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01-21-2014 Edition of the San Mateo Daily Journal
01-21-2014 Edition of the San Mateo Daily Journal

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Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
Tuesday • Jan. 21, 2014 • Vol XIII, Edition 134
SANCTIONS LIFTING
WORLD PAGE 8
COSTELLO GIVES
SCOTS A BOOST
SPORTS PAGE 11
DRINKING LINKED
TO MENTAL DECLINE
HEALTH PAGE 17
IRAN,U.S.,EUROPE START IMPLEMENTING NUCLEAR DEAL
Millbrae Kohl’s to close down
By Angela Swartz
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Those looking to go clothing shop-
ping in Millbrae will soon have one
less option now that Kohl’s at
Millbrae Square Shopping Center is
closing.
The Kohl’s Corporation confirmed
the clothing and household goods
franchise plans on shutting down its
855 Broadway location in April. The
space was long housed by Mervyn’s
until 2008 when the Kohl’s
Corporation, in partnership with
Forever 21, won a joint $6.25 million
bid for the leaseholds of 46 Mervyn’s
locations including the Mervyn’s in
Millbrae. There is still no word on
what will replace the most recent
department store.
Mayor Wayne Lee said he’s sorry to
see Kohl’s go.
“We’re going to lose an anchor store
that brings in about $100,000 in
taxes,” he said. “At the same time, it
could provide vibrancy to that area
(with the opening of a new store).”
Employees will be able to find jobs
at other Kohl’s, said Julia Fennelly,
public relations representative for
Kohl’s .
“Kohl’s customers can continue to
find great values at the 23 remaining
greater San Francisco-Oakland area
locations, or in any of the 128 Kohl’s
stores throughout the state of
California,” Fennelly said in an email.
“We are pleased to share that all Kohl’s
associates have been offered positions
at other stores in the area. Those
choosing not to relocate are being
offered severance packages.”
Walt Kelly, a lifetime Millbrae resi-
Downtown anchor store to shut its doors this spring
Following in King’s footsteps
Various faith based organizations give back to community on MLK holiday
By Samantha Weigel
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
More than 300 volunteers
organized by the Peninsula
Multifaith Coalition dispersed
yesterday to several San Mateo
County sites to carry on the works
of Martin
Luther King
Jr. by assist-
ing schools,
shelters and
the elderly.
“This is
what he stood
for; giving
back to the
communi t y,
people help-
ing each other and making the
world a better place. One way we
can do this is to give to people
who have not. Historically, serv-
ice work has been connected with
Martin Luther King Day,” said Kim
Lazarus, co-organizer of the
PMC’s volunteering at San
Mateo’s First Step for Families
shelter and member of the
Publichelp
needed in
cold case
San Mateo police and
loved ones try to solve
six-year-old homicide
By Samantha Weigel
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Today marks the six-year
anniversary of the homicide of a
T.G.I. Friday’s night manager and
San Mateo police are asking the
public for any clues that could help
apprehend the killer.
Douglas Castello, 36, worked as
a night manager at the restaurant
when his life was brutally taken by
an unknown assailant. He was dis-
covered by a morning shift manag-
er at approximately 5:15 a.m. Jan.
21, 2008, in the restaurant’s safe
room located at 3101 El Camino
Douglas Castello
ANGELA SWARTZ/DAILY JOURNAL
Customers enter the soon-to-close Kohl’s in Millbrae.
REUTERS
A family takes a portrait of themselves at the Martin Luther King Memorial.
SAMANTHA WEIGEL/DAILY JOURNAL
Peninsula Multifaith Coalition volunteers Laura Aron and Daniela Salgado spend the holiday with children at First
Step for Families in San Mateo.
By Philip Lucas
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ATLANTA — As the nation
remembered and reflected Monday
on the legacy of the Rev. Martin
Luther King Jr., leaders and every-
day Americans talked about how
far the country has come in the
past 50 years and how much more
is to be done.
At Ebenezer Baptist Church in
King’s hometown of Atlanta, civil
rights leaders and members of
Speeches, marches honor
Martin Luther King Jr. Day
See HONOR, Page 20
See KING, Page 20
See page 5
Inside
2014 Martin Luther
King Jr. Essay, Poetry
Contest winners
See CASTELLO, Page 18
See KOHL’S, Page 18
Fisherman dies
after being swept to sea
POINT REYES NATIONAL
SEASHORE — A fisherman is dead
after getting dragged into the ocean by
large, strong surf while trying to
retrieve an ice chest.
The Marin Independent Journal
reports that witnesses on Monday
reported seeing the man disappear into
the sea at North Beach in the Point
Reyes National Seashore.
Park spokesman John Dell’Osso
tells the newspaper that onlookers
lost sight of the fisherman just sec-
onds after he went in.
The U.S. Coast Guard and Sonoma
County Sheriff’s Office launched a
search, found the man’s body and
brought it back to shore.
The Marin County coroner and park
service are investigating the death,
and did not identify the man.
Con-man who defrauded
couple to be sentenced
SAN FRANCISCO — Aman convict-
ed of defrauding a Northern California
couple out of $1.6 million is sched-
uled to be sentenced in federal court.
The U.S. attorney’s office tells The
Marin Independent Journal that it is
seeking a 37-month sentence and a
restitution order for 42-year-old
Blessed Marvelous Herve, who pre-
tended to be the son of Congo’s presi-
dent.
Herve admitted to persuading the
couple to forward him money with
promises of repayment, lucrative com-
missions and false claims that the fed-
eral government had seized his money
and imprisoned him.
The two victims, ages 69 and 70,
lost their retirement savings and ended
up $200,000 in debt.
Herve’s lawyers say his father was a
“high-level government official” in
the Republic of Congo who was assas-
sinated during political unrest.
Herve is due in court Wednesday.
Fallon and Crystal
among Leno’s final guests
PASADENA — Jay Leno will close
out his 22-year run as host of NBC’s
“The Tonight Show” with a nod to the
future and to the past.
His heir apparent, Jimmy Fallon,
will kick off Leno’s final week with a
guest appearance on Feb. 3. Fallon is
taking over the gig after hosting
NBC’s “Late Night” since 2009.
Leno’s final night, on Feb. 6, will
feature Billy Crystal, who was Leno’s
first guest in May 1992 when he suc-
ceeded Johnny Carson. Country super-
star Garth Brooks will also appear.
Leno’s last week will also include
Betty White, Matthew McConaughey,
Sandra Bullock, country singer Blake
Shelton, musician Lyle Lovett and
NBAHall of Famer Charles Barkley.
Fallon starts his run on Feb. 17 dur-
ing the second week of the network’s
Olympics coverage. As a result, the
“Tonight Show” will air at midnight
following the nightly games coverage
from Sochi, Russia. On Feb. 24, the
show will revert to its regular 11:35
p.m. slot.
Leno left the show in 2009 to host a
prime time talk show, with Conan
O’Brien replacing him on “Tonight.”
After six months of poor ratings for
both men, O’Brien was out at
“Tonight” and Leno returned to his old
gi g.
NBC Entertainment president
Robert Greenblatt is hoping to con-
tinue the network’s relationship with
Leno after he leaves late night.
“I would love him to do specials
with us, and we’ve got ideas about
other sorts of shows he can host,”
Greenblatt said Sunday at the
Television Critics Association meet-
ing. “As he told me recently, NBC has
really been his only home.”
He said Leno didn’t want to discuss
his future until he finished his final
week.
FOR THE RECORD 2 Tuesday • Jan. 21, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
800 S. Claremont St., Suite 210, San Mateo, CA 94402
Publisher: Jerry Lee Editor in Chief: Jon Mays
jerry@smdailyjournal.com jon@smdailyjournal.com
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twitter.com/smdailyjournal facebook.com/smdailyjournal
Phone:. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (650) 344-5200 Fax: (650) 344-5290
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As a public service, the Daily Journal prints obituaries of approximately 200 words or less with a photo one time on the date of the family’s choosing.To submit obituaries, email
information along with a jpeg photo to news@smdailyjournal.com.Free obituaries are edited for style, clarity, length and grammar. If you would like to have an obituary printed
more than once, longer than 250 words or without editing, please submit an inquiry to our advertising department at ads@smdailyjournal.com.
Microsoft
co-founder Paul
Allen is 61.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1954
The first atomic submarine, the USS
Nautilus, was launched at Groton,
Conn., as first lady Mamie
Eisenhower christened the vessel with
the traditional bottle of champagne
broken against the bow.
“Would to God that we
might spend a single day really well.”
— Thomas a Kempis, German monk and author (1380-1471)
U.S. Attorney
General Eric
Holder is 63.
Singer Emma
Bunton is 38.
Birthdays
REUTERS
A pro-European integration protester catches fire during clashes with police in Kiev, Ukraine.
Tuesday: Sunny. Highs in the mid 60s.
Northeast winds 5 to 10 mph.
Tuesday ni ght: Mostly clear except
patchy fog. Lows in the mid 40s to lower
50s. North winds 5 to 10 mph.
Wednesday: Partly cloudy in the morn-
ing then becoming sunny. Highs in the
lower 60s. North winds 5 to 10 mph.
Wednesday night: Mostly clear. Lows in the mid to upper
40s. Northwest winds 5 to 10 mph in the
evening...Becoming light.
Thursday: Sunny. Highs in the mid 60s.
Thursday night through Friday night: Mostly clear.
Lows in the mid 40s to lower 50s. Highs in the mid 60s.
Saturday: Sunny. Highs in the mid 60s.
Saturday night through Monday: Mostly clear.
Local Weather Forecast
I n 1648, Margaret Brent went before the Maryland colo-
nial assembly to seek two votes in that body, one for herself
as a landowner, the other as the legal representative of the
absent Lord Baltimore; the assembly turned her down.
I n 1793, during the French Revolution, King Louis XVI,
condemned for treason, was executed on the guillotine.
I n 1861, Jefferson Davis of Mississippi and four other
Southerners whose states had seceded from the Union
resigned from the U.S. Senate.
I n 1908, New York City’s Board of Aldermen passed an
ordinance prohibiting women from smoking in public (the
measure was vetoed two weeks later by Mayor George B.
McClellan Jr. ).
I n 1910, the Great Paris Flood began as the rain-swollen
Seine River burst its banks, sending water into the French
capital.
I n 1924, Russian revolutionary Vladimir Lenin died at age
53.
I n 1937, Count Basie and his band recorded “One O’Clock
Jump” for Decca Records (on this date in 1942, they re-
recorded the song for Okeh Records).
I n 1950, former State Department official Alger Hiss,
accused of being part of a Communist spy ring, was found
guilty in New York of lying to a grand jury. (Hiss, who pro-
claimed his innocence, served less than four years in
prison.) George Orwell (Eric Blair), author of “Nineteen
Eighty-Four,” died in London at age 46.
I n 1968, the Battle of Khe Sanh began during the Vietnam
War. An American B-52 bomber carrying four hydrogen
bombs crashed in Greenland, killing one crew member and
scattering radioactive material.
In other news ...
(Answers tomorrow)
SWUNG DAISY EVOLVE SYSTEM
Yesterday’s
Jumbles:
Answer: The special pricing at the bakery was a —
SWEET DEAL
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
AROPE
TINNH
REPBUS
DACAFE
©2014 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
All Rights Reserved.
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A:
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are Lucky Star,No.
2,in first place; California Classic,No.5,in second
place; and GOld Rush, No. 1, in third place. The
race time was clocked at 1:47.85.
0 3 0
1 10 26 31 51 11
Mega number
Jan. 17 Mega Millions
13 14 19 31 38 25
Powerball
Jan. 18 Powerball
11 12 24 28 38
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
3 7 5 2
Daily Four
2 4 5
Daily three evening
16 23 25 35 47 13
Mega number
Jan. 18 Super Lotto Plus
Actress Ann Wedgeworth is 80. World Golf Hall of Famer
Jack Nicklaus is 74. Opera singer Placido Domingo is 73.
Singer Mac Davis is 72. Actress Jill Eikenberry is 67.
Country musician Jim Ibbotson (The Nitty Gritty Dirt Band)
is 67. Singer-songwriter Billy Ocean is 64. U.S. Ambassador
to China Gary Locke is 64. Actor-director Robby Benson is
58. Actress Geena Davis is 58. Basketball Hall of Famer
Hakeem Olajuwon is 51. Actress Charlotte Ross is 46. Actor
John Ducey is 45. Actress Karina Lombard is 45. Rapper
Levirt (B-Rock and the Bizz) is 44.
3
Tuesday • Jan. 21, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal,
a locally owned, award-winning daily newspaper on the
Peninsula has an opening for a Account Executive.
The position is responsible for developing new business
opportunities and maintaining those customers within the
San Mateo County and Santa Clara County area.
The candidate will develop new business through a
combination of cold calling, outdoor canvassing, net-
working and any other technique necessary to achieve
his or her goals.
º The candidate will effectivel], professionall] and
accurately represent the Daily Journal’s wide range of
products and services which include print advertising,
inserts, internet advertising, social media advertising,
graphic design services, event marketing, and more.
º The candidate will manage their clients in a heavil]
customer-focused manner, understanding that real
account management begins after the sale has been
closed.
º A strong work ethic and desire to succeed responsiol]
also required.
Work for the best local paper in the Bay Area.
To apply, send a resume and follow up to
ads @ smdailyjournal.com
Immediate
Opening
for an
Account
Executive
Job Requirements:
º 8ell print, digital and other mar-
keting solutions
º B2B sales experience is preferred
º hewspaper and other media
sales experience desired but not
required
º work well with others
º Excellent communication, pre-
sentation, organizational skills are
required
º A strong work ethic and desire to
succeed responsibly also required.
Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
SAN MATEO
Theft. Aman took two bags of groceries on
the 1600 block of South El Camino Real
before 10:56 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 8.
Burglary. A bag was taken from a silver
Toyota Sienna that had its window smashed
on the 2900 block of South Norfolk Street
before 12:32 a.m. Wednesday, Jan. 8.
Vandalism. The rear window of a vehicle
was smashed on the 1300 block of Palos
Verdes Drive before 8:11 p.m. Saturday, Jan.
4.
Burglary . The door of a business was
kicked in on the 100 block of North
Kingston Street before 6:49 p.m. Saturday,
Jan. 4.
Accident. Avehicle hit a parked car at the
intersection of South B Street and Ninth
Avenue before 12:49 p.m.
UNINCORPORATED
SAN MATEO COUNTY
Burglary. A bicycle valued at $500 was
taken from a garage on the 400 block of
Terrace Avenue in Moss Beach before 8 p.m.
Monday, Jan. 13.
Arres t . A person wanted on a felony war-
rant was found in possession of parapherna-
lia, black tar heroin and unprescribed med-
ications on the 700 block of Stetson Street
in Moss Beach before 1:50 p.m. Thursday,
Jan. 2.
Police reports
Sausage fest
Someone took two packages of sausage
on the 1600 block of South El Camino
Real in San Mateo before 8:18 p.m.
Friday, Jan. 10.
By Angela Swartz
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
With 50 years under her belt as a volun-
teer in San Mateo County’s Assistance
League, Laura Sale is being honored with a
scholarship under her name.
Sale, 87, began working with the group
in her mid-30s and the scholarship in her
name will go to young women returning
to education after time off. For the past 10
years, it’s been her pet project to help
women complete their community college
degrees.
“It’s so rewarding to see how happy
they are,” said Sale, who lives in
Burlingame Hills. “I was surprised and
overwhelmed with the award.”
The local Assistance League sends two
women to each of the three community
colleges in the area with its scholarship.
Sale said she never thought her member-
ship would extend for so many years.
“I don’t think anyone ever looks ahead
50 years,” said Sale, who is married with
two sons, six grandchildren and four
great-grandchildren. “My whole family
got involved and it was a beautiful organ-
ization. We could do what we really felt
was important in the community.”
For her work, she was honored by U.S.
Rep. Jackie Speier, D-San Mateo, and
received 50 roses to mark her years as a
volunteer.
One such important thing was estab-
lishing Operation School Bell, the orga-
nization’s largest initiative, during her
presidency in 1970. This program, fund-
ed mostly from proceeds from the
Turnstyle Thrift Shop in downtown San
Mateo, provides free and new clothing to
needy students in grades K-7 in a total of
21 schools from Daly City to East Palo
Alto.
“There were two outstanding things that
happened during my time here,” she said.
“One was signing the first contract for
Operation School Bell [with local
schools]. The other was securing a chapter
house. At the time, the area was filled with
women’s volunteer organizations that did
nothing but raise money. ”
The difference for Assistance League,
and what explains its longevity, is the
fact the volunteers get to be hands-on
with where the money goes, Sale said.
“It’s a good thing to have volunteers,”
she said. “They’re worth more than their
weight in gold.”
Still, the Assistance League has evolved
over the years, Sale said.
“It has changed because the world has
changed,” said Sale, who worked as a pub-
lisher for a time, but was a housewife for
most of her life. “Most members have had
careers outside of the home.”
The group is still doing well and mem-
bership is up, said Sale, who went to
College of William & Mary in Virginia
before transferring to University of
California at Los Angeles.
“It’s rewarding to see we’re taking up
more members,” she said.
For more information on the Assistance
League visit sanmateocounty.assistance-
league.org .
angela@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 105
New scholarship honors lifelong volunteer
Laura Sale has been with Assistance League for 50 years
Turnstyle chairman Pat Reed, right, honored volunteer Laura Sale, center, and Assistance
League President Gladys Baggetta, right, work in the Turnstyle Thrift Shop.
4
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5
Tuesday • Jan. 21, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
TOM JUNG/DAILY JOURNAL
Above: Aragon High School student Andrew Grant read his poem during the 29th national
holiday celebration honoring Dr.Martin Luther King Jr.on Saturday,Jan.18 at the King Center
in San Mateo.Grant’s poem,a tribute to Dr.King’s dream,placed first in the 12th-grade category.
Below:Sunnybrae Elementary School student Alexander Acosta smiles at the applause for his
poem which placed first in the grade 1 category.
2014 MARTIN LUTHER KING JR. ESSAY AND POETRY CONTEST
Grade 1, essay
First place, Logan Ortiz; second place, Sarah
Thomas
Grade 1, poetry
First place, Alexander Acosta; second place,
Khaliah White; third place, Juan Torres
Grade 2, essay
First place, Sofia Ruiz; second place, Sanjna
Banerjee; third place, Arden Acosta
Grade 2, poetry
First place, Daniel Morgan and Lola Unga; sec-
ond place, Gaelle Djinqueuzian; third place,
Kevin Estrada
Grade 3, essay (A-F)
First place, Anna Daveggio; second place,
Madeline Cummins; third place, Joanna Bar-
rameda
Grade 3, essay (G-N)
First place, Rohaan Mohwala; second place,
Katie Maupin; third place, Alexandra Gorman
Grade 3, essay (O-Z)
First place, Maya Sanchez; second place,
Sharon Orellana; third place, Emiko Phillips
Grade 3, poetry
First place, Sophia Park; second place, Kiera
Aldridge; third place, Sofia Carcamo
Grade 4, essay
First place, Alexis Curry; second place, Con-
rad Marilla; third place, Lauren Fujii
Grade 4, poetry
First place, Jeramil Solorio; second place,
Caden Mallory; Pascal Nguyenn
Grade 5, essay
First place, Emma Aguada and Jenaly Car-
reno; second place, Maya Siegel; third place,
Soana Leanea
Grade 5, poetry
First place, Alan Lumos; second place Dora
Kocs-Meyers; third place, Brett Tsamasfuros
Grade 6, essay
First place, Asante Spencer; second place, Ikjot
Dhillon
Grade 6, poetry
First place, Shawn Cotton Jr.; second place,
Michael McVey; third place, Magdalena
Humphrey
Grade 7, essay
First place, Amy Zhang; second place, Ross
Klein; third place, Moriah Shih
Grade 7, poetry
First place, Shatoparba Banerjee; second
place, Jocelyn Lee; third place, Alyce Thorn-
hill
Grade 8, essay
First place, Elliot Biagini
Grade 8, poetry
First place, Eliana Grant; second place, Michael
Wang; third place, Marlena McVey
Grade 9, poetry
First place, Julia Rathmann-Bloch
Grade 10, essay
First place, Isseah Gutierrez
Grade 10, poetry
First place, Raymond Owens
Grade 11, poetry
First place, Adesia Cotton; second place, David
Rathmann-Bloch
Grade 12, poetry
First place, Andrew Grant
Contest winners
6
Tuesday • Jan. 21, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
Esther Andreini
July 1, 1927 – January 12, 2014
Resident of Redwood Shores, CA
Passed away in Redwood Shores on January 12, 2014.
Beloved wife of the late Paul Andreini. Sweet, cherished
mother of Adele (Rick) Freedman, Chris (Vicky) Andreini,
and Adrienne Louise. Proud, loving grandmother of
Stephanie Barbara Freedman, Anna Marie Andreini,
and Emma Rose Andreini. Loving daughter of the late Christos and Constance
Cavrikas. Dear sister of the late Spiro and Steve Cavrikas. Esther was a native of
San Francisco.
Family and friends are invited to attend a Memorial Service on Friday, January
24, 2014 at 11:00 a.m. at Sneider & Sullivan & O’Connell’s Funeral Home,
977 So. El Camino Real in San Mateo. Private inurnment.
Obituary
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www.lsalon.com
650-342-6668
223 S. San Mateo Dr. San Mateo
Betty Carey Schofield-Miller
Betty Carey Schofield-Miller, born in San Francisco Sept.
29, 1928, died Jan. 16, 2014.
Mother of five daughters, Katherine
McQuade, Anne (McQuade) Piol, Lynette
(McQuade) Gianni, Susan McQuade and
Sandra (Schofield) Taliva’a. Additionally
her sister Julie (Carey) Meedon, brother
Maurice Carey, brother-in-law Harry
Meedon, daughter-in-law Pam Hones,
son-in-law Larry Piol and Mike Gianni,
grandchildren Kevin (Breeann), Ryan,
Lauren (Jade), James, Ashley (Rose),
Kelly and Kaitlyn, and godchild Brittany Bickel. Also many
nieces, nephews, friends, particularly her side-kick Louise
Ribero. Including a soon-to-be great-grandchild.
Member of the San Bruno Senior Center; the Monday
bowling league at Brentwood Bowl; San Bruno Senior
Computer Club; the Golden Years Senior Club, and AARP.
“Mom, you are our shining ‘star, ’ and you always will be!”
Visitation is 4 p.m.-8 p.m., with remembrance services 7
p.m., Thursday, Jan. 23 at the Chapel of the Highlands, El
Camino Real at 194 Millwood Drive in Millbrae. Afuneral
mass is 10:30 a.m. Friday, Jan. 24 at St. Robert’ s Catholic
Church, 1380 Crystal Springs Road in San Bruno, immedi-
ately followed by a reception at the Basque Cultural Center
located at 599 Railroad Ave. in South San Francisco.
Patricia Alice Hobbs
Patricia Alice Hobbs died peacefully in her sleep at her
home in Foster City Nov. 27, 2013.
She is survived by her daughter Ann Hobbs. At Pat’s
request, no funeral services were held. Patricia was born
Aug. 8, 1934, and resided in Foster City for about 50 years.
Patricia’s husband Dean Hobbs died in 2006.
As a public service, the Daily Journal prints obituaries of
approximately 200 words or less with a photo one time on
the date of the family’s choosing. To submit obituaries,
email information along with a jpeg photo to news@smdai-
lyjournal.com. Free obituaries are edited for style, clarity,
length and grammar.
Obituaries
D
es i gn Tech Hi gh School,
a charter school in the San
Mateo Uni on School
Di stri ct, is now accepting applica-
tions for its founding class.
Applications are available online at
dtechhs.org and are due Feb. 28.
Design Tech High School is partner-
ing with the Hasso Plattner
Institute of Design at Stanford
Uni versi ty to redesign high school
to personalize education and make stu-
dents innovation ready.
Design Tech will open in August
with a founding class of 150 ninth-
graders.
***
Through Jan. 31, artwork by
College of San Mateo students in
painting classes will be on display at
Twin Pine Manor House, 10 Twin
Pines Lane in Belmont. This exhibi-
tion, the first for the studio art pro-
gram, was orchestrated by Rebecca
Al ex, full-time studio art faculty. The
exhibit displays a wide variety of gen-
res, with works from beginning artists
to advanced students. It includes every-
thing from still life and landscapes to
portraits and large gallery pieces, most
of which are available for sale.
It is open to the public noon-4 p.m.
Wednesdays through Sundays.
***
The Millbrae Chamber o f
Commerce has selected the
Millbrae Education Foundation
as the recipient of the Chamber
Excel l ence Award for 2 0 1 3, one of
four awards given yearly by the
Chamber of Commerce.
Board members will accept the award
at the 15t h Annual Millbrae
Excel l ence i n Busi ness Awards
Dinner on 5:30 p.m. Jan. 16 at the
El Rancho Inn & Suites in the
Palm Room.
According to the Millbrae Chamber
of Commerce, three other awards will
be made at the dinner: 2 0 1 3
Busi ness of the Year, Associ ated
Wi ndow Cl eani ng; 2013
Restaurant of the Year,
Leonardo’s Cafe and Deli; and
2013 Beauti ficati on Award,
Bronzini Dental Group.
For information about the event,
contact the Millbrae Chamber of
Commerce at 697-7324 or cham-
ber@millbrae.com.
Class notes is a column dedicated to school
news. It is compiled by education reporter
Angela Swartz. You can contact her at (650)
344-5200, ext. 105 or at angela@smdailyjour-
nal.com.
The Foster City Rotary Club recently issued dictionaries to all third-graders in the
Foster City school system.
LOCAL/STATE/NATION 7
Tuesday • Jan. 21, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Thursday January 23rd 10:00 am to 12:00 pm
Shari’s Café
2010 Rollingwood Drive
San Bruno, CA 94066
Thursday January 23rd 2:00 pm to 4:00 pm
United Irish Cultural Center
2700 45th Avenue
San Francisco, CA 94116
(Outer-Sunset District)
Tuesday February 4th 10:00 am to 12:00 pm
Zephyr Café
3643 Balboa Street
San Francisco, CA 94121
(Outer Richmond District San Francisco)
Tuesday February 4th 2:00 pm to 4:00 pm
Peninsula Jewish Community Center
800 Foster City Blvd.
Foster City, CA 94404
Conference Room A
(THIS EVENT/PROGRAM IS NOT SPONSORED BY THE PJCC)
Wednesday February 5th 10:00 am to 12:00 pm
Home Town Buffet
212 Greenhouse Marketplace
San Leandro, CA 94579
Wednesday February 5th 2:00 pm to 4:00 pm
City of Belmont Twin Pines Lodge
40 Twin Pines Lane
Belmont, CA 94002
Thursday February 6th 10:00 am to 12:00 pm
Millbrae Library – Room A
1 Library Lane
Millbrae, CA 94030
Thursday February 6th 2:00 pm to 4:00 pm
CyBelle’s Front Room Restaurant
1385 9th Avenue
San Francisco, CA 94122
(Sunset District)
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Dollar robbery suspect pleads not guilty
One of two San Mateo men accused of using a fake hand-
gun to rob an audio store clerk of $1 pleaded not guilty to
armed robbery and will stand trial in May.
Tyler Aaron Ehrman’s May 19 trial date
comes a month after the April trial of
codefendant Cameron Keyoun
Nickravesh.
Prosecutors allege Ehrman, 21, and
Nickravesh, 22, entered Tri Audio Sound
on North San Mateo Drive the evening of
Oct. 15 and pulled out a replica handgun.
They allegedly robbed the worker of the
single dollar in his wallet and fled in a
Toyota Camry onto Highway 101. Other
officers stopped the car traveling south
and reported finding the replica gun in the
vehicle during the arrest, according to the
District Attorney’s Office.
The pair’s cases were split when
Ehrman’s attorney expressed a doubt
about his mental competency but two
court-appointed doctors ultimately
agreed he was able to aid in his own
defense.
Ehrman is in custody on $100,000 and
a no-bail probation hold for a 2011 residential burglary
conviction. Nickravesh is free from custody on a $30,000
bail bond.
Drunk driver arrested
after trapping infant in vehicle
Awoman was arrested for driving under the influence after
she crashed her car trapping herself, a male passenger and a
16-month-old child on Bayfront Expressway and Chrysler
Drive on Friday night, according to the Menlo Park Police
Department.
The 26-year-old Redwood City driver collided with anoth-
er vehicle before 8:36 p.m. forcing the Menlo Park Fire
Department to rescue the woman and her two passengers
who were trapped in the vehicle, according to police.
The three were transferred to the hospital with serious, but
non-life threatening injuries and were later released from the
hospital. The occupants of the second vehicle were not
injured, according to police. The woman was booked into
county jail on numerous counts of driving under the influ-
ence, according to police.
Bicyclist struck by car suffers major head trauma
Abicyclist suffered major head trauma after colliding with
a car in Redwood City on Sunday afternoon, a California
Highway Patrol spokesman said.
CHP officers responded to the collision on El Camino
Real north of Fifth Avenue around 4:15 p.m., Officer Art
Montiel said.
The bicyclist was transported to Stanford Hospital for
major head trauma and the driver of a Honda was not injured,
according to Montiel.
A preliminary investigation showed the bicyclist might
have ridden off the sidewalk and into the front of the Honda,
he said.
The cause of the collision is under investigation, Montiel
said.
Anyone who witnessed the collision is asked to call CHP
Officer Yair Orona at (650) 369-6261.
Local briefs
Wildfire in suburban Los
Angeles 84 percent contained
GLENDORA— Crews continue to build containment lines
around a wildfire near Los Angeles that destroyed several
homes.
The U.S. Forest Service said Monday the fire in the San
Gabriel Mountains is 84 percent contained, with full con-
tainment expected Wednesday.
The roughly 3-square-mile blaze destroyed six homes and
10 outbuildings after erupting Thursday in the Angeles
National Forest. Flames spread quickly when Santa Ana
winds hit a campfire that authorities said was recklessly set
by three men.
Some 3,700 residents of Glendora and Azusa had to evac-
uate at the fire’s peak.
Officials caution that bone-dry winter conditions remain a
threat for the region.
Fireplace use banned in seven California counties
BAKERSFIELD — Air district officials have issued a ban
on fireplace use in seven California counties.
The Air Quality Management District says burning wood,
pellets and manufactured fire logs in residential fireplaces,
stoves and fire pits is prohibited until midnight Monday.
The counties included are San Joaquin, Stanislaus,
Madera, Fresno, Kings and Tulare. Portions of Kern County
are also included.
Officials say the ban results from deteriorating air quality
across the Central Valley.
Violations can result in fines.
Around the state
Tyler Ehrman
Cameron
Nickravesh
By Steve Peoples
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
MANCHESTER, N.H. — Dan Innis’
husband persuaded him to run for the
U.S. House.
It didn’t matter that Innis, a former
business school dean, faced an aggres-
sive Democratic incumbent, GOP col-
leagues who oppose his right to marry,
and history — no Republican ever has
been openly gay when first elected to
Congress.
“He said, ‘You’ve got to do this,”’
recalls Innis, running in the first
Congressional District, which covers
most of eastern New Hampshire. “He
said, ‘You need to take this opportunity
and see if you can make a difference.”’
Innis plays down his sexuality as a
campaign issue, but acknowledges the
historic undertones. He is among three
openly gay Republicans nationwide
expected to run in this year’s midterm
elections. None has an easy path to
Washington.
Each ultimately must unseat a
Democratic incumbent, overcome
brushes with hate and confront passion-
ate divisions within the GOP about the
way they live their lives. The
Republican Party is trying to soften its
tone on divisive social issues, but many
religious conservatives see homosexu-
ality as immoral.
Innis is married to a man, as is former
state Sen. Richard Tisei, R-Mass., who
is expected to run again for the north-
eastern Massachusetts congressional
seat he narrowly lost in 2012 to
Democratic Rep. John Tierney.
In San Diego, former Republican city
councilman Carl DeMaio is challenging
first-term Democratic Rep. Scott Peters.
“You can’t focus on any of the nasty
comments or attacks — not just from far
right, also from far left,” DeMaio says.
During his unsuccessful 2012
Republican mayoral campaign, DeMaio
and his male partner of six years were
booed as they walked hand in hand in
San Diego’s gay pride parade.
“Every once in a while we’ll get some
hate that is truly over the top — a truly
venomous voice mail message. Every
time we need a lift-me-up, we play it and
chuckle,” DeMaio says. “It’s just a
reminder that what we’re fighting for
matters.”
He is fighting his own party, too.
Gay Republicans face long
odds in House campaigns
WORLD 8
Tuesday • Jan. 21, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Taxi
By Ali Akbar Dareni
and John-Thor Dahlburg
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
TEHRAN, Iran — Iran unplugged
banks of centrifuges involved in
its most sensitive uranium enrich-
ment work on Monday, prompting
the United States and European
Union to partially lift economic
sanctions as a landmark deal aimed
at easing concerns over Iran’s
nuclear program went into effect.
The mutual actions — curbing
atomic work in exchange for some
sanctions relief — start a six-
month clock for Tehran and the
world powers to negotiate a final
accord that the Obama administra-
tion and its European allies say
will be intended to ensure Iran can-
not build a nuclear weapon.
In the meantime, the interim
deal puts limits on Iran’s program
— though it continues low levels
of uranium enrichment. Tehran
denies its nuclear program is
intended to produce a bomb.
The payoff to Iran is an injec-
tion of billions of dollars into its
crippled economy over the next
six months from the suspension
of some sanctions — though other
sanctions remain in place.
In part a reflection of a thaw
between Washington and Tehran,
the moves coincidentally occurred
on the 33rd anniversary of the end
of the Iran hostage crisis. The
holding of 52 Americans for 444
days by radical Iranian students
that ended Jan. 20, 1981 was fol-
lowed by more than three decades
of U.S.-Iranian enmity that only
began to ease last year with signs
that Iran was ready to meet U.S.
demands and scale back its nuclear
activities.
British Foreign Secretary
William Hague called the deal “an
important milestone” — but not
the ultimate goal.
“It’s important that other sanc-
tions are maintained and the pres-
sure is maintained for a compre-
hensive and final settlement on the
Iranian nuclear issue,” Hague said.
The Europeans are aiming to
start negotiations on a final deal
in February, though no date or
venue has been agreed on yet.
Iranian Foreign Minister
Mohammad Javad Zarif said
Saturday that Tehran is ready to
enter talks as soon as the interim
deal goes into force.
Iran, U.S., Europe start implementing nuclear deal
Comet-chasing probe
wakes up, signals Earth
BERLIN — Waking up after
almost three years of hibernation, a
comet-chasing spacecraft sent its
first signal back to Earth on
Monday, prompting cheers from
scientists who hope to use it to land
the first space lander onto a comet.
The European Space Agency
received the all-clear message from
its Rosetta spacecraft at 7:18 p.m.
(1:18 p.m. EST) — a message that
had to travel some 500 million
miles.
In keeping with the agency’s
effort to turn the tense wait for a
signal into a social media event,
the probe triggered a series of
“Hello World!” tweets in different
languages.
Around the world
By Matthew Lee
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — The United
States on Monday welcomed
U.N. chief Ban Ki-moon’s deci-
sion to rescind his invitation to
Iran to attend an international
conference on Syria this week,
saying it hoped the move would
refocus attention on the goals of
the meeting.
“We are hopeful that, in the
wake of today’s announcement,
all parties can now return to
focus on the task at hand, which
is bringing an end to the suffer-
ing of the Syrian people and
beginning a process toward a
long overdue political transi-
tion,” State Department spokes-
woman Jen Psaki said in a state-
ment. The statement was
released shortly after the U.N.
announced that Ban had with-
drawn the invitation that he had
issued to Iran on Sunday and the
main western-backed Syrian
opposition group dropped its
threat to boycott the confer-
ence, known as Geneva II.
Secretary of State John Kerry
is to attend the conference,
which is actually being held in
the Swiss town of Montreux,
on Wednesday.
U.S. officials said earlier
Monday that they expected the
United Nations would reevaluate
the invitation and rescind it
unless Iran fully and publicly
endorsed the aim of the meeting,
which is to begin to prepare a
transitional government for
Syria that would pave the way for
democratic elections there. That
goal was outlined in 2012 in the
so-called “Geneva Communique,”
to which the U.S. and others said
all conference participants must
embrace. Iran had refused to do
so, although the U.N. said Ban
had received assurances from
Tehran that it would.
Public statements from Iran
after Ban issued the invitation
fell “well short” of what was
required, the U.S. officials said.
The officials restated U.S. com-
plaints about Iran’s role in
Syria’s civil war, including arm-
ing Assad’s forces and sending
fighters to assist his side.
U.S. hails withdrawal of Iran invite to Syria meet
“We are hopeful that, in the wake of today’s announcement, all parties can now
return to focus on the task at hand, which is bringing an end to the suffering of the
Syrian people and beginning a process toward a long overdue political transition.”
— State Department spokeswoman Jen Psaki
REUTERS
Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif speaks during a joint
news conference .
OPINION 9
Tuesday • Jan. 21, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Letters to the editor
Dimitre’s thoughts on droughts
Editor,
In her column in the Jan. 15 issue of the
Daily Journal titled “Thoughts on
droughts,” Dorothy Dimitre displays her
usual condescension to religious people,
and Catholics in particular.
After writing about the present drought,
Ms. Dimitre segues into a criticism of
Bishop Jaime Soto of Sacramento and the
other Catholic bishops of California for
asking “people of all faiths to join in
prayers for rain.” For Ms. Dimitre, those
who would join the Bishop are “they,” cer-
tainly not enlightened people like the
columnist. “What is so disconcerting (to
throw into confusion) is that they think
they are holy and actually believe that
there is some accommodating spirit up
there listening.” Her atheism or agnosti-
cism appear to be believed without any
sense of respect for the belief of others
(they!).
Bishops, per Ms. Dimitre, should be
seen for what they are — “pious religions
icons who hide behind their cloistered
existence.” One might think of such clois-
tered bishops as the heroic anti-communist
bishops Joseph Mindszenty of Hungary or
Aloysius Stepinac of Croatia. Nearer in
time, bishops like Pope John Paul I, Pope
Francis, Archbishop Timothy Dolan of
New York come to mind. “Cloistered?” I
think not. Living “in their own fantasy
world” — let fair-minded people judge. As
for Mrs. Dimitre’s dismissal of prayer,
those who believe in the efficacy of prayer
might remember Alfred Lord Tennyson’s
often repeated comment, “More things are
wrought (done) by prayer than this world
dreams of.”
Gordon M. Seely
Belmont
Electricity
Editor,
Using less electricity is a great goal for
us. I am referring to your op-ed “Americans
are using less electricity” (in the Jan. 9 edi-
tion of the Daily Journal).
I am just wondering if your readers know
that their electricity bill will continue to
go higher and higher even if they would use
very little of the precious stuff? Indeed, for
years now, our electricity bills show differ-
ent charges for a bunch of services that
Pacific gas and Electric provides. Most
important is the separation of distribution
and cost of producing the energy. It’s a
grand scheme of bean counters and politi-
cians to be able to keep jacking up the
price for your service. See, the fact that
energy itself would cost very little to gen-
erate is not where the fees and charges are
levied. Check your electricity bill.
Assume that PG&E will find and get the
government to agree on many additional
fees and charges slowly but surely, one
inch — or should I say one dollar — at a
time, very much like the small-change
charges that appear on your monthly
mobile phone bill. Soon, you won’t be
able to opt out from all those services and
charges, just like your property taxes even
if you would produce all your electricity
from your gloriously expensive rooftop
solar panels.
Remember, when people make a living
out of a scheme (Ponzi or otherwise), no
matter how bad it is, it is impossible to
kill it off. Case in point: the dodo high-
speed train project to nowhere.
Harry Roussard
Foster City
7-Eleven
Editor,
This 7-Eleven debacle, “Judge rules in
city’s favor for 7-Eleven” in the Jan. 18
edition of the Daily Journal, is right up
there with “The Attack of the Killer
Tomatoes,” “The Toxic Avenger” and “The
Milpitas Monster.” I wouldn’t miss the
movie version for anything!
Cole G. Canafax
Redwood City
It’s still a hoax!
Editor,
Bouquets to Irv Chase and his excellent
letters. I thoroughly concur. There should
be more Americans like this.
James G.B. DeMartini Jr.
Foster City
Misrepresented statements
Editor,
Scott Abramson never wastes an opportu-
nity to trash our duly elected President
Barack Obama. And if necessary, he will
gleefully cook up a reason for an attack
(“Presidential ‘misstatements’” in the Jan.
11 issue of the Daily Journal).
Here he goes after Obama for having stat-
ed that al-Qaida is decimated and on the run.
That didn’t mean that they weren’t able to
fight back, fiercely, and with fresh recruits
drawn from a cesspool of Islamists who
hate us, and each other, for various rea-
sons.
Instead, he should go after George W.
Bush, the one responsible for the Iraq deba-
cle in the first place, the president that lied
us into a totally unnecessary, insane and
devastating war, which Obama was able to
get us out of, against Republican opposi-
tion. Despite how utterly despicable dicta-
tor Sadam Hussein was, at least he kept al-
Qaida out of Iraq, as well as archenemy Iran
in check. After all, there was a semblance
of power balance in the region back then,
which Bush had to upset, with no under-
standing of the consequences, nor any
regard for the loss of life on both sides, or
the enormous unpaid cost. This was never
Obama’s war. He inherited this Republican
fiasco and had to deal with it the best he
could. I’m not sure anyone could have done
better. We should not forget that Bush was
responsible for the Iraq war and the
Afghanistan war as well.
Oh, yes, according to President Obama,
we could keep our old health plans, provid-
ed they were good enough and up to the
new standards. If you had no health plan, or
just flimsy coverage, obviously, you could-
n’t keep it! Kind of obvious, no?
Jorg Aadahl
San Mateo
Affordable Care
Act protects rich and poor
Editor,
Reading newspapers about the Obamacare
controversy raging throughout the country
during these past three months has left
many Americans suffering from a case of
vertigo. It is as if we are all passengers
within the confines of a tempest-tossed
ship.
The president’s enemies dubbed the ACA
“Obamacare” as a way to remind bigots of
the huge legacy coming from a black presi-
dent. From the time he arrived in the
Senate, the personal attacks directed
against him have been relentless and uglier
than those against any other president
since Lincoln.
In the past, the “loyal opposition,”
whether led by Democrats or Republicans,
was usually conducted as constructive, not
a destructive response. Social Security and
minimum wage legislations that preceded
the ACAalso divided the nation along
socio-economic lines.
The history of Social Security and mini-
mum wage laws shows that both had to
undergo several amendments over time and
continue to be fine-tuned to this day. But,
the ACAhas been under intense siege from
day one.
Despite all of the unforeseen problems of
the ACA, one thing is indisputable: mil-
lions previously denied health insurance
due to pre-existing conditions are now pro-
tected whether they are rich or poor.
So far the only problem comes from
affluent persons whose policies were can-
celled because they refused to pay the pre-
mium demanded by their insurance
providers to continue providing the same
benefits. The affluent have no problem find-
ing another insurance company, with or
without ACA.
Yes, the ACAcomforts the afflicted and
afflicts the comfortable.
Guy M. Guerrero
Burlingame
Running
in circles
W
hen it comes to animal behavior,
I apparently know Jack. After
failing a newsroom query about
why dogs scratch at the ground after using
it as their personal toilet — scent glands in
their paws further mark the territory,
according to our paper’s Pet Tip contributor
— I threw out one of my own. Why do dogs
insist on turning in a circle several times
before lying
down?
They instinctu-
ally want to tamp
down the grass, I
theorized. In
“Little House on
the Prairie” the
dog, Jack, always
circled three times
before settling in
underneath the
wagon. By the
way, I added, that
little guy must
have always been
tired. He never got to actually ride in the
wagon and had to run. Then there was that
time he went missing trying to cross the
river because Pa refused Laura’s request to
help him out. Where was prairie PETAwhen
you need them?
My editor looked at me like I was weird,
which is not an uncommon reaction. Guess
boyhood tastes didn’t quite run to books
about churning butter and never showing
one’s ears. But he fired off a missive to test
my hypothesis. Per our Pet Tipper, experts
haven’t studied the circling extensively but
say essentially the same thing as me about
this “nesting” action.
Ha! I was brilliant and obviously every-
thing I need to know I learned from Laura
Ingalls Wilder.
Actually, that’s not exactly true. I’m sure
the bulk of the reading, writing and arith-
metic in my head came from text books,
teachers and the application of number two
pencil to lined binder paper. Although, to
be fair, the Little House series did send the
unspoken message that school was impor-
tant — more a privilege than a right, really,
as those who lived too far from town or
went blind like Mary can attest to — and
that you should never let Nellie Oleson get
the upper hand.
By the way, I’m talking about the series
of books here, not the Michael Landon and
Melissa Gilbert TVshow. My childhood
copies of the yellow-bound paperbacks
ended up with dog-eared pages and creased
spines as I read and reread romanticized
tales about corn cakes and a coat with swan-
skin hood, hay twisted into makeshift logs
when wood and coal ran out, using a pig
bladder as a toy and barefoot summers when
shoes were oiled and put away. This knowl-
edge came to great use for that fifth-grade
school project requiring me to build a cov-
ered wagon out of a cardboard box, com-
plete with all the prairie necessities like
cattle yoke and a frying pan. With years
separating the current me with my younger
Wilder fandom, the details of the stories
have grown hazy. Why exactly was Mary
blind? How long did Pa stay trapped under
the snow bank in that one book?
Yet somewhere in the recesses of my
brain, that gem about Jack’s sleeping pat-
terns stuck. I barely remember the capitals
of some countries, the four years of high
school French are long gone and I couldn’t
pencil out a calculus equation if my life
depended on it. But ask me about Jack the
dog and somehow I’m a history genius.
And, like all good pieces of random facts,
that bit seemed completely useless until it
wasn’t. That wisdom and a few bucks might
get me nothing but a cup of coffee. Then
again, in terms of odd trivia there’s nothing
wrong with being a Jack of all trades.
Michelle Durand’s column “Off the Beat” runs
every Tuesday and Thursday. She can be
reached by email: michelle@smdailyjour-
nal.com or by phone (650) 344-5200 ext.
102. What do you think of this column? Send
a letter to the editor: letters@smdailyjour-
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BUSINESS 10
Tuesday • Jan. 21, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
PALO ALTO — An increasing
number of electric-vehicle driving
employees at Silicon Valley com-
panies are finding it hard to access
car-charging stations at work, cre-
ating incidents of “charge rage”
among drivers.
Installation of electric vehicle
charging ports at some companies
has not kept pace with soaring
demand, creating thorny etiquette
issues in the workplace.Peter
Graf, chief sustainability officer
for German software company
SAP, says the company’s 16
charging stations are now not
nearly enough for the 61 employ-
ees who drive electric vehicles.
Graf says cars are getting
unplugged while charging, creat-
ing animosity between employ-
ees. A charge can take as little as
30 minutes.
“Cars are getting unplugged
while they are actively charging,
and that’s a problem,” Graf told
the newspaper. “Employees are
calling and messaging each other,
saying, ‘I see you’re fully charged,
can you please move your car?”’
The company is drafting guide-
lines for EV-driving employees.
ChargePoint, which operates a
large EV-charging network, says
companies should provide one
charging port for every two of
their employees’ electric vehicles.
Companies everywhere will
probably begin facing similar
problems.
Pacific Gas & Electric Co.
expects 800,000 electric vehicles
to be on state roads by 2020 —
there are only 20,000 now — cre-
ating a high demand for charging
stations. Currently, there are
about 5,000 public and workplace
charging stations in California
and 20,000 nationwide.
“Having two chargers and 20
electric cars is worse than having
no chargers and 20 electric cars. If
you are going to do this, you have
to be willing to continue to scale
it,” said Pat Romano, CEO of
ChargePoint.
Adding chargers can be expen-
sive, especially at sites where
companies are leasing space and
don’t want to invest in permanent
charging infrastructure.
Some Valley companies have
already taken steps toward allevi-
ating charge rage in the work-
place.
About 10 percent of Infoblox’s
260 employees have electric vehi-
cles, with only six charging sta-
tions.
So, the company set up an EV
user distribution list and a shared
calendar for booking time at the
charging stations.
“You can only book for a two-
hour window. But Rule No. 1 is:
No one touches anyone else’s car
without permission,” said David
Gee, the company’s executive vice
president of marketing.
Silicon Valley sees shortage of
electric vehicle charge stations
Currently, there are about 5,000 public and workplace charging stations in California and 20,000 nationwide.
By John Heilprin
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
DAVOS, Switzerland — Talks
over the future of Syria and Iran
will occur on the sidelines of the
annual gathering for political and
financial elites in the Swiss ski
resort of Davos, the founder of the
World Economic Forum said
Monday.
Klaus Schwab said in an inter-
view with the Associated Press
that there will be crossover
between the forum’s 2,500 partic-
ipants and the more than 30 for-
eign ministers attending the start
of the Syria peace conference sev-
eral hours away in Montreux,
Switzerland.
Syria’s main, Western-backed
opposition group threatened
Monday to sit out this week’s
peace conference that is trying to
end the country’s devastating civil
war. But the head of the opposi-
tion has confirmed his attendance
in Davos.
“Here you have some of the true
leaders with the influence on the
region, so I am sure the results
will have an impact on our own
discussions,” said Schwab, a
German-born economist and engi-
neer who founded the Davos forum
in 1971. Since then, the five-day
gathering, which attracts heads of
state, royalty and top executives,
has grown into a massive net-
working event — what some con-
sider speed-dating for the political
and corporate elites.
Iranian leaders will also be pres-
ent at Davos just as some interna-
tional sanctions on their country
are lifted after they agreed to limit
the national nuclear program.
But Schwab said it would be too
early for Iranian President Hassan
Rouhani and his foreign minister,
Javad Zarif, to start negotiating
new investments while at the
forum. First, they need to boost
international trust that Iran will
respect the terms of their nuclear
deal.
“We have to create the reality
which allows confidence between
the different parties, and only in
the next phase you can really talk
about business,” Schwab said of
the Iranians’ prospects for new
oil, gas and other business deals.
Iran’s participation in the Syrian
peace talks is complicating the
prospects for those discussions.
Ahmad Ramadan, a senior member
of the Syrian National Coalition,
said the opposition group is “sus-
pending” its participation because
of the invitation to Iran.
Discussions on the Israeli-
Palestinian conflict are also
expected at the Davos forum, with
Israel’s Prime Minister Benjamin
Netanyahu, President Shimon
Peres and Justice Minister Tzipi
Livni all attending. The flagging
Mideast peace process is a priority
for U.S. Secretary of State John
Kerry, who is expected in Davos
for most of the event, which lasts
through Saturday.
Other pressing topics that will
likely be touched upon, Schwab
said, include climate change,
unemployment and the disparity
between the rich and poor that
could lead to a “lost generation” of
youth and social unrest.
Davos forum founder sees Syria, Iran in spotlight
By Michael Melia
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
HARTFORD, Conn. — Worried
about the groom getting cold feet?
There’s an insurance policy for
that.
With the cost of the average
American wedding reaching about
$26,000, insurers have been sell-
ing a growing number of policies
to protect against losses from
extreme weather, illness and, in
one firm’s case, even a sudden
change of heart.
Cheryl Winter spent $500 for
Hartford-based Travelers Cos. Inc.
to cover her daughter’s $50,000
destination wedding last October
in New Orleans, where her biggest
concern was a potential hurricane.
The weather cooperated, but the
limousine never showed up. Her
daughter took a taxi cab to the
church, and they used the insurance
policy to claim the deposit money
they couldn’t get back from the
limo driver.
“No one wants to be walking in
the French Quarter in a long gown
and high heels,” said Winter, who
lives in the Houston area.
The insurance is offered by a
small number of U.S. companies.
Insurers declined to provide data on
the number of customers beyond
saying they are growing steadily.
It can cover losses from issues
ranging from bankrupt wedding
halls to cancelations forced by
unexpected military deployments.
Travelers says issues with vendors
account for about a quarter of the
claims, with most of those related
to issues with photographers or
videographers.
For Travelers, an insurance giant
with annual revenue of $26 bil-
lion, the policies will not make or
break the bottom line. But the wed-
ding insurance it began selling in
2007 is also a way to connect with
a couple who might later think of
the company for home insurance
and other life milestones.
“It could be the beginning of a
relationship with a young couple,”
said Ed Charlebois, a Travelers
vice president for personal insur-
ance.
Wedsafe, backed by Aon, also
offers wedding insurance, which
differs little from the specialty
insurance that firms may offer for
other kinds of events and celebra-
tions.
Wedding insurance expands as
average nuptials reach $26,000
By Josh Funk
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
OMAHA, Neb. — An explosion
Monday morning that brought
down part of an animal feed pro-
cessing plant in Omaha left at
least two people dead and 10 oth-
ers seriously hurt, authorities said.
It was unclear if the death toll
would rise as crews continued sift-
ing through the rubble of the
International Nutrition plant.
Interim Omaha Fire Chief Bernie
Kanger said the search was pro-
gressing slowly because the struc-
ture is unsafe.
Kanger wouldn’t provide an
exact figure for the number of dead,
but Douglas County Attorney Don
Kleine said Monday afternoon that
two deaths had been confirmed.
Thirty-eight people were work-
ing at the plant when the blast
happened. In addition to the two
people who died and 10 who were
hospitalized, seven people were
hurt but refused treatment.
Officials have not said how many
of the 19 others escaped.
“We haven’t cleared the building
yet because of the significant risk
to our people,” Kanger said.
He said that he didn’t believe
anyone who was still in the build-
ing Monday afternoon was alive.
A team of urban search-and-res-
cue experts arrived from Lincoln
to help with the search.
Authorities don’t know what
caused the blast, but Kanger noted
that there were no hazardous chem-
icals at the plant.
Two deaths confirmed in
Omaha plant explosion
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
It’s safe to say that Michael Costello’s
senior season did not begin the way he
envisioned it.
Avarsity player since his sophomore year
at Carlmont, last season was Costello’s
breakout year. In a season when he emerged
as one of the best scorers in the Peninsula
Athletic League, Costello was the driving
force behind a solid Central Coast Section
run by the Scots and thus, his senior season
was full of optimism before it began.
But a wrist injury to start camp and then a
torn ligament in his ankle had Costello sup-
porting his team from the sideline and not
on the court where his double-digit scoring
and defending was sorely missed by a very
young and inexperienced Carlmont team.
“It really stung,” said Carlmont first-year
head coach Patrick Smith, who’s known
Costello since his freshman year when he
met him during a P.E. class. “I just know the
type of kid he is, not only on the basketball
court but in general as a student. Going into
this year, you thought he’d be able to build
off of [his junior year] and have his time to
shine as a senior. But he had the two injuries
... I could just tell how disappointing it was
for him.”
But after doing his time building himself
up physically and mentally as a more vocal
leader for the Scots, Costello returned to the
floor where he belongs last week in leading
a now more dangerous Carlmont team to a 1-
1 record.
The numbers weren’t phenomenal — 15
points in a win against San Mateo and 11
against Menlo-Atherton. If anything, they
were solid Costello-esque games. But
Costello brought back much more than just
his scoring touch and outside shooting to
the Scots. As the PAL season really starts
heating up, he’s brought back a belief and
confidence to a team with just one player
with any kind of varsity experience on the
<<< Page 13, Pacers too strong
for the Warriors in Oakland
Tuesday, Jan. 21, 2014
HONOR ROLL: A COUPLE OF MENLO KNIGHTS REACH THE SCHOOL RECORD BOOKS >> PAGE 12
By Janie McCauley
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SANTA CLARA — NaVorro Bowman
tore the anterior cruciate and medial col-
lateral ligaments in his left knee when he
went down during Sunday’s NFC champi-
onship loss at Seattle, a person with
direct knowledge of the injury said
Monday.
The person said that Bowman would
have surgery for the ACL tear but that the
MCL is likely to heal with rest and he is
expected to be ready for the 2014 season.
“It’s not as bad as feared,” the person
said, speaking on condition of anonymi-
ty to The Associated Press because the
team hadn’t made an announcement
regarding the results of tests on
Bowman’s knee.
Coach Jim Harbaugh said after Sunday’s
23-17 season-ending loss to the
Seahawks that Bowman was believed to
have torn his ACL, and Harbaugh wasn’t
to address the media again until Tuesday.
W
ell, it appears the rumors are true
regarding the Woodside coach-
ing change. Both the San
Francisco Chronicle and San Jose Mercury
News reported this weekend that former
coach Doug Fountain, along with a junior
varsity coach, were
both fired for a hazing
incident against two
players while the team
was participating in
the Orestimba tourna-
ment in the Central
Valley during the win-
ter break.
Both coaches were
allegedly involved in
the incident and, at the
very least, did nothing
to stop it.
I heard the rumors
shortly after it became apparent something
was going on at Woodside. Acouple of
assistant coaches from two different pro-
grams in the Peninsula Athletic League told
me what the rumors were and a third head
coach from a different program told me he
saw video of the alleged assault.
The story allegedly goes something like
this: two players were grabbed by their
Emotional and physical recovery
Looks like
the rumors
are correct
Costello’s return gives Scots a big boost
See 49ERS, Page 16
ATHLETE OF THE WEEK
See LOUNGE, Page 14
By Oskar Garcia
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
HONOLULU — Deion Sanders is giving
Jerry Rice one concession as Pro Bowl week
begins: The record-setting wide receiver will
call the coin toss Tuesday
that starts the process of
picking teams.
Besides that, the Hall
of Fame cornerback
claims he has the upper
hand under the game’s
new schoolyard-style
format.
“I think it is going to
be a blowout,” Sanders
said. “I don’t think Jerry
has strategized.”
Rice’s response: “That’s not going to
happen. I have a pretty good mindset of
where I want to go.”
The Rice-Sanders rivalry is just one of
Rice, Sanders try
to rekindle Pro
Bowl interest
See PRO, Page 14
See ATHLETE, Page 16
Jerry Rice
SPORTS 12
Tuesday • Jan. 21, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Paul Larson
MILLBRAE –
Have you ever been
entrusted to make
final arrangements
for a funeral?
Those of you
who’ve had this
experience know
that important decisions are required and
must be made in a timely manner. The next
of kin is many times required to search for
information about the deceased which may
not be easily accessible, and must answer
questions without the time to think things
out. Even though your Funeral Director is
trained to guide you every step of the way, it
is still best for you to be prepared with the
proper information if the need should arise.
Ask your Funeral Director what info is
needed before you meet with him/her.
Making funeral arrangements can be very
simple, or can become difficult at times if
you are not prepared. A good Funeral
Director is experienced in leading you with
the necessary requirements, and will offer
details that you may not have thought about
or previously considered as an option.
Allowing him/her to guide you will make
the arrangements go by quickly and easily.
A number of items should be considered
in preparation for the future:
1. Talk to your loved ones about the
inevitable. Give them an indication on what
your wishes are regarding the type of funeral
you want, burial or cremation, etc., and ask
them their feelings about plans for their own
funeral. This is only conversation, but it is
an important topic which will help break the
ice and prevent any type of confusion when
the time comes.
2. Talk to your Funeral Director. Write
down a list of questions and make a phone
call to your Funeral Director asking how to
be prepared. He/she will gladly provide
detailed information and can mail this
information to you for your reference.
Asking questions doesn’t cost anything and
will help you with being organized.
3. Make an appointment and Pre-plan a
Funeral. Many more people are following
through with this step by making Pre-Need
Arrangements. Completing arrangements
ahead of time makes this process more
relaxed, and putting these details behind you
will take a weight off your shoulders. Your
wishes will be finalized and kept on file at
the Mortuary. Your Funeral Director will
even help you set aside funding now as to
cover costs at the time of death. Families
who meet with us at the CHAPEL OF THE
HIGHLANDS are grateful for the chance to
make Pre-Need Arrangements. With their
final details in place it helps to make matters
more calming for surviving loved-ones.
4. Enjoy Life. There are those who dwell
on situations that can’t be controlled.
Taking time to stop and look around at
beauty in the world and appreciate good
things can be therapeutic. If you need to use
a negative statement, try re-wording it into a
positive. Change “I had a lousy day today”
into “Today was demanding, but it made me
appreciate my better days.” As the song
goes: “Accentuate the positive; Eliminate
the negative; Latch on to the affirmative.”
If you ever wish to discuss cremation,
funeral matters or want to make pre-
planning arrangements please feel free to
call me and my staff at the CHAPEL OF
THE HIGHLANDS in Millbrae at (650)
588-5116 and we will be happy to guide you
in a fair and helpful manner. For more info
you may also visit us on the internet at:
www.chapelofthehighlands.com.
Accentuating The Positive
Can Eliminate The Negative
ADVERTISEMENT
No. 19 California
defeats Arizona 79-64
TUCSON, Ariz.— Brittany Boyd
and Reshanda Gray did it all for No.
19 California, scoring 24 and 20
respectively, as the Golden Bears
beat Arizona 79-64 on Monday.
Gray grabbed 12 rebounds and
Boyd pulled down five more, had
seven assists and four steals for
California (13-4, 5-1 Pac-12).
Boyd entered the game ranked sec-
ond in the nation in steals.
Boyd was just 4-of-14 shooting,
but made 15 of her 17 free throw
attempts, while Gray made 7 of 9
field goals for the Golden Bears.
Afure Jemerigbe helped to extend
Arizona’s defense by making 2 of
3 shots from beyond the arc and
finished with eight points.
Arizona (4-13, 0-6) got 16
points apiece from LaBrittney
Jones, Carissa Crutchfield and
Erica Barnes. Crutchfield made
three 3-pointers, Jones made all
eight of her free throws and Barnes
was 8 of 10 from the floor.
Isner, Querrey, Bryans
on U.S. Davis Cup roster
SAN DIEGO — Despite an early
exit at the Australian Open because
of an injured right ankle, John
Isner is on the U.S. roster for its
first-round matches against
Wimbledon champion Andy
Murray and Britain.
Isner, who is ranked 13th, quit
after dropping the first two sets of
his opening match at the
Australian Open last week.
Joining him on the American
roster announced Monday by U.S.
captain Jim Courier are Sam
Querrey and the doubles team of
twins Bob and Mike Bryan.
Sports Briefs
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
Don’t look now, but the track
and field season isn’t too far away.
And it looks like Menlo’s
Maddy Price is rounding that last
corner and leading the early charge
already.
Price, the reigning Daily
Journal Female Athlete of the Year,
finished in the top three in three
events, including a record-setting
win in the 400-meter race of the
Great Southwest Track and Field
Indoor Classic on Saturday in
Albuquerque, N.M.
With her time of 55.97 seconds,
Price eclipsed the 400 previous-
best of 57.63 set by Payton Miller
last year.
About an hour earlier, Price —
despite being a newcomer to the
event — won her 60-meter heat
and took third overall with a time
of 7.81.
“Running the 60 meters was a
whole new experience for me, but
it was very fun,” Price said via
school press release.
Price had about a half-hour rest
before her next race. She then
went and placed second in the 200
in 25.23 behind only Ky
Westbrook, last year’s Youth
Worlds champion in the 100 and
winner of the 2014 60-meter
event.
“It was so awesome to get to run
my first indoor meet at such an
amazing track, and be able to have
solid performances to open the
season,” Price said after the 200.
“I have been training really hard
this fall, and I can’t wait to
improve on the performances in
upcoming meets.”
Elsewhere in the county, other
players were accomplishing
things you only see in YouTube
videos.
Chief among those is a fresh-
man out of Hillsdale High School,
Valerie Chiang. The defender start-
ed her Honor Roll worthy after-
noon against Sequoia by assisting
on a lovely ball from her back line
to Kayla Coleman for the second
of three Knights goals.
Minutes later, and after coming
really close on a previous attempt,
Chiang pulled off the Olympico
Goal when she swung in a corner
kick with her left foot straight
into the Sequoia net — definitely
a front-runner for the Goal of the
Year.
Major props also go out to Mills
defender-turned-forward April
French. In just a couple of days
into her new role on the Vikings
soccer team, French had a foot in
both Mills goals during a victory
over Ocean Division rival El
Camino.
In the Bay Division, Alyssa
Fagel and Lauren Racioppe of
Carlmont girls’ soccer proved the
Scots are in the right hands this
season. The pair of goalkeepers
came up big as the Scots ended
Woodside’s 31-game unbeaten
streak with a 1-0 victory. Fagel
played the first half and finished
with five saves. Racioppe came on
in the second half and finished
with nine stops — including sev-
eral from point-blank range.
Sacred Heart Prep’s Tierna
Davidson had a five-goal week for
the Gators to help in victories
against Monta Vista and Woodside
Priory.
Over on the boys’ side of the
SHP pitch, it was a productive
week for Issac Polkinhorne, who
had a three-goal week for the
Gators.
On the hardwood, Anisah Smith
of Carlmont continued her big sea-
son for the Scots. In two victo-
ries, Smith averaged over 22
points per game.
Still in the PAL, Julia Gibbs of
Mills basketball led the Vikings
to a 45-30 win over Menlo-
Atherton Wednesday, pouring in
21 points. She then added 19
points in a Monday loss to
Hercules. Gibbs is only a sopho-
more.
In the West Bay Athletic League,
Hannah Paye is now in the record
books. Paye set a new Menlo
record by burying seven 3-point-
ers in the Knights’ last-second 48-
45 win over Mercy-SF Friday.
Paye finished with 25 points.
Her WBAL-Valparaiso rival,
Meaghan Holland averaged nearly
17 points per game last week in a
pair of SHP wins.
In boys’ basketball, Danny
Mahoney of Serra basketball was
the Padres’ leading scorer in a pair
of games last week. He scored 15
in a 50-41 loss to Mitty last
Tuesday and then duplicated that
number in a 56-44 win over
Bellarmine Saturday.
Corbin Koch of Sacred Heart
Prep is in midseason form. He
scored 11, 17 and 20 points in
three SHP victories last week —
for an average of 16 a game.
In the PAL, Brian Houle of
Hillsdale basketball exploded for
24 points in a 50-45 OT loss to
Sequoia Wednesday. He came back
with 22 in a 59-41 win over
Capuchino.
Honor Roll takes early look at track
MENLO ATHLETICS
Maddy Price competes in one of three races last Saturday in New Mexico.
SPORTS 13
Tuesday • Jan. 21, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Pacers too strong for Dubs
Sharks put Flames out
By Josh Dubow
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN JOSE — Joe Pavelski scored two
goals to move into a tie for the second most
in the NHL this season and the San Jose
Sharks beat the Calgary Flames 3-2 on
Monday night.
Pavelski scored on a deflection in the first
period and on the power play in the second
to give him five goals in his past two games
and 18 in the past 20 to tie Anaheim’s Corey
Perry with 27 on the season. Only
Washington’s Alex Ovechkin has more this
season with 35.
Tommy Wingels also scored and Antti
Niemi made 21 saves for the Sharks, who
returned home from a perfect three-game
road trip with a win over struggling Calgary
to open a pre-Olympic stretch of eight
games out of 10 at home.
Jiri Hudler and Kevin Westgarth scored for
the Flames, who have lost four straight
games and 11 of 13. Karri Ramo made 24
saves.
Pavelski followed up his first career hat
trick on Saturday in Tampa Bay with his
third multi-goal game in his past six games
as he thrives on a line with Joe Thornton
and Brent Burns. Pavelski is only four goals
shy of matching his career high of 31 set
two seasons ago.
He broke a tie late in the second period
after Matt Stajan was sent off for interfering
with Eriah Hayes on the first penalty of the
game.
After a broken play at the blue line, Jason
Demers kept the puck in the offensive zone
and passed to Thornton, who was all alone
on the opposite side of the ice.
Thornton fired a cross-ice pass to
Pavelski, who was alone near the front of
the net and deflected the pass past Ramo to
give the Sharks a 3-2 lead. That set off
another round of “U-S-A! U-S-A!” chants
from the crowd for the Olympian.
Both teams scored twice during the first
period with help from shaky goaltending
from Niemi and Ramo. The four goals came
on 18 shots and included three in a span of
1:12 midway through the period.
The Flames started the scoring when
Hudler beat Brad Stuart in the corner and
then beat Niemi with a backhand from in
front of the net for his 13th goal.
The Sharks responded with two goals in a
21-second span with Pavelski tipping
Justin Braun’s point shot for his 26th goal
of the season and 17th in the past 20 games.
Before that goal could even be announced,
Wingels ended a 15-game goalless stretch
on a bad angle shot from near the boards
that beat Ramo to give the Sharks the lead.
By Antonio Gonzalez
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
OAKLAND — Paul George scored 23
points, Roy Hibbert had 14 points and 13
rebounds and the NBA-leading Indiana
Pacers built a big lead before holding off the
Golden State Warriors 102-94 on Monday
night for their fifth straight win.
The Pacers (33-7) went ahead by 20 in
third quarter, watched the Warriors whittle
the lead to two and then regrouped in the
closing minutes to open a five-game West
Coast trip with a victory.
David West added 17 points and Lance
Stephenson finished with 14 points, 10
rebounds and seven assists to help the
Pacers pull away for good.
Stephen Curry had 24 points and nine
assists, and David Lee had 20 points and 12
rebounds for the Warriors, who have lost
four of six since their 10-game winning
streak.
Indiana outshot the Warriors 45.1 to 40.7
percent and outrebounded them 52 to 45.
Both teams committed 15 turnovers.
Golden State still made the Pacers work
for the win.
After going down by 20 in the third quar-
ter, Harrison Barnes hit a 3-pointer to slice
Indiana’s lead to 79-77 early in the fourth.
The Pacers pulled away by eight before the
Warriors roared back within three on Lee’s
free throws.
But Stephenson came back with a 3-
pointer to put the Pacers up 94-87. Klay
Thompson answered from long range, then
George Hill hit another from beyond the arc
to keep Indiana in control.
The final come back by the Warriors ended
almost as quickly as it started.
Andre Iguodala made a fadaway to trim
Indiana’s lead to 98-94 with less than a
minute left. After Iguodala stole the ball
from Hill, Curry missed a contested 3-point-
er short, and the Pacers put the game away
on free throws.
The Warriors entered the night having
played an NBA-high 25 road games com-
pared to 17 at home. The game began a
string of five straight and nine of 11 at
Oracle Arena, though Golden State’s home
court provided little comfort against the
NBA’s best.
Sparked by its defense and work-to-get-a-
good-shot approach, Indiana opened a 35-
21 lead at the end of the first quarter. Golden
State switched to a smaller lineup to try and
outrun the Pacers, who instead exploited
their size inside.
After going ahead by 16 points late in the
second quarter, Indiana let the Warriors
creep closer thanks to a series of turnovers.
The Pacers led 53-40 at the half.
Indiana came out of the break just like it
did to start the game, scoring the first seven
of the third quarter to take a 60-40 lead that
halted most of the announced sellout crowd
of 19,596 to a hush.
But Curry and Co. quickly had fans on
their feet and to a fever pitch after a timeout.
Curry hit a jumper, then tossed an alley-
hoop to Andrew Bogut before Thompson’s
3-pointer started a run that brought the
Warriors within eight heading to the fourth
quarter.
NOTES: Warriors coach Mark Jackson
said it was an honor to play on the holiday
honoring the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.
“I’m not sitting here if he didn’t have a
dream and he didn’t fight for that dream the
right way,” Jackson said. ... The Warriors
haven’t won a series against the Pacers
since the 2000-01 season.
SHARKS 3, FLAMES 2
PACERS 102, WARRIORS 94
teammates, taped to chairs, had their
mouths duct-taped and at least one had lip-
stick applied to his face and one was forced
to watch Spanish-language programming
on television.
Now, at least one of the victim’s families
is suing the Sequoia Union High School
District. Acall to attorney Christopher B.
Nolan of the Nolan Law Firm in San
Francisco, who has filed the lawsuit, was
not returned Monday and SUHSD superin-
tendent James Lianides was out of the office
because of the Martin Luther King Jr. holi-
day.
According to the Mercury News, Lianides
said the team has since gone through sensi-
tivity training. I certainly hope there was
more discipline than that. Those involved
in the attack should have, at the very least,
been kicked off the team and prevented
from playing for school-sponsored teams
for at least the rest of the season. At this
point, we may never know what happened
unless someone involved comes forward to
tell the story or it plays out in court. Now
that a lawsuit has been filed, everyone
involved will more than likely clam up and
the guess here is there will be a settlement
with a non-disclosure order included.
I’ve supported Fountain in the past but,
if these allegations are true, there is no
defense for it. As a high school coach, he
is there to not only teach the kids about
the game and life, but to protect them —
not allegedly participate in such an ugly
incident.
But to put all this on the coach is mis-
guided. High school kids nowadays are
pretty savvy and they had to know what
they were doing was wrong — but not so
smart to record the incident and then send
it around to others.
More than that, by being on the team,
they agreed not to participate in any haz-
ing incidents. Before being allowed to play
sports for the school, all student-athletes
at Woodside have to sign an athletic packet
that spells out what is expected of the
players. One of the sections includes an
anti-hazing clause. In theory, everyone on
the team had signed this. Obviously, some
don’t remember doing so, or simply chose
not to abide by it.
It’s actually appalling that in this day
and age, any player would think of doing
something like this. What really galls me
in that athletes do this to their own team-
mates as a way of … bonding? Seems to me
that an incident like this would only drive
a wedge between the victims and the perpe-
trators.
And the old standard, “boys will be
boys,” doesn’t work here either. That’s an
antiquated thought process and even if
“boys will be boys,” there is no part of
that adage that precludes them from any
punishment. There are repercussions and
consequences.
I know the school district is being sued
because more money can be squeezed out of
it and it is ultimately responsible for the
safety of its students. But if nothing
popped up on Fountain’s background
check, how can the school or district know
what actions one might take in the future?
As much as I hate to say it, the coaches and
the parents of those players who took part
in the assault should be the ones on the
hook for any monetary damages.
***
Friday was a big night for Naomi and
Ilana Baer, members of the Menlo-
Atherton girls’ basketball team. Ilana, a
freshman, was making her varsity debut
and playing alongside older sister Naomi.
Ilana went on to be the team’s leading scor-
er in a loss to Carlmont that night. Naomi
was second.
It was a big deal for the family.
Unfortunately, leave it to the media (in this
case, yours truly) to screw it up. Somehow,
I was looking at the wrong roster and
misidentified Naomi Baer.
I have since corrected the name in the
story on the Daily Journal website.
Nathan Mollat can be reached by email:
nathan@smdailyjournal.com or by phone:
344-5200 ext. 117. He can also be fol-
lowed on Twitter @CheckkThissOutt.
SPORTS 14
Tuesday • Jan. 21, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
1390 El Camino Real, Millbrae 94030
Reservations (650) 742-1003
(located in La Quinta Hotel. Free Parking)
www.bashamichirestaurant.com
Serving Lunch & Dinner
Featuring Wagyu Beef
imported from Japan
several moves the NFL is using to try to
rekindle interest in the Pro Bowl, set for
Sunday in Hawaii. The game has been criti-
cized as too lax in recent years by fans and
even Commissioner Roger Goodell, putting
the future of the game in question.
The biggest change — a two-day draft on
Tuesday and Wednesday that will determine
teams in a new “unconferenced” game —
responds by targeting player egos and fan
love for fantasy football.
Instead of briefly mentioning a player’s
accomplishments during a quick cameo in
the all-star game, Rice and Sanders will
make choices that reveal the players they
believe to be the best among the best —
even all-stars don’t want to be picked last in
a game with no bad players.
“You want to embrace good-natured rib-
bing and chop busting,” said Mike
Muriano, senior coordinating producer at
NFLNetwork, which is running the draft and
televising its second part live.
The league was announcing replacements
throughout Monday for players missing the
game because of injury or the Super Bowl.
Andrew Luck of Indianapolis and Nick Foles
of Philadelphia are replacing the quarter-
backs in the Super Bowl, Denver’s Peyton
Manning and Seattle’s Russell Wi l son.
Running backs Eddie Lacy and Alfred Morris
will step in for Adrian Peterson and
Marshawn Lynch, while Alshon Jeffery and
Larry Fitzgerald replace Calvin Johnson
and Demaryius Thomas.
Rice and Sanders aren’t being too specific
about how they’ll make their picks, though
Sanders has said he doesn’t want any Pro
Bowlers on his team who have played in
more than four all-star games.
“You want what you want,” Sanders said.
“I know the guys that are going to cover. No
matter what, they’re not cutting no deals.”
Rice said he’s not paying Sanders too
much attention because his former 49ers
teammate could be trying to misdirect him.
“That might be his strategy — he might
go the opposite way and try to select some
veterans,” Rice said.
Rice and Sanders have done plenty of
talking leading up to the draft, even offer-
ing to suit up against one another on the
field. Rice says the league won’t let it hap-
pen but Sanders says nothing is final until
Goodell says so.
“He’s going to be hurting if we suit up,”
Rice said.
According to STATS, Sanders had four
interceptions in games played against
Rice’s teams, going back to 1989. Rice,
meanwhile, had 60 catches for 1,051 yards
and 11 touchdowns against Sanders’ teams.
Continued from page 11
PRO
Continued from page 11
LOUNGE
SPORTS 15
Tuesday • Jan. 21, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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EASTERNCONFERENCE
ATLANTICDIVISION
W L Pct GB
Toronto 20 20 .500 —
Brooklyn 17 22 .436 2 1/2
New York 15 26 .366 5 1/2
Boston 14 28 .333 7
Philadelphia 13 28 .317 7 1/2
SOUTHEASTDIVISION
W L Pct GB
Miami 29 12 .707 —
Atlanta 21 19 .525 7 1/2
Washington 20 20 .500 8 1/2
Charlotte 18 25 .419 12
Orlando 11 30 .268 18
CENTRALDIVISION
W L Pct GB
Indiana 33 7 .825 —
Chicago 20 20 .500 13
Detroit 17 24 .415 16 1/2
Cleveland 15 26 .366 18 1/2
Milwaukee 7 33 .175 26
WESTERNCONFERENCE
SOUTWESTDIVISION
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 32 9 .780 —
Houston 28 15 .651 5
Dallas 25 18 .581 8
Memphis 20 20 .500 11 1/2
New Orleans 16 24 .400 15 1/2
NORTHWEST DIVISION
W L Pct GB
Portland 31 10 .756 —
Oklahoma City 31 10 .756 —
Denver 20 20 .500 10 1/2
Minnesota 19 21 .475 11 1/2
Utah 14 28 .333 17 1/2
PACIFICDIVISION
W L Pct GB
L.A. Clippers 29 14 .674 —
Golden State 26 17 .605 3
Phoenix 23 17 .575 4 1/2
L.A. Lakers 16 26 .381 12 1/2
Sacramento 14 25 .359 13
Monday’sGames
L.A. Clippers 112, Detroit 103
Washington 107, Philadelphia 99
Charlotte 100,Toronto 95
Brooklyn 103, New York 80
New Orleans 95, Memphis 92
Atlanta 121, Miami 114
Chicago 102, L.A. Lakers 100, OT
Houston 126, Portland 113
Indiana 102, Golden State 94
NBA GLANCE
EASTERNCONFERENCE
ATLANTICDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Boston 49 31 15 3 65 141 109
Tampa Bay 50 29 16 5 63 146 123
Montreal 49 27 17 5 59 126 120
Toronto 51 26 20 5 57 145 154
Detroit 49 21 18 10 52 122 134
Ottawa 49 21 19 9 51 139 155
Florida 49 19 23 7 45 116 148
Buffalo 47 13 27 7 33 86 133
METROPOLITANDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Pittsburgh 49 34 13 2 70 157 120
N.Y. Rangers 51 27 21 3 57 128 128
Philadelphia 50 25 19 6 56 137 144
Columbus 48 24 20 4 52 138 135
Washington 49 22 19 8 52 142 150
New Jersey 50 20 19 11 51 115 123
Carolina 48 20 19 9 49 117 137
N.Y. Islanders 51 20 24 7 47 142 166
WESTERNCONFERENCE
CENTRALDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Chicago 51 32 8 11 75 184 139
St. Louis 48 33 10 5 71 170 108
Colorado 48 31 12 5 67 142 122
Minnesota 51 27 19 5 59 125 125
Nashville 51 22 22 7 51 125 152
Dallas 49 21 20 8 50 137 152
Winnipeg 50 22 23 5 49 141 150
PACIFICDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Anaheim 51 37 9 5 79 175 126
San Jose 50 32 12 6 70 161 123
Los Angeles 50 29 15 6 64 128 103
Vancouver 50 25 16 9 59 127 127
Phoenix 49 23 17 9 55 141 149
Calgary 50 16 27 7 39 111 159
Edmonton 51 15 30 6 36 131 181
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime
loss.
Monday’sGames
N.Y. Islanders 4, Philadelphia 3, SO
Boston 3, Los Angeles 2
Florida 5, Pittsburgh 1
St. Louis 4, Detroit 1
Nashville 4, Dallas 1
Toronto 4, Phoenix 2
San Jose 3, Calgary 2
Tuesday’sGames
Florida at Buffalo, 4 p.m.
NHL GLANCE TRANSACTIONS
TUESDAY
Girls’ soccer
Priory at Menlo School,2:45 p.m.; Sacred Heart Prep
at Notre Dame-SJ, Oceana at El Camino, Mills vs.
South City at Skyline College, San Mateo at Aragon,
3 p.m.; Eastside Prep at Crystal Springs, Mercy-
Burlingameat Harker,Mercy-SFat Summit Prep,3:30
p.m.; Capuchino at Half Moon Bay, Menlo-Atherton
at Carlmont, Hillsdale at Woodside, Burlingame at
Sequoia, 4 p.m.
Boys’ basketball
Priory at Crystal Springs, Menlo School at Sacred
Heart Prep, 7:30 p.m.
Girls’ basketball
Menlo School at Sacred Heart Prep,6 p.m.; Castilleja
at Crystal Springs, 6:30 p.m.
WEDNESDAY
Boys’ soccer
Crystal Springs at Priory, Menlo School at Harker .El
Camino at Jefferson, Terra Nova at Mills, South City
at Hillsdale, Capuchino at Westmoor, Carlmont at
Aragon, Sequoia at San Mateo, 3 p.m.; Sacred Heart
Prep at Eastside Prep, 3:30 p.m.; Bellarmine at Serra,
3:15 p.m.;Woodside at Half Moon Bay,Menlo-Ather-
ton at Burlingame, 4 p.m.; Serra at St. Ignatius, 7:30
p.m.
Girls’ soccer
Notre Dame-Belmont at Presentation, 3:15 p.m.
Girls’ basketball
Aragonat Burlingame,Hillsdaleat Carlmont,Menlo-
Atherton at Capuchino,Woodside at Mills, Sequoia
at San Mateo, Terra Nova at South City, Half Moon
Bay at Westmoor, Oceana at Jefferson, 6 p.m.
Boys’ basketball
Burlingame at Aragon, Carlmont at Hilsdale, Ca-
puchino at Menlo-Atherton, Mills at Woodside, San
Mateo at Sequoia, South City at Terra Nova, West-
moor at Half Moon Bay, Jefferson at Oceana, 6 p.m.
Wrestling
Mitty at Serra, 7 p.m.
THURSDAY
Girls’ soccer
Terra Nova at El Camino,Half Moon Bay at Jefferson,
Westmoor at Mills,Capuchino at Oceana,3 p.m.; Sa-
cred Heart Prep at King’s Academy, Crystal Springs
at Mercy-Burlingame,3:30p.m.;SanMateoatWood-
side,Hillsdaleat Menlo-Atherton,Aragonat Sequoia,
Carlmont at Burlingame, 4 p.m.
Wrestling
Capuchino at Half Moon Bay, El Camino at Terra
Nova, Sequoia at South City, Mills at Menlo-Ather-
ton, Burlingame at Oceana, Woodside at Aragon, 7
p.m.
Girls’ basketball
Crystal Springsat Mercy-Burlingame,6:30p.m.;St.Ig-
natius at Notre Dame-Belmont, 7:30 p.m.
FRIDAY
Boys’ soccer
Prioryat SacredHeart Prep,Crystal Springs at Menlo
School, 2:45 p.m.; Mills vs. South City at Skyline Col-
lege,Hillsdale at El Camino,Terra Nova at Westmoor,
Jeffersonat Capuchino,SanMateoat Aragon,3p.m.;
Sequoia at Menlo-Athrton, Burlingame at Wood-
side, Half Moon Bay at Carlmont, 4 p.m.
Girls’ basketball
Eastside Prep at Sacred Heart Prep, 5 p.m.; Menlo
School at Notre Dame-SF, 6:30 p.m.; Burlingame at
San Mateo,Aragon at Hillsdale,Woodside at Menlo-
Atherton, Capuchino at Mills, Carlmont at Sequoia,
Jefferson at Westmoor,Terra Nova at Half Moon Bay,
South City at El Camino, 6:15 p.m.
Boys’ basketball
Eastside Prep at Sacred Heart Prep,6:30 p.m.; Sacred
Heart Cathedral at Serra,Crystal Springsat Pinewood,
Menlo School at Harker, 7:30 p.m.; Burlingame at
San Mateo,Aragon at Hillsdale,Woodside at Menlo-
Atherton, Capuchino at Mills, Carlmont at Sequoia,
Jefferson at Westmoor,Terra Nova at Half Moon Bay,
South City at El Camino, 7:45 p.m.
SATURDAY
Boys’ soccer
Serra at Valley Christian, 2:30 p.m.
Girls’ soccer
Valley Christian at Notre Dame-Belmont, 2:30 p.m.;
NotreDame-SJ at MenloSchool,2:45p.m.;Mercy-SF
at Crystal Springs, Summit Prep at Harker, 3:30 p.m.
Girls’ basketball
Notre Dame-Belmont at Sacred Heart Cathedral,
6:30 p.m.
BASEBALL
National League
MILWAUKEE BREWERS — Agreed to terms with
1B Lyle Overbay on a minor league contract.
NEWYORKMETS— Agreed to terms with RHP Dil-
lon Gee on a one-year contract. Signed LHP John
Lannan to a minor league contract. BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
CHICAGOBULLS— Re-signed F Cartier Martin to a
second 10-day contract.
HOUSTON ROCKETS — Reassigned G Isaiah
Canaan to Rio Grande Valley (NBADL).
WASHINGTONWIZARDS— Assigned G Glen Rice
to Iowa (NBADL). FOOTBALL
National Football League
NEWENGLANDPATRIOTS — Signed OL Braxton
Cave and R.J. Mattes, T Jordan Devey, WRs Reggie
Dunn and Greg Orton,RB Sam McGuffie and LB Tay-
lor Reed to reserve/future contracts.
TENNESSEETITANS— Named Ray Horton defen-
sive coordinator and Louie Cioffi defensive backs
coach.
WASHINGTONREDSKINS—NamedIkeHilliardre-
ceivers coach.
HOCKEY
National HockeyLeague
MINNESOTAWILD — Recalled D Jonathon Blum
and G Johan Gustafsson from Iowa (AHL).
MONTREAL CANADIENS — Recalled F Louis
Leblanc from Hamilton (AHL).
OTTAWA SENATORS — Recalled F Stephane Da
Costa from Binghamton (AHL).
WASHINGTONCAPITALS— Reassigned G Philipp
Grubauer to Hershey (AHL).
COLLEGE
CHOWAN—NamedLindsayAustinassistant trainer.
ELON— Named Damian Wroblewski offensive co-
ordinator and offensive line coach.
INDIANA — Named Brian Knorr defensive coordi-
nator.
LIMESTONE—NamedIzzyTrottier assistant softball
coach.
MONTANATECH— Fired athletic director Charles
Bradley.Announcedtheresignationof women’sbas-
ketball coach DeAnn Craft and women’s assistant
basketball coach Kesha Watson. Named Bob Green
interim athletic director. Named Lindsie Wilson
women’s interim basketball coach.
SOUTHDAKOTATECH— Announced it is joining
the Rocky Mountain Athletic Conference.
WHAT’S ON TAP
Kansas City’s Derrick Johnson was
chosen Monday to replace Bowman in
the Pro Bowl.
49ers linebackers coach Jim Leavitt
remained optimistic earlier Monday
that Bowman would be playing when
the 49ers open new Levi’s Stadium
next season.
“He’s a warrior. He’s going to push
forward, there’s no question,” Leavitt
said. “He’s a special guy, tremendous-
ly talented, but he’s got such a heart.
He’s been so good with me it’s unbe-
lievable. He’s great young man. He’ll
be fine. We’re going into a new stadi-
um and he’ll be ready to go when we
start.”
In addition, left guard Mike Iupati
broke his left ankle in the loss. He
says he doesn’t know whether he will
need surgery, but is scheduled to be fur-
ther evaluated Tuesday.
“This is a bad-luck year,” said
Iupati, who missed four games with a
left knee injury. “I’ll probably be in a
cast for a while. I’ll be here rehab-
bing. It’s day by day and wish for the
best.”
As the 49ers braced for Bowman’s
lengthy recovery, they were still deal-
ing with the sting of another season
that ended just short of the goal.
Safety Donte Whitner was irked at
any Seattle fans involved with throw-
ing popcorn and other debris on
Bowman as he was carted off at
CenturyLink Field.
“That’s pure ignorance,” said
Whitner, who noted losing to the rival
Seahawks “makes it a little worse ‘cuz
I wanted to send those fans home cry-
ing.”
And how about the postgame com-
ments by cornerback Richard Sherman
calling 49ers wideout Michael
Crabtree “mediocre” and “sorry” fol-
lowing his game-saving defensive
play in the end zone during the waning
moments?
“Pure ignorance, simple as that,”
Whitner said.
Added tight end Vernon Davis: “He
talks a lot. Sometimes you just need to
shut your mouth. You got the win. Be
humble, be gracious and just accept it.
... Maybe he could learn from other
people around the league that know
how to be a true gentleman that show
good sportsmanship.”
For Bowman, this is a terrible end-
ing to a career season in which he
emerged as a Defensive Player of the
Year candidate. In December,
Bowman’s three sacks, two intercep-
tions, one returned for a touchdown,
two forced fumbles and a fumble recov-
ery were unmatched by any other play-
er all season.
The 25-year-old Bowman, drafted
out of Penn State in 2010 and signed
to a five-year contract extension
worth $45.25 million in November
2012, had 145 tackles, five sacks, two
interceptions and four forced fumbles
this season.
“He sacrificed his body for this
team. He’s our leader and arguably the
best player that we have,” rookie safe-
ty Eric Reid said. “To see him go
down, it hurts. I’ll be praying for him
and wishing him a speedy recovery. . . .
He was surprisingly optimistic (on
the plane). He looked like he was
doing OK.”
Harbaugh, Leavitt and the other
coaches met with their players
Monday morning, passing out paper-
work on the offseason conditioning
program before everybody packed
their belongings and parted ways.
For many, especially players on
defense, having the season end seeing
Bowman go down made it that much
tougher.
“I didn’t talk to him, because there’s
nothing really that you can say to
somebody that puts so much into it
and they go out with an injury like
that,” Whitner said. “From playing up
here and being on this high level to
being dropped all the way to the bot-
tom on an injury, it has to be devastat-
ing. So I don’t really know what to
say to him right now. I’ll say some-
thing eventually. ”
Pro Football Talk first reported
details of Bowman’s injury Monday.
Bowman still planned to attend a
meet and greet appearance Tuesday
night at a mall in nearby Concord,
according to publicist Theodore
Palmer.
Notes: LB Ahmad Brooks is sched-
uled to fly to Hawaii on Tuesday to join
the NFC Pro Bowl team, though the
49ers didn’t yet know whether other
selections planned to attend or pull
out of the game. ... C Jonathan
Goodwin said he will listen to any
offers this offseason but also might
consider retirement. “Deep down I
think I’m still willing, but what cre-
ates uncertainty for me is being a 35-
year-old free agent, which in this time
of the NFL can be tough,” Goodwin
said. ... Whitner and WR Anquan
Boldin also are uncertain they will be
back with the 49ers. Whitner said he
would like to stay and that Harbaugh
and GM Trent Baalke expressed they
would like him to return. “Hopefully
we can get something done,” Whitner
said. “This is a business. Sometimes
players don’t fit into what you want to
do salary-cap wise.”
16
Tuesday • Jan. 21, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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In his first game back, Michael Costello scored 15 points.
Continued from page 11
49ERS
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — He’ll be wearing a
coat and no doubt gloves.
NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell
will be like most other folks at the
Super Bowl on Feb. 2 in East
Rutherford, N.J. — he’ll be outside.
The league says the commissioner
will be sitting in the elements as he
regularly does at games — rain or
shine, cold or warm.
Goodell often sits in the stands or is
in a luxury box that has outdoor seats.
He’s done that in the past, even in
serious chill.
He sat in the stands in Minnesota at
the outdoor game after the Metrodome
roof collapsed in 2010. He also once
sat at a game in Chicago where he said
his beer froze.
NFL conference title games’ TV
viewership up big
NEWYORK — The NFL conference
title games’ television viewership is
up big from last season.
The Broncos’ 26-16 win over New
England for the AFC championship
averaged 51.3 million viewers Sunday
on CBS. That’s up 22 percent from the
early game a year ago between San
Francisco and Atlanta.
The Seahawks’ 23-17 victory over
the 49ers in the NFC averaged 55.9
viewers on Fox, up 17 percent from
Ravens-Patriots in the late window in
2013.
CBS said Monday that Denver’s win
had a 28.1 rating and 51 share — the
second-highest rating for the AFC
game in 17 years, behind a 28.3 for
Jets-Steelers in 2011. Seattle’s victo-
ry drew a 28.5/44, the highest-rated
non-overtime NFC game since 1997.
Ratings measure the percentage of
households with televisions watching
a program, while shares represent the
percentage of TVs in use at the time.
Carroll says Sherman
sorry rant overshadowed win
RENTON, Wash.— Seattle coach
Pete Carroll says after speaking with
Richard Sherman the fiery cornerback
was apologetic that his rant against
San Francisco’s Michael Crabtree
overshadowed the Seahawks reaching
their second Super Bowl in franchise
history.
Carroll said the pair spoke Monday
a day after Sherman deflected a pass
intended for Crabtree and was inter-
cepted by teammate Malcolm Smith in
the closing seconds of Seattle’s 23-17
win over the 49ers to win the NFC
championship.
Goodell ready to tackle elements at Super Bowl
roster — him.
For those efforts, Costello is the Daily Journal Athlete of
the Week.
“I think it allowed him to become more vocal,” Smith
said of Costello’s rehab time. “Since he wasn’t playing, he
had to find another way to impact the team. It helped him to
step up. He tried to get the guys going some more, have a
little more energy. I think that was big for him.
“For me, I was just happy to have him come back for
himself — where he can look back at his senior season and
have some memories.”
Right at the top of the memory list for Costello will be
his first game back last Wednesday against San Mateo.
Going in, Smith said he talked to Costello about where he
was physically and how he intended to ease him back into
action. Costello had told Smith he was around 95 percent
and both agreed to have him come in late into the first quar-
ter.
But early foul trouble changed that and Costello came in
sooner than expected.
Two touches into the game and Costello knocked in his
first 3 — and all was back to normal.
“I think as a team, everyone took a deep breath and let it
out,” Smith said. “Because, it was like, ‘OK, we got our
scorer back. He’s going to be able to provide some points
for us.’ Plus, after that, there was a calming sense offen-
sively. I think he played more than he thought he could and
the ankle felt better than he thought it would — to the
point where, after the game he said, I’m 100 percent. I’m
good to go as much as you need me from this point for-
ward.”
And from that point forward, the rest of the PAL South
has to watch out because Costello makes Carlmont a com-
pletely different team.
Continued from page 11
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A new study showed that middle-aged men risk a faster mental decline as they age if they’ve
been drinking heavily for years.
By Malcolm Ritter
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — Middle-aged men risk a
faster mental decline as they age if they’ve
been drinking heavily for years, new
research suggests.
The study of about 5,000 British civil ser-
vants found that over a decade, the added
decline was the equivalent of about two extra
years of aging for a combined measure of
mental abilities like reasoning, and about
six years for memory. The heavy drinkers’
abilities were compared to those of men who
drank moderately or abstained.
It’s no surprise that heavy alcohol con-
sumption can affect the brain, but the study
focuses on an age range that has received
much less attention from alcohol researchers
than the elderly and college students.
The work was published online Wednesday
by the journal Neurology. Researchers found
no such effect in women, but the study
included too few female heavy drinkers to
test the effect of drinking the same amount
as in men, said Severine Sabia, a study
author from University College London.
In an email, she said it was not possible to
identify a specific minimum level of con-
sumption at which the risk begins in men.
Her study used data from over 20 years.
Using questionnaires, researchers calculated
the men’s average daily intake of alcohol for
the decade up to when they were an average
of 56 years old. Then, they tracked decline in
mental abilities over the following decade
from tests administered every five years.
Accelerated decline was seen for the heavi-
est-drinking group, which included 469 men
with a wide range of alcohol intake. The
minimum amount was the equivalent of
about 13 ounces of wine a day or about 30
ounces of beer. The maximum was about
three times that.
Men drinking that minimum amount are
not necessarily at risk for accelerated mental
decline, since the results pertain to the cate-
gory overall, said Sara Jo Nixon, a substance
abuse researcher at the University of Florida
in Gainesville, who did not participate in the
work.
She also said that the study shows a link
between drinking and faster mental decline
but not proof that alcohol intake was
responsible. And she said that because of the
sensitive mental tests used in the study, the
extra declines in performance may be too
subtle to make a difference in daily life.
Sabia said she believed the difference would
eventually be noticeable.
Drinking linked to faster
mental decline in men
By Jim Suhr
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ST. LOUIS — Federal prosecutors filed a
record number of health care fraud cases last
fiscal year, perhaps reflecting the greater
emphasis the government has placed on
combatting the crime costing taxpayers bil-
lions of dollars per year.
According to Justice Department statis-
tics obtained through a Freedom of
Information Act request by a Syracuse
University-based nonprofit group that
tracks federal spending, staffing and
enforcement activities, prosecutors pursued
377 new federal health care fraud cases in the
fiscal year that ended in October. That was 3
percent more than the previous year and 7.7
percent more than five years ago.
Southern Illinois led the nation on a per-
capita basis in such cases filed, with the
government pursuing 10.1 prosecutions per
1 million people, which was more than
eight times the national average.
The latest numbers, while not necessarily
showing that the white-collar crime is on
the rise, may reflect a greater emphasis by
authorities, predominantly the FBI and the
Department of Health and Human Services,
to root out the wrongdoing, said Susan
Long, who is an associated professor of
managerial statistics at the school and the
co-director of the nonprofit, the
Transactional Records Access
Clearinghouse.
“Clearly the numbers suggest this is an
area the (Obama) administration is not
ignoring,” Long said Wednesday.
An illustration of the anti-fraud push came
last May, when 89 people in eight cities —
including 14 doctors and nurses — were
charged for their alleged roles in separate
Medicare scams that collectively billed the
taxpayer-funded program for roughly $223
million in bogus charges.
Because such fraud is believed to cost the
Medicare program between $60 billion and
$90 billion each year, Attorney General Eric
Holder and Health and Human Services
Secretary Kathleen Sebelius partnered in
2009 to increase enforcement by allocating
more money and staff and creating strike
forces in fraud hot spots around the country.
Medicare fraud has morphed into complex
schemes over the years, moving from med-
ical equipment and HIV infusion fraud to
ambulance scams as crooks try to stay a step
Report: Health
care fraud cases
hit high last year
See HEALTH Page 18
18
Tuesday • Jan. 21, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
HEALTH
* Frescriptians & Bame
MeJicaI 5uppIies 0eIivereJ
* 3 Fharmacists an 0uty
{650} 349-1373
29 west 257B Ave.
{ßear EI 0amina}
5an Matea
ahead of authorities. The scammers have
also grown more sophisticated using
recruiters who are paid kickbacks for finding
patients, while doctors, nurses and compa-
ny owners coordinate to appear to deliver
medical services that they are not.
For decades, Medicare has operated under a
pay-and-chase system, paying providers
first and investigating suspicious claims
later. Federal authorities are using new tech-
nology designed to flag suspicious claims
before they are paid, but the system still is
relatively new.
While “frankly surprised” by his office’s
distinction as the per-capita leader in
health-care fraud prosecutions, southern
Illinois U.S. Attorney Stephen Wigginton
said every U.S. attorney enjoys discretion
in prioritizing which crime issues to com-
bat, taking into account regional demo-
graphics and Holder’s desires.
But Wigginton said he placed special
emphasis on going after health-care
defrauders since he began overseeing his
district more than three years ago. Since
then, Wigginton’s office has increased such
investigations each year. Last year, more
than 30 people were indicted for allegedly
scamming a Medicaid program meant to
allow individuals to stay in their homes
instead of entering a nursing home.
“I think we’re very focused and strategic,”
said Wigginton, whose office also has taken
a lead nationally in cracking down on fraud-
ulent time-share marketing and the St. Louis
region’s increasing struggles with heroin
use.
Continued from page 17
HEALTH
dent, is concerned about the closure, espe-
cially because the store was one of the few
places in the city to go clothing shopping.
“I hate to see them leave,” he said. “I
don’t see the logic in closing the only store
in town that’s making money. They have
good quality, affordable [products] for low-
income people.”
Meanwhile, Councilwoman Anne Oliva
said the space could be better filled.
“I hate to see anybody good go,” she said.
“Like in any business, in regards to Kohl’s ,
anybody is replaceable. For the employees,
bigger and better things will come their
way. ”
Councilwoman Marge Colapietro said she
was sad to hear about the closure, especially
because it will be jobs lost.
“I’m hoping the owners will maybe want
to have a meeting with the city to discuss ...
in advance what types of businesses we
would like to see there,” she said.
“Hopefully, it will be a business that
attracts people from throughout Bay Area
and will be retail that will generate revenue
for our city. ”
Other Millbrae residents were sad to hear
the news as well. Clara Pacini said she goes
to the Kohl’s in Millbrae once or twice a
week and, with the closure, she will proba-
bly go to the Kohl’s in Colma.
“I really don’t like it (the closure),” she
said. “This is a surprise.”
Local management could not comment on
the store’s closure.
angela@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 105
Continued from page 1
KOHL’S
Real. Police pronounced him dead shortly
after arriving on scene. He died from blunt
force trauma and the person, or people,
responsible made off with an undisclosed
amount of money from the restaurant’s
office.
Few new clues have surfaced in the years
that passed, so those who cared for Castello
and police are asking for the public’s help
in solving this cold case. Areward, which at
one point was $40,000, is still being
offered for information leading to an arrest
in Castello’s murder, said Laura Johnson,
Castello’s girlfriend at the time of his death.
“My life has changed a thousand percent,
it’s not the same. And I’ve gotten past it to
an extent now six years later, but it’s still
always there,” Johnson said.
After Castello’s murder, Johnson discov-
ered she was pregnant and later lost their
baby. Castello loved his job, he was a bois-
terous happy person whose life was stolen
from him, Johnson said.
“It just bothers me to know that some-
body, at this point in time, somebody took
a life and got away with it. No one is being
held responsible,” Johnson said.
Homicide cases are never closed and
although the case has passed through the
hands of different detectives, the San Mateo
Police Department remains diligent in find-
ing the assailants who took Castello’s life.
“We never close a homicide investigation
and so the case is still considered open and
we’re still pursuing it,” said San Mateo
police Detective Sgt. Tim Sullivan.
“It’s definitely something that still trou-
bles us and it’s something we really want to
solve,” Sullivan said.
Investigators have revisited information
over the years and have worked with other
law enforcement agencies, including the
Federal Bureau of Investigation’s cold case
unit, to push forward with the case, said
Detective Sgt. Ryan Monaghan of the San
Mateo Police Investigation Bureau.
“We worked with [the FBI] to kind of
piece together some of the intricacies of
this case to ensure the follow-up we do from
now and forward is consistent with the
direction we need to be going in with this
case,” Monaghan said. “We’ve reached out
to a multitude of agencies to assist us to
ensure we’re using a multi-pronged
approach to bring justice to the victim’s
family and to Doug.”
The events of the morning Castello was
found murdered will never be forgotten in
Johnson’s mind, she said, and although she
remains appreciative of the detectives
who’ve worked his case, she desperately
hopes someone will come forward with
information.
“I think a lot of times what happens is
because people forget, if I bring it up now
and they realize it’s not solved, people are
shocked. But it’s because it’s no longer in
the public eye,” Johnson said. “Maybe
there’s somebody out there that does know
something that hasn’t said. Maybe at the
time they didn’t want to get involved … or
maybe it was something they didn’t think
was important at the time. Now, six years
later, even if it’s something they didn’t
think was important then, it might give
[police] another piece of information to
look into. I figure nothing can hurt at this
point in time.”
Even if a person prefers to remain anony-
mous, anyone with information regarding
the murder of Castello should call the San
Mateo Police Department, Monaghan said.
“We absolutely encourage it, like I said,
by no stretch of the imagination is it a done
case. On our part, there was loss of human
life and we want justice to be brought for
Doug and his family. So anyone with infor-
mation is strongly encouraged to contact
us,” Monaghan said.
Her life will never be the same and, as in
any homicide case, no one should be able to
take a life and get away with it, Johnson
said. She hopes somebody out there can
help bring justice to the Castello family and
those he loved by reaching out and provid-
ing even the slightest clue, Johnson said.
“They don’t know what [information]
might affect; even if it’s something small
tied together with something else the police
have, could help it in a direction [police]
haven’t gone yet,” Johnson said. “I don’t
think any information is too small if it has
to do with that night. Something they’ve
seen or heard back then, something they’ve
seen or heard after. He deserves justice. At
the very least his family deserves answers
and I deserve answers.”
The public is invited to join Johnson and
Castello’s supporters 6 p.m. at T.G.I.
Friday’s in San Mateo to gather in his mem-
ory.
Anyone with information regarding the
Jan. 21, 2008, homicide of Douglas
Castello should call the San Mateo Police
Department’s Investigation Bureau at (650)
522-7650 or the anonymous tip line at
(650) 522-7676.
samantha@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 106
Continued from page 1
CASTELLO
HEALTH 19
Tuesday • Jan. 21, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Asif Shazad
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ISLAMABAD — In Pakistan, a country
where breast cancer kills more women than
terrorist attacks, an awareness group could-
n’t even say the word “breast” while talking
at a university about mammograms and how
to check for lumps.
They had to use the euphemism “cancer of
women” to discuss a disease often shrouded
in social stigma in this majority Muslim
nation.
One in nine women in Pakistan will face
breast cancer during their life, with the coun-
try itself having the highest rate of the dis-
ease across Asia, according to the breast
cancer awareness group PinkRibbon, oncol-
ogists and other aid groups.
Yet discussing it remains taboo in a con-
servative, Islamic culture where the word
breast is associated with sexuality instead of
health and many view it as immoral for
women to go to the hospital for screenings
or discuss it even within their family.
Now, women like breast cancer survivor
and prominent Pakistani politician Fehmida
Mirza and groups are trying to draw atten-
tion to the disease and break the silence sur-
rounding it.
“There’s nothing to be shy about it,”
Mirza told the Associated Press in a recent
interview. “No woman, no woman should die
of ignorance and negligence.”
No national database tracks breast cancer
statistics but people who combat the disease
say it kills nearly 40,000 women every year
in Pakistan. That’s about the same number
as in the U.S., though Pakistan only has
180 million residents to the U.S.’ 313 mil-
lion.
With a health care system in shambles and
more young women getting the disease,
breast cancer rates only are expected to get
worse. World Health Organization official
Shahzad Aalam in Pakistan said it was diffi-
cult to determine the exact magnitude, but
that the disease is rampant.
“It is the leading cancer killer among
women,” Aalam said.
Among Pakistani women there is very lit-
tle knowledge about the disease. A study
done at Rawalpindi General Hospital about
breast cancer awareness among 600 women
found nearly 70 percent totally ignorant of
the disease, while 88 percent did not know
about breast self-exams and 68 percent did
not understand the significance of finding a
lump in the breast.
“If women are being diagnosed with breast
cancer, they don’t even share the news with
their family members,” said Omar Aftab,
who heads PinkRibbon in Pakistan, which
put on the university presentation where
organizers couldn’t even say “breast.”
“So, we’re trying to break these taboos,”
he said.
Those cultural taboos have been one of the
biggest issues preventing women from
seeking treatment or even knowing about
the disease. During an awareness event in
Pakistan’s capital, Islamabad, female stu-
dents attending a breast cancer lecture
demanded the men leave.
“It will take very long for us to discuss
these issues openly,” said one female stu-
dent who requested anonymity because
she feared her family wouldn’t like her
speaking about the issue.
Another challenge is Pakistan’s abysmal
health care sector that is starved for money,
the latest technology and drugs. Oncologist
Saira Hasan at Shifa International Hospital
in Islamabad said most major hospitals lack
a screening center or mammogram facility.
Many patients first go to a traditional healer
and by the time they visit a reputable doctor,
the disease is often too far advanced to treat,
Hasan said.
Women in the developing world, like
Pakistan, tend to die at greater rates than in
more developed countries because the dis-
ease is generally detected later and health
care options aren’t as good.
Hasan said several factors have con-
tributed to the rise in the disease - above all
the cultural taboos. Breast cancer survivor
Sameera Raja, who owns an art gallery in
southern Karachi and supports women fac-
ing breast cancer, says that it has to be
changed.
“You’re surprised to hear how women actu-
ally sit on things,” Raja said. Recalling
how a woman would feel too embarrassed to
talk about it even with her husband, she
said: “Don’t hide behind closed doors.”
Unlike in the U.S. where celebrities like
singer Sheryl Crow or actress Christina
Applegate have freely discussed their fight
with breast cancer, few such public figures
have come forward in Pakistan. That’s
changed with Mirza, though she had to delay
her treatment for three months after she was
diagnosed in March 2012 to handle her
work, which included how to rule on whether
a criminal conviction against the serving
prime minister should disqualify him from
politics.
“There was lot of pressure on me, work
pressure,” she said. “Everybody (would) say
it’s an excuse I’m using to run away. ”
Mirza described her friends and family
being shocked by the diagnosis, as the can-
cer is considered by many as a death sen-
tence. But during her diagnosis and treat-
ment, she attended international confer-
ences, ruled on the then-prime minister’s
case and later ran for re-election and won
while undergoing chemotherapy.
She now uses her position in parliament
to advocate for women’s health issues. She
plans to propose a bill making it mandatory
for women to have breast cancer screenings
and mammograms yearly, as well as to teach
girls in schools to do breast exams them-
selves. She also pushed the health ministry
to explain why there is no national database
on breast cancer deaths.
“I think the role models will have to come
forward,” Mirza said. “That is one reason I
had to.”
Challenge rises to Pakistan’s breast cancer taboos
REUTERS
A study done at Rawalpindi General Hospital about breast cancer awareness among 600
women found nearly 70 percent totally ignorant of the disease,while 88 percent did not know
about breast self-exams and 68 percent did not understand the significance of finding a lump
in the breast.
DATEBOOK 20
Tuesday • Jan. 21, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
TUESDAY, JAN. 21
Dig It Teen Video Workshop:
‘Story.’ 3:30 p.m. Belmont Library,
1110 Alameda de las Pulgas,
Belmont. This program will be a
three-part workshop (one per week)
for students to complete a movie to
submit to the SMCL Teen Film
Festival. This week will teach stu-
dents how to write a story for film.
Bring your own movie equipment or
rent from the Belmont Library. Teen
and guardian must sign liability
form before renting equipment.
Ages 12 to 19. For more information
contact conrad@smcl.org.
WEDNESDAY, JAN. 22
Free Tax Preparation. 10 a.m. to 4
p.m. Samaritan House, 4031 Pacific
Blvd., San Mateo. To make an
appointment or for more informa-
tion call 523-0804.
San Mateo Professional Alliance
weekly networking lunch. Noon to
1 p.m. Spiedo Ristorante, 22 E. Fourth
Ave., San Mateo. Free admission, but
lunch is $17. For more information
contact Mike Foor at mike@mike-
foor.com.
CSM Painting Class Exhibition.
Noon to 4 p.m. Twin Pines Art Center
Manor House, 10 Twin Pines Lane,
Belmont. Through Jan. 31. Noon to 4
p.m. Wednesdays to Sundays. For
more information call the Twin Pines
Manor House at 654-4068.
City Talk Toastmasters Club
Meeting. 12:30 p.m. to 1:30 p.m.
Redwood City Main Library,
Community Room on the Second
Floor, 1044 Middlefield Road,
Redwood City. Free. For more infor-
mation contact
johnmcd@hotmail.com.
Historian Discusses San Mateo
County at Sofitel San Francisco
Bay. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Bay 223 Sofitel
San Francisco Bay, 223 Twin Dolphin
Drive, Redwood City. Free. For more
information call (713) 524-0661.
Preschool Preview Night. 6 p.m. to
8 p.m. Community Activities
Building, 1400 Roosevelt Ave.,
Redwood City. Free. For more infor-
mation call 780-7311.
Lifetree Cafe Conversations: Care
for Caregivers. 7 p.m. Bethany
Lutheran Church, 1095 Cloud Ave.,
Menlo Park. Free. Includes compli-
mentary snacks and beverages. For
more information contact Angelina
Ortiz at angelina@bethnay-mp.org.
An evening with author Lisa
Unger. 7 p.m. Belmont Library, 1110
Alameda de las Pulgas, Belmont.
Unger will read from her latest
novel, ‘In the Blood.’ Light refresh-
ments and a book signing will fol-
low. For more information contact
conrad@smcl.org.
San Carlos Children’s Theater
presents ‘The Little Mermaid Jr.’ 7
p.m. Mustang Hall, Central Middle
School, 828 Chestnut St., San Carlos.
$12 for students 18 and under, $15
for adults. Through Jan. 22 to Jan. 26.
Tickets and information are available
online at www.sancarloschildren-
stheater.com.
NAMI General Meeting: Mental
Health Court Systems. 7 p.m. to
8:30 p.m. Hendrickson Aud./Mills
Health Center, 100 S. San Mateo
Drive, San Mateo. Free. For more
information call 638-0800.
Introduction to Brewing Beer. 7
p.m. Millbrae Library, 1 Library Ave.,
Millbrae. Join Jonnie Dukes of brew-
beer101 as he covers the basics of
home brewing and offers taster
samples of two different brews for
those 21 or over. For more informa-
tion call 697-7607.
THURSDAY, JAN. 23
Lifetree Cafe Conversations: Care
for Caregivers. 9:15 a.m. Bethany
Lutheran Church, 1095 Cloud Ave.,
Menlo Park. Free. Includes compli-
mentary snacks and beverages. For
more information contact Angelina
Ortiz at angelina@bethnay-mp.org.
Hillbarn Theatre presents ‘The
Grapes of Wrath.’ Hillbarn Theatre,
1285 E. Hillsdale Blvd., Foster City.
Continues through Feb. 9. For more
information and tickets call 349-
6411.
Employment Roundtable
Sponsored by Phase2Careers. 10
a.m. Burlingame Public Library, 480
Primrose Road, Burlingame. Free. For
more information email ronviscon-
ti@sbcglobal.net.
Community Health Talk — Hot
Topics in Nutrition. Noon to 1 p.m.
Downtown Library Community
Room, 1044 Middlefield Road,
Redwood City. For more informa-
tion call 299-2433.
Movies for school-age children:
‘Planes.’ 3:30 p.m. San Mateo Public
Library, 55 W. Third Ave., San Mateo.
Rated PG. 91 minutes. Free. For
more information call 522-7838.
CSM Painting Class Exhibition.
Noon to 4 p.m. Twin Pines Art
Center Manor House, 10 Twin Pines
Lane, Belmont. Runs to noon to 4
p.m. Jan. 31, Wednesdays to
Sundays. For more information call
the Twin Pines Manor House at 654-
4068.
Charged Particles —
Contemporary Jazz — Live
Concert. 7 p.m. Downtown Library
Fireplace Room, 1044 Middlefield
Road, Redwood City. For more infor-
mation call 299-2433.
San Carlos Children’s Theater
presents ‘The Little Mermaid Jr.’ 7
p.m. Mustang Hall, Central Middle
School, 828 Chestnut St., San Carlos.
$12 for students 18 and under, $15
for adults. Runs Jan. 22 to Jan. 26.
Tickets and information are available
online at www.sancarloschildren-
stheater.com.
‘Rx’ by Kate Fodor opens Dragon
Theatre’s 2014 Main Stage
Season. 8 p.m. Dragon Theatre, 2120
Broadway, Redwood City. The pro-
duction is rated R. Shows runs
through Feb. 9. $30 tickets. For more
information go to http://dragonpro-
ductions.net.
FRIDAY, JAN. 24
Hillbarn Theatre Presents ‘The
Grapes of Wrath.’ Hillbarn Theatre,
1285 E. Hillsdale Blvd., Foster City.
Through Feb. 9. 8 p.m. on Thursdays,
Fridays and Saturdays, and 2 p.m. on
Sundays. $23-$38. For more informa-
tion call 349-6411.
Free Tax Preparation. 10 a.m. to 4
p.m. Samaritan House, 4031 Pacific
Blvd., San Mateo. To make an
appointment or for more informa-
tion call 523-0804.
CSM Painting Class Exhibition.
Noon to 4 p.m. Twin Pines Art Center
Manor House, 10 Twin Pines Lane,
Belmont. Through Jan. 31, noon to 4
p.m. Wednesdays to Sundays. For
more information call the Twin Pines
Manor House at 654-4068.
California Wildlife Art Show
Reception. 5 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Coastside Land Trust Gallery, 788
Main St., Half Moon Bay. Through
March 21. 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Thursdays and 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Fridays and Sundays. All art is for
sale.
Reel Comic Relief: ‘My Favorite
Year.’ 7 p.m. Belmont Library, 1110
Alameda de las Pulgas, Belmont. For
more information contact
conrad@smcl.org.
San Carlos Children’s Theater
presents ‘The Little Mermaid Jr.’ 7
p.m. Mustang Hall, Central Middle
School, 828 Chestnut St., San Carlos.
$12 for students 18 and under, $15
for adults. Through Jan. 26. Tickets
and information are available online
a t
www.sancarloschildrenstheater.com
.
Songs of Freedom Concert. 7:30
p.m. Unitarian Universalist Church,
300 E. Inez Ave., San Mateo. Mat
Callahan and Yvonne Moore will per-
form songs from James Connolly, an
Irish revolutionary whose original
songbook was published in 1907.
$10 donation requested. For more
information email
craig@reachandteach.com.
Hillbarn Theatre presents ‘The
Grapes of Wrath.’ 8 p.m. Hillbarn
Theatre, 1285 E. Hillsdale Blvd., Foster
City. Set during the Great
Depression, John Steinbeck’s
Pulitzer Prize winning story of the
Joad family and their journey from
the dust bowl fields of Oklahoma to
the farmlands of California in search
of jobs and a future has become a
testament to the strength of the
human spirit. $23 to $38 for adults
and seniors. Students 17 and
younger with current student ID, call
349-6411 for pricing. For more infor-
mation go to hillbarntheatre.org.
‘Rx’ by Kate Fodor opens Dragon
Theatre’s 2014 Main Stage
Season. 8 p.m. Dragon Theatre, 2120
Broadway, Redwood City. The pro-
duction is rated R. Through Feb. 9.
$30 tickets. For more information go
to http://dragonproductions.net.
SATURDAY, JAN. 25
San Carlos Week of the Family. San
Carlos. Fifteenth annual San Carlos
Week of the Family will be celebrat-
ed through Feb. 1. Activities are
planned to celebrate and strength-
en the values of our family-centered
community. For more information
go to www.sancarlosweekofthefam-
ily.org.
Flea Market. 8 a.m. to 3 p.m.
American Legion Hall, 130 South
Blvd., San Mateo. $20 to rent an 8 -
foot table. For more information call
520-4325.
Health care reform seminar pre-
sented by Kaiser Permanente. 9
a.m. to 11 a.m. Hospital Tower
Basement Conference Rooms, 1150
Veterans Blvd., Redwood City. Free
and open to the public. Seating is
limited; reserve your seat at
kp.org/healthcarereform/event. If
you have questions please call 299-
4291.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
Peninsula Temple Sholom in
Burlingame.
PMC is comprised of 16 different
faith-based congregations that share
in the values of community outreach
and service, Lazarus said. Founded in
2012, members’ beliefs range from
Christianity, Judaism, Buddhism,
Islam, Catholicism and other denomi-
nations, said PMC representative
Karen Wisialowski.
Yesterday volunteers visited
InnVision Shelter Network’s First Step
for Families, an emergency and tempo-
rary housing facility, to spend the
afternoon contributing to its day care
program by reading, playing, crafting
and cooking for residents and their
children.
“For this facility, they’re especially
in need because they typically have a
day care program but, because it’s a
holiday, they don’t have the program
today. So it’s a perfect opportunity to
find a day when they’re really in need
for social activities for their kids,”
Lazarus said.
Mary Velez is currently living at the
shelter with her five children and
enjoyed meeting a group of people
who wouldn’t visit during a normal
day. Velez’s children played, painted
and made jewelry with the volunteers
during the day off.
“We would be in our rooms basically
the rest of the day if we didn’t have the
volunteers to help us,” Velez said.
King instilled social service values
in youth and teaching one’s own chil-
dren to respect those of varying reli-
gious beliefs and socioeconomic back-
grounds is a vital tradition to uphold,
said Michele Epstein, a member of the
PMC committee and the Peninsula
Temple Beth El in San Mateo.
She began volunteering as a teenag-
er and brought her 16-year-old son
Jacob who is already heavily involved
in community service programs,
Epstein said.
“For me, it was a lifelong thing that
started when I was a teenager and also
starting to work with other people and
learn to respect their choice of wor-
ship. To promote peace, we need to
understand each other, in our country
and overseas,” Epstein said.
Fifteen-year-old Daniela Salgado is a
member of the Congregational Church
of Belmont and spent her first day vol-
unteering at the shelter by playing
with children. She discovered giving
back is gratifying.
“It’s actually been really fun. It’s
exciting to see, and you get to help
these little kids,” Salgado said.
Thirty-nine families currently reside
at First Step for Families; but the shel-
ter has served a total of 588 families
during the 10 years it’s been located in
San Mateo, said Lynelle Bilsey, senior
volunteer manager for InnVision.
Having young generations of volun-
teers visit the shelter and interact with
the residents helps bridge the gap
between people of different back-
grounds, Bilsey said.
“We want them to see children in
shelters are no different than the peo-
ple in their communities and to help
break that stereotype of what home-
lessness is,” Bilsey said.
The shelter has strong community
support from the city, county and indi-
viduals who make charitable dona-
tions, Bilsey said. Yet contributors
rarely interact with the residents and
donations tend to be briefly dropped
off, Bilsey said.
The shelter’s occupants are members
of the San Mateo County community
whose lives were uprooted due to eco-
nomic circumstances. Yesterday’s hol-
iday presented an opportunity for vol-
unteers to help bring a sense of nor-
malcy to shelter residents, Bilsey said.
“We want the clients who are living
here to feel the same as if they’re liv-
ing in the community and not feel stig-
matized that they’re living in a shel-
ter,” Bilsey said.
Carrying on Martin Luther King Jr. ’s
legacy starts with individuals working
at home alongside their neighbors,
Lazarus said.
“In our [PMC] community here,
there’s a real strong push that people
feel they should give back,” Lazarus
said. “And to be able to do it locally, in
your own community, is how to make
the best connections.”
For more information about
Peninsula Multifaith Coalition visit
www.peninsulamultifaith.org.
For more information about
InnVision Shelter Network and First
Step for Families visit www.ivsn.org.
Samantha@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 106
Continued from page 1
KING
King’s own family spoke about pover-
t y, violence, health care and voting
rights, all themes from the civil
rights struggle that still resonate to
this day.
“There is much work that we must
do,” King’s daughter Bernice King
said. “Are we afraid, or are we truly
committed to the work that must be
done?”
The event in Atlanta featured music,
songs and choirs and was one of many
celebrations, marches, parades and
community service projects held
Monday across the nation to honor
the slain civil rights leader. It was
about 50 years ago today that King
had just appeared on the cover of Time
magazine as its Man of the Year, and
the nation was on the cusp of passing
the Civil Rights Act of 1964. King
would win the Nobel Peace Prize later
that year.
Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal said not
many states could boast a native son
that merited a national holiday. “But
we Georgians can,” he told the audi-
ence.
Deal said this year he would work
with state legislators to find a way to
honor King at the Georgia Capitol,
which drew a standing ovation. He did
not give any specifics, but civil rights
leaders have suggested a statue. The
only current tribute to King at the
state Capitol is a portrait inside the
Statehouse.
“I think that more than just saying
kind thoughts about him we ought to
take action ourselves,” said Deal, a
Republican. “That’s how we embed
truth into our words. I think it’s time
for Georgia’s leaders to follow in Dr.
King’s footsteps and take action,
too.”
In the fall, a statue of 19th century
white supremacist politician and
newspaperman Tom Watson was
removed from the Capitol.
Deal also touched on criminal jus-
tice reforms his administration has
tried to make, including drug and men-
tal health courts, saying too many
people are not being rehabilitated in
prisons.
“Let’s build a monument, but the
monument should inspire us to build a
better world,” said the Atlanta event’s
keynote speaker, the Rev. Raphael
Warnock. He also said the growing
disparities in income, opportunity
and health care are indications of a
continuing struggle for equality
decades after King’s death.
The event closed with the choir
singing “We Shall Overcome,” with
visitors singing verses in Spanish,
Hebrew and Italian as audience mem-
bers joined hands and swayed in uni-
son.
President Barack Obama honored
King’s legacy of service by helping a
soup kitchen prepare its daily meals.
Obama took his wife, Michelle, and
daughters Malia and Sasha to DC
Central Kitchen, which is a few min-
utes away from the White House.
New York City’s new Mayor Bill de
Blasio marked the day by talking
about economic inequality, saying it
was “closing doors for hard-working
people in this city and all over this
country.”
“We have a city sadly divided
between those with opportunity, with
the means to fully partake of that
opportunity, and those whose dreams
of a better life are being deferred again
and again,” he told an audience at the
Brooklyn Academy of Music.
Continued from page 1
HONOR
COMICS/GAMES
1-21-14
MONDAY’S PUZZLE SOLVED
PREVIOUS
SUDOKU
ANSWERS
Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 • La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifieds
Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifieds
Boggle Puzzle Everyday in DateBook


Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.
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1 Make dinner
5 Scribble down
8 Neaten the hedge
12 Waikiki setting
13 Dazzle
14 Late night Jay
15 In the cards
17 Absorbs
18 CD predecessors
19 Like cloudless nights
21 Test versions
24 First 007 movie (2 wds.)
25 Evergreen
26 Decorate, as leather
30 Lamb’s alias
32 Charged particle
33 Sporty vehicles
37 Fast planes of yore
38 Set afire
39 Half quart
40 Dent
43 Size above med.
44 Go in reverse
46 Apparent
48 Soup or salad
50 Cave, often
51 Disentangle
52 Divides by three
57 End-of-week cry
58 Youngest Cratchit
59 Bludgeon
60 Carbon deposit
61 Ripen
62 “Fish Magic” artist
DOWN
1 Police officer
2 Galley slave’s tool
3 Melodrama shout
4 — Khan
5 Elbows
6 Athena’s symbol
7 Golf pegs
8 Stops raining (2 wds.)
9 Find out
10 Opening remarks
11 Nosegay
16 Cathedral part
20 NFL events
21 Parting words
22 Morays and congers
23 Bothersome sort
27 Factory
28 More than simmer
29 Not fooled
31 Bush’s first attorney
general
34 Linoleum square
35 MIT grad
36 Dele canceler
41 Signs off on
42 Misfortunes
44 Small drum
45 Sound
47 Sweater style (hyph.)
48 Skips class
49 Blues singer — James
50 Thin coin
53 18-wheeler
54 Mil. rank
55 Half a dangerous fly
56 Yon maiden
DILBERT® CROSSWORD PUZZLE
CRANKY GIRL®
PEARLS BEFORE SWINE®
GET FUZZY®
TUESDAY, JANUARY 21, 2014
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) — If you stay informed
and talk your way through complications, you’ll be
able to find solutions to whatever you face. Changes
to your home will be beneficial.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) — If you are feeling run-
down, allow yourself some time to rejuvenate. You can
start a business partnership with a person who will
add value to a project. Take care of yourself.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) — Don’t be overcome
by fits of anger. Focus on accomplishing reasonable
things that will lead to personal satisfaction. It’s a
good day to check things off your list.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) — You’ll have
momentum and should be able to complete your
agenda. Creativity will lead to all sorts of interesting
new projects. Love is on the rise.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) — You may need to walk
on eggshells, or you could end up in an argument with
someone at home. Hold off on talks until late in the day
to increase the likelihood of a more favorable outcome.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) — Heed the advice
of others and you will discover all sorts of salient
details. Catch up on your emails. A relationship can
thrive if you put in the hours.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) — Learn from experience,
especially when there is money involved. You can
improve your financial future if you take a direction
that you’ve wanted to pursue for some time.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) — If you refuse to
compromise, you will jeopardize a partnership. You
may want to take on fewer projects. It’s preferable to
do one thing well than it is to do many things poorly.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) — If you act fast
and avoid procrastinating, you’ll find success.
Investments could shape the year ahead for you.
Indecision will be your worst enemy.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) — Someone is likely
to enchant you today. Relationships can become
magical, intense and exciting. Open communication
is what will seal a deal.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) — Embellishing the
truth will get you into trouble, so be honest. Lies will
come back to haunt you. Do what you can to dispel
any clouds hanging over your head.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) — Focus on what you
wish to accomplish, and get things moving promptly.
Disputes will escalate later in the day, so start
moving forward with your agenda.
COPYRIGHT 2014 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
Tuesday • Jan. 21, 2014 21
THE DAILY JOURNAL
22
Tuesday • Jan. 21, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
110 Employment
CAREGIVERS
2 years experience
required.
Immediate placement
on all assignments.
Call (650)777-9000
CRYSTAL CLEANING
CENTER
San Mateo, CA
Two positions available:
Customer Service/Seamstress;
Presser
Are you…..Dependable,
friendly, detail oriented,
willing to learn new skills?
Do you have….Good English skills, a
desire for steady employment and
employment benefits?
Immediate openings for customer
service/seamstress and presser
positions.
If you possess the above
qualities, please call for an
Appointment: (650)342-6978
CUSTOMER CONTACT -
OUTSIDE POSITION
FULL TIME/PART TIME
$15.62 per hour start
to $35 per hour
with bonuses
Full training and expenses
Mr. Connors (650)372-2810
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
110 Employment
CAREGIVERS, HHA, CNA’S
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY
15 N. Ellsworth Avenue, Ste. 201
San Mateo, CA 94401
PLEASE CALL
650-206-5200
Please apply in person from Monday to Friday
(Between 10:00am to 4:00pm)
You can also call for an appointment or
apply online at
www.assistainhomecare.com
ASSISTA
IN-HOME CARE
GREETER /
SALES PERSON
Greet customers and up-sell car
wash and detail services. $8.00 +
commission. Potential for $15-$30
per hr. Jacks Car Wash. 3651 S. El
Camino Real, SM. 650-627-8447.
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
MECHANIC - Part-Time work, mostly
evenings. Call Tom, (650)327-5200.
NOW HIRING
Kitchen Staff (easy job)
$9.00 per hr. Apply in Person at or email
resume to info@greenhillsretirement.com
Marymount Greenhills Retirement Center
1201 Broadway, Millbrae
(650)742-9150
No experience necessary
110 Employment
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
OFFICE HELP NEEDED -
Part time, college student welcome. 3
days a week for tax office. Bookeeping
and tax experience preferred. Call
(650)624-9583
TECHNOLOGY
INFORMATICA Corporation has the fol-
lowing job opportunities available in Red-
wood City, CA :
Senior Storage Engineer (RC34SBH) -
Lead global backup practice, design, and
administration (Netbackup, Datadomain,
Tape libraries, cloud tapeless initiative).
Position may require travel to various,
unanticipated locations.
Professional Services Senior Consultant
(PSSC1) - Work independently or with a
team of Informatica and/or Business
Partner consultants to analyze, advise,
design, build, and deploy data ware-
houses. Position may require travel to
various, unanticipated locations.
Submit resume by mail to: Attn: Global
Mobility, Informatica Corporation, 2100
Seaport Blvd., Redwood City, CA 94063.
Must reference job title and job code.
TAXI DRIVER
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY
Clean DMV and background. $500
Guaranteed per week. Taxi Permit
required Call (650)703-8654
TAXI & Limo Driver, Wanted, full time,
paid weekly, between $500 and $700
cash, (650)921-2071
110 Employment
SOFTWARE -
Sr. Software Engineer. Shutterfly, Inc.
has a Sr. Software Engineer position
available. Responsible for implementing
and helping design a flexible, scalable,
data-intensive infrastructure supporting
composition and efficient print output
generation. Integrate with best of class
composition engine and coordinate with
non-technical team members
(content/creative/production) to under-
stand their workflow and communicate
technical limitations. Review engineering
designs and provide constructive feed-
back. Interface with marketing and user
experience for requirements gathering
and refinement. Define and scope high-
level design and development tasks. RE-
QUIRES: Bachelor's degree or equiva-
lent in Computer Engineering or a related
field and 5 years of progressive experi-
ence in the job offered or as a Software
Engineer, Web Engineer, Programmer
Analyst, or any combination thereof. Al-
ternatively, the employer will accept a
Master's degree or equivalent in Comput-
er Engineering or a related field and 3
years of progressive experience in the
job offered or as a Software Engineer,
Web Engineer, Programmer Analyst, or
any combination thereof in lieu of a
Bachelor's degree or equivalent in Com-
puter Engineering or a related field and 5
years of progressive experience in the
job offered or as a Software Engineer,
Web Engineer, Programmer Analyst, or
any combination thereof. Academic
background or work experience to in-
clude: Adobe Flex or C/C++. Work expe-
rience to include: 1. implementation and
design of flexible, scalable, data-inten-
sive infrastructure supporting content
management; 2. ensuring systems meet
documented SLA and system standards;
3. bug triage and prioritization of devel-
opment tasks and defects; 4. resolving or
escalating problems to appropriate per-
sonnel and managing risks for both de-
velopment and production support; 5. de-
veloping applications using Java/J2EE
and Tomcat; 6. iOS development; 7.
Adobe CQ web content management; 8.
SQL and relational databases (Oracle or
SQL server); 9. creating WebServices
using SOAP, REST, and Java Messag-
ing; 10. JavaScript, JSON, Akamai, and
Java caching; 11. Agile development
methodology. M-F 8A-5P. 40 hrs/wk.
Salary: $132,080/yr. Standard company
benefits. Job site: Redwood City, CA.
Submit resume to: Recruitment & Em-
ployment Office, SHUTTERFLY, INC.,
Attn: Job Ref#: SHU98912, PO Box
56625, Atlanta, GA 30343.
127 Elderly Care
FAMILY RESOURCE
GUIDE
The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
twice-a-week resource guide for
children and families.
Every Tuesday & Weekend
Look for it in today’s paper to
find information on family
resources in the local area,
including childcare.
180 Businesses For Sale
ESTABLISHED BUSINESS FOR SALE
in Downtown San Mateo (510)962-1569
or (650) 347-9490.
203 Public Notices
AMENDED FICTITIOUS BUSINESS
NAME STATEMENT #258131
The following person is doing business
as: Catherine Organics, 858 Coleman
Ave., Apt E, MENLO PARK, CA 94025 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Marisa Nelson, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on 10/14/13.
/s/ Marisa Nelson /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/18/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/07/14, 01/14/14, 01/21/14, 01/28/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259147
The following person is doing business
as: Striker Auto Works and Towing, 830
Kaynyne St., REDWOOD CITY, CA
94063 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owners: Aleksey D. Shamilov, 181B
W. Hillsdale Blvd., San Mateo, CA 94403
and Igor Finkel, 1802 Plumeria Ct.,
Pleaston, CA 94566. The business is
conducted by a General Parthnership.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 01/01/14.
/s/ Aleksey D. Shamilov/
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/07/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/14/14, 01/21/14, 01/28/14, 02/04/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258959
The following person is doing business
as:Burlingame Acupuncture Center, 654
North El Camino Real #103, SAN MA-
TEO, CA,94401 is hereby registered by
the following owner: IB Acupunture Inc.,
860 South Winchester Blvd., #B, San
Jose, CA 95128. The business is con-
ducted by a Corporation. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN.
/s/ Lee Bai /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 12/23/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/31/13, 01/07/14, 01/14/14, 01/21/14).
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 525809
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Monelle Palencia
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Monelle Palencia filed a peti-
tion with this court for a decree changing
name as follows:
Present name: Monelle Palencia
Propsed Name: Monelle Palencia Abaya
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on February 4,
2014 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room , at 400
County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 01/06/ 2014
/s/ Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 12/30/2013
(Published, 01/14/14, 01/21/2014,
01/25/2014, 02/04/2014)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258894
The following person is doing business
as: Clean All Cleaning Services, 420
Chestnut Street # 3, REDWOOD CITY,
CA 94063 is hereby registered by the fol-
lowing owner: Ray Charles Watts, same
address. The business is conducted by
an Indivdual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN.
/s/ Ray C. Watts /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 12/16/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/07/14, 01/14/14, 01/21/14, 01/28/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259107
The following person is doing business
as: Dance Away, 105 Cresent Avenue,
South San Francisco, CA 94080 is here-
by registered by the following owner: Al-
vin Zachariak, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Indivdual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN.
/s/ Alvin Zachariak /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/02/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/07/14, 01/14/14, 01/21/14, 01/28/14).
23 Tuesday • Jan. 21, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
The San Mateo Daily Journal,
a locally owned, award-winning daily newspaper on the
Peninsula has an opening for a Account Executive.
The position is responsible for developing new business
opportunities and maintaining those customers within the
San Mateo County and Santa Clara County area.
The candidate will develop new business through a
combination of cold calling, outdoor canvassing, net-
working and any other technique necessary to achieve
his or her goals.
º The candidate will effectivel], professionall] and
accurately represent the Daily Journal’s wide range of
products and services which include print advertising,
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NOTICE INVITING SEALED BIDS
Sealed proposals will be received at the office of the City Clerk, City Hall, 501 Primrose Road,
Burlingame, California, until 2:00 P.M., on Tuesday, February 11, 2014 and will, at 2:00 P.M. on
that date, be publicly opened and read at the City Hall, in Conference Room "B" for: SANCHEZ
BYPASS AND NEIGHBORHOOD SEWER REHABILITATION PROJECT PHASE 3, CITY PROJ-
ECT NO. 82622, within the City of Burlingame, San Mateo County, California.
Plans and Specifications covering the work may be obtained by prospective bidders upon applica-
tion and a cash or check, non-refundable deposit of $65.00, or $80.00 if contract documents are
mailed (USPS only), at the office of the City Engineer, 501 Primrose Road, Burlingame, CA
94010.
The work shall consist of constructing approximately 6,850 LF of new 8-inch through 18-inch sani-
tary sewer (5,460 LF in base bid and 1,390 LF in alternate bids) of sanitary sewer pipe through-
out the City using guided auger boring, pipe bursting, cured-in-place pipe or horizontal directional
drilling methods in public right-of-way, along easement areas, and in private properties. Other re-
lated works include installation and replacement of manholes, cleanouts and laterals by pipe
bursting, CIPP, or open cut, rehabilitation of manholes, bypass pumping, connecting all laterals,
and other miscellaneous works.
Special Provisions, Specifications and Plans, including minimum wage rates to be paid in
com¬pliance with Section 1773.2 of the California Labor Code and related provisions, may be in-
spected in the office of the City Engineer during normal working hours at City Hall, 501 Primrose
Road, Burlin¬game, California.
Bidders shall attend a mandatory pre-bid job site meeting at 9:30 A.M. at the east corner of San-
chez Avenue and El Camino Real on Thursday, January 23, 2014. Questions pertaining to the
contract documents will be accepted up to 5 p.m. on February 4, 2014.
The Contractor shall possess either a Class A license or a combina¬tion of Class C-8, C-12 and
C-34 licenses prior to submitting a bid.
All work specified in this project, shall include the base bid and alternate bids, and shall be com-
pleted within one hundred seventy-five (175) working days from date of the Notice to Proceed. If
alternate bids are awarded, an additional fifteen (15) working days will be added to the 175 work-
ing days.
Donald Chang, P.E.
Senior Civil Engineer
DATE OF POSTING: January 14, 2014
TIME OF COMPLETION FOR BASE BID: One Hundred Seventy-five (175) WORKING DAYS
ADDITIONAL TIME OF COMPLETION FOR ALTERNATE BID ITEMS: Fifteen (15) WORKING
DAYS
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259031
The following person is doing business
as: Colma Animal Hospital, 1232 El Ca-
mino Real, Colma, CA 94014 is hereby
registered by the following owner:
Bhakhri Veteriniary Group, Inc., same
address. The business is conducted by a
Corporation. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN 05/27/2005
/s/ Naudeep Bhakhri /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 12/26/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/07/14, 01/14/14, 01/21/14, 01/28/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258884
The following person is doing business
as: PMAI, 40 Forbes Boulevard, SOUTH
SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94080 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Pacific
Marketing Alliance, Inc., same address.
The business is conducted by a Corpora-
tion. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN
02/04/2002.
/s/ Masanori Takenaka /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 12/13/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/31/13, 01/07/14, 01/14/14, 01/21/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258882
The following person is doing business
as: Fagan Properties,5 Tranquility
Ct.,PACIFICA, CA 94044 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: John Fe-
ga, same address. The business is con-
ducted by a Married Couple. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN 11/11/2013.
/s/ John D. Fegan /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 12/13/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/31/13, 01/07/14, 01/14/14, 01/21/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259053
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Onni Financial Network, 2) Onni
Investment Group, 1500 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA 94030 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Onni Enter-
prise, Inc., P.O. Box 663, Millbrae, CA
94030. The business is conducted by a
Corporation. The registrants commenced
to transact business under the FBN.
/s/ Amie Chan /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 12/30/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/31/13, 01/07/14, 01/14/14, 01/21/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259112
The following person is doing business
as: Fly Away With Us,1175 Park Place
#204, SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Nina
Revko, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN 12/10/2013.
/s/ Nina Revko /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/03/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/07/14, 01/14/14, 01/21/14, 01/28/14).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259059
The following person is doing business
as: Carrier Travel Agency, 1319 Adrian
Ave, SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Tony
Nan, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN.
/s/ Tony Nan /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 12/30/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/07/14, 01/14/14, 01/21/14, 01/28/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259070
The following person is doing business
as: Redwood City Pediatric
Dentistry,2130 Ralston Ave Ste 1B,BEL-
MONT, CA 94002 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Savannah Kim,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by an S Corporation. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN 12/15/2013.
/s/ Savannah Kim /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 12/31/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/07/14, 01/14/14, 01/21/14, 01/28/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258888
The following person is doing business
as: Marci Associates, 113 East Hillsdale
Blvd, SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Matt
Bigting, same address and Merci Bigting,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by a General Partnership. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN.
/s/ Matt Bigting /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 12/16/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/07/14, 01/14/14, 01/21/14, 01/28/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259208
The following person is doing business
as: Clay Oven Cuisine of India, 78 E. 3rd
Ave., SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Swar-
an Singh 3948 Ortega St., San Francis-
co, CA 94121. The business is conduct-
ed by an individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on .
/s/ Swaran Singh /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/14/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/21/14, 01/28/14, 02/04/14, 02/11/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259169
The following person is doing business
as: Gold Angel Cleaning, 7 Delmor Ct.,
REDWOOD CITY, CA 94063 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Cindy
P. Lagos, same address. The business is
conducted by an individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on .
/s/ Cindy P. Lagos /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/09/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/21/14, 01/28/14, 02/04/14, 02/11/14).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259265
The following person is doing business
as: Lebon Transportation Services, 1499
Bayshore Hwy, Ste. 136, BURLINGAME,
CA 94010 is hereby registered by the fol-
lowing owner: Bon Aralu, Inc., CA. The
business is conducted by a Corporation.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on .
/s/ Bon Aralu /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/17/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/21/14, 01/28/14, 02/04/14, 02/11/14).
210 Lost & Found
FOUND: RING Silver color ring found
on 1/7/2014 in Burlingame. Parking Lot
M (next to Dethrone). Brand inscribed.
Gary @ (650)347-2301
LOST AFRICAN GRAY PARROT -
(415)377-0859 REWARD!
LOST DOG-SMALL TERRIER-$5000
REWARD Norfolk Terrier missing from
Woodside Rd near High Rd on Dec 13.
Violet is 11mths, 7lbs, tan, female, no
collar, microchipped. Please help bring
her home! (650)568-9642
LOST GOLD Cross at Carlmont Shop-
ping Cente, by Lunardi’s market
(Reward) (415)559-7291
LOST GOLD WATCH - with brown lizard
strap. Unique design. REWARD! Call
(650)326-2772.
LOST ON Sunday 03/10/13, a Bin of
Documents on Catalpa Ave., in
San Mateo. REWARD, (650)450-3107
LOST SET OF CAR KEYS near Millbrae
Post Office on June 18, 2013, at 3:00
p.m. Reward! Call (650)692-4100
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
REWARD!! LOST DOG - 15LB All White
Dog, needs meds, in the area of Oaknoll
RWC on 3/23/13, (650)400-1175
295 Art
ALASKAN SCENE painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
ART: 5 prints, nude figures, 14” x 18”,
signed Andrea Medina, 1980s. $40/all.
650-345-3277
POSTER, LINCOLN, advertising Honest
Ale, old stock, green and black color.
$15. (650)348-5169
296 Appliances
COIN-OP GAS DRYER - $100.,
(650)948-4895
FRIGIDAIRE ELECTRIC stove, $285. as
new! (650)430-6556
G.E. ELECTRIC DRYER - New, pur-
chased Sept 2013. Paid $475. Will sell
for $300. Excellent condition. Call
(650)712-1291.
LEAN MEAN Fat Grilling Machine by
George Foreman. $15 (650)832-1392
LG WASHER/ DRYER in one. Excellent
condition, new hoses, ultracapacity,
7 cycle, fron load, $600, (650)290-0954
MAYTAG WALL oven, 24”x24”x24”, ex-
cellent condition, $50 obo, (650)345-
5502
PREMIER GAS stove. $285. As new!
(650)430-6556
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
ROTISSERIE GE, IN-door or out door,
Holds large turkey 24” wide, Like new,
$80, OBO (650)344-8549
SANYO MINI REFRIGERATOR- $40.,
(415)346-6038
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SMALL REFRIGERATOR great for of-
fice or studio apartment . Good condition
$40.00 SOLD
STOVE AND HOOD, G.E. XL44, gas,
Good condition, clean, white.. $250.
(650)348-5169
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
297 Bicycles
GIRLS BIKE 18” Pink, Looks New, Hard-
ly Used $80 (650)293-7313
GIRLS SCHWINN Bike 24” 5 speed in
very good condition $75 SOLD!
SCHWINN 20” Boy’s Bike, Good Condi-
tion $40 (650)756-9516
298 Collectibles
101 MINT Postage Stamps from Eu-
rope, Africa, Latin America. Pre 1941,
All different . $6.00, SOLD
120 Foreign (70), U.S. (50) USED Post-
age Stamps. Most pre-World War II. All
different, all detached from envelopes.
$5.00 all, SOLD
19 TOTAL (15 different) UN postage-
stamp souvenir cards, $70 catalog value,
$5, (650)-366-1013.
1920'S AQUA Glass Beaded Flapper
Purse (drawstring bag) & Faux Pearl
Flapper Collar. $50. 650-762-6048
1940 VINTAGE telephone bench maple
antiques collectibles $75 (650)755-9833
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
2 VINTAGE Light Bulbs circa 1905. Edi-
son Mazda Lamps. Both still working -
$50 (650)-762-6048
255 US used postage-stamp blocks &
strips (1300 stamps) and more, mounted,
$20, (650)-366-1013.
4 NOLAN RYAN - Uncut Sheets, Rare
Gold Cards $90 (650)365-3987
400 YEARBOOKS - Sports Illustrated
Sports Book 70-90’s $90 all (650)365-
3987
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23”, $50. OBO,
(650)754-3597
BOX OF 2000 Sports Cards, 1997-2004
years, $20 (650)592-2648
FRANKLIN MINT Thimble collection with
display rack. $55. 650-291-4779
298 Collectibles
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
FRAMED 19X15 BARBIE USPS Post-
mark picture Gallery First Day of issue
1960. Limited edition $85.
JAPANESE MOTIF end table, $99
(650)520-9366
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MEMORABILIA CARD COLLECTION,
large collection, Marilyn Monroe, James
Dean, John Wayne and hundreds more.
$3,300/obo.. Over 50% off
(650)319-5334.
SCHILLER HIPPIE poster, linen, Sparta
graphics 1968. Mint condition. $600.00.
(650)701-0276
TATTOO ARTIST - Norman Rockwell
figurine, limited addition, $90.,
(650)766-3024
TEA POTS - (6) collectables, good con-
dition, $10. each, (650)571-5899
TRIPOD - Professional Quality used in
1930’s Hollywood, $99, obo
(650)363-0360
UNIQUE, FRAMED to display, original
Nevada slot machine glass plate. One of
a kind. $50. 650-762-6048
300 Toys
14 HOTWHEELS - Redline, 32
Ford/Mustang/Corv. $90 all (650)365-
3987
‘66 CHEVELLE TOY CAR, Blue collecti-
ble. $12. (415)337-1690
LEGO - unopened, Monster truck trans-
porter, figures, 299 pieces, ages 5-12.
$27.00 (650)578-9208
PINK BARBIE 57 Chevy Convertible
28" long (sells on E-Bay for $250) in box
$99 (650)591-9769
RADIO CONTROL car; Jeep with off
road with equipment $99 OBO
(650)851-0878
24
Tuesday • Jan. 21, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
300 Toys
TONKA EXCAVATOR, two arms move,
articulated,only $22 SOLD!
TOY - Barney interactive activity, musical
learning, talking, great for the car, $16.
obo, (650)349-6059
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14” x 21”, carved top, $45.,
(650)341-7890
ANTIQUE CRYSTAL floor lamp, marble
table top. Good condition. $90. Call
(650)593-7001
ANTIQUE CRYSTAL table lamps, (2),
shades need to be redone. Free. Call
(650)593-7001
ANTIQUE CRYSTAL/ARCADE Coffee
Grinder. $80. 650-596-0513
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE OLD Copper Wash Tub, 30 x
12 x 13 with handles, $65 (650)591-3313
ANTIQUE WASHING MACHINE - some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
BOX FULL TOYS Original Pkg., 40’s -
50’s, $90 for all (650)365-3987
MAHOGANY ANTIQUE Secretary desk,
72” x 40” , 3 drawers, Display case, bev-
elled glass, $500. (650)766-3024
OLD VINTAGE Wooden “Sea Captains
Tool Chest” 35 x 16 x 16, $65 (650)591-
3313
STERLING SILVER loving cup 10" circa
with walnut base 1912 $65
(650)520-3425
303 Electronics
27” SONY TRINITRON TV - great condi-
tion, rarely used, includes remote, not flat
screen, $65., (650)357-7484
30" SHARP T.V. w/ remote - $65.
(650)333-5353
32 “ FLAT SCREEN TV - Slightly Used.
HDMI 1080, $100 SOLD
46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
AUTO TOP hoist still in box
$99.00 or best offer (650)493-9993
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
BLACKBERRY PHONE good condition
$99.00 or best offer (650)493-9993
DVD PLAYER, $25. Call (650)558-0206
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
IPAD 4, brand new! 16 GB, Wi-Fi, black,
still unopened in box. Tired of the same
old re-gifts? Get yourself something you
really want... an iPad! $500. Call
(954)479-8716 (San Carlos)
IPHONE GOOD condition $99.00 or best
offer (650)493-9993
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
PHILLIPS ENERGY STAR 20” color TV
with remote. Good condition, $20
(650)888-0129
PHOTO ENLARGER, new in box $25.
650-726-6429
SAMSUNG 27" TV Less than 6 months
old, with remote. Moving must sell
$100.00 (650) 995-0012
SET OF 3 wireless phones all for $50
(650)342-8436
SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with re-
mote good condition $99 (650)345-1111
304 Furniture
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
2 TWIN Mattresses - Like New - $35
each , OBO SOLD
2 TWIN Mattresses - Like New - $35
each , OBO SOLD
AMOIRE ENTERTAINMENT cabinet $50
(650)622-6695
ANODYZED BRONZE ETEGERE Tall
banker’s rack. Beautiful style; for plants
flowers sculptures $70 (415)585-3622
304 Furniture
BBQ GRILL, Ducane, propane $90
(650)591-4927
BRASS DAYBED - Beautiful, $99.,
(650)365-0202
CHAIRS 2 Blue Good Condition $50
OBO (650)345-5644
CHANDELIER, ELEGANT, $75.
(650)348-6955
CHINA CABINET, 53” x “78” wooden
with glass. Good shape. $120 obo.
SOLD
CHINESE LACQUERED cabinet, 2
shelves and doors. Beautiful. 23 width 30
height 11 depth $75 (650)591-4927
DINETTE SET, round 42" glass table,
with 4 chairs, pick up Foster City. Free.
(650)578-9045
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DINNING ROOM table with chairs excel-
lent condition like new. $99.00 SOLD
DISPLAY CABINET 72”x 21” x39 1/2”
High Top Display, 2 shelves in rear $99
(650)591-3313
DRESSER - Five Drawer - $30.
(650)333-5353
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
DURALINER ROCKING CHAIR, Maple
Finish, Cream Cushion w matching otto-
man $70 (650)583-4943.
END TABLE, medium large, with marble
top. and drawer. $60 or best offer,
(650)681-7061
EZ CHAIR, large, $15. Call (650)558-
0206
FLAT TOP DESK, $35.. Call (650)558-
0206
I-JOY MASSAGE chair, exc condition
$95 (650)591-4927
KING SIZE Brass bed frame. $200 OBO
SOLD!
KITCHEN CABINETS - 3 metal base
kitchen cabinets with drawers and wood
doors, $99., (650)347-8061
KITCHEN CABINETS - 3 metal base
kitchen cabinets with drawers and wood
doors, $99., (650)347-8061
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
MATCHING RECLINER, SOFA & LOVE
SEAT - Light multi-colored fabric, $95.
for all, SOLD
MIRROR, SOLID OAK. 30" x 19 1/2",
curved edges; beautiful. $85.00 OBO.
Linda 650 366-2135.
MIRRORS, large, $25. Call
(650)558-0206
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
NATURAL WOOD table 8' by 4' $99
(650)515-2605
OUTDOOR WOOD SCREEN - NEW $80
RETAIL $130 OBO (650)873-8167
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PATIO TABLE with 4 chairs, glass top,
good condition 41” in diameter $95
(650)591-4927
PEDESTAL SINK $25 (650)766-4858
PORTABLE JEWELRY display case
wood, see through lid $45. 25 x 20 x 4 in-
ches. (650)592-2648.
RECLINER CHAIR very comfortable
coast $600.00 sacrifice $80.00 SOLD
RECLINING CHAIR (Dark Green) - $55.
(650)333-5353
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
ROCKING CHAIR Great condition,
1970’s style, dark brown, wooden,
suede cushion, photo availble, $99.,
(650)716-3337
ROCKING CHAIR w/wood carving, arm-
rest, rollers, swivels $99, (650)592-2648
SEWING TABLE, folding, $20. Call
(650)558-0206
SHELVING UNIT from IKEA interior
metal, glass nice condition $50/obo.
(650)589-8348
SMALL VANITY chair with stool and mir-
ror $99. (650)622-6695
304 Furniture
SOFA 7-1/2' $25 SOLD!
SOFA EXCELLENT CONDITION. 8FT
NEUTRAL COLOR $99 OBO
(650)345-5644
SOFA PASTEL color excellent
condition $99 (650)701-1892
SOFA- FABRIC, beige w/ green stripes
(excellent cond.) - $95. (650)333-5353
SOLID OAK bed frame, dresser, mirror
and night table, $75, 650-726-6429
SOLID WOOD oak desk $50 (650)622-
6695
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
T.V. STAND- Excellent Condition - $35.
(650)333-5353
TABLE 4X4X4. Painted top $40
(650)622-6695
TEA / UTILITY CART, $15. (650)573-
7035, (650)504-6057
TEACART - Wooden, $60. obo,
(650)766-9998
TOWER BOOK Shelf, white 72” tall x 13”
wide, $20 SOLD!
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
TV STAND brown. $40.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
TV STAND, with shelves, holds large TV,
very good condition. $90. SOLD.
TWIN BED including frame good condi-
tion $45.00 SOLD
WALL CLOCK - 31 day windup, 26 “
long, $99 (650)592-2648
WHITE 5 Drawer dresser.Excellent con-
dition. Moving. Must sell $90.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
WHITE METAL daybed $40. 650-726-
6429
WICKER DRESSER, white, 3 drawers,
exc condition 31 width 32 height 21.5
depth $35 (650)591-4927
WOOD BOOKCASE unit - good condi-
tion $65.00 (650)504-6058
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE” decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Three avail-
able, Call (650)345-5502
BRADFORD COLLECTOR Plates THAI
(Asian) - $35 (650)348-6955
CANNING POTS, two 21 quart with lids,
$5 each. SOLD!
COFFEE MAKER, Makes 4 cups $12,
(650)368-3037
COOKING POTS(3) stainless steel
21/2 gal., 4 gal., 5 gal. - $10 all
(650)574-3229
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
GAS STOVE - Roper, Oven w 4 Burners,
good condition $95 (650)515-2605
HOUSE HEATER Excellent condition.
Works great. Must sell. $30.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
MANGLE-SIMPLEX FLOOR model,
Working, $20 (650)344-6565
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
PUSH LAWN MOWER - very good
condition $25., (650)580-3316
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
VACUMN EXCELLENT condition. Works
great.Moving. Must sell. $35.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
VINTAGE VICTORIAN cotton lawn
dress, - $65. (650)348-6955
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
LADIES GLOVES - gold lame' elbow
length gloves, size 7.5, $15. new,
(650)868-0436
PRO DIVER Invicta Watch. Brand new in
box, $60. (650)290-0689
308 Tools
BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269
CEMENT/ CONCRETE hand mixing box
Like New, metal $25 SOLD!
CLICKER TORQUE Wrench 20-150 lbs,
warranty & case $25 650-595-3933
CRACO 395 SP-PRO, electronic paint
sprayer.Commercial grade. Used only
once. $600/obo. (650)784-3427
CRAFTMAN JIG Saw 3.9 amp. with vari-
able speeds $65 (650)359-9269
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN 9" Radial Arm Saw with 6"
dado set. No stand. $55 (650)341-6402
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
LOG CHAIN (HEAVY DUTY) 14' $75
(650)948-0912
NEW 18VOLT Drill/Driver w/ light,
warranty, only $29.99 SOLD!
308 Tools
PUSH LAWN mower $25 (650)851-0878
ROLLING STEEL Ladder10 steps, Like
New. $475 obo, (650)333-4400
TOOL BOX full of tools. Moving must
sell. $100.00 (650) 995-0012
WINCHESTER POCKETKNIFE scis-
sors, bade, sdriver file $10 650-595-3933
309 Office Equipment
CANON COPIER, $55. Call
(650)558-0206
DESK - 7 drawer wood desk, 5X2X2.5'
$25., (650)726-9658
PANASONIC FAX machine, works
great, $20. (650-578-9045)
SLIDE PROJECTOR, Vivitar + slide
trays/carousels $25. 650-726-6429
SUPER 8 projector $25. 650-726-6429
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20., (650)871-7200
16 BOOKS on Histoy if WWII Excllent
condition $95 all obo, (650)345-5502
2 FLOWER pots with Gardenia's both for
$20 (650)369-9762
4 IN 1 STERO UNIT. CD player broken.
$20., (650)834-4926
Alkaline GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM - ,
PH Balance water, anti-oxident proper-
ties, new, $100., (650)619-9203.
ALUMINUM WINDOWS - (10)double
pane, different sizes, $10. each,
(415)819-3835
ANTIQUE CAMEL BACK TRUNK -wood
lining. (great toy box) $99.,
(650)580-3316
ANTIQUE KILIM RUNNER woven zig
zag design 7' by 6" by 4' $99.,
(650)580-3316
ANTIQUE LANTERN Olde Brooklyn lan-
terns, battery operated, safe, new in box,
$100, (650)726-1037
ARTIFICIAL FICUS TREE 6 ft. life like,
full branches. in basket $55. (650)269-
3712
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
BALANCING SANTA, Mint condition,
Santa rocks back/forth, 20 in high, sturdy
metal, snowman, chimney, $12.00
(650)578-9208
BATH TOWELS(3) - 1 never used
( 26"x49") aqua - $15 each
(650)574-3229
BATH TOWELS(3) - 1 never used(
26"x49") aqua - $15 each (650)574-3229
BLACK LEATHER Organizer, Unop-
ened, Any Year, Cell Holder, Wallet, Cal-
ender., In Box $12 (650)578-9208
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
BODY BY JAKE AB Scissor Exercise
Machine w/instructions. $50.00
(650)637-0930
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BUFFET CENTERPIECE: Lalique style
crystal bowl. For entre, fruit, or dessert
$20 (415)585-3622
CEILING FAN 44", three lights, Excel-
lent condition, white or wood grain rever-
sible blades. $25. 650-339-1816
CHEESESET 6 small and 1 large plate
Italian design never used Ceramica Cas-
tellania $25. (650)644-9027
COPPERLIKE CENTERPIECE, unused
oval, 18 inches high, x 22 x 17,$10.00
(650)578-9208
DOWN PILLOW; Fully Stuffed, sterilized,
allergy-free ticking. Mint Condition $25
(650)375-8044
DRAIN CLEANER Snake 6' long,
new/unused only $5 (650)595-3933
DVD'S TV programs 24 4 seasons $20
ea. (650)952-3466
ELECTRIC OMELET Maker quesadillas
& sandwich too $9 650-595-3933
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good
condition $50., (650)878-9542
EXOTIC EROTIC Ball SF & Mardi gras 2
dvd's $25 ea. (415)971-7555
EXTENDED BATH BENCH - never
used, $45. obo, (650)832-1392
FULL SIZE quilted Flowerly print green &
print $25 (650)871-7200
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GOURMET SET for cooking on your ta-
ble. European style. $15 (650)644-9027
GRANDFATHER CLOCK with bevel
glass in front and sides (650)355-2996
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10),
(650)364-7777
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
HONEYWELL HEPA Filter $99
(650)622-6695
HUMAN HAIR Wigs, (4) Black hair, $90
all (650)624-9880
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
IGLOO COOLER - 3 gallon beverage
cooler, new, still in box, $15.,
(650)345-3840
JAPANESE SAKE Set, unused, boxes,
Geisha design on carafe and 2 sake
cups, $7.00 (650)578-9208
JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
OVAL MIRROR $10 (650)766-4858
310 Misc. For Sale
KENNESAW ORIGINAL salute cannon
$30. (650)726-1037
LAMPSHADE - Shantung, bell shaped,
off white, 9” tall, 11” diameter, great con-
dition, $7., (650)347-5104
LANDSCAPE PICTURES (3) hand
painted 25" long 21" wide, wooden
frame, $60 for all 3, (650)201-9166
LAWN CHAIRS (4) White, plastic, $8.
each, (415)346-6038
LITTLE PLAYMATE by IGLOO-10"x10",
cooler includes 2 icepaks, 1 cooler pack
$20 (650)574-3229
MANUAL LAWN mower ( by Scott Turf )
never used $65 (650)756-7878
MEDICINE CABINET - 18” X 24”, almost
new, mirror, $20., (650)515-2605
MERITAGE PICNIC Time Wine and
Cheese Tote - new black $45
(650)644-9027
MIRROR 41" by 29" Hardrock maple
frame $90 OBO SOLD!
NATIVITY SET, new, beautiful, ceramic,
gold-trimmed, 11-pc.,.asking: $50.
Call: 650-345-3277 /message
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
OUTDOOR GREENHOUSE. Handmade.
33" wide x 20 inches deep. 64.5 " high.
$70.00 (650)871-7200
PET CARRIER Excellent Condition Very
Clean Size small "Petaire" Brand
$50.00 (650)871-7200
PILGRIM DOLLS, 15” boy & girl, new,
from Harvest Festival, adorable $25 650-
345-3277
PRINCESS PLANT 6' tall in bloom pot-
ted $15 SOLD!
QUEENSIZE BEDSPREAD w/2 Pillow
Shams (print) $30.00 (650)341-1861
RED DEVIL VACUUM CLEANER - $25.,
(650)593-0893
REVERSIBLE KING BEDSPREAD bur-
gundy; for the new extra deep beds. New
$60 (415)585-3622
RICHARD NORTH Patterson 5 Hard-
back Books @$3.00 each (650)341-1861
ROGERS' BRAND stainless steel steak
knife: $15 (415)585-3622
SCREWDRIVERS, SET of 6 sealed
pack, warranty only $5 (650)595-3933
SET OF 11 Thomas registers 1976 mint
condition $25 (415)346-6038
SF GREETING CARDS -(300 with enve-
lopes) factory sealed, $10 (650)365-3987
SHOWER CURTAIN set: royal blue
vinyl curtain with white nylon over-curtain
$15 (650)574-3229
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48” x 69”
$70 (650)692-3260
SINGER SEWING machine 1952 cabinet
style with black/gold motor. $35.
(650)574-4439
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
TRAVIS MCGEE (Wikipedia) best mys-
teries 18 classic paperbacks for $25.
Steve (650) 518-6614
TWIN BEDDING: 2 White Spreads,
Dust-Ruffles, Shams. Pink Blanket,
Fit/flat sheets, pillows ALL $60 (650)375-
8044
TWIN SIZE quilt Nautica, New. Yellow,
White, Black Trim “San Marino" pattern
$40 Firm (650)871-7200.
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VINTAGE WHITE Punch Bowl/Serving
Bowl Set with 10 cups plus one extra $35
(650)873-8167
VINTAGE WHITE Punch Bowl/Serving
Bowl Set with 10 cups plus one extra
$35. (650)873-8167
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WEST AFRICAN hand carved tribal
masks - $25 (650)348-6955
WHEEL CHAIR asking $75 OBO
(650)834-2583
WOMEN'S LADY Cougar gold iron set
set - $25. (650)348-6955
311 Musical Instruments
ACOUSTIC GUITAR no brand $65
(650)348-6428
BALDWIN GRAND PIANO, 6 foot, ex-
cellent condition, $8,500/obo. Call
(510)784-2598
GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO -
Appraised @$5450., want $3500 obo,
(650)343-4461
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
SHERMAN CLAY Player Piano, with 104
player rolls, $1000, SOLD!
VIOLIN $50 (650)622-6695
WURLITZER PIANO, console, 40” high,
light brown, good condition. $490.
(650)593-7001
312 Pets & Animals
BAMBOO BIRD Cage - very intricate de-
sign - 21"x15"x16". $50 (650)341-6402
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
AUTHENTIC PERUVIAN VICUNA PON-
CHO: 56” square. Red, black trim, knot-
ted fringe hem. $99 (650)375-8044
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
HOODED ALL-WEATHER JACKET:
reversible. Outer: weatherproof tan color.
Iner: Navy plush, elastic cuffs. $10
(650)375-8044
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES DONEGAL design 100% wool
cap from Wicklow, Ireland, $20. Call
(650)341-8342
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES FUR Jacket (fake) size 12 good
condition $30 (650)692-3260
LADIES WOOL BLAZER: Classic, size
12, brass buttons. Sag Harbor. Excellent
condition. $15.00 (650)375-8044
LARRY LEVINE Women's Hooded down
jacket. Medium. Scarlet. Good as new.
Asking $40 OBO (650)888-0129
LEATHER JACKET Classic Biker Style.
Zippered Pockets. Sturdy. Excellent Con-
dition. Mens, XL Black Leather $50.00
(650)357-7484
LEATHER JACKET, brown bomber, with
pockets.Sz XL, $88. (415)337-1690
LEATHER JACKETS (5) - used but not
abused. Like New, $100 each.
(650)670-2888
MENS JEANS (11) Brand names various
sizes 32,33,34 waist 30,32 length $100.
for all (650)347-5104
MENS WRANGLER jeans waist 31
length 36 five pairs $20 each plus bonus
Leonard (650)504-3621
MINK CAPE, beautiful with satin lining,
light color $75 obo (650)591-4927
MINK JACKET faux, hip length, satin lin-
ing. Looks feels real. Perfect condition
$99 OBO 650-349-6969
NIKE PULLOVER mens heavy jacket
Navy Blue & Red, Reg. price $200 sell-
ing for $59 (650)692-3260
PROM PARTY Dress, Long sleeveless
size 6, magenta, with shawl like new $40
obo (650)349-6059
VELVET DRAPE, 100% cotton, new
beautiful burgundy 82"X52" W/6"hems:
$45 (415)585-3622
VINTAGE 1970’S GRECIAN MADE
DRESS SIZE 6-8, $35 (650)873-8167
WHITE LACE 1880’s reproduction dress
- size 6, $100., (650)873-8167
WINTER COAT, ladies european style
nubek leather, tan colored, green lapel &
hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
25 Tuesday • Jan. 21, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 Big cat of Narnia
6 Salad alternative
10 No more than
14 Pope after John X
15 Facility
16 Iowa State’s city
17 *Genealogist’s
tool
19 Political syst.
20 Priestly robes
21 Suffix with Capri
22 Door sign
23 __ Fáil: Irish
coronation stone
24 *“Top Hat”
leading man
27 Abandon
29 British throne?
30 Churchillian
sign
31 Compound
conjunction
32 Uppercut target
33 Take a break
34 *Stewed chicken
dish
38 First Greek
consonant
41 Go a few rounds
42 Petting zoo
critter
46 Pulitzer poet
Lowell
47 Gloss target
48 Concession
speech deliverer
50 *Most serious or
least serious
53 Former telecom
co.
54 Toga party
hosts
55 HDTV brand
56 Amazed sounds
57 “Lois & Clark”
reporter
58 Escapes, and,
literally, what
each of the
answers to
starred clues
does
61 Blues singer
James
62 Carded at a club
63 Catorce ÷ dos
64 Work station
65 Billy of “Titanic”
66 Extra
DOWN
1 “Our Gang” kid
with a cowlick
2 Circus barker
3 Gable’s third wife
4 Thrifty alternative
5 Zilch
6 Parlor piece
7 Propelled, as a
galley
8 Capitalize on
9 Peruvian capital?
10 __ cum laude
11 Eliciting feeling
12 Really looks up
to
13 Springsteen’s __
Band
18 N.Y.C. part
22 DDE’s WWII
arena
24 Klinger portrayer
on “M*A*S*H”
25 “Ah, me!”
26 Porcine moms
28 Cushioned seat
32 Fla. NFL team,
on scoreboards
33 Move for the job,
briefly
35 Abbr. referring to
a previous
citation
36 Make do
37 “What __ can I
say?”
38 Bewildered
39 Kuwait or Qatar
40 Ruthless rulers
43 Like a Brink’s
truck
44 Jungle explorer’s
tool
45 Ouzo flavoring
47 Capt.’s
underlings
48 Game venue
49 Pipe problem
51 Porterhouse, e.g.
52 Putting spot
56 “The Wizard __”
58 Line of work, for
short
59 Nutritionist’s
abbr.
60 Fed. retirement
org.
By Kurt Krauss
(c)2014 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
01/22/14
01/22/14
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
316 Clothes
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10 labeled Du-
plex and is priced at $15 (650)574-4439
317 Building Materials
(1) 2" FAUX WOOD WINDOW BLIND,
with 50" and 71" height, still in box, $50
obo (650)345-5502
30 FLUORESCENT Lamps 48" (brand
new in box) $75 for all (650)369-9762
BATHROOM VANITY, antique, with top
and sink: - $65. (650)348-6955
BRAND NEW Millgard window + frame -
$85. (650)348-6955
PVC - 1”, 100 feet, 20 ft. lengths, $25.,
SOLD!
318 Sports Equipment
2 BASKETBALLS Spalding NBA, Hardly
used, $30 all (650)341-5347
2 SOCCER balls hardly used, $30 all
San Mateo, (650)341-5347
AB LOUNGE exercise machine cost
$100. sell for $25. Call 650-570-6023
BASEBALLS & softballs 6 in all for only
$5 650-595-3933
BOWLING BALLS. Selling 2 - 16 lb.
balls for $25.00 each. (650)341-1861
BUCKET OF 260 golf balls, $25.
(650)339-3195
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18” di-
meter, “Halex” brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
DL1000 BOAT Winch Rope & More,
$50., (650)726-9658
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
FISHERS MENS skis $35 SOLD!
GOTT 10-GAL beverage cooler $20.
(650)345-3840
KIDS 20" mongoose mountain bike 6
speeds front wheel shock good condition
asking $65 (650)574-7743
LADIES BOWLING SET- 8 lb. ball, 7 1/2
sized shoes, case, $45., (650)766-3024
318 Sports Equipment
LADIES STEP thruRoadmaster 10
speed bike w. shop-basket Good
Condition. $55 OBO call: (650) 342-8510
MENS ROLLER Blades size 101/2 never
used $25 (650)520-3425
POWER PLUS Exercise Machine $99
(650)368-3037
REI 2 man tent $40 (650)552-9436
SALMON FISHING weights 21/2 pound
canon balls $25 (650)756-7878
SCHWINN 26" man's bike with balloon
tires $75 like new (650)355-2996
STATIONARY BIKE, Volt, Clean, $15
SOLD!
TAYLOR MADE 200, driver & Fairway
metals. 9 PC iron set $99 OBO. SOLD!
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
VINTAGE ENGLISH ladies ice skates -
up to size 7-8, $45., (650)873-8167
VINTAGE ENGLISH ladies ice skates -
up to size 7-8, $40., (650)873-8167
WET SUIT - medium size, $95., call for
info (650)851-0878
WO 16 lb. Bowling Balls @ $25.00 each.
(650)341-1861
WOMAN'S BOWLING ball, 12 lbs, "Lin-
da", with size 7 shoes and bag, $15.
(650)578-9045
322 Garage Sales
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
335 Garden Equipment
CRAFTSMAN 5.5 HP gas lawn mower
with rear bag $55., (650)355-2996
GAS ENGINE String Trimmer - Homelite
- 25cc engine. Excellent Cond.$70
(650)654-9252
LAWN MOWER High performance
Cordless Electric 21" self propelled. Ex-
cellent working cond. $80. Call
(650)593-1261.
LAWNMOWER - American made, man-
ual/push, excellent condition, $50.,
(650)342-8436
REMINGTON ELECTRIC lawn mower,
$40. (650)355-2996
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
CLASSICAL YASHICA camera
in leather case $25. (650)644-9027
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $99
(415)971-7555
345 Medical Equipment
MEDICAL EQUIPMENT - Brand new
port-a-potty, never used, $40., Walker,
$30., (650)832-1392
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
380 Real Estate Services
HOMES & PROPERTIES
The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
weekly Real Estate Section.
Look for it
every Friday and Weekend
to find information on fine homes
and properties throughout
the local area.
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedrooms, new carpets, new granite
counters, dishwasher, balcony, covered
carports, storage, pool, no pets.
(650)591-4046.
REDWOOD CITY WEST OF EL CAMI-
NO - WALK TO STORES - 1 BR, 1 BA
W/NEW RUGS AND PAINT - WALK IN
SHOWER - ELECTRIC OVEN AND
HEAT - 2 CLOSETS WITH CABINETS -
CARPORT - NO SMOKING.
MANAGER AVAILABLE 9-4.
NON REFUNDABLE APPLICATION
FEE $30. $1500/ MONTH (650)361-1200
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49.-59.daily + tax
$294.-$322. weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator & A/C
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $40
We’ll run it
‘til you sell it!
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
FLEETWOOD ‘93 $ 3,500/offer. Good
Condition (650)481-5296
MERCEDES ‘06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
VOLVO ‘85 244 Turbo, automatic, very
rare! 74,700 original miles. New muffler,
new starter, new battery, tires have only
200 miles on it. $4,900. (650)726-8623.
625 Classic Cars
FORD ‘63 THUNDERBIRD Hardtop, 390
engine, Leather Interior. Will consider
$6,500 /OBO (650)364-1374
VOLVO ‘85 244 Turbo, automatic, very
rare! 74,700 original miles. New muffler,
new starter, new battery, tires have only
200 miles on it. $4,900. (650)726-8623.
630 Trucks & SUV’s
FORD ‘98 EXPLORER 6 cylinder, 167K
miles, excellent condition, good tires,
good brakes, very dependable! $2,400 or
best offer. Moving, must sell! Call
(650)274-4337
ISUZU ‘96 RODEO, V-6, 153K miles,
clean body, red, no dents, immaculate in-
terior. Kenwood stereeo with boom box
included. Great car! Asking $3,750.
SOLD!
635 Vans
‘67 INTERNATIONAL Step Van 1500,
Typical UPS type size. $1,950/OBO,
(650)364-1374
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
MOTORCYCLE GLOVES - Excellent
condition, black leather, $35. obo,
(650)223-7187
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAGS with
brackets and other parts, $35.,
(650)670-2888
670 Auto Service
MA'S AUTO
REPAIR SERVICE
Tires • Service • Smog checks
***** - yelp!
980 S Clarem’ont St San Mateo
650.513.1019
704 N San Mateo Dr San Mateo
650.558.8530
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
CAR TOWchain 9' $35 (650)948-0912
HONDA SPARE tire 13" $25
(415)999-4947
HONDA WHEELS with tires. Good
tread/ 14 in. 3 for $99 (415)999-4947
MECHANIC'S CREEPER vintage, Com-
et model SP, all wood, pillow, four swivel
wheels, great shape. $40.00
(650)591-0063
NEW BATTERY and alternator for a ‘96
Buick Century never used Both for $80
(650)576-6600
NEW, IN box, Ford Mustang aluminum
water pump & gasket, $60.00. Call
(415)370-3950
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, 1
gray marine diesel manual $40
(650)583-5208
SHOP MANUALS for GM Suv's
Year 2002 all for $40 (650)948-0912
TIRE CHAIN cables $23. (650)766-4858
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
35 Years Experience
1823 El Camino
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $40
We will run it
‘til you sell it!
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
26
Tuesday • Jan. 21, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ADVERTISE
YOUR SERVICE
in the
HOME & GARDEN SECTION
Offer your services to 76,500 readers a day, from
Palo Alto to South San Francisco
and all points between!
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
Cabinetry
Cleaning
ANGELICA’S HOUSE
CLEANING & ERRAND
SERVICES
• House Cleaning • Move In/Out
Cleaning • Janitorial Services
• Handyman Services
• General Errands
call or email for details
(650)918-0354
MyErrandServicesCA.com
Concrete
Construction
WARREN BUILDER
Contractor & Electrician
Kitchen, Bathroom, Additions
Design & Drafting Lowest Rate
Lic#964001, Ins. & BBB member
Warren Young
(650)465-8787
Construction
DEVOE
CONSTRUCTION
Kitchen & Bath
Remodeling
Belmont, CA
(650) 318-3993
O’SULLIVAN
CONSTRUCTION
(650)589-0372
New Construction, Remodeling,
Kitchen/Bathrooms,
Decks/ Fences
Licensed and Insured
Lic. #589596
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed • Insured • Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
Doors
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
Electricians
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
Gardening
GENERAL
LANDSCAPE
MAINTENANCE
Commercial & Residential
Gardening
New lawn &
sprinkler installation,
Trouble shooting and repair
Work done by the hour
or contract
Free estimates
Licensed
(650)444-5887, Call/Text
glmco@aol.com
Flooring
SHOP
AT HOME
WE WILL
BRING THE
SAMPLES
TO YOU.
Call for a
FREE in-home
estimate
FLAMINGO’S FLOORING
CARPET
VINYL
LAMINATE
TILE
HARDWOOD
650-655-6600
SLATER FLOORS
. Restore old floors to new
. Dustless Sanding
. Install new custom & refinished
hardwood floors
Licensed. Bonded. Insured
www.slaterfloors.com
(650) 593-3700
Showroom by appointment
Gutters
GUTTERS AND ROOF
REPAIR
• New Installation seamless,
• Cleaning and Screening,
• Commercial and Residential
Power Washing
Free Estimates
(650)669-6771
Lic.# 910421
O.K.’S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutters
Down Spouts
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Roof & Gutter Repairs
Friendly Service
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
(650)556-9780
Handy Help
AAA HANDYMAN
& MORE
Since 1976
Repairs • Maintenance • Painting
Carpentry • Plumbing • Electrical
All Work Guaranteed
(650) 995-4385
Handy Help
DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
Kitchen/Bathroom Remodeling,
Tile Installation,
Door & Window Installation
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
HONEST HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766
(650)740-8602
PAYLESS
HANDYMAN
Kitchen & Bath remodling, Tile
work, Roofing, And Much More!
Free Estimates
(650)771-2432
SENIOR HANDYMAN
“Specializing in Any Size Projects”
•Painting • Electrical
•Carpentry •Dry Rot
40 Yrs. Experience
Retired Licensed Contractor
(650)201-6854
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
•Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
•Refinish
•High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
CHAINEY HAULING
Junk & Debris Clean Up
Furniture / Appliance / Disposal
Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo
Starting at $40& Up
www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
Moving
Bay Area
Relocation Services
Specializing in:
Homes, Apts., Storages
Professional, friendly, careful.
Peninsula’s Personal Mover
Commercial/Residential
Fully Lic. & Bonded CAL -T190632
Call (650) 630-0424
Painting
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Quality Work, Reasonable
Rates, Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
NICK MEJIA PAINTING
A+ Member BBB • Since 1975
Large & Small Jobs
Residential & Commercial
Classic Brushwork, Matching, Stain-
ing, Varnishing, Cabinet Finishing
Wall Effects, Murals, More!
(415)971-8763
Lic. #479564
Plumbing
$89 TO CLEAN
ANY CLOGGED
DRAIN!
Installation of Trenchless Pipes,
Water Heaters, Faucets,
Toilets, Sinks, & Re-pipes
(650)461-0326
Plumbing
Remodeling
HARVEST KITCHEN
& MOSAIC
Cabinets * Vanities * Tile
Flooring * Mosaics
Sinks * Faucets
Fast turnaround * Expert service
920 Center St., San Carlos
(650)620-9639
www.harvestkm.com
Tree Service
Hillside Tree
Service
LOCALLY OWNED
Family Owned Since 2000
• Trimming Pruning
• Shaping
• Large Removal
• Stump Grinding
Free
Estimates
Mention
The Daily Journal
to get 10% off
for new customers
Call Luis (650) 704-9635
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
GUTTER
CLEANING
27 Tuesday • Jan. 21, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Attorneys
• BANKRUPTCY •
Huge credit card debit?
Job loss? Foreclosure?
Medical bills?
YOU HAVE OPTIONS
Call for a free consultation
(650-363-2600
This law firm is a debt relife agency
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Clothing
$5 CHARLEY'S
Sporting apparel from your
favorite teams,low prices,
large selection.
450 San Bruno Ave.
San Bruno
650 771 -5614
Dental Services
MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER
Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken
(650)697-9000
15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA
Food
CROWNE PLAZA
Foster City-San Mateo
Champagne Sunday Brunch
Wedding, Event &
Meeting Facilities
(650) 295-6123
1221 Chess Drive Foster City
Hwy 92 at Foster City Blvd. Exit
GET HAPPY!
Happy Hour 4-6• M-F
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
Food
JACK’S
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA
Because Flavor Still Matters
365 B Street
San Mateo
www.sfpanchovillia.com
PRIME STEAKS
SUPERB VALUE
BASHAMICHI
Steak & Seafood
1390 El Camino Real
Millbrae
www.bashamichirestaurant.com
VEGETARIAN
BAMBOO GARDEN
Lunch & Dinner
Only Vegetarian Chinese
Restaurant in Millbrae!
309 Broadway, Millbrae
(650)697-6768
Financial
RELATIONSHIP BANKING
Partnership. Service. Trust.
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
Half Moon Bay, Redwood City,
unitedamericanbank.com
San Mateo
(650)579-1500
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
Furniture
WESTERN FURNITURE
Grand Opening Sale
Everything Marked Down !
601 El Camino Real
San Bruno, CA
Mon. - Sat. 10AM -7PM
Sunday Noon -6PM
We don't meet our competition,
we beat it !
Guns
PENINSULA GUNS
(650) 588-8886
Handguns.Shotguns.Rifles
Tactical and
Hunting Accessories
Buy.Sell.Trade
360 El Camino Real, San Bruno
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
DENTAL
IMPLANTS
Save $500 on
Implant Abutment &
Crown Package.
Call Millbrae Dental
for details
650-583-5880
EYE EXAMINATIONS
579-7774
1159 Broadway
Burlingame
Dr. Andrew Soss
OD, FAAO
www.Dr-AndrewSoss.net
NCP COLLEGE OF NURSING
& CAREER COLLEGE
Train to become a Licensed
Vocational Nurse in 12 months or a
Certified Nursing Assistant in as little
as 8 weeks.
Call (800) 339-5145 for more
information or visit
ncpcollegeofnursing.edu and
ncpcareercollege.com
Health & Medical
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
STUBBORN FAT has met its match.
FREEZE Your Fat Away with
COOLSCULPTING
Bruce Maltz, M.D.
Carie Chui, M.D.
Allura Skin & Laser Center, Inc.
280 Baldwin Ave., San Mateo
(650) 344-1121
AlluraSkin.com
Insurance
AANTHEM BLUE
CROSS
www.ericbarrettinsurance.com
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
AFFORDABLE
HEALTH INSURANCE
Personal & Professional Service
JOHN LANGRIDGE
(650) 854-8963
Bay Area Health Insurance Marketing
CA License 0C60215
a Diamond Certified Company
HEALTH INSURANCE
All major carriers
Collins Insurance
Serving the Peninsula
since 1981
Ron Collins
650-701-9700
Lic. #0611437
www.collinscoversyou.com
PARENTI & ASSOCIATES
Competitive prices and best service to
meet your insurance needs
* All personal insurance policies
* All commercial insurance policies
* Employee benefit packages
650.596.5900
www.parentiinsurance.com
1091 Industrial Rd #270, San Carlos
Lic: #OG 17832
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
est. 1979
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues, Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
ASIAN MASSAGE
$45 per Hour
Present ad for special price
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
ENJOY THE BEST
ASIAN MASSAGE
$40 for 1/2 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
Massage Therapy
UNION SPA
Grand Opening
Full Massage and
Brazilian Wax
(650)755-2823
7345 Mission St., Daly City
www.unionspaand salon.com
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes • Multi-family •
Mixed-Use • Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Real Estate Services
VIP can help you with all of your
real estate needs:
SALES * LEASING * MANAGEMENT
Consultation and advice are free
Where every client is a VIP
864 Laurel St #200 San Carlos
650-595-4565
www.vilmont.com
DRE LIC# 1254368
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living
Care located in
Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
&
Burlingame Villa
- Short Term Stays
- Dementia & Alzheimers
Care
- Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
NAZARETH VISTA
Best Kept Secret in Town !
Independent Living, Assisted Living
and Skilled Nursing Care.
Daily Tours/Complimentary Lunch
650.591.2008
900 Sixth Avenue
Belmont, CA 94002
crd@belmontvista.com
www.nazarethhealthcare.com
Travel
FIGONE TRAVEL
GROUP
(650) 595-7750
www.cruisemarketplace.com
Cruises • Land & Family vacations
Personalized & Experienced
Family Owned & Operated
Since 1939
1495 Laurel St. SAN CARLOS
CST#100209-10
851 Cherry Ave. #29, San Bruno
in Bayhill Shopping Center
Open 7 Days 10:30am- 10:30pm
650. 737. 0788
Foot Massage $19.99/hr
Free Sauna (with this Ad)
Body Massage $39.99/hr
Hot StoneMassage $49.99/hr
GRAND OPENING
RELAX
REJUVENATE
RECHARGE
in our luxury bath house
Water Lounge Day Spa
2500 S. El Camino
San Mateo
(650)389-7090
28
Tuesday • Jan. 21, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL

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