2.8 ..... £169 28 F2.8 ................................ £69 35 F2.8 shift M-.................. £269 35-70 F3.5/4.5 ..................... £99 35-70 F4 .............................. £89 35-105 F3.5/4.5 ................. £129 50 F1.4 ................................ £99 50 F3.5 Macro......................... £99 65-200 F4 box.......................£149 75-150 F4................................ £49 135 F3.5..£39 180 F2.8 ..... £399 300 F4.5 ............................ £199 F280 Flash ............................ £69 T32 Flash .............................. £39 Olympus Auto bellows + slide copier M- ................ £169 Man ext tube 7/14/25 ea ...... £15 Auto ext tube 14/25 ea ..............£20 PANASONIC DIGITAL USED LX3 compact ....................... £149 GH2 body box ..................... £549 G5 + 14-42 M- ..................... £429 G3 Olympic kit M- box ....... £399 G3 body box ...................... £199 G2 body ............................. £149 G1 body ............................... £99 GF3 body mint box ............ £199 GF2 body box .................... £169 GF1 body box .................... £149 GX1 body box.................... £249 14 F2.5 .............................. £199 14-42 F3.5/5.6 ..................... £69 14-45 F3.5/5.6 ................... £239 14-50 F3.8/5.6 OIS ............ £299 45-175 F4/5.6 PZ M- ......... £269 45-200 F4/5.6 OIS ............. £219 100-300 F4/5.6 box ........... £379 LVF2 finder M- ................... £159 PENTAX 645 DIGITAL AF USED 45 F2.8 AL ......................... £379 45-85 F4.5 FA M- box........ £749 80-160 F4.5 FA.................. £599 PENTAX DIGITAL AF USED K7D body........................... £349 K20D body box .................. £349 PENTAX 35mm AF USED MZ-5N body......................... £69 MZ-6 body ........................... £39 MZ-10 or MZ-30 body ea .... £29 12-24 F4 ............................ £449 18-55 F3.5/5.6 WR .............. £69 18-55 F3.5/5.6 ..................... £49 28-70 F4 AL ............................. £69 28-90 F3.5/5.6 FA................ £69 43 F1.9 Limited.................. £399 50-200 F4/5.6 DA WR ......... £99 70-300 F4/5.6 ...................... £79 80-200 F4.7/5.6 ................... £49 100-300 F4/5.6 .................... £99 AF200G Mint ....................... £49 AF500FGZ Flash ................. £79 SIGMA PKAF USED 8 F4 EX M- box ................. £279 18-200 F3.5/6.3 DC box .... £129 28-200 F3.5/5.6 ................. £139 70-300 F4/5.6 DG................ £79 105 F2.8 EX DG M- box.... £329 TAM 18-200 XR DiII .......... £139 TAM 70-300 F4/5.6 Di ......... £79 PENTAX 35mm MF USED K2 body chrome .................. £79 K1000 body chr ................... £99 M42 300 F4 M- .................. £279 28 F3.5 ................................ £49 35-70 F3.5/4.5 PK ............... £49 40-80 F2.8/4 PK .................. £69 50 F1.7...£49 50 F2 ............ £49 80-200 F4.5 ......................... £49 135 F2.5 .............................. £69 135 F3.5 .............................. £49 400-600 F8/12 ................... £399 Rear converter PT62 ........... £69 PENTAX 645AF USED 645NII body ....................... £549 645N body ......................... £299 120 insert............................. £79 45 F2.8 FA ......................... £379 45-85 F4.5 M- box ............. £699 80-160 F4.5 FA.................. £499 PENTAX 645MF USED 55 F2.8 M- ......................... £249 120 F4 Macro .................... £349 135 F4 Leaf ....................... £199 150 F3.5 EX++ .................. £149 200 F4 ....................... £129/179 1.4x converter .......................£199 2x converter ..........................£179 120 Insert M- box................. £49 PENTAX 67 USED 67 MU + metered prism + 105 F2.4 ......................... £699 67 MU body ..........................£299 55 F3.5 early...................... £199 55 F4 ................................. £279 75 F4.5 latest box .............. £249 75 F4.5 shift ....................... £449 135 F4 Mac early ............... £129 165 F2.8 ............................ £149 165 F4 leaf......................... £299 200 F4 latest ...................... £269 300 F4 early scruffy............ £149 300 F4 late......................... £349 Auto ext tubes...................... £99 Vivitar 2x conv ..................... £79 YASHICA TLR USED 124G 6x6 ........................... £199 WIDELUX USED Widelux F8 box .................. £449

27-29, Bolton Street, Brixham. Devon. TQ5 9BZ.

01803 852400
Mail Order :

U.K. Stock Only

FAMILY RUN SINCE 1954

NEW AT MIFSUD

High quality manual focus lenses for your DSLR

NEW AT MIFSUD

High quality auto focus lenses for your DSLR

NEW STOCK 45-CL4 Digital

£299

STUDIO LIGHTING KITS FROM...
DSLR SENSOR CLEANING ON THE PREMISES Email us now for details - done by appointment only MON-FRI

£399

Email for details Subject to availability
email with your requirements & we will advise when we have what you want.

PRO LENS BODY HIRE

If what you are looking for is not listed...

Visit our clearance site on ebay http://stores.ebay.co.uk/Mifsuds-Photographic

Mail order used items sold on 10 day approval. Return in 'as received' condition for refund if not satisfied (postage not included - mail order only). Subscribe to our email newsletter be amongst the first to learn about special offers and promotions - ask us for details.

Prices correct when compiled April 16th 2013. E&OE.

Connect now with your QR app

BUY ONLINE (new stock only) - CHECK LATEST PRICES - UPDATED DAILY:

www.mifsuds.com
(SECURE SSL ENCRYPTION)

CLOUD STORAGE

INSURANCE

Photographer

Simple, Safe & Secure
Unlimited Cloud Storage for Home and Business Users
Backup your Pictures, Movies, Music and Work documents quickly and easily.

Digital

from £19.99 per year

beCloud365.com

STUDIO/TRAINING

The The right insurance rig for YOU? f

With a full rangeWith of specialist policies a ful for Photographers, for Video-makers, Photog Film Processing Labs Processing and everyone involved in L Image-making, Image-maki Imaging makes insurance simple, effective and hassle simple, free.

Imaging strives Imaging to give you excellent cover,striv service, security and service, value for money. se

01202 586430 CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

Shoot
for a new career • Portrait

Learn Photography in Central London Day - Evening - Weekend Beginners welcome
25% discount if you book early

For a quote For or more information. a quo Call Imaging Call Insurance now Imag on...

• Lighting • Black + White • Re-touch advanced

• Fashion • Wedding • Still Life

01277 0 243016 127
Or visit our website... Or

www.imaginginsurance.co.uk www .ima

v

20 new courses now available www.media-courses.com 020 7138 2909

London Academy of Media Film and TV

Imaging Insurance Imaging is a trading name licensed to Vantage Insurance Insurance Services Limited (VISL) isbya Nichetrading Insurance Services Limited. name lic VISL is authorised and regulated by the VISL Financial Services Authority. is authorised VISL is registered in England, No 3441136. and regulate VISL’s registered address is: 5th Floor, 41 Eastcheap, London, EC3M 1DT VISL ’ s regis Imaging Insurance can be contracted Imaging at: 2nd Floor, Juniper House, Insurance Warley Hill Business Park, Brentwood, can CM13 3BEbe contrac Tel: 01277 243016, Fax: 0207 6558060, Email: info@imaginginsurance.co.uk T el: 01277 24

NOTHING ELSE MATTERS
www.total911.com

10p0 ecial
th

S

issue

Available from all good newsagents and supermarkets
TM

ON SALE NOW > Guest Editor Magnus Walker > 25 iconic 911s revealed > PDK gearbox test
ULTIMATE GUIDES IN-DEPTH TESTS BIG INTERVIEWS 911 MOTORSPORT CLASSICS REBORN

Print edition available at www.imagineshop.co.uk Digital edition available at www.greatdigitalmags.com
Available on the following platforms

BUY YOUR ISSUE TODAY
facebook.com/total911magazine

twitter.com/Total911

INTERViEW

Taylor made
Commercial photographer and workshop guru Karl Taylor talks about succeeding in photography
It’s easy to assume that a photographer whose expertise is now highly sought after as a workshop leader and presenter of DVD training videos must have set out to become a photographer. But that wasn’t exactly the case with Karl Taylor. “I was studying art and design at school,” he recalls. “I left school and took a job in a graphic-design position. I was made redundant after a year, at 17 years old, so I took a job working in a camera shop. That was my first introduction to photography.” Despite the fact that Karl had only taken the job as a means to an end, it was a job that would change his life. “I just switched my interest from art to photography and from that moment onwards I became hooked on it. I really liked the mixture of art and science that photography offered, but I didn’t get interested in it at a professional level until my mid-20s,” he reveals. “Originally, I wanted to go into photojournalism, and I knew I needed to get a couple of bodies, several lenses and other bits and pieces. Eventually, I got the kit that I needed and got started properly.” Despite being known for his commercial and advertising work, photojournalism has been his most longstanding passion. “I was always drawn to National Geographic. I was very interested in the mix of the natural world and culture – and I always admired the work of the photographers there. My dream really at that stage was to work as a photojournalist doing that type of work.” So, with the spirit of the great National Geographic photographers in mind, Karl headed for the great open road. “I set out on a round-the-world trek for a couple of years to shoot stock images and culture images and tried to get that work published. Eventually, from the back of that, a couple of years later, I managed to carve a living working in south-east Asia photographing the culture and people in Indonesia. I was only making as much as I was spending, but I was enjoying the work, as photojournalism was what I was drawn to originally in photography.” But, once again, fate intervened and taking a job changed Karl’s life for a second time. “I took a job in Australia working as an assistant in a commercial, advertising photography studio. The technicalities of manipulating light and tweaking it to make something pretty 8

© Karl Taylor

104 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHER

Karl Taylor

“High-speed flash with a duration of 1/10,000sec to freeze two wine glasses colliding. This was shot as part of a live demo at Focus On Imaging 2013. We used the Broncolor Scorro pack to achieve the ultra-fast flash” Shot details: Hasselblad H4-50D with 150mm lens at f27,1/800sec, ISO 400

WINE SMASH

© Nathalie Rock

DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHER 105

INTERViEW
8
When Photoshop either didn’t exist or it was in its boring look amazing fascinated me. I’d spent time early stages, you concentrated more on getting the working in photojournalism and not making a lot of result in-camera and overcoming any problems. money, and I thought there was no way that I was Photographers of my generation try to craft an image going to be able to make a living from the level of with light. I solve as much as can possibly be solved photojournalism that I was doing. This was another in-camera. I try to get to the very-best possible result area of photography that I found very interesting, before we consider Photoshop. Say, for example, so I moved onto commercial and advertising you’re shooting a bottle and you’ve got a very slight photography as a career when I came back to reflection in the product. We know now, with Guernsey and started my studio in 1998.” Karl was soon able to build up a strong client base. Photoshop, it’s a two-minute job to remove… back in those days, you’d figure how to get rid of it, rather “I started shooting commercial product photography than planning to retouch it.” with what I’d learnt from assisting in Australia and Karl believes that it’s always vitally important for it kind of just grew from there,” he remembers. “I photographers to keep an eye on new technologies started with a very small studio, shooting a lot of and stay up to date with the things that may local commercial stuff, whether it was for the ‘Visit have an impact on the industry in years to come. Guernsey’ tourism, hotel brochures, architectural “Photographers starting now who’ve got experience stuff. Specsavers were doing well, and they had in CGI and 3D modelling will have an advantage in their head office here – we still shoot a lot of their the future, which is something that we’ve paid close national and European advertising campaigns. attention to. Fortunately, I’ve been involved in some We’ve just got a good range of clients that we’ve forms of computer modelling and 3D modelling, so expanded over the years, and we’ve worked with I understand it and am familiar with it – because I various advertising agencies as well.” do think that at some point in the future we’re going During his time as a commercial and advertising to see a larger volume of work in that direction – as photographer, Karl has seen the working process we already are in car photography. As soon as it change greatly. “When I started in advertising becomes cheaper to do something one way and get photography, Photoshop wasn’t really a part of it. the same result, obviously the clients are going to err It was more about the trickery of what you could towards that, so photographers that are learning the do with the light. It was all about doing Polaroid trade now should be learning also about video and tests one after the other to perfect it – that’s the CGI and 3D modelling if they plan to have a career in way I learnt photography. You weren’t thinking this [business] in ten years time.” in a way of ‘oh, I’m going to do this in Photoshop’. There’s no doubt that Karl has made a big success of his studio, and he attributes the success of Karl Taylor Photography today not only to his photographic skill but also his business acumen. “To be a photographer today – especially in the current marketplace – although you obviously have to be a good photographer, you also have to work very hard on all aspects of the business, the marketing, building relationships with clients, so it’s not just about the techniques.” For Karl, many aspiring photographers don’t realise some of the fundamental realities of being a photographer, which can cause them to struggle. “What people neglect is that as a photographer you’re usually just self-employed, with maybe just one member of staff as an assistant,” he says. “I don’t know whether it’s the word photography and the buzz around that, but people seem to neglect the fact that just like a carpenter or a plumber, you’re still running a business. You’ve got to balance your books, you’ve got to keep your eyes on the finances, you’ve got to plan your advertising, you’ve got to figure out how to reach your clients, you’ve got to meet clients, you’ve got to network. There is so much to it – purely because most photographers are self-employed; they’re not a photographer working for a photography firm.” Karl’s advice is clear. “No matter how good you are at photography, you’re not going to get anywhere if you can’t manage your business. You’ve got to look at every aspect of the business as a business; 8

All images © Karl Taylor

8

106 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHER

Karl Taylor
“High-speed flash with a duration of 1/10,000sec to freeze the liquid paint which was thrown over the model by an assistant. It took about 10 attempts” Shot details: Hasselblad H2D with 150mm lens at f8, ISO 100

PAINTED LADY

“Shot from Montparnasse Tower” Shot details: Canon EOS-1Ds Mark III with a 16-35mm lens at 33mm and f9, 30sec, ISO100

PARIS AT DUSK

DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHER 107

INTERVIEW
“Paris location shoot demonstrating mixing location flash with ambient light. Elinchrom ranger pack with two silver brollies” Shot details: Canon EOS-1Ds Mark III with a 16-35mm lens at 31mm and f3.5, 1/200sec, ISO 100

PARISIAN BRIGHTS

 sometimes you have to forget that you’re in this

“Shot in my studio, with three-light setup. The model was jumping onto a crash mat, we then removed the mat and positioned her on a pillar to capture her shadow. I then merged the images together” Shot details: Hasselblad H2D with an 80mm lens 108 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHER

SPLASHDOWN

arty, photography world… we’re not here to take pictures that are just amazingly arty. We’re here to take the pictures that the art director needs us to take to solve a problem based on marketing decisions or market research that’s been done that means that this image in this layout with these words will help sell that product. The picture we take is often dictated by an art director or marketing executive before we’ve taken it.” But one of Karl’s biggest passions today, and something that consumes much of his time, is his ever-expanding range of training DVDs. “About five years ago, we decided to run a couple of workshops in photography as an extra revenue source because we kept getting asked a lot about doing it – and they went really well. I really enjoyed doing them, I actually quite liked imparting my knowledge to people and I loved talking about photography,” Karl explains. “Then, we thought about how else could we reach a wider audience, and that’s when we decided upon a DVD and online format. We film all over the world to create a really exciting visual experience that’s both entertaining and educational. Our ethos with it has always been to entertain people, inform people and make sure that you get to the point quickly and you don’t tell them how to do it, you show them how to do it… getting people to understand and learn how to use a camera in manual mode… not how to use it in any of automatic modes but to get you fully up to speed with aperture, shutter speed and exposure so that we can then move you forward from that point.” Another goal that Karl has for his training DVDs is to make them as honest and truthful as possible. “Even if we make a mistake, we’ll include the part of the process that was the mistake,” he says. Karl’s training DVDs are broad and comprehensive, covering a wide range of photographic subjects, an eclecticism that he attributes to having started in photojournalism before switching to something completely different in the form of commercial photography. “I don’t believe in having to stick to a certain genre and be an expert in one particular field. If you understand what makes a good image and you understand about light, and you understand about the discipline of creating an image, I think you can apply it to any image,” he explains. “I enjoy shooting different stuff. I love all forms of photography and all aspects of photography and I just get really excited when I’m talking about it and demonstrating it. People love that enthusiasm and passion, it comes across in our training and they then get more excited about getting out there and giving it a try themselves.” Today, Karl Taylor Photography is busier than ever, with plenty of shoots and training in store, including a nine-day trip to Iceland later this year to film another DVD, something that Karl never tires of. “It’s almost a mechanism of release to explain what I’m doing, while I’m doing it. It almost helps to me DP understand it better myself!”

All images © Karl Taylor

Karl Taylor

WIN a photography workshop
The ‘4 for 3’ photography course includes Karl Taylor’s Introduction to Photography, Travel & Landscape Photography, Advanced Digital Photography Level 1 and the Advanced Digital Photography Level 2. It normally retails on Karl’s website for £90 (exc. VAT) or $150. The Advertising, Product & Still Life Photography Secrets contains Karl’s guide to all the pro-level techniques he’s learnt throughout his career in the industry. It normally retails on Karl’s website for £295 (exc.VAT) or $489. For more information on these products, please visit www. karltaylorphotography.com To enter, all you have to do is answer the following question correctly: Karl Taylor mostly shoots: a) Family portraits b) Commerical and advertising photography c) Landscapes Email your answer to team@ dphotographer.co.uk with a subject line of EITHER ‘4 for 3 competition’ OR ‘Advertising, Product and Still Life competition’ depending on which prize you’d prefer to win before the closing date of midnight GMT on Friday 26 July 2013. A winner for each prize will be selected at random and notified by Wednesday 31 July 2013. TERMS AND CONDITIONS
Entries will only be accepted as emails sent to team@dphotographer.co.uk with the subject line of either ‘4 for 3 competition’ or ‘Advertising, Product and Still Life competition’ before the closing date of midnight GMT on Friday 26 July 2013. Employees of Imagine Publishing (including freelancers), or Karl Taylor Photography, their relatives or any agents or employees are not eligible to enter. Imagine Publishing and its partners have the right to substitute the prize for a similar one of equal or higher value. The prize cannot be exchanged for cash. The editor’s decision is final and no correspondence will be entered into. From time to time Imagine Publishing or its agents may send you related material or special offers. If you do not want to receive this, please state this clearly in your entry.

“High-speed flash with a duration of approx 1/10,000sec to freeze the liquid paint thrown on the model. The incredible ‘sheets’ of paint were just luck of the draw!” Shot details: Hasselblad H2D with a 150mm lens at f9.8, 1/499sec, ISO 100

THE PAINTING GAME

DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHER 109

PORTFOLIO

in the

wild
We take a walk on the wild side with Capture Safari’s competition winner Andrew Scriven as he explores the Serengeti
The inspiring landscape and exotic wildlife that roam the Serengeti plains can’t be matched anywhere else on Earth. Many of us dream about venturing across the African continent with a camera in hand, in search of a true photo adventure. Last year we offered one such opportunity to one of our readers as part of a £6,000-prize competition with Capture Photographic Safaris (www. capturesafaris.com). The incredible prize included flights, luxury accommodation and a seven-day photo tour with professional and experienced wildlife photography tutors. We had well over 1,000 entries, but the winning image, taken by Andrew Scriven (www.andrewscriven. co.uk), really caught our attention. Andrew’s stunning shot depicted a tranquil scene of a humpback whale as it breached the water. On winning the competition, he says, “I was over the moon to win. What a fantastic prize! It combined my biggest passions of photography and travel. I have always wanted to photograph the Serengeti, and I was not disappointed. The photographic opportunities are endless. The trip was tailor-made for photographers, which is ideal. I knew I would be with other photographers, and we would all be committed to capturing the best images we could. I was incredibly excited.”

Working

© Andrew Scriven

110 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHER

On a shoot with…

“Have fun, and appreciate the fact that Paul’s top wildlife tips you are in the middle of nowhere seeing
01
You never know when something is going to jump out/chase/kill/eat/pose. Always make sure batteries are charged and you have plenty of images left on your cards.

ALWaYS BE REaDY

something special!” Paul Joynson Hicks
Meet the pro
Paul Joynson Hicks MBE is one of the most admired wildlife photographers in Africa

02

If you don’t know where you are, where you’re going or what you’re going to see, forget it. Know what animals you are likely to see where and when, and you are much more likely to get that incredible shot.

KNOW YOUR STUFF

03 BE PaTIENT

It may sound tedious and clichéd, but actually I am not talking about spending a month in a hide for that one amazing shot, because we don’t all have that luxury. I am saying that if you find some cheetah and they are looking a bit itchy, and on the horizon are some Thompson’s gazelles, stick around for an hour or two, and you may well be rewarded with a hunt. You may not, but at least you won’t come back to camp and find those people in the next tent saw them kill!

Paul has been a professional photographer in East Africa for over 20 years, and has a deep love for the African bush. Shooting wildlife and landscapes is his passion, and teaching others to do the same is a natural progression, keeping him in the bush, sharing his love of the environment and capturing it on film. He works with Capture Safaris, offering unique safaris and workshops that head ‘off-piste’ for stunning locations and photographic opportunities. www.capturesafaris.com

Paul Joynson Hicks MBE

04 LENSES aND BODIES

We don’t all have a huge budget, but you can hire lenses and bodies quite cheaply, so if you have a trip coming up make sure you are well equipped. In any situation, your needs can change in nano-seconds. Make sure you have good zoom lenses, fixed lenses and, if you can, at least two bodies so you aren’t perpetually changing lenses and getting dust on the sensor. You have to be able to get yourself into position in order to be able to actually get the shot. Composition is the key, so remember to try and get the shot from different angles. If you are shooting wildlife, you are more than likely to be in a car (if not, yikes), so shoot from the roof hatch, the top of the car or from the window. Vary the lens choice, put the animal in space, don’t always get as close as possible and focus on the eyes, but don’t always necessarily put them bang in the middle.

05 COMPOSITION

06 ENJOY

Have fun, and appreciate the fact that you are in the middle of nowhere seeing something special!

DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHER 111

On a shoot with…

Behind the scenes

Here, we present a closer look at how the course panned out…
CONSIDERED cOMPOSITIONS

Paul’s comment: “At the beginning of the trip, I think Andrew felt he had a clear idea about how he liked images and his composition – but despite the fact that he is a very competent wildlife photographer already, together we were able to find aspects of composition he either hadn’t thought of or wasn’t clear about. By the end of the trip he was developing styles that he’d never considered before. It was great to see him produce really original images.”

© Paul Joynson Hicks MBE

Andrew says: “The resting lion was catching the last of the light from the setting sun. Reflecting this light, the golden coat popped from the fading background.  The wind brushed his coat from left to right. It was just wonderful to photograph.” Paul’s comment: “Don’t mess! This is what you can achieve in gloomy wet conditions. We all shot this fella and his cropping is nice and tight and the catch-light in the eyes is great.”

RESTING LION

Andrew says, “I would 100 per cent recommend the course to others. We were so well looked after throughout by Paul, Tim and the guides. The food and accommodation were first class. We even enjoyed a glass or two of prosecco while on a walk through the Serengeti. Being with likeminded photographers is also a joy. You learn from one another, and are prepared to wait as long as necessary for that special shot.”

© Paul Joynson Hicks MBE

© Paul Joynson Hicks MBE

OVERALL EXPERIENcE

Andrew says: “We were encouraged to consider different ways of taking a photograph, which was great. We took the time to experiment with our cameras and alter the pictures we were taking. We were playing with long exposure times, over-exposure and panning. It was good fun, and the results were terrific.”

EXPERIMENTATION

Andrew says: “The Maasai were dancing as the sun set.  I wanted to capture their energy and spirituality. I reduced the shutter speed to capture the movement and over exposed the picture to blow the background.”  Paul’s comment: “This is by far his most extraordinary picture. He has taken a classic scene and thought outside the box. By blowing out the background and blurring the action he has created a ‘painting’. The key to its success is it hasn’t lost the ability to communicate its meaning.”

MAASAI

Meet the competition winner
Andrew Scriven

Andrew Scriven is a wildlife enthusiast turned pro photographer

© Andrew Scriven

Andrew is a photographer who loves to travel and capture landscapes and wildlife images around the world. He has been a finalist in the National Geographic International Photo Contest, the Sony World photography Awards and Top 10 in the National Geographic World in Focus Contest. Andrew’s work was also in the final judging rounds of the Veolia Wildlife Photographer of the Year Award. He is currently shooting with the Sony Alpha 99 and NEX 6. www.andrewscriven.co.uk

DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHER 112

© Andrew Scriven

«clikpic»
Websites for photographers

Great websites for only £40 pa
Clikpic is an award-winning service for any photographer who wants a great website without the cost and hassle of setting one up. With minimal expertise required, you can use our online admin system, a variety of beautifully designed templates and a vast array of additional functionality, to create your own website quickly, easily and very cost-effectively.
or change your site whenever • Update you want. as many pages as you like in a • Have variety of formats.

( includes ecommerce )

Amazing value!

You can do it!
It’s VERY easy to build a great looking Clikpic website with virtually no technical expertise. Sign up for our free 14 day trial at www.clikpic.com - download our Easy Start User Guide – you can build a great template website within a matter of hours. Then have a look at our Cliktips Guides to explore the many additional features we offer.
“Building the website was uncomplicated and completely hassle-free. ” Digital Photo magazine

• Full ecommerce facilities. of options to present images • Dozens in a stylish way, including slideshows, •
carousels, image watermarking, etc. Add a blog, take enquiries through a ‘Contact’ form, add a guestbook and/or a user comments facility, news pages, a calendar - even an events diary.

range of styling and customisation • Huge options – change font, font size, text

• an existing domain name if you • Use already have one or buy one
Search engine friendly. through us for as little as £6.50 pa.

colours, text alignment, etc.

Visit www.clikpic.com for a FREE 14 day trial

Don’t just go on holiday. Go on location.
PHOTOGRAPHY COURSE IN TUSCANY
18-25 May 2013
The beautiful Crete Senesi of Tuscany will be the backdrop for this course, led by award-winning photographer Suzy Prior. Our base for the week is a converted farmhouse with wonderful views and excellent facilities including a fantastic pool with hot thermal spring. We will build on our photographic skills by practising a variety of landscape, street photography, portrait work and night photography through a combination of group sessions and visits to places of interest. Excursions will include an afternoon and evening in Siena, a visit to the celebrated gardens of La Foce with some of the best views in Tuscany and a trip to the medieval town of Pienza.

PHOTOGRAPHY SAFARI IN MOROCCO
12-19 October 2013
Visit North Africa with an exciting photo-safari in southern Morocco led by adventurous travel photographer Toby Savage. Photographic opportunities will abound as we travel by 4x4 from the vibrance of the city to mountain villages and desert wilderness. During the week we will visit the souks of Marrakech, the spectacular Kasbah of Ait Benhaddou, set of many Hollywood films, sleep in a nomad tent and take a camel ride across the dunes. Under Toby’s expert guidance we will learn about the elements of a good photograph and hone our skills immersed in spectacular scenery.

EXCLUSIVE! 5% discount for Digital Photography readers
Quote “DP Offer”

www.heliconarts.co.uk/DPoffer

VIEW POINT

Mark Bauer

Tales of orange sunsets and orange brides
Back in the mists of time when I first got into this photography lark, I imagined the life of a professional landscape photographer to be a glamorous one, travelling from one far-flung corner of the globe to the next; an endless stream of airports and exotic destinations. I’ve been a full-time landscape pro for about 10 years now, and the reality has proved to be somewhat more mundane. Far from roaming the world, I’ve more or less made a living from photographing Dorset – in fact, at least two of my most successful images were shot no more than about 300 yards from my front door. Of course, it helps that I live in a particularly photogenic part of the country, but even so, I recently decided to spread my wings a little. So off I went to Slovakia, Jersey and Iceland. Oh, and I nearly went to the Scilly Isles, but there was the wrong type of fog for the plane to take off. Faraway locations don’t guarantee great results. My first visit to Iceland yielded nothing more than neck ache from spending hours staring upwards, waiting in vain for the northern lights to appear, and I managed to be in Jersey during the worst snowfall they’d had for about 30 years. But perseverance is key in photography, and my return trip to Iceland coincided with a couple of decent aurora displays. No matter how bad things get with landscape and travel photography, I can always comfort myself with the thought that I’m not a wedding photographer. Doing weddings full time would probably finish me off, as I just don’t have the patience for it, and I genuinely admire those who do it well. I did give it a go a few years ago, assisting a wedding photographer friend of mine on a few occasions. To my credit, I never swore at any guests – unlike my colleague, who once had one of those ‘Oops! Did I really say that out loud?’ moments with the father of the bride. Perhaps the biggest problem I had was trying to colour-correct a fake-tanned orange bride. I’d DP chose the orange glow of a sunset any day!

Travelling to exotic locations is very exciting, but don’t overlook the potential of what’s on your doorstep

Travelling to great destinations doesn’t guarantee great shots – hard work and perseverance are also necessary. It took two visits to Iceland and a lot of late nights before I saw an aurora display worth shooting

Mark Bauer

114 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHER

© Images by Mark Bauer

Mark Bauer has made a name for himself as one of the UK’s premier landscape photographers. He first became interested in photography while living abroad during the 1990s, and after completing a City and Guilds course in photography he began to shoot his local landscape. Mark lives in Dorset, which is packed with picturesque villages, rolling hills and the dramatic Jurassic Coast, making it the perfect muse and subject for his photography. Mark is the author of two books; one dealing with his home county, entitled Romantic Dorset, and another that showcases landscapes from the neighbouring county of Wiltshire, entitled Perfect Wiltshire. He is also the author, with Ross Hoddinott, of photographic technique book The Landscape Photography Workshop. www.markbauerphotography.com

No Disc. No Problem Many of the files you’re looking for can be
found on the magazine’s website
Imagine digital editions are a new and exciting way to experience our world-leading magazines and bookazines.
To get the most out of your digital editions, be sure to enjoy all of our fantastic features, including:

• Zoomable text and pictures • In-app browsing • Searchable text • Take your collection with you • Read offline

To buy more Imagine digital editions, please go to

www.GreatDigitalMags.com
for the latest issues and best offers.

www.olympusomd.com

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful