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Technical Training Light

Technical Introduction Training for Non-Technical Maserati Dealership Staff


May 2011

Training Documentation for Maserati Dealer Network

Technical Training Light

Preface

Technical Training Light

Engineering excellence is, and always has been, an important part of the Maserati brand DNA. The Maserati history is characterized by the use of innovative and often remarkable technical solutions on its cars. These solutions are often inspired by Maseratis long expertise in motor racing. To obtain a better understanding of Maserati products, it is vital to be aware of certain technical concepts of which they make use. This Technical Training Light manual is intended for Maserati dealership staff, e.g. sales and marketing people, receptionists, service advisors, parts personnel, who did not receive any technical education.

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Technical Training Light

Index

Index
Preface Index Maserati History and Heritage Introduction to Technical Concepts Technical Benchmarking Vehicle Functionality Overview Emergency and Service related Guidelines Maserati Technical Dictionary 2 3 4 44 85 103 126 144

Maserati Academy Hi-tech vehicles like Maserati require highly skilled people to service and repair them. The Maserati Academy team is very passionate about their task of training the service technicians of the Maserati dealership network worldwide. For this occasion they take on the new challenge of increasing the technical awareness of non-technical Maserati dealership staff.

The Maserati Academy team, from left to right: Nevill, Dave, Shawn, Cristian & Hans

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History and Heritage

History and Heritage


Historic Overview of Maserati Maserati Milestones 5 17

Maserati Road Cars

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History and Heritage

Hystoric Overview of Maserati

Officine Alfieri Maserati, Maseratis first workshop was located in the Via de Pepoli in Bologna

The Maserati Brothers


The Maserati brothers, seven male sons, were all born in a small house on the outskirts of Voghera, in the province of Pavia, where their father, Rodolfo, a railway engine driver, had moved from Piacenza after marrying Carolina Losi. Carlo, the eldest son, was born in 1881, Bindo in 1883, Alfieri in 1885: the latter died after only a few months and his name was given to the next son, born in 1887. Then Mario (1890), Ettore (1894) and Ernesto (1898) were born. With the exception of Mario, who turned his creative vocation towards painting, they all became involved in engineering, in modification and later in design and construction of automobiles and engines. The initial experiences were gained by Carlo Maserati. Carlo the oldest son, who as a very young apprentice in a bicycle factory at Affori, near Milan, designed a monocylindrical engine in 1898 to power a velocipede. He even found a patron, the Marquis Michele Carcano di Anzano del Parco who, together with his son Cesare, started a factory for the production of bicycle engines in the same year.

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History and Heritage

Carcano took part in motor cycle competitions for a few seasons and with Carlo Maserati riding, some successes were gained such as the Padova-Bovolenta, the 5 km record and the Brescia-Mantova-Verona-Brescia race, all in 1900. The following year (1901) the Carcano firm ceased its activity and Carlo Maserati went to work first for Fiat (the current owners of Maserati) and then, in 1903, for Isotta Fraschini, as technical adviser and test-driver. He quickly made a career for himself: in 1907 he was with Bianchi, in 1908 with Junior as General Manager, but in 1919 his young life was cut short with an illness.

In 1903, when Carlo joined Isotta Fraschini, he also persuaded them to hire his brother Alfieri, who was only sixteen, but with a passion at least equal to his refined mechanical sensitivity. These two qualities were destined to become related in Alfieri with the progressive expression of his uncommon creative talent. Alfieri Maserati soon made a name for himself at Isotta Fraschini (where his brother Bindo and Ettore later followed) both as a technician and as a driver and later the Milanese firm sent him and his brother Ettore to Argentina, then to London and finally, in 1912 to Bologna with the task of organising customer service. Two years later Alfieri Maserati set out on his own.

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Technical Training Light 1914-1937: The first Maserati

History and Heritage

The Neptune statue on the Piazza Maggiore (main square) of Bologna provided the inspiration for Maseratis famous trident logo.

The 14th of December, 1914, was a normal Monday just like any other. Italy, the only "great power" of Europe not to have been overwhelmed by what was to pass into history as the First World War, was half way through the ten illusory months which separated its short-lived proclamation of neutrality (August 2nd , 1914) from its fatal entry into the conflict on May 24th of the following year. These were certainly not propitious times for any sort of business initiative, except perhaps for arms and munitions factories. Nevertheless, on that cold winter's day towards the end of the year, the "Societa Anonima Officine Alfieri Maserati" was born in Bologna at a ground floor office rented in Via de' Pepoli. A "trademark" was about to be added to the list of those which "had made" the history of the automobile.

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History and Heritage

Starting business with a workshop specialising in race preparation for Isotta Fraschini engines, Alfieri was joined by Ettore and Ernesto Maserati (20 years and 16 years old respectively) and five mechanics. It was the beginning of a legend! At the outbreak of war, Alfieri and Ettore were called up for action and the workshop was entrusted to young Ernesto. When Alfieri completed his military service, he set up a spark plug factory in Milan while hostilities continued and in 1919 moved it to Bologna and returned with his brothers Ettore and Ernesto. A new site was acquired for the workshop on the eastern outskirts of the city in an area known as the Alemanni quarter but which was better known as the Ponte Vecchio. These years were agitated not only by deep social unrest and upheavals but also by a great fervor of activity in industrial reconversion, reconstruction initiatives and growth in every sector of the economy. Even at Maserati activity resumed intensely.

Race modifications were based on Isotta Fraschini mechanics but every now and then other marques were used especially for Alfieri Maserati's race appearances, which were becoming more and more frequent as well as promising. The Isotta Fraschini Tipo Speciale was built in 1920 and this coupled a series-built chassis to a four-cylinder engine of 6330cc . Alfieri drove this car brilliantly in 1921 races winning the SusaMoncenisio and coming fourth at the Mugello Circuit and the Gentleman GP in the Settimana di Brescia. In 1922, Alfieri, together with his brother Ernesto, used an improved version of this car to win the Mugello Circuit in record time, the Susa Moncenisio again and the Aosta-Gran San Bernadino.

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History and Heritage

These victories impressed the directors of Diatto who offered Alfieri Maserati a car for the remaining races of the season together with a technical consultancy contract for preparation of their competition models. The Monza victory in the GP d'Autunno (3000cc class), gave rise to big expectations, but was not to be followed up in 1923. In spite of numerous retirements and the not too healthy state of the company, that same year Diatto helped Maserati to build a unique racing car powered by a 5000 cc Hispano Suiza V-8 cylinder engine which had been radically modified. This car enabled Alfieri to win the Coppa Principe Amedeo and gave him his third consecutive victory in the Susa Moncenisio, followed by his second in the Aosta-Gran San Bernadino. 1924 was less successful and the year in which Ernesto Maserati made his racing debut with some good results, while Alfieri, after having dominated the San Sebastian GP was unable to finish because of engine failure. Then he was unceremoniously disqualified (for five years, but condoned a few months later), for having replaced the two litre engine of Diatto with a three litre for the Rabassada Hill climb, not too far from Barcelona.

Forced to give up racing, Alfieri dedicated more of his time to work in the factory and this enabled him to build a Grand Prix Diatto for the 1925 season powered by an eight cylinder, two litre engine designed to be fed with a supercharger. However, the unhealthy economic situation at Diatto brought a definite end to the Maserati brothers' collaboration and so, in the winter between 1925 and 1926, they committed themselves to construction of an entire car, which would be the first to carry their name ... the Maserati Tipo 26.

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History and Heritage

The first car they were wholly responsible for was the Tipo 26, built in 1926. The engine was an 8-cylinder in line with a 1.5 litre supercharged displacement that developed 120 bhp at 5300 rpm. Above the radiator a then unknown badge presented a trident that evoked Bologna's famous statue of Neptune. The Tipo 26 made its debut with Alfieri Maserati at the wheel and Guerino Bertocchi as mechanic in the Targa Florio on April 25 1926. It came first in its class, ninth overall.

After that the wins came thick and fast. In 1929 Maserati won the Tripoli Grand Prix (Borzacchini-E. Maserati) and the Mille Miglia (overall winner). In the same year, Borzacchini set a new 3-5 litre world speed record in a Maserati Tipo V4, an extraordinary car with a V16 engine made by coupling together two Tipo 26 engine blocks. The Maserati's average speed of 246 km/h was achieved from a propelled start on a 10 km track near Cremona and was not beaten until eight years later. It was a performance that did a lot for the Maserati image and sales figures.

In 1933, Tazio Nuvolari appeared on the scene, driving the 8C to victory in the Belgian Grand Prix, the Coppa Ciano at Montenero and the Nice Grand Prix

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History and Heritage

The Maserati V4: The worlds first supercar

In 1929, a sensational new vehicle was presented by Maserati: the outrageous 16-cylinder V4 race car. The engine of this car was created by coupling two Tipo 26B 8cylinder compressor engines together in an angle of 25. Both engines shared the same basement and the carburettors were designed especially for this car by Eduardo Weber. Similar projects came also into existence by Fiat and Bugatti, and later also by Alfa Romeo, but Maseratis V4 project was courageous and innovative by every standard. With its more than 280 hp, power output was almost double compared the Tipo 26B. This car had excellent potential as a race car, but tyres and brakes of the time were not able to hold against the power. In September 1929, The V4 won the world land speed record by achieving an average speed of 246,500 km/h over a 10 km straight (non-asphalted!) near Cremona. This record was beaten only 8 years later by Bernd Rosemeyer in an Auto Union. Only two of these spectacular V4 cars were ever made. One of them received in 1931 an elegant new spider body from Zagato adapted for road use and was finished in a stylish two-tone green colour. By doing so the worlds first supercar was born before the word was even invented.

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Technical Training Light The Orsi years: 1937-1967

History and Heritage

Omar Orsi with chief engineer Giulio Alfieri and test driver Guerino Bertocchi

In 1937 the Maserati brothers handed over the financial management of their company to the Orsi family, while keeping their hands on the engineering side of the business. That opened the way to operations on a much broader scale, which bore fruit in two successive race wins on United States soil. In 1939 and 1940, Maserati won the Indianapolis 500 with Wilbur Shaw in an 8CTF. That made Maserati the first and the only Italian constructor to win the legendary American race.

Meanwhile in 1939, the firm moved to its now celebrated premises on Viale Ciro Menotti in Modena. It is here that its extraordinary creativity was deployed in the service of the Italian war effort as it converted to the production of machine tools, electrical components, spark plugs and even electric vehicles.

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Technical Training Light

History and Heritage

In 1957, Stirling Moss left Maserati after he had racked up numerous victories in the 250 F but had failed to win the F1 world championship. His place was taken by Fangio who made a triumphant debut in the Argentine Grand Prix where Maserati took all three places on the podium. (1st Fangio, 2nd Behra, 3rd Menditeguy). By the end of the season Fangio had won the world title in a Maserati 250 F. At the same time, Maserati was also excelling itself in the World Sports car Championship with the legendary 450S, a genuine powerhouse driven by a weighty 4.5 litre V8 engine that developed 400 bhp.

Then at the end of the year Maserati unexpectedly announced that it would no longer race, though it would go on designing racing cars. Indeed it went on to produce several masterpieces of the art including the Tipo 60 and the 61 "Birdcage" as well as the 3litre V12 power unit used on the Cooper Maserati Formula 1 car in 1965-67.

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Technical Training Light 1967-1975: the Citron Era

History and Heritage

In 1968, the Orsi family sold Maserati to Citron which was primarily interested in acquiring its engine know-how. Indeed a 6-cylinder Maserati engine was used on the Citron SM coup. Under the new management and in total contrast with Maserati's traditional insistence on a front-mounted engine, the firm also produced two centreengined models: the Bora (1971-79) with a 90 V8 engine and the Merak (1972-83) with a 90 V6 power unit, both of them with Italdesign bodies. Citron also introduced a new version of the Quattroporte with SM mechanicals and front wheel drive! Very few were ever produced and the model was never homologated. 1973 saw the debut of the Khamsin, a sharply cut streamlined coup with a Bertone body. In the same year, though, Maserati sales were badly hit by the oil crisis and Citron pulled out.

The Citroen SM luxury coupe used a new V6 engine designed and built by Maserati. This engine made it the worlds fastest front wheel drive car of its days.

The Maserati Merak model borrowed many components from parent company Citroen, like the hydraulic system for power steering, brakes and seat adjustment.

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Technical Training Light 1975-1993: the De Tomaso years

History and Heritage

In 1975, the effects of the oil crisis forced Citron to draw in its horns, which meant abandoning Maserati which was then sold to Alejandro De Tomasos GEPI. Under its management, the firm produced a 2000 cc version of the Merak and in 1976 it launched a new version of the Quattroporte. This went on to become the best selling Maserati of all time. The Quattroporte was also famous for being the vehicle of choice for successive Italian presidents.

The eighties brought many changes, not least the creation of a model destined for mass production. That was the surprising Biturbo, a compact performance saloon with a 2000cc V6 engine that was launched in 1981. In 1984, an impressive 6,000 Biturbos were constructed. Further development of the turbocharged V6 engine led in 1989 to the launch of the Shamal that featured the first Maserati V8 adopting twin turbo's.

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Technical Training Light 1993 onwards: under Fiats wings

History and Heritage

In 1993, Fiat Auto acquired the entire share capital of Maserati, which was later put under the full control of Ferrari in July of 1997. Work began on the new Maserati factory on 1st October, 1997 and the Quattroporte Evoluzione came out in 1998. That same year the 3200GT coup was launched at the Paris Motorshow. It was both the first Maserati of the new era and a revival of a 4-seater Grand Tourer tradition that began forty years earlier with the 3500GT. The 3200GT instantly captured the attention of automotive aficionados all over the world.

Maserati today is a modern and fast growing specialist car manufacturer with representations worldwide. After having gone through a technological revolution under the Ferrari administration from 1997 till 2005, the Maserati ownership has been transferred from Ferrari S.p.A. to Fiat Partecipazioni S.p.A.

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Technical Training Light

History and Heritage

Maserati Milestones
The first Maserati, Tipo 26, made its debut by winning its class at the Targa Florio of 1926. Alfieri Maserati was at the wheel.

Maserati breaks the world land speed record in 1929 with the mighty V4.

Maserati 8CM engine powers the world water speed record in 1933 on the Garda lake.

The Maserati breaks the world speed record again in 1934 with the 4CM (1100cc class).

Maserati fills the complete podium (victory, 2nd and 3rd place) of the famous Targa Florio road race for four consecutive years: 1937, 1938, 1939 & 1940.

Maserati wins the Indianapolis 500 miles race for two consecutive years (1939 and 1940) with Wilbur Shaw at the wheel of the 8CTF.

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Technical Training Light

History and Heritage

Maserati wins the 1957 Formula 1 world championship with Juan Manuel Fangio at the wheel of the legendary 250F

The 3500 GTI introduced in 1957 important innovations such as twin-plug ignition system, fuel injection and disc brakes.

The Quattroporte of 1963 was named the fastest saloon car in the world.

Maserati introduces the worlds first twin-turbo engine on the Biturbo model in 1981.

The same Biturbo model introduces the Torsen limited slip differential for the first time on a road car.

During the early 1990s the Maserati Racing, and little later also the Ghibli and Ghibli Cup, were the worlds most powerful 2-litre road cars.

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Technical Training Light

History and Heritage

Maserati stunned the world in 1998 with the gorgeous 3200GT, which introduced the worlds first tail lights using led technology.

Maserati reinvented the luxury sports saloon with the launch of the 2003 Quattroporte. This car is worldwide renowned for its styling and set a new benchmark for performance and handling in the luxury car segment for the next decade. The Quattroporte has won over 50 international and national awards since its introduction, and has proven to be Maseratis most successful production car ever.

The mighty MC12 has proven to be the worlds most successful GT race car in the 2004-2010 era with a total of 14 championship titles over these years and three important victories in the Spa 24 hours race (2005, 2006 & 2008).

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Technical Training Light

History and Heritage

Maserati Road Cars


1500 Gran Turismo (A6)

Model code: A6 Years of production: 1946-1950 Numbers produced: 61 Engine: 6 cylinder, 1500cc, 65 hp

It was already in 1941 that the decision was made for the development of a GT car, but the first examples of Maseratis first ever road car were not built until 1946. However this car was officially called 1500 Gran Turismo, it is better known under its project name A6 (Alfieri, 6-cylinder). The over head cam engine had a sophisticated valve command system and the tubular chassis was innovating for its time with round section steel tubes. Except for one experimental prototype built by Zagato, all bodies were built by Pinin Farina. First examples had covered head lights and a different rear section. The car received its final body style in 1948 (see picture).

2000 Gran Turismo (A6G)

Model code: A6G Years of production: 1950-1951 Numbers produced: 16 Engine: 6 cylinder, 2000cc, 100 hp

The A6G or 2000 Gran Turismo had a new two-litre engine based on the power unit of the A6GCS racing cars. Compression ratio and thus power was reduced to allow the engine to run on commercial fuel, of which excellent quality was not always guaranteed. Coup bodies ware built by Frua, Vignale and Pinin Farina and an elegant spyder version was created by Frua. All bodies were of great luxury, refined and cured in every detail. However a high list price and performances not matching the quickly changing standard in the luxury car segment didnt favour its sales. Only 16 pieces were produced.

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Technical Training Light A6GCS Berlinetta Pinin Farina

History and Heritage

Model code: A6GCS Years of production: 1953-1954 Numbers produced: 4 Engine: 6 cylinder, 2000cc, 170 hp

A very special car was presented at the Turin motor show of 1954. It concerned a 2000 Sport fitted with an elegant closed berlinetta body from Pinin Farina. The 2000 Sport (project name A6GCS) was a higly successful open 2-seater race car designed for road races and was much beloved by the racing drivers of the area for its excellent driving qualities. An elegant berlinetta body from Pinin Farina on this basis was the right recipe for one of the most beautiful creations in automotive history. Only four of them were built (chassis 2056, 2057, 2059 and 2060), but chassis 2060 had a short life as it was re-bodied as an open race car in 1955 and received a new identification number (2086). This car is one of the most sought-after historic Maserati cars. One of them is on display at the Panini-collection.

2000 Gran Turismo (A6G54)

Model code: A6G54 Years of production: 1954-1957 Numbers produced: 60 Engine: 6 cylinder, 2000cc, 150 hp

The experience gained with the successful 2000 Sport was used for a small series GT cars with elevated performances and reserved to a limited number of elite customers. The A6G54 twin cam engine of the 2000 Sport was detuned and had now a classic oil sump instead of a dry sump lubrication system. Its 150 horse power gave the 2000 Gran Turismo of 1954 the true GT performance its predecessor lacked and this car was highly appreciated by the public. Coup and spyder bodies were made by Frua, Zagato and Allemano.

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Technical Training Light 3500 GT & GTI

History and Heritage

Model code: AM 101 Years of production: 1957-1964 Numbers produced: 1983 (all versions) Engine: 6 cylinder, 3.5L, 220 & 235 hp

The 3500 GT was an important car for Maserati as it was the first production car to be built in large numbers. In 1957 Maserati had officially withdrawn from motor racing and full attention was now on the production of Gran Turismo road cars. The elegantly shaped body of the 3500 GT was a creation from Carrozzeria Touring and was made from aluminium which was attached to a tubular steel frame (Superleggera patent). The 6-cylinder engine came from the 350S racing car of 1956 and was characterised by excellent torque values at low engine speed. In 1961, the triple Weber carburettors were replaced by a mechanical fuel injection system from Lucas, boosting the power to 235 hp. Injection equipped vehicles were referred to as 3500 GTI. This car became a big commercial success and contributed importantly in resolving the economical difficulties of Maserati at the time.

3500 GT & GTI Spyder

Model code: AM 101 Years of production: 1958-1964 Numbers produced: 242 Engine: 6 cylinder, 3.5L, 220 & 235 hp

Almost simultaneously with the coup, an open version of the 3500 GT was under development. Early prototypes of the Spyder were made by Touring and Frua, but the final design was a masterpiece of designer Giovanni Michelotti when he was working for Vignale. The body was now made from steel instead of aluminium and was fitted on a 10 cm shortened chassis. Also the Spyder adopted the Lucas fuel injection system and its drum brakes were replaced by more modern disc brakes on later versions, although drum brakes remained available upon request.

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Technical Training Light 5000 GT

History and Heritage

Model code: AM 103 Years of production: 1959-1966 Numbers produced: 34 Engine: 90 V8, 5.0L, 325 & 340 hp

The worldwide success of the 3500 GT has drawn much attention to the Maserati brand. Some however desired from Maserati a Gran Turismo that was even more exclusive. On specific request of the Shah of Persia the 5000 GT was born. Chief engineer Giulio Alfieri used only the very best components available to built this extraordinary car. Its powerful V8 engine originated from the 450S racing car by which Juan Manuel Fangio and Jean Behra won the 1957 Sebring 12 hours race and the vehicle used a reinforced 3500 GT chassis. The brake system was servo-assisted with discs on the front wheels and drums on the rear. Performance was unprecedented for a road car at the time. Bodies for the 5000 GT were created by the worlds most famous coachbuilders: Touring, Pinin Farina, Monterosa, Allemano, Ghia, Bertone, Vignale and Frua.

Sebring

Model code: AM 101 Years of production: 1962-1968 Numbers produced: 600 Engine: 6 cylinder; 3.5L, 3,7L & 4.0L; 220-265 hp

Before the sales of the 3500 GT began to slow, Maserati presented its new Sebring coupe at the Geneva motorshow of 1962. The new car was named after the race track in Florida were the 450S racing cars obtained an important win a few years earlier. The Sebring was based on the short 3500 GT Spyder chassis and its 2+2 body was a design from Michelotti during his time at Vignale. The 6-cylinder engine always had fuel injection from Lucas and total displacements were 3.5L, 3.7L and also 4.0L from 1965, with power outputs varying from 220 to 265 hp. The Sebring showed a number of technical improvements over the 3500 GT. Automatic transmission, air conditioning and Borrani wire wheels were available on request.

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Technical Training Light Quattroporte l

History and Heritage

Model code: AM 107 Years of production: 1963-1969 Numbers produced: 776 Engine: 90 V8, 4.1L & 4.7L, 260 & 290 hp

In the early 1960s, Giulio Alfieri started to work on a completely new project. Inspired by the success of its Gran Turismo cars, Maserati was now thinking about a saloon car. The new Quattroporte (Italian for four doors) must of course have the same level of elegancy, refinement, power and performances as the other trident products. With a top speed of 230 km/h, it was the fastest saloon production car at the time. The design was from Pietro Frua and the car had a modern sheet metal monocoque structure instead of a tubular frame. The De Dion rear axle was replaced by a more traditional rigid axle and the option was offered for a more powerful 4.7 engine when a second series was presented in 1966. A curious detail: 5 Quattroportes were converted into pick-ups by coachbuilder Grazia of Bologna and were used as fire extinguisher cars on the Italian race tracks.

Mistral & Mistral Spyder

Model code: AM 109 Years of production: 1964-1969 Numbers produced: 955 Engine: 6 cylinder; 3.5L, 3,7L & 4.0L; 220265 hp

With this car started Maseratis tradition to name its Gran Turismo cars after famous winds (the Ghibli, Bora, Merak, Khamsin, Karif and Shamal would follow). The Mistral shared its mechanical base with the Sebring but, thanks to its 2-seater fastback body from Pietro Frua, had a much more modern appearance compared to the more traditional styled 2+2 Sebring. A first prototype of the Mistral was presented at the Turin motorshow in the autumn of 1963 but production didnt start before 1964. The body was from steel but the doors, bonnet and rear window frame were made from aluminium to reduce the weight. An open Spyder version was presented at the Geneva motorshow in March 1964. The Spyder was produced in about 120 units.

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Technical Training Light Mexico

History and Heritage

Model code: AM 112 Years of production: 1966-1972 Numbers produced: 485 Engine: 90 V8, 4.1L & 4.7L, 290 & 300 hp

After the 5000 GT and the Quattroporte, the Mexico is Maseratis third road car using a civilised version of the V8 race engine from the 450S sport prototype race car. A first prototype of the Mexico was shown in 1965, but the official presentation of the final version was at the Paris motorshow in 1966. The sober but balanced and elegant design from Vignale keeps the middle between a 4-seater coupe and a 2-door saloon car and the car offers comfortable interior space to four people thanks to its 2640 mm wheelbase. The Mexico shares its mechanical base with the Quattroporte and has a steel monocoque structure combined with a front auxiliary frame. The Mexico was available with both 4.1L and 4.7L engine and has a top speed between 250 and 260 km/h.

Ghibli & Ghibli Spyder

Model code: AM 115 Years of production: 1967-1972 Numbers produced: 1280 Engine: 90 V8, 4.7L & 4.9L, 340 & 330 hp

In 1966 a project was started for a new sporty Gran Turismo in the best tradition of the Maserati Brand. The new Ghibli, named after a desert breeze, was strictly a 2-seater and its beautiful design was a true masterpiece of the young designer Giorgetto Giugiaro during his period at Ghia. The body of the Ghibli was perfect in every detail and is still regarded as one of Giugiaros most beautiful designs. The V8 engine from the Quattroporte/Mexico adopted a dry sump lubrication system in order to fit under the long and low Ghibli bonnet. From 1969 the Ghibli was also made available with a 4.9L engine, named Ghibli SS, and an open Spyder version was added, of which only 125 units were produced.

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Technical Training Light Indy

History and Heritage

Model code: AM 116 Years of production: 1969-1975 Numbers produced: 1104 Engine: 90 V8; 4.1L, 4.7L & 4.9L; 260, 290 & 300 hp

The Maserati Indy, officially presented at the Geneva motorshow in 1969, was a tribute to the two consecutive victories of the Maserati 8CTF race cars in the famous 500 miles race at the Indianapolis speedway in 1939 and 1940. This new car was designed by Vignale and could be seen as a model in between the Ghibli and the Mexico. The roof line was higher compared to the Ghibli in order to offer space for the rear passengers. Mechanicals were borrowed from the Ghibli and traditional Maserati: 90 V8 engine with four overhead camshafts, semi-monocoque structure with front auxiliary frame, independent double wishbone front suspensions and a rigid rear axle with leaf springs. In 1973 the Indy adopted the brake system from Citron, who was the new owner of Maserati.

Bora

Model code: AM 117 Years of production: 1971-1978 Numbers produced: 530 Engine: 90 V8, 4.7L & 4.9L, 310 & 320 hp

The Bora was a milestone in Maseratis history: It was the first Maserati road car with a central mounted engine - engineer Guilio Alfieri gained much experience with the central engined Birdcage Tipo 63-65 race cars - and it was the first car which has been developed under full Citron ownership. The engine was the well-known V8, first in 4.7L and later also in 4.9L configuration, while its beautiful fastback body was another masterpiece from Giorgetto Giugiaro. The Bora was equipped with Citrons complex hydraulic system, which was used for the brakes, the opening of the headlights, the adjustment for the drivers seat and the pedals. Sales of the Bora suffered from the oilcrisis in the mid-seventies, while racing plans were crossed due to homologation problems.

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Technical Training Light Merak, Merak SS & Merak 2000

History and Heritage

Model code: AM 122 Years of production: 1972-1983 Numbers produced: 1820 Engine: 90 V6; 3.0L & 2.0L; 190, 208 & 170 hp

The Merak was Maseratis answer to the oil crisis, which strongly penalised the sales of big-engined cars. This small sister of the Bora used a modified version of the type C.114 engine, which Maserati had produced for Citron. This smaller engine made it possible to equip the Merak with two small rear seats, while the Bora was a two seater. The Merak used even more Citron components as its bigger sister, such as the single-spoke steering wheel; but much of these components disappeared again on later versions. In 1976, a lighter and more powerful version was presented, the Merak SS, while for the Italian market a two-litre version was offered. This latter version was recognisable by its black striping. The combination of its sensational Italdesign body and more economic engine choice made from the Merak a real best-seller.

Khamsin

Model code: AM 120 Years of production: 1974-1982 Numbers produced: 430 Engine: 90 V8, 4.9L, 320 hp

The Khamsin was a remarkable vehicle, it was not only the last work of Giulio Alfieri as head of Maseratis engineering department, it was also Maseratis first seriesproduction car to be designed by Bertone. The result was a streamlined, wedgeshaped car with elegant proportions. The mechanical base was still borrowed from the Ghibli, but now with independent rear suspensions, while brake system was a legacy from Citron and not appreciated by everyone equally. The Kamshins traditional GranTurismo configuration a big sports car with front mounted engine and rear wheel drive indicated the end of an area which would only return in the late 1990s.

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Technical Training Light Quattroporte II

History and Heritage

Model code: AM 123 Years of production: 1976-1978 Numbers produced: 12 Engine: 90 V6, 3.0L, 210 hp

The second generation of the Quattroporte conceals one of the obscurest periods in Maseratis history. The car has been developed under Citrons ownership and was technically identical to the Citron SM, included its front wheel drive and hydropneumatic suspension. Performances were behind on the first generation Quattroporte and the car was unloved by Maserati purists, but nevertheless the Quattroporte II was very comfortable, well equipped and offered an excellent ride. Its Bertone-designed body was modern and the build quality very good. Unfortunately, the early end of the agreement with Citron in 1975 and financial problems hampered the launch of the Quattroporte II. In fact, the model has never been homologated for the European market. Only 12 units were produced in its three years of production and they were all sold to the Middle East.

Kyalami

Model code: AM 129 Years of production: 1976-1983 Numbers produced: 200 Engine: 90 V8, 4.1L & 4.9L, 255 & 280 hp

The Kyalami indicated at the same time the end and the beginning of an area. It was the last Maserati coupe equipped with the illustrious V8 engine and it was the first that has been developed under the new ownership of Alejandro de Tomaso. The Kyalami was actually based on De Tomasos own Longchamp model, but the Ford-Cleveland V8 has been removed in favour of Maseratis own four-cam V8, and the original design from Tom Tjaarda has been elegantly reworked by Frua. Only 200 units were produced of this car that was named after the South African race track where the Maseratiengined Cooper Formula 1 cars scored an important win almost ten years earlier.

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Technical Training Light Quattroporte III

History and Heritage

Model code: AM 330 Years of production: 1979-1990 Numbers produced: 2155 Engine: 90 V8; 4.1L & 4.9L; 255, 280 & 300 hp

The third generation of the Maserati luxury saloon was meant to make up for the Quattroporte II fiasco. Alejandro de Tomaso, who disliked Citron, discarded all Citron technology used on the Quattroporte II. Mechanical parts came from the Kyalami and the Quattroporte had again a V8 engine and rear wheel drive. The impressive body of the Quattroporte III was designed by Giugiaro and the steel body shells were built at the Innocenti plant near Milan, prior to assembly in Modena. When the car went on sale in 1979, it was an instant commercial success. In 1987, a restyled version called Quattroporte Royale offered an upgraded interior and a 20 hp more powerful 4.9L engine. Production of the Quattroporte III continued until 1990.

Biturbo

Model code: AM 331 Years of production: 1982-1989 Numbers produced: 11919 Engine: 90 V6 twin turbo 18v, 2.0L, 180-223 hp

When the Biturbo was presented in December 1981, a new era started for Maserati. Alejandro de Tomasos plan to resolve Maseratis financial problems was the introduction of a compact coupe with first level performance and an interesting price setting, and in this way attracting new customers to Maserati. Its engine was a modified version of the Merak V6 with the adoption of two small turbochargers, a world premiere. The Biturbo became a big commercial success thanks to its excellent performances and luxury interior, but first generation versions suffered from reliability problems. In 1983, the more powerful Biturbo S was presented with twin intercoolers and two Naca air ducts on the bonnet. In 1986 and 1987, both versions were upgraded with fuel injection (Biturbo i and Biturbo Si).

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Technical Training Light Biturbo 2500

History and Heritage

Model code: AM 331 Years of production: 1983-1991 Numbers produced: circa 6500 Engine: 90 V6 twin turbo 18v, 2.5L, 189-196 hp

While the two-litre versions of the Biturbo were reserved for the Italian market, a 2.5 litre version destined for exportation was presented in 1983. The 90 V6 three-valve engine had an increased bore to expand its capacity to 2491 cc, but the cylinder liners were now from cast iron instead of aluminium and this engine didnt have intercoolers for the two IHI turbochargers. The Biturbo 2500 maintained the Torsen limited slip differential from the two-litre versions (a world first on a production car). A slightly more powerful version was named Biturbo ES. In 1987 the Biturbo 2500 and Biturbo ES adopted fuel injection and the name was changed into Biturbo Si 2500.

Biturbo 4-door models (all versions)

Model code: AM 332 Years of production: 1984-1994 Numbers produced: 9809 (all versions) Engine: 90 V6 twin turbo 18v; 2.0L, 2.5L & 2.8L; 200-248 hp; 90 V6 twin turbo 24v, 2.0L & 2.8L, 245 & 279 hp

With an 86 mm extended wheelbase and two added rear doors, the Biturbo was transformed into a compact and sporty saloon car. It was presented first in 1984 with the 2.5L engine destined for export (425), but little later also followed by a two-litre version meant for the Italian market (420, 420S, 420i, 420Si). A minor facelift in 1988 had these models replaced by the 422, in harmony with the two-door 222. This model was joined in 1990 by the 4.18v. and the four-valve 4.24v., both fitted with a two-litre engine. The export model received in 1987 the 2.8L engine in 3-valve and in 1991 also in 4-valve version (430 and 430 4v.). Other upgrades and aesthetical modifications were in-line with the coupe models. In spite of the fact that they had four doors, these models were never named Quattroporte.

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Technical Training Light Biturbo Spyder (all versions)

History and Heritage

Model code: AM 333 Years of production: 1985-1994 Numbers produced: 3076 (all versions) Engine: 90 V6 twin turbo 18v; 2.0L, 2.5L & 2.8L; 180-224 hp; 90 V6 twin turbo 24v, 2.0L, 241 hp

Top performances and open top driving fun were again combined in the Biturbo Spyder who was the first open Maserati since the Ghibli Spyder, more than 12 years earlier. Development for the body was done by Zagato near Milan while the bodies were assembled in Turin before transportation to Modena where the mechanical parts were added. The 2514 mm wheelbase from the Biturbo was reduced to 2400 mm for the Spyder models. The Biturbo Spyder existed in various versions and followed the same technical and aesthetical evolutions as the coupe, with exception of the 24-valve 2.8L engine. The various versions were: Biturbo Spyder, Biturbo Spyder 2500, Biturbo Spyder i, Biturbo Spyder i 2500, Biturbo Spyder 2.8i, Spyder 2.0 4v. and Spyder 2.8. In 1991 the Biturbo name was dropped for the open models.

228

Model code: AM 334 Years of production: 1987-1991 Numbers produced: 469 Engine: 90 V6 twin turbo 18v, 2.8L, 255 hp

With the 228, of which production started in 1987, Maserati wanted to offer an alternative to the big luxury coupes from Mercedes-benz and BMW. The design of the 228 recalls much to the Biturbo, but its lines were softer and the 228 was built on the longer chassis taken from the 4-door Biturbo models. The engine capacity was increased to 2.8 litres. The 228 was a very luxurious coupe and standard equipment included power steering, alloy wheels, central locking, electric windows and handstitched leather seats. ABS was available on request. This model was in 1991 followed by the 222.4v.

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Technical Training Light 222 & 2.24v

History and Heritage

Model code: AM 331 Years of production: 1988-1992 and 1989-1992 Numbers produced: 1156 & 1147 Engine: 90 V6 twin turbo 18v, 2.0L, 223 hp; 90 V6 twin turbo 24v, 2.0L, 245 hp

With its new name 222, the Biturbo received a small stylistic upgrade. The front grille was new and the Naca air ducts on the bonnet disappeared, while the two-litre engine still had twin intercoolers. Injection was now electronic from Weber-Marelli with integrated ignition. The 222 had electrically adjustable seats and electronic climate control. In 1989, the twin-turbo V6 engine received a substantial technical upgrade. The cylinder heads were new with four valves per cylinder instead of three and two camshafts per cylinder bank. The light alloy cylinder liners were treated to reduce internal friction. Vehicles equipped with this more powerful version of the two-litre engine were named 2.24v.

Karif

Model code: AM 339 Years of production: 1988-1991 Numbers produced: 221 Engine: 90 V6 twin turbo 18v, 2.8L, 248-224 hp

The Maserati Karif, presented at the Geneva motorshow of 1988, was designed for pure driving fun. It had the same powerful 2.8L twin-turbo engine as used in the 228, but it was based on the shortened chassis from the Biturbo Spyder. The 114 mm shorter wheelbase and the increased torsional rigidity due to the reinforced sills from the spyders floorplan had a positive effect on the Karifs handling. The rear seats from the Biturbo were sacrified for the Karif. Instead, extra lugguage space was available behind the front seats. This made the Karif ideal for long and joyful travelling for two persons. Later versions of the Karif were equipped with a catalytic converter which reduced the engine power.

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Technical Training Light Shamal

History and Heritage

Model code: AM 339 Years of production: 1990-1996 Numbers produced: 369 Engine: 90 V8 twin turbo 32v, 3.2L, 322 & 326 hp

Named after a Mesopotamian wind, the new Shamal was the most extreme derivate from the Biturbo model family. It was, just like the Karif, based on the shorter Biturbo Spyder floorplan, but offered also two small rear seats. The body of the Shamal was completely new, with exception of the doors. The Shamals muscular and aggressive design was the work of designer Marcello Gandini, which could be easily recognised by the shape of the rear wheel arches. The biggest news of the Shamal was however found under the bonnet. The V6 was replaced by a completely new twin-turbo V8 engine with four camshafts and 32 valves. This was coupled to a new 6-speed gearbox from Getrag. The design of the Shamal gave inspiration for the later Ghibli model. This is one of the most extreme production cars ever made.

Racing

Model code: AM 331 Years of production: 1990-1992 Numbers produced: 230 Engine: 90 V6 twin turbo 24v, 2.0L, 283 hp

The Maserati Racing was presented in December 1990, at Maseratis usual press meeting before Christmas. This latest version of the Biturbo family received a restyling with a nose that was inspired by the Shamal, but he most important news came from under the bonnet. The Racing had the same 24-valve version of the two-litre engine as presented two years earlier for the 2.24v, but a number of modifications were made. The crankshaft was new, the connecting rods were lighter and the compression ratio has been increased. Together with modified turbochargers, made this from the Racing the most powerful two-litre production car in the world. Also the Getrag gearbox was new and the car was fitted with intelligent active shock absorbers from Koni. With a top speed of 256 km/h and an acceleration to 1000m in only 25,9 seconds, performances of the racing were excellent.

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Technical Training Light 222 SR & 222.4v

History and Heritage

Model code: AM 331 Years of production: 1991-1993 Numbers produced: 220 & 130 Engine: 90 V6 twin turbo 18v, 2.8L, 224 hp; 90 V6 twin turbo 24v, 2.8L, 279 hp

While the 222 and 2.24v with their smaller two-litre engine were meant for the Italian market - Italian tax rules penalised strongly cars with an engine capacity of over two litres - the 222 SR and 222.4v with their 2.8L version of the twin-turbo V6 engine were destined for exportation. These cars received the same stylistic upgrade as the Racing a few months earlier. The 222SR, who replaced the Biturbo Si 2500, still had the engine with 3-valve cylinder heads and single over head camshafts, and was fitted with 15 wheels. The more powerful 222.4v had the 4-valve cylinder heads and received 16 wheels.

Barchetta

Model code: THB CMM Years of production: 1992-1993 Numbers produced: 17 Engine: 90 V6 twin turbo 24v, 2.0L, 315 hp

The Maserati Barchetta is a bit an outsider in the list of Maserati road cars as it was never really intended for road use. This car was developed for a single-make championship which was held on various race tracks across Italy and Europe during 1993. The Barchetta had a single backbone chassis made from aluminium. This was a new technology that has been developed for the Chubasco-prototype. The centrally mounted engine was the two-litre V6 in 24-valve configuration with power boosted to 315 hp, while its wheel geometry was Formula 1-style and the body was made from composite and carbon fibre. With a total weight of only 775 kg, performances were outstanding. A road-going version was considered but never commercialised due to homologation difficulties.

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Technical Training Light Ghibli (2nd generation)

History and Heritage

Model code: AM 336 Years of production: 1992-1998 Numbers produced: 2303 (all versions) Engine: 90 V6 twin turbo 24v; 2.0L & 2.8L; 306, 281 & 330 hp

For the latest descendant of the Biturbo family tree, the name of one of the greatest Maserati Gran Turismo cars of the 1960s was revived. The new Ghibli was still based on the Biturbo platform, but had a more modern body design and wider tracks. As usual, the two-litre version was destined for the Italian market, while the 2.8L was made for exportation. In 1995, the Ghibli was named Ghibli GT and underwent a number of technical modifications, included a new rear differential. A more potent version of the 2.0L, the Ghibli Cup, referred to the one-make racing series which was organised with the model. This was with its 330 hp the worlds most powerful two-litre production car.

Quattroporte IV

Model code: AM 337 Years of production: 1994-1998 Numbers produced: 1670 (all versions) Engine: 90 V6 twin turbo 24v, 2.0L & 2.8L, 287 & 284 hp; 90 V8 twin turbo 32v, 3.2L, 335 hp

The fourth generation of the Maserati Quattroporte was presented at the Turin motorshow in April 1994. It was the first car to be presented under full Fiat ownership. The sober but elegant design came from Marcello Gandini, just like the spectacular Shamal five years earlier. With respect to the first generations of the Quattroporte, the Quattroporte IV is very compact but its performances are at true Gran Turismo level: a top speed of 260kmh and acceleration from 0 to 100 km/h in less than 6 seconds. From 1996, the Quattroporte was also made available with the 3.2L 32-valve V8 engine from the Shamal, which improved performances even further, and fitted with 17 wheels. Standard was a 6-speed gearbox from Getrag but an automatic 4-speed transmission from ZF (V6) or BTR (V8) was also available.

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Technical Training Light Quattroporte Evoluzione

History and Heritage

Model code: AM 337 Years of production: 1998-2001 Numbers produced: 730 (all versions) Engine: 90 V6 twin turbo 24v, 2.0L & 2.8L, 287 & 284 hp; 90 V8 twin turbo 32v, 3.2L, 335 hp

When in July 1997 Ferrari took over control of Maserati, one of the main objectives was to radically improve the quality of the vehicles. Notwithstanding it was widely renowned for its excellent driving qualities, the Quattroportre suffered since its introduction from reliability problems. Measurements taken were a complete revision of the production process and hundreds of the Quattroportes components were redesigned in order to improve quality. The result was presented in 1998. These revised Quattroportes can be recognised by the Evoluzione label on the front wings.

3200 GT

Model code: AA 338 Years of production: 1998-2002 Numbers produced: 4795 Engine: 90 V8 twin turbo 32v, 3.2L, 370hp

With the introduction of the completely new 3200 GT, in Paris 1998, Maserati returned to its roots by building a true Gran Turismo in the great tradition of the brand and concluded in this way the Biturbo era. It still had a twin-turbo engine, but everything else on this vehicle was completely new. The V8 from the Shamal and Quattroporte IV underwent a number of substantial modifications and delivered now 370 hp. Choice was between a 6-speed manual transmission (ZF) or a 4-speed auto gearbox (BTR). The design from Giugiaro was, just like his creations for Maserati in the past, a true masterpiece and this model was mainly responsible for Maseratis sales revival which started in 1998. Its boomerang-shaped taillights were the first on a production car using led-technology. In 2001, a more edgy version was presented carrying the name Assetto Corsa.

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Technical Training Light Spyder GT & Spyder Cambiocorsa

History and Heritage

Model code: M138 Years of production: 2001-2007 Numbers produced: 3889 Engine: 90 V8 dry sump, 4.2L, 390 hp

With the introduction of the Maserati Spyder, at the Frankfurt motor show of 2001, again a new area started for Maserati, this time an area of close technical collaboration with group partner Ferrari. Whilst the exterior of the new Spyder still bore strong resemblance to the 3200GT model, under the skin this car was completely new. Under the hood the twin-turbo unit has been dropped in favour of a completely new, normallyaspirated 4.2L V8 with a dry sump lubrication system. Also the transmission was totally new. The gearbox has moved to the rear end of the car where it forms a single unit with the differential (transaxle). The Spyder has a shortened wheelbase with respect to the Coup and is strictly a two-seater only. The soft-top opens and closes fully automatically. This model initiated the return of the Maserati brand to the United States.

Coup GT & Coup Cambiocorsa

Model code: M138 Years of production: 2002-2007 Numbers produced: Engine: 90 V8 dry sump, 4.2L, 390 hp

Shortly after the introduction of the new Spyder, it was time for the coup model to undergo the same technical transformation. The result was presented to the public at the Detroit motor show in January 2002. The Coup adopted the elegant Giugiarodesigned body style from the 3200GT model it replaced, but under the skin almost everything is new. The typical boomerang-shaped taillights from the 3200GT were dropped to meet American homologation requirements. The new Coup has the same all-new normally aspirated V8 engine and offers, just like the open Spyder variant, two gearbox options: a traditional manual transmission (GT) and a Formula 1-style electrohydraulic operated gearbox with gearshift paddles at the steering wheel (Cambiocorsa), both located between the rear wheels (transaxle layout).

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Technical Training Light Quattroporte V (Duoselect)

History and Heritage

Model code: M139 Years of production: 2003-2008 Numbers produced: Engine: 90 V8 dry sump, 4.2L, 400 hp

While the Quattroporte IV was a compact sports sedan, the fifth generation Quattroporte marked Maseratis return to the upper premium segment, in the spirit of the first generation Quattroporte of 1963. The Quattroporte V combines royal interior space and the highest levels of comfort with a true sports heart. A powerful dry-sump V8 engine, mounted well back in the chassis, and a robotized transaxle transmission stand for a perfect weight distribution and excellent dynamic qualities. After its launch at the 2003 Frankfurt motor show, the Quattroporte became an instant commercial success for Maserati and has won numerous awards. This is partly thanks to its astonishing Pininfarina-designed bodywork.

GranSport & GranSport Spyder

Model code: M138 Years of production: 2004-2007 Numbers produced: ??? + 472 Spyder Engine: 90 V8 dry sump, 4.2L, 400 hp

With the GranSport, presented at the Geneva motor show of 2004, Maserati revives one of the great names of its own motoring heritage to indicate the most dynamic version of the M138 model range. The GranSport incorporates all necessary ingredients to convert the Coup from a great performance GT car in a true driving machine. Various engine modifications brought the power up to 400 hp, while the control logic of the Cambiocorsa gearbox, standard for the GranSport, has been improved. Other modifications include new 19-inch alloy wheels, upgraded suspensions, a new front bumper with larger grille, aerodynamic side sills and a more sporty interior with new seats. The GranSport was joined later by an open GranSport Spyder version, presented at the Frankfurt motor show of 2005.

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Technical Training Light MC12 Stradale

History and Heritage

Model code: M144 Years of production: 2004-2007 Numbers produced: 50 Engine: 65 V12 dry sump, 6.0L, 630 hp

The MC12 (Maserati Corse, 12-cylinder) represents Maserati in its most extreme performance form. The Stradale, or road-going version, was created to be able to homologate the model for international GT-racing. With the MC12 Maserati returned to GT racing in a highly successful way and the GT1 version has proven itself as the car to beat on race tracks all over the world. The MC12 is the fastest Maserati road car ever made; acceleration from standstill to 200 km/h takes less than 10 seconds and top speed exceeds 330 km/h. The technology of the MC12 is based on the Ferrari Enzo model, however substantial modifications were made to engine, chassis and aerodynamics. In late 2006, Maserati presented the MC12 Versione Corse, an even more extreme track-day variant of this all-conquering supercar.

Quattroporte Automatic

Model code: M139 Years of production: 2007-2008 Numbers produced: Engine: 90 V8 wet sump, 4.2L, 400 hp

The most important technical evolution for the Quattroporte came with the introduction of an automatic version at the 2007 Detroit motor show. While the Quattroporte with Duoselect transmission has proven to be an ideal match for Maseratis sporty reputation, demand for a fully automatic version had always been present. The Quattroporte Automatic is much more then a Quattroporte simply fitted with a new gearbox. From the 16.500 components of which the Quattroporte is made, 4.800 are new. The powertrain is completely new with the adaption of a new wet sump engine (F136UC), 6-speed automatic gearbox from ZF, propellor shaft and limited slip differential. The Quattroporte Automatic is available in standard version as well as Sport GT and Executive GT. The Sport GT was later on replaced by the more expressive Sport GT S.

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Technical Training Light GranTurismo

History and Heritage

Model code: M145 Start of production: 2007 Engine: 90 V8 wet sump, 4.2L, 405 hp

With the new GranTurismo, presented at the 2007 Geneva motor show, Maserati applies the experience gained in the luxury car segment with the Quattroporte to create a true luxury GT car. The GranTurismo is based on a modified Quattroporte floorplan. With an overall length of 488cm, the GranTurismo is significantly bigger than the Coup/Gransport models it replaces, and offers comfortable interior space to four adults. While the mechanical layout of the GranTurismo is identical to the Quattroporte Automatic it uses the same 4.2L V8 wet sump engine and automatic 6-speed gearbox from ZF various settings are specific to give the GranTurismo a more dynamic ride. Its pure and elegant body design is from the hand of Pininfarina and reflects perfectly Maseratis great tradition in the creation of elegant and sporty grand touring cars.

GranTurismo S

Model code: M145 Start of production: 2008 Engine: 90 V8 wet sump, 4.7L, 440 hp

Exactly one year after the presentation of the original GranTurismo, Maserati unveiled a first derivate of this highly renowned GT car. The GranTurismo S was created to meet the demand of those who prefer a more dynamic version of the existing GranTurismo. Its more powerful 4.7L V8 engine and completely new, rear mounted robotized gearbox with super fast MC-shift strategy, in combination with an upgraded braking system and modified suspensions turn the GranTurismo S in a true performance car. The more sporty nature of the GranTurismo S is perfectly reflected in its appearance with newly designed alloy wheels, dark headlights, new aerodynamic side sills, a boot lid spoiler, liberated exhaust system and specific interior trim. The character of the GranTurismo S is unmistakably aggressive, yet it keeps loyal to its GT background by offering the highest standards of comfort for all four occupants during long travel.

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Technical Training Light Quattroporte & Quattroporte S (Restyling)

History and Heritage

Model code: M139 Start of production: 2008 Engine: 90 V8 wet sump, 4.2L & 4.7L, 400hp & 430hp

Five years after its launch and with more than 15.000 vehicles produced, Maseratis highly successful Quattroporte saloon underwent a discrete restyling. Pininfarina has reworked the Maserati flagship without affecting the purity and elegance of its original design. The new front and rear give the car a more fresh and modern appeal while at the same time enhancing the connection with its GranTurismo sister model. Also the interior has been updated with a new and more user friendly entertainment and satellite navigation system, and new interior colours. Under the bonnet, the classic 4.2L V8 wet sump engine (Quattroporte) is now joined by a more powerful 4.7L version (Quattroporte S). The restyled Quattroporte models are available with an automatic sixspeed transmission only.

Quattroporte Sport GT S (Restyling)

Model code: M139 Start of production: 2008 Engine: 90 V8 wet sump, 4.7L, 440 hp

A sports car in black tie, with these words the international press praised the latest Quattroporte variant after the first road tests. The Sport GT S is the most exciting combination of luxury sedan and performance sports car that Maserati has ever produced. Thanks to a revised intake and exhaust system, its 4,7L wet sump engine liberates 10 more horsepower than the Quattroporte S model. The Sport GT S has a lowered ride height and specific single-rate dampers and springs to further improve its handling. Other modifications include new 20 wheels with specific tyres and a faster gearshift strategy for the 6-speed automatic transmission. Externally the Sport GTS can be recognized by its dark headlights, a black concave grille, dark window lining, dark, oval exhaust pipes and painted door handles.

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Technical Training Light GranTurismo S Automatic

History and Heritage

Model code: M145 Start of production: 2009 Engine: 90 V8 wet sump, 4.7L, 440 hp

The GranTurismo S Automatic forms the logical completion of Maseratis GranTurismo range. This model, which was presented during the 2009 Geneva motor show, benefits the performance of the more powerful 4.7L engine combined with the superior driving comfort of the ZF 6-speed automatic transmission. While its style is undoubtedly less aggressive than the version with a mechanical, robotized transmission, the GranTurismo S Automatic can be recognized by its new 20 wheels and subtle profiling of the side sills.

GranCabrio

Model code: M145 Start of production: 2010 Engine: 90 V8 wet sump, 4.7L, 440 hp

The GranCabrio, presented at the Frankfurt motor show of 2009, is Maseratis first real four-seater convertible in the history of the brand. This model can be seen as the Tridents third prong: Maserati customers can now choose between a four door sedan, a true GT coupe and the pleasure of open top motoring with four people in a stylish cabriolet. The GranCabrio borrows its technical underpinnings from the GranTurismo S Automatic: it shares the same platform albeit reinforced to compensate for the absence of a steel roof structure and also its engine and gearbox are identical. The fabric roof is premium quality an folds away by a simple push on a button in only 28 seconds. In some markets this model is sold as GranTurismo Convertible.

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Technical Training Light GranTurismo MC Stradale

History and Heritage

Model code: M145 Start of production: 2010 Engine: 90 V8 wet sump, 4.7L, 450 hp

The fastest, lightest and most powerful car in the Maserati range inspired by the Maserati Corse experience in the Maserati Trofeo and FIA GT4 championship. Maserati, on the basis of the well performing GranTurismo S and thanks to the experience on the racetrack with the MC Trofeo and GT4 version, is debuting with the GranTurismo MC Stradale. This model makes large use of the Maserati Corse experience, as clearly stressed by its name. It represents the real link with the racing environment and shows Maserati's ability to develop a product both for road and racetrack use.

GranCabrio Sport

Model code: M145 Start of production: 2011 Engine: 90 V8 wet sump, 4.7L, 450 hp

One year after its introduction, the GranCabrio has proven to be an instant success and is widely regarded as one of the most beautiful convertible cars on the market. The stylish and elegant GranCabrio is now complemented with a more performancefocused variant. A new wheel design, dark headlights, sharper profiled side sills and oval tail pipes give the GranCabrio Sport a more aggressive and sporty appearance, but modifications are not limited to aesthetics alone. Increased engine power and torque, combined with a faster gearshift and sharper handling make this car the ideal choice for those who want to enjoy the pleasure of open top motoring without compromising performance.

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Technical Training Light

Technical Concepts

Introduction to Technical Concepts


Vehicle Lay-Out Engine What is an engine The 4-stroke principle Torque and Horsepower Dry Sump Engine Wet Sump Engine Variable Valve Timing (VVT) Catalytic converter Robotized Transmission Automatic Transmission Limited Slip Differential Braking System Braking System MSP Tyre Pressure Monitoring System Suspension Skyhook Passive Safety Systems Florence Electronic Vehicle Architecture Vehicle Diagnostics 45 46 47 47 50 52 54 55 56 65 68 70 72 74 75 77 82 84

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Technical Training Light

Technical Concepts

Vehicle Lay-Out
A carefully balanced weight distribution is a fundamental characteristic of every Maserati. This feature is derived from Maseratis racing heritage. Robotized transmission:

47 %

53 %

Automatic transmission:

49 %

51 %

Most cars on the market are heavier on their front axle than they are on their rear axle. All recent Maserati vehicles have a near ideal weight distribution with a slight emphasis on the rear axle. This configuration has several advantages: Better traction during acceleration thanks to the higher grip level of the rear wheels. Better balance and steering capacity during braking. This is because the original weight distribution compensates for the dynamic weight transfer to the front axle during braking. More balanced handling and reduced understeer during cornering, more precise steering.

A complete driveline group (included engine, gearbox, drive shafts and wheel suspensions) is waiting in the factory to be united with a vehicles body. This step in the assembly process of a Maserati is internally called the marriage.

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Technical Training Light

Technical Concepts

Engine
What is an engine?
The basic function of an engine is that it produces the power to move the vehicle down the road as well as supply power for accessories like power steering and air conditioning. Many people believe that the engine is the Heart of the vehicle. In the case of Maserati this is very true. Maserati engines employ race bred designs and features.

Maserati vehicles currently use 90 V8 engines. This means that there are 8 cylinders arranged in a 90 degree V configuration.

90

Maserati engines use a 90 degree crankshaft as well. This means the crank connecting rod journals are spaced 90 degrees apart. It takes 720 degrees of crankshaft rotation to complete all of the 4 strokes. 720/8 = 90, so a 90 degree V8 is considered naturally balanced, or you have a 90 degree block with a 90 degree crankshaft and a cylinder firing every 90 degrees. Sometimes this would be called and even fire design.

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Technical Training Light

Technical Concepts

The 4-stroke principle:


1. Intake stroke: the piston goes down, the intake valve is open and fresh air /fuel mixture is aspirated. 2. Compression stroke: all valves are closed, the piston goes up and compresses the mixture. 3. Work stroke: a spark from the spark plug ignites the compressed mixture. The strong increase in pressure pushes the piston down to deliver power. 4. Exhaust stroke: the piston goes up and the exhaust valve opens. The burned mixture is pushed out of the engine as exhaust gas.
Camshafts

Intake valve

Exhaust valve

Piston

Connecting rod

Crankshaft

Horsepower and Torque

What is Torque? Torque can be best described as rotational force. A force applied at a right angle to a lever multiplied by its distance from the levers fulcrum (the length of the lever arm) gives us torque. Torque is what gets a vehicle moving from a rest position, it is what pushes you back in the seat. Torque allows trucks and trains to move large loads. Humans produce torque when they pedal a bicycle. The maximum acceleration a vehicle is capable of it owes to the maximum torque of its engine. Torque is expressed in Newton-metres, but alternatively also foot-pounds is accepted.

Torque = Force x Distance

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What is Horsepower? Horsepower was originally defined to compare the output of steam engines with the power of draft horses. The mechanical horsepower, also known as imperial horsepower, of exactly 550 foot-pounds per second is approximately equivalent to 745.7 watts. In other words, power is a measure of how quickly you can produce torque. Torque is what gets a vehicle moving, Horsepower is what allows it to go 280 km/h. A motor vehicle will reach its top speed when its engine reaches its maximum horsepower. Power is expressed in watts or Kilowatts, but for motor vehicles the horsepower is still widely used. Force x Distance Time

Power =

Power and torque curves The performances an engine is capable of are defined by its power and torque curves. B A

Power curve (red) and torque curve (blue) of a Maserati engine. One can see that the torque is always above 400Nm starting from 2250rpm. Maximum power is reached at 7000rpm.

For every engine there is a certain rotational speed (rpm) at which a maximum amount of air-fuel mixture, which is burned to generate work, enters the engine. At this speed the engine delivers its maximum torque (A). Above this point the torque an engine delivers will decrease. Why then does the power continue to rise? Even though the torque decreases, the engine speed rises and by consequence the number of work-cycles generated per unit of time increases. At a certain moment the balance between maximum burned mixture (work) and speed (rpm) reaches its most favourable point. At this moment the engine will deliver its maximum horsepower (B).

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F
When pedalling a bicycle, the obtained torque is the force (F) we apply on the pedal multiplied by the length of the lever arm (L). If we multiply this result with the pedalling speed we know the obtained power (example, Lance Armstrongs maximum measured power is 495 Watts or 0.66hp).

What gives an engine high torque? Engine torque is more or less directly related to engine capacity (cylinder displacement). Other factors like an efficient intake and exhaust system, an efficient fuel combustion and low internal friction play an important role as well. What gives an engine high power? The capacity to produce the above described at a high engine speed. To this end it is of the highest importance that its internal components like pistons, connecting rods, crankshaft, etc. are not only very strong but also light and well balanced. This depends very much on the engine design.

A slow spinning diesel engine, like this Iveco-unit driving a generator, produces high torque and relatively low horsepower.

A race engine, like this classic Maserati Formula 1 engine of the 250F, produces a high specific power output since it is designed for high rpm.

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Dry Sump Engine

The 4.2L Dry Sump engines are used in the Coup, Spyder , GranSport and Quattroporte Duoselect models

Main characteristics: 4.2L all-alloy 90 V8 4 camshafts, 32 valves Variable valve timing (VVT) on the intake camshafts 90 crankshaft for smooth running Nicasil technology for cylinder liners Dry sump lubrication system Competition pedigree 7500 RPM Redline Compact and light weight High specific power and torque figures Dry sump lubrication system: Derived from aircraft and racing technology. Oil is stored in a remote oil tank. Oil is scavenged by 3 stages of the oil pump to fill the tank. Then one stage of the oil pump draws oil from the tank to supply the engine continuous oil pressure. Absence of the traditional oil pan permits a lower positioning of the engine in the vehicle chassis (Lower centre of gravity = better vehicle dynamics). Ensures efficient lubrication in extreme high acceleration, braking, and cornering conditions.

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The pressure in the lubrication system is assured by three scavenge pumps and one delivery pump, fitted in series with the water pump (3 in the figure below).

Always check oil level with engine running!

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Remote engine oil tank Oil/water heat exchanger (Oil Cooler) Chain driven water/oil pump group Oil filter Liquid supply line from oil tank to water/oil pump Return line from heat exchanger to oil tank

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Wet Sump Engine

The Wet Sump engines are used in all GranTurismo and GranCabrio models as well as all Quattroporte vehicles with automatic transmission.

Main characteristics: 4.2L(Blue) & 4.7L (Red) all-alloy 90 V8 4 camshafts, 32 valves Variable valve timing (VVT) on the intake camshafts 90 crankshaft for smooth running Same basic characteristics as dry sump engine, comparable power and torque figures for 4.2L. Improved power and torque for 4.7L Nicasil technology for 4.7L version 80% new components vs. dry sump engine Improved fuel economy Improved reliability

Wet sump lubrication system:


Engine oil is stored in the engine sump (oil pan) vs. a remote tank. Reduced operating noise Improved fuel economy Less complex, more reliable

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Always check oil level with engine off!

The oil pump (indicated with the yellow arrow) is located inside the oil pan, underneath the crankshaft.

The Maserati wet sump lubrication system is specifically designed for very high performance applications. The oil bath is not in direct contact with rotating components like the crankshaft, but in a separate section of the engine sump (dry sump-like design). Efficient lubrication is guaranteed also in extreme conditions. Thanks to the specific design, this engine is fitted only 15mm higher in the vehicles chassis with respect to the dry sump engine. Advantages of wet sump and dry sump are combined in one engine!

Oil level Independently from the engine type, a correct oil level is always of the highest importance. Too low oil level will lead to: lack of lubrication due to starving during manoeuvres like acceleration, braking and cornering. Quick overheating of the oil, making it lose its lubricating characteristics. Severe engine damage in extreme conditions (starving) Too high oil level will lead to: Foaming of engine oil from crankshaft windage Engine vibrations Increased fuel consumption Severe engine damage in extreme conditions (hydraulic lock)

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Variable Valve Timing (VVT)


What is VVT? VVT is a system that allows variable opening and closing timing of the engines valves. The timing of the intake camshafts can be varied continuously between maximum retarded and maximum advanced position. To this end, a timing variator is fitted on each intake camshaft. VVT optimises engine efficiency for different engine load and engine speed conditions Why Maserati engines have VVT?

The adoption of continuous timing variation on the intake camshafts mean that 82% of torque is available from 2500 rpm. This translates into exceptional acceleration even with higher gears, allowing comfortable driving on motorway journeys and, in general, the engine's full potential can be exploited over the entire operating range. Further, VVT increases engine efficiency and reduces fuel consumption.

The timing variators on both intake camshafts are indicated by the yellow arrows.

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Catalytic converter
What is a catalytic converter? A catalytic converter is a device that is fitted in the exhaust system of motor vehicles. Its task is to convert the toxic substances present in the exhaust gas (carbonmonoxide, hydrocarbons and nitrogen oxides) into non-toxic elements such a oxygen, nitrogen, carbon dioxide and water. This is achieved by a chemical reaction that takes place inside the converter. This chemical reaction is initiated by what is called a catalyst, usually a precious metal such as platinum.

Maserati vehicles uses metal-core type catalytic converters on its recent vehicles. These have the advantage of creating little obstruction to the exhaust flow, and thus are more suitable for powerfull engines with respect to the more traditional ceramiccore type catalytic convertors.

The catalytic converters (indicated by the yellow arrows) are located in the exhaust system, close to the engine.

When a vehicle is used in extreme circumstances, for example intensive track use, there is a risc of overheating of the catalytic converters. The driver is informed of such a situation by means of a designated warning light. To avoid damage one must slow down the vehicle to allow the system to cool down.

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Robotized Transmission
The robotized gearbox control system is composed of an electro-hydraulic servo system which manages the gearshift and clutch operation. A specific ECU (NCR) controls the complete system by using a strategy which is based on driver inputs and various vehicle parameters. Therefore the NCR interacts with other vehicle systems like the engine control, ABS and stability control systems and uses a driver interface (gearshift paddles and control buttons). A specific characteristic of the system is that it can be integrated on a mechanical transmission without requiring any specific modifications.

System outline
1. Clutch housing with twin disc clutch Torque reaction tube with transmission shaft Gearbox assembly with integrated limited slip differential

2. 3.

For its vehicles with robotized transmission (Coup & Spyder, GranSport, Quattroporte Duoselect, GranTurismo S and GranTurismo MC Stradale), Maserati uses the Transaxle layout. The integrated gearbox/differential assembly at the rear is rigidly connected to the engine via a stiff torque reaction tube. This solution offers ideal weight distribution and a direct power delivery to the driven wheels.

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Twin disc clutch The use of a clutch with two compact discs (225mm only) instead of a clutch with a single large disc like used in most other vehicles with manual transmission, significantly reduces the kinetic inertia of the flywheel-clutch assembly while at the same time maintaining a high torque transfer capacity. A low rotational inertia allows quicker engine revving, typical for racing engines. This provides quicker vehicle acceleration as well. Transmission shaft and torque reaction tube A solid transmission shaft without joints is the most efficient way to transfer engine power to the driven wheels. Power delivery is direct and without delay, ideal for performance-focused vehicles. The torque reaction tube links the engine with the clutch at one side, and the gearbox/differential assembly at the other side to a single, rigid unit. By this way the engine mounts can remain soft, absorbing vibrations for maximal comfort, while the power delivery is still direct. Gearbox with electro-hydraulic operating mechanism A mechanical 6-speed gearbox with integrated mechanical limited slip differential is fitted in a rear subframe to which also the rear wheel suspensions are attached. The electro-hydraulic gearshift operating system is fitted onto the rear of the gearbox. Its most important components are identified in the figure below.

1. Gearbox housing 3 4 2 2. High pressure pump 3. Power unit 4. Solenoid valves 5. High pressure pipes 6. Fluid reservoir 7. Pressure accumulator The robotized gearbox control node (NCR) is located in the boot space at right hand side (image: Quattroporte Duoselect) 8. Hydraulic gearshift actuator

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Driver interface

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The driver interface is composed of the following parts: Gearshift paddles fitted on the steering column: Up (right) and Down (left). Driving direction selector on the central console for selection of 1 or reverse gear. Driving mode selection buttons (Auto/Manual, Normal/Sport, Ice, Race). Display screen for visualisation of the selected gear and driving mode.

Quattroporte Duoselect

Gearshift paddles

T-lever for selection of 1 or Reverse gear

Gear and driving mode visualisation on central display

GranTurismo S and GranTurismo MC Stradale

Longer gearshift paddles permit easy shifting during cornering Push buttons replace the T-lever for driving direction selection

Driving mode selection buttons on the central console: Auto/Manual, Normal/Sport, ICE, Race (MC Stradale only)

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The robotized gearbox control system went through a number of significant technical evolutions from 2001 till today. Various software and hardware evolutions have been applied during these years with the aim to improve driving comfort, improve gearshift performance, reduce clutch wear and simplify service operations. PRE-SOFAST and SOFAST transmission control system: this is the first generation of transmission control system as introduced in 2001 on the M138 model. The name SOFAST (soft + fast) was introduced a little later when a new control software was applied with the aim to enhance operating comfort. Management of gearshifts is not influenced by information concerning vehicle dynamics (ie. Braking, cornering).

SOFAST II transmission control system: a new control unit with new software was introduced to optimise gearshift comfort and reduce noise levels. An improved operating management of the clutch was obtained by the introduction of the Kisspoint self-learning procedure. Management of gearshifts is not influenced by information concerning vehicle dynamics (ie. Braking, cornering).
SOFAST III transmission control system: the introduction of Sofast III involves a new control unit and the introduction of a longitudinal acceleration sensor and a clutch pressure sensor. The longitudinal acceleration information allows a gearshift and clutch management to be influenced by the vehicle dynamics. The clutch pressure information allows the ECU to calibrate the clutch diaphragm spring characteristic. These modifications resulted in a much improved clutch management. SOFAST III+ transmission control system: identical to SOFAST III but with modified clutch and new operating software for further improved clutch management. SOFAST IV with Superfast shift transmission control system: new operating software and various hardware modifications are applied. The introduction of the Superfast shift gearshift operating strategy reduces gearshift times to 100ms. SOFAST IV with Superfast shift 2 transmission control system: new operating software and various hardware modifications are applied. The introduction of the Superfast shift 2 (CV2) gearshift operating strategy further reduces gearshift times to 60ms.

Robotized transmission systems


Model Coup & Spyder Commercial name Cambiocorsa Technical system evolution Pre-Sofast / Sofast / Sofast 2

Gransport & Gransport Spyder


Quattroporte GranTurismo S GranTursismo MC Stradale

Cambiocorsa
Duoselect MC-Shift MC-Race

Sofast 2
Sofast 2 / Sofast 3 / Sofast 3+ Sofast 4 Sofast 4 with CV2

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M138 Coup/Spyder/GranSport Cambiocorsa


SOFAST up to assembly 12203 SOFAST II from assembly 12204

M139 Quattroporte Duoselect, EUROPE version SOFAST II up to assembly 18821 SOFAST III from assembly 18822 SOFAST III+ from assembly 21925

M139 Quattroporte Duoselect, US version SOFAST III up to assembly 21925 SOFAST III+ from assembly 21926

M145 GranTurismo S (MC-Shift) SOFAST IV with Superfast shift

M145 GranTurismo MC Stradale (MC-Race)


SOFAST IV with CV2 (Superfast shift 2)

M144 MC12 SOFAST

ALFA ROMEO 8C Competizione (Q-Select) SOFAST III+

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Clutch management: What is Kisspoint?

Technical Concepts

The kisspoint also referred to as the PIS (Punto Incipiente Slittamento or slip beginning point) is a parameter that defines the nominal value of the clutch engagement point as stored in the robotized transmission node. The kiss point is the actual thrust bearing position at the moment of clutch engaging, The Kisspoint can best be compared to the position of the clutch pedal in a manual transmission vehicle at the moment the clutch starts to engage. But instead of being controlled by a human, it is controlled by an electronic processor. A correct assessment of the Kisspoint is the key for a smooth and comfortable drive away, quick gearshift operation, and low clutch wear. Maserati, together with supplier Magnetti Marelli, has put important efforts in optimizing the clutch operation.
Transmitted engine torque by the clutch

10 Nm Kisspoint (1020 1040 rpm) Thrust bearing travel

Clutch open (idle)

Clutch fully closed, 100% transmitted torque (1800 rpm)

Clutch layout: Clutch disc Engine flywheel Pressure plate with diaphragm spring Thrust bearing

Engine crankshaft

Input shaft gearbox

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Operating modes for robotized transmission

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The robotized transmission has different operating startegies, which depend on the selected driving modes:

MANUAL or AUTOMATIC driving mode selected SPORT mode engaged/disengaged ICE mode engaged/disengaged (not for GranTurismo MC Stradale) RACE mode engaged/disengaged (only for GranTurismo MC Stradale)

These strategies can vary for each vehicle model version. A detailed description of the different driving modes and their effect on the transmission operation startegy, as well as some guidelines on the correct use of a vehicle with robotized transmission, can be found in the chapter Vehicle Functionality Overview. System safety The gear disengages: Immediately when the engine compartment is open; After 2 seconds when the drivers door is open and the brake pedal is released; After 1 minute when the drivers door is closed and the brake pedal is released; After 10 minutes when the door is closed and the brake pedal is depressed;

Indicator lights The instrument cluster is fitted with following transmission-related warning lights:

The gearbox warning light is ON whenever an anomaly has been detected.

The oil level warning light for the hydraulic fluid is ON when the level is below minimum

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Superfast shift strategy for GranTurismo S: MC-Shift During normal gearshift the different actions occur sequentially:

Technical Concepts

t1

t2

t3

time

When MC-shift is acttivated the actions occur quicker and partially overlap:
Total gearchange time (acceleration gap) = 100ms

t1

t2

t3

time

Shift time: 40ms

Engine torque reduced / clutch open t1 Gear disengagement /selection /engagement t2 Clutch closed / engine torque restored t3

When is MC-Shift available? MC-Shift is available in MANUAL-SPORT mode, and following conditions met: Engine speed > 5500 rpm Accelerator pedal fully depressed (>80%) Lateral acceleration <0.9g ASR not in operation No wheel spin During upshift only and for the first 5 gears Engine and gearbox at normal operating temperature

The MC-S icon on the central info display indicates that the vehicle is ready for a superfast shift

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2nd generation Superfast shift strategy for GranTurismo MC Stradale: MC-Race When is MC-Race available? MC-RACE 60ms gearshift is available in RACE mode, and following conditions met: Engine speed > 5000 rpm Accelerator pedal fully depressed >65% Lateral acceleration <0.9g ASR not in operation No wheel spin During upshift only and for the first 5 gears Engine and gearbox at normal operating temperature

Activation of this strategy is communicated to the driver via the MC-R icon, which at first flashes on the display and then remains permanently illuminated.

The figure indicates the difference in shift time between a MC-Race shift (red curve) and a comfortable gearshift of a Quattroporte Duoselect (green curve)

MC Stradale driving modes Gearshift times Automatic gearshifting Manual gearshifting

Auto 240 ms Yes Yes

Sport 100 ms No Yes

Race 60 ms No Yes

Sequential downshifting strategy Downshifting of more gears can be obtained by setting one of the two manual modes, SPORT or RACE, and holding the DOWN lever pulled and the brake pedal depressed. The number of downshifts and the downshift speed depend on the braking duration and intensity.

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Automatic Transmission
The fully electronically controlled, automatic 6-speed transmission with ASIS adaptive shift strategy is used for the following vehicles: Quattroporte Automatica Quattroporte MY09 (Restyling) all versions GranTurismo GranTurismo S Automatica GranCabrio & GranCabrio Sport

System outline:
Limited slip differential at the rear Hydraulic torque converter 6-speed fully automatic gearbox with adaptive shift strategy

Driveshaft with three constant velocity joints

Hydrodynamic torque converter This is a device filled with oil that is fitted between the engine and the gearbox. It replaces the clutch of a manual transmission car. The torque converter transmits little torque when the engine is idling, and automatically increases the transferred torque smoothly when the engine speed increases. Since the torque converter transmits torque through hydrodynamic oil flow, it absorbs driveline vibrations and is largely responsible for the superior driving comfort of an automatic transmission vehicle. An integrated lock-up clutch is used to improve fuel economy when driving at constant speeds.

The internal components of a torque converter: turbine (1), stator wheel (2), pump wheel (3)

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Automatic 6-speed gearbox

Technical Concepts

The automatic 6HP26 6-speed gearbox from ZF is one of the most advanced automatic transmissions on the market. The electro-hydraulic Mecatronik control unit is integrated inside the gearbox unit and automatically adapts to the drivers preferences. Its design is very robust and completely maintenance free.

Drive shaft with three constant velocity joints. A unique feature of the driveshaft used in the Maserati cars with automatic transmission is that it uses three constant velocity joints. In this way the power delivery to the driven wheels is direct, and without delays or vibrations.

Adaptive gearshift strategy (ASIS)

By increasing and synchronizing the control of the transmission with other systems in the car, such as the engine, braking system, drive wheels and steering, a series of signals are provided, which describe the driving conditions in real time. In response to the application of longitudinal or lateral acceleration, the control unit actuates additional functions of the electronic transmission control system, by acquiring signals such as engine torque and speed, oil temperature, the position and movement of the accelerator pedal and the speed of each individual wheel. On the basis of this information, the transmission control system is able to recognize whether the car is cornering, the driver is braking or the driver wants to accelerate.
Using these signals, it is possible to draw conclusions about the effective load of the car and the topography of the stretch of road (uphill or downhill gradient), which can then be applied to the transmission function. This system is generally known as automatic transmission with adaptive transmission control. It is capable of recognizing the intentions of the driver, recording his style of driving and adapting the gear selection accordingly. No manual intervention is therefore necessary.

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Calculating the road gradient:

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The ASIS system distinguishes 5 different categories of road gradient, each of which is associated with a gearshift map. In AUTO NORMAL and AUTO SPORT modes, recognition of driving style and calculation of road gradient take place simultaneously. Since road gradient and driving style category are calculated independently, the ASIS system has 20 gearshift maps. 10 for AUTO NORMAL and 10 for AUTO SPORT. Due to the interpolation between the different categories, the current gearshift map generally represents the interpolation of 4 gearshift maps (2 for driving style and 2 for road gradient).

Downhill strategies When DRIVE is selected and the accelerator pedal not pressed, the system recognizes that the car is travelling downhill and prevents the gearbox from changing UP. If the driver presses the brake pedal, the gearbox can change DOWN to provide a higher degree of engine braking. The purpose of this management strategy is to make downhill driving safer. Cornering strategies The gear management system recognizes when the car is cornering. When DRIVE is selected and the car is cornering, the system prevents gear changes for the full duration of the maneuver. Gear changes are enabled again once the car has come out of the bend after a distance that varies depending on the speed of travel.

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Limited Slip Differential


What is a differential? When cornering, the wheel at the outside of the corner needs to travel over a larger distance than the wheel at the inside of the corner, therefore it needs to rotate faster. A differential is a device that allows this difference of speed between both driven wheels. Without a differential, a vehicle would be difficult to turn.

When cornering, each wheel of a car travels over a different distance and thus needs to rotate at a different speed

A differential allows the driven wheels to rotate at different speeds

What is a Limited Slip Differential? Because a differential allows difference in speed of the driven wheels, in conditions of low grip, the wheel with the least grip could start spinning. The spinning wheel takes all of the engine torque, while the wheel with the higher grip receives no torque. This strongly compromises the traction of a vehicle, especially for more powerful cars and when driving in low grip conditions.

Multi-disc clutch pack reduces slip Differential gears

A Limited slip differential limits the amount of speed difference allowed between both driven wheels. Often this is achieved by a multi-disc clutch pack that generates friction at the moment both wheels tend to rotate at different speed. By this way, a certain amount of traction is always ensured.

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A mechanical limited slip differential is the best way to guarantee for maximum traction in all driving conditions. This is because it will send the engine torque to the driven wheel with the highest grip. A mechanical limited slip differential is standard equipment for all Maserati vehicles.

The Graziano limited slip differential as used on Maserati vehicles with automatic transmission

Maserati differentials use a locking factor of 25/45%, what does this mean? 25% differential lock during acceleration: The locking factor of a differential is expressed as a percentage of its transmitting torque. In other words, making the driven wheels rotate independently from each other will require a torque which is 25% of the acceleration torque. For a high performance road car, a 25% locking factor for acceleration is considered as the best compromise between handling (no locking needed) and good traction (lots of locking needed). 45% differential lock during release / braking: A higher locking factor is used under throttle release or braking conditions. This is done to eliminate oversteer which could occur when the throttle is suddenly released during cornering. By this way each Maserati has a well balanced handling, also when driven to the limit.

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Braking System
Maserati was one the first car manufacturers to use a hydraulic brake circuit on its prewar race cars, and to use disc brakes on its road cars as early as 1957. Maseratis braking systems today:

330 mm ventilated discs with 4/4 piston calipers for 4.2L engined vehicles

360/330 mm ventilated & cross drilled discs with Dual Cast technology and 6/4 piston calipers for all 4.7L engined vehicles (GranTurismo MC Stradale excluded) and optionally for 4.2L engined vehicles

380/360 mm Carbon Ceramic Material discs (CCM) with 6/4 piston calipers for the GranTurismo MC Stradale

Which factors define braking performance? Disc size: This is directly related to the braking torque a braking system can apply. Disc size is limited by the wheel size. Caliper type: The caliper generates the braking force by pressing the brake pads against the discs. Generally, the more and the larger pistons a caliper has, the more force it can apply.

Brake pad type/material: This is determining for the braking characteristics of a vehicle, since the pad is the part that generates the friction. Pads come in large variations of price, quality and performance. The pad has an important impact on factors like the braking power, durability, resistance against fading, brake feel and wear. They are specifically designed by the manufacturer to suit the vehicles requirements.
Disc ventilation: Many discs on todays vehicles are ventilated, this means that the outer surfaces of a brake discs are separated by an air gap. When braking, the stopping power of a vehicle is converted into heat. The way a braking system can get rid of that heat defines its consistency, i.e., the capacity to perform repeated braking without loosing stopping power. Disc ventilation performs this task. Grooved/cross drilled discs: Variations in the brake disc surface like grooves and holes improve the friction between the pad and the disc surface. Further, they help to carry off worn pad material and dust, guaranteeing braking performance over time. Also known as Gas Vents or Gas Ports.

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Which other factors are important as well?

Technical Concepts

Weight: Since brakes are part of the unsprung weight of a vehicle, their weight must be limited. Handling, ride and comfort all benefit from a low unsprung weight. Vehicle weight distribution: During braking, a dynamic weight transfer from the rear to the front takes place. This means that the vehicles front axle will become heavier while the rear axle becomes lighter. Many vehicles are already heavier on their front axle than on their rear. During strong braking, the front axle becomes so heavy that it compromises steering, while the rear axle becomes so light that its contribution to the vehicles stopping power is almost zero and stability can be lost. Maseratis characteristic ideal weight distribution with a slight emphasis on the rear axle favours braking performance.

Normal driving

Braking

Chassis and wheel suspensions design: The kinematics of the wheel suspensions and related components define the vehicles behaviour during braking and acceleration. Maseratis double triangle front and rear suspension design feature builtin anti-dive and anti-squat kinematics. In this way the stability is maintained during strong braking and acceleration. Dual-cast technology This new technology was developed by specialist brake supplier Brembo and used for the first time on a road car with the launch of the Maserati Quattroporte Sport GT S in 2007. Dual-cast brake discs feature a cast iron friction ring combined with an aluminium centre part, co-cast into a single piece. By this way these revolutionary new brake discs combine the superior friction characteristics of cast iron with the lightness of aluminium, and this without needing the complexity of a composed brake disc. Carbon Ceramic Material (CCM) technology The use of carbon and ceramic materials in vehicle brake components derives form aircraft and racecar technology. The most important advantage of this technology is that the friction characteristics are not affected by high temperature. In practice this means that intensive and repeated braking can be applied without loosing braking performance, like is the case on conventional braking systems. Other advantages are reduced weight of the CCM-disc compared to steel or cast iron, and very high resistance against wear.

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Braking System - MSP

An image of an opened up Bosch ESP 8.0+ unit (right) illustrates the large number of electro-hydraulic valves that that require extreme precision during assembly

Maserati uses on its recent vehicles the advanced Bosch ESP 8.0+ system. This is an integrated electronic-hydraulic unit that controls all braking and vehicle stability related functions. The tuning of the system is specific for each model, and has been defined by Maserati test engineers together with specialists from Bosch in order to achieve the best possible balance between safety and performance.

Maserati MSP offers the following functionality: ABS (Anti-lock Braking System): prevents the wheels from locking during braking, maintaining in this way the steering capacity. ASR (Anti-Slip Regulation): ensures traction by preventing the driven wheels from spinning during acceleration. EBD (Electronic Brake force Distribution): distributes the brake force optimally between the front and the rear axle. MSR (Motor Schleppmoment Regelung): electronically controls the engine braking torque during downshifting, preventing that this would cause instability of the vehicle. MSP (ESP), (Maserati Stability Program): controls the brake of each individual wheel to ensure vehicle stability during cornering. HBA (Hydraulic Brake Assist): recognizes an emergency braking situation and hydraulically increases the braking power to reduce the stopping distance. Hill Holder: assists with driving away in uphill conditions by preventing the vehicle from rolling backwards.

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MSP operation: understeer and oversteer

Technical Concepts

Understeer condition: the MSP will correct by braking the inner rear wheel

Oversteer condition: the MSP will correct by braking the outer front wheel

When cornering, the tyres of a vehicle are always subject to a certain amount of lateral slip. The balance of the slip amount between the front and the rear wheels define the handling characteristics. We can identify three conditions: neutral, understeer or oversteer. Neutral: slip amounts are the same front and rear, the vehicle follows the chosen path in accordance to the steering wheel input. Understeer: the lateral slip amount is higher at the front wheels then at the rear. The vehicle tends to turn with a bigger radius than was intended by the steering wheel input. Oversteer: the lateral slip amount is higher at the rear wheels then at the front. The vehicle tends to turn with a smaller radius than was intended by the steering wheel input.

The MSP system will eliminate understeer and oversteer when it asesses that this condition could compromise the vehicles stability. Stability is ensured by braking wheels individually by well defined braking inputs from the MSP electro-hydraulic unit.

What happens if MSP is switched off? In that case ASR, MSR and MSP are fully disabled. ABS and EBD on the other hand remain active in all conditions.

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Tyre Pressure Monitoring System (TPMS)


Faults and defects with the tires are among the most common causes of breakdowns and accidents: Inadequate air pressure leads to increased flexing work and premature tire wear. In turn, at high speeds this can lead to tires no longer being able to withstand the loads and bursting. Therefore Maserati in collaboration with automotive supplier Beru has developed a Tyre Pressure Monitoring System (TPMS) for its vehicles. This system measures in real time the air pressure of the four tyres and has the task of informing the driver in the event of a pressure loss.

Layout of the TPMS: four RF antennas that are located in the proximity of the wheels receive pressure information from the 4 wheel valves and pass on this information to a central ECU (NTP).

A warning light and messages on the central info display inform the driver in the event of a pressure loss.

A pressure sensor, a temperature sensor, a battery, an RF transmitter and a microprocessor are all integrated into the wheel valve.

Note: depending on the model variant and on the market specification, TPMS is available as an option or standard equipment. TPMS is not available on the GranTurismo MC Stradale model. Note (2): in the USA, all newly licensed vehicles from 2007 onward must be fitted with a system that informs the driver in case a tyre has a pressure loss of 25% below the target pressure.

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Technical Concepts

Wheel suspension Skyhook

The base suspension design of every Maserati is derived from competition. Double light alloy oscillating triangles front and rear are attached to a subframe and incorporate anti-dive and anti-squat kinematics. This is the best configuration for supreme handling and driving precision. Depending on the model version, Skyhook electronically controlled adaptive damping system is applied. Skyhook adaptive damping system The system consists of the following components: 4 electronically controlled shock absorbers that can instantly and gradually adjust between maximum rigid (for better handling) and maximum soft (for maximum driving comfort) positions. 5 acceleration sensors that monitor in real time the movement of the vehicles body and the vertical movement of the wheels. A central ECU that receives information form the acceleration sensors and various driving parameters, and adjust in real time the damping settings.

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Front adjustable shock absorbers Rear adjustable shock absorbers Electronic control unit (Sachs) Front wheel acceleration sensors Body vertical acceleration sensors

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Technical Concepts

The Skyhook system is specifically tuned by Maserati test engineers and engineers from specialist supplier Sachs for each different model. Its role is not to simply switch between sporty and comfortable damping settings; it instead constantly monitors the driving style, road conditions and drivers preferences to adapt instantly and continuously to the best achievable setting for every given situation. The following parameters are monitored by Skyhook: Driving speed Requested engine torque (accelerator pedal movement) Gearchange information

Steering wheel input


Braking pressure Lateral acceleration Road surface condition (through wheel movement) Vehicle body movement Selected setting: Normal or Sport driving mode

By this way the system is capable of offering: Maximum driving comfort during normal driving, automatically adapting to changing conditions like driving speed and road surface conditions. Best handling with minimal body movements (roll, dive, squat) and maximum steering precission when sporty driving is requested. Maximal vehicle stability if a sudden steering manouvre is necessary.

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Technical Concepts

Passive Safety Systems

GranTurismo range passive safety features: Dual stage frontal airbags with Low Risk Deployment technology Side bags in the door panels for lateral head protection Side bags in the front seats for lateral chest protection (not for the GranTurismo MC Stradale model) Seatbelt pretensioners for all seats (not for the GranTurismo MC Stradale in case the optional roll cage and harness seatbelts are installed) Seatbelt reminder for the front passenger Inertia switch for fuel cut off Passengers front airbag deactivation key switch (depending on the market) GranCabrio range passive safety features: Dual stage frontal airbags with Low Risk Deployment technology Large side bags in the front seats for lateral chest and head protection Seatbelt pretensioners for the front seats Seatbelt reminder for the front passenger ROPS roll over protection system with two extendable roll bars Inertia switch for fuel cut off Passengers front airbag deactivation key switch (depending on the market) Quattroporte range passive safety features: Dual stage frontal airbags with Low Risk Deployment technology (from MY09) Lateral curtain bags for head protection front and rear. Side bags in the front seats for lateral chest protection Seatbelt pretensioners for all seatbelts, except for the central rear seatbelt Inertia switch for fuel cut off Passengers front airbag deactivation key switch (depending on the market)

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Impact detection

Technical Concepts

A number of sophisticated sensors are positiond in carefully defined locations in order to evaluate the severity and the direction of every impact.
X (+) 2 2

1. Acceleration sensor(s) inside the NAB 2. Front crash zone sensors for advanced impact warning and impact angle detection. 3. Lateral crash sensors
Y (-) NAB 1 Y (+)

4. Lateral pressure sensors for advanced impact warning (GranCabrio only)

4 3

4 3

X (-)

Airbag Node (NAB) The NAB manages the entire system, controlling all of its components and, with the help of the remote front and side sensors, it is capable of recognising an impact situation quickly enough to activate, depending on the type and severity of the impact, either only the pretensioners or only the front bags, or the pretensioners and the front airbag modules, or the curtain bags and the sidebags.

The NAB is firmly secured to the casing underneath the vehicle centre console, near the vehicles barycentre. This is to allow the internal deceleration sensor(s) to monitor the vehicle deceleration accurately.

The airbag node (NAB) is always located near the barycentre of the vehicle

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Front drivers airbag

Technical Concepts

The drivers airbag is integrated in the steering wheel and protects the driver in the event of a head-on collision. The airbag is inflated by a gas generator which has two intervention stages (Dual Stage). These can be activated separately and will adjust the airbag inflation speed depending on the severity of the collision.

Nitrogen

Sodium azide Explosive charge

Low Risk Deployment The Quattroporte restyling, GranTurismo models from 2009 and GranCabrio models are equipped with a new-generation passengers airbag system that uses an intelligent technology, called Low Risk Deployment. These new bags automatically adapt to the shape and size of the occupant, reducing drastically the risk of any injury caused by airbag deployment.

The new LRD airbag system represents a point of excellence in technological development in the field of vehicle occupant protection and provides increased safety in head-on collision conditions.

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Technical Concepts

Side airbag module (Sidebag) The sidebag module is composed of a plastic casing which houses the gas generator and a permeable nylon airbag with a volume of approx. 12 litres.

1. 2. 3.

External cover Casing Electrical connector

4.
5. 6.

Gas generator
Folded bag Warning label

Lateral curtain bags (Quattroporte) A curtain-shaped cushion with a volume of approximately 21 litres drops down from the roof pillars to protect the heads of the front and rear occupants in the event of a side impact.

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Connector Gas generator Cushion container Fixing points Roof upholstery

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Technical Concepts

Seatbelt pretensioners The seatbelt winders (retractors) are fitted with electrically-controlled pretensioners, which are operated by the airbag node, with a load limiting device. This device, introduced to enhance passive safety, is capable of reducing the load pressure normally exerted by the seat belts against the shoulders and chest following an impact, minimising the injuries resulting from the action of the seat belts.

1. 2. 3.

Gas generator Piston Rack

4.
5. 6.

Belt winder
Seat belt Torsion bar

Rollover protection system (ROPS) (GranCabrio) The active roll bars are controlled by the airbag node (NAB) and are activated by means of a pyrotechnic release mechanism. A specific control logic in the NAB assesses the rollover risk and activates the roll bars when a preset roll angle is reached. The rollover protection system and the reinforced windshield frame provide optimal protection in the event of overturning. The total activation time plus the system extension time is less than 190 milliseconds, in other words, an interval far shorter than the time the vehicle takes to turn around its own axis.
Extendible roll bar Aluminium container

Pyrotechnic charge

The tungsten pin concealed underneath the plastic breaks the rear window during roll bar activation.

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81

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Technical Concepts

The Florence Electronic Vehicle Architecture


Multiplexing forms an integral part of motor vehicles nowadays. With every new model generation that comes out there seem to be more safety and comfort systems, more useful gadgets and luxuries that simplify our lives, yet car sizes aren't growing to accommodate everything that is being packed in them now. This is all due to multiplexing.

1. 2. 3. 4.

ECU called NODE Microprocessor Communication interface (CAN controller) CAN bus (two wires)

What is Multiplexing? Technically speaking, the term multiplexing indicates the technology to send multiple electrical signals over one single wire. By this way, multiple users can use the same single wire, called bus, for data exchange. The access to the bus, i.e. which user can make use of the bus at which moment, is defined by the bus protocol. Multiplexing in modern motor vehicles has reached a high level of complexity. One of the bus protocols widely used in vehicles today is CAN (Controller Area Network). CAN is a sophisticated serial data network that can manage a high stream of data between a large amount of users, called nodes.

What is Florence? Florence is an electronic vehicle architecture that has been developed by the Fiat Group specifically for the use in high-end luxury vehicles. Maserati uses Florence in all its current models. Florence contains a number of multiplexing networks that connects a large number of nodes, each of which control a specific vehicle function, into a single integrated system. The heart of the Florence system is the Body Computer Node (NBC). The NBC is the network manager and acts as a gateway between the different communication networks. The NBC can be best described as the brain of the vehicle. It is located underneath the dashboard at drivers side, near the A-pillar.

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Technical Concepts

Example of the Florence diagram of the Quattroporte model

The following data communication lines in the vehicle can be identified: C-CAN: high speed CAN line for power train and chassis related functions, data speed of 500kbit/s B-CAN: low speed CAN line for body related functions, data speed of 50kbit/s K-line: serial data line dedicated for system diagnostics LIN: serial data line for a dedicated data exchange between two nodes only A-bus: serial data line for systems with reduced complexity

Advantages of the Florence architecture: Data which is owned by a certain node is also available to the other vehicle nodes, this allows for integrated vehicle functions High speed data communication between nodes, adapted to the needs of each vehicle subsystem Reduction of wiring length Reduction of the number of hardware components Elimination of data redundancy Extended diagnostic functions Extension capacity for new (future) applications Optimized energy management of vehicles various electrical functions

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Technical Concepts

Vehicle Diagnostics
What is OBD / EOBD? OBD stands for On Board Diagnostics. OBD originates in the USA where a universal diagnostic system for emission related vehicle systems was needed. Power train systems of modern cars have reached a high level of complexity, and even a small failure can potentially have a large impact on the exhaust gas emissions a vehicle produces. Therefore, modern vehicles must be equipped with a system that constantly checks the correct operation of these systems, and in case a failure is detected, stores a specific error code and alerts the driver by means of a warning light. Al cars sold in the USA from 1996 (OBD-II), and in Europe from 2000 (European OBD or EOBD), must have a standardized 16-pin OBD-II/EOBD connector to interface with a diagnostic tool. For Maserati this connector is located on the Body Computer.

Maserati Diagnosi The Maserati diagnostic tool, Maserati Diagnosi, does much more than only the legally required OBD diagnostics. It performs a large number of diagnostics and service related functions that cover all complex vehicle systems. All recent Maserati cars can be checked with Maserati Diagnosi.

Bluetooth / USB connection

OBD-II/EOBD 16 pin connector

Maserati Diagnosi Laptop

Vehicle Communication Interface (VCI)

Vehicle

What are the different tasks of Maserati Diagnosi? Check vehicle systems for stored error codes Check correct functionality and parameters of vehicle systems Activate service related procedures like self-learning and system initialisation of certain vehicle systems Perform specific procedures like key programming, battery test, etc. Software updating of vehicle systems Check / modify the Proxi configuration of a vehicle

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Technical Benchmarking

Technical Benchmarking

Maserati Product Range Quattroporte

86 87

GranTurismo and GranCabrio


GranTurismo MC Stradale

92
98

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Maserati Product Range


Three Product lines: Quattroporte 4 door, 5 seats Saloon GranTurismo 2 door, 4 seats Coupe (2 seats for MC Stradale version) GranCabrio 2 door, 4 seats Convertible

Maserati Shared Technical Characteristics

Engine options:
4.2 L 90 V8, naturally aspirated 4.7 L 90 V8, naturally aspirated Automatic - 6 speed fully automatic transmission with adaptive shift strategy and manual gearshift option. Robotized - 6 speed mechanical transmission with electro-hydraulic clutch and gearshift actuation (GranTurismo S and GranTurismo MC Stradale). Mechanical limited slip differential standard on all cars. Conventional sports suspension with single-rate springs and dampers. Skyhook continuously adaptable electronic suspension with sport and comfort settings. 330mm ventilated brake discs with 4 piston calipers for 4.2L engined cars. 360mm Dual Cast steel/aluminium ventilated discs with 6 piston calipers for 4.7L engined cars (excluded GranTurismo MC Stradale) and 4.2L engined cars with Handling Pack. 380/360mm Carbon Ceramic brake discs with 6 piston calipers for GranTurismo MC Stradale. Maserati Stability Program with ABS, EBD, MSR, ASR, ESP and Hill Holder standard on all vehicles.

Transmission options:

Suspension options:

Braking options:

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Technical Benchmarking

Quattroporte

Technical highlights of the Quattroporte compared to its competitors : The Quattroporte is the only sports sedan that has an ideal weight distribution with a slight emphasis on the rear axle. The only competitor that comes close to the Quattroporte on this point of view is the Aston Martin Rapide. This characteristic gives the Quattroporte a superior dynamic balance amongst its competitors. The Quattroportes engines (4.2L and 4.7L) have the highest specific power output of all naturally aspirated engines in its class. This is a characteristic of a true racebred engine that contributes to enthusiastic driving pleasure. Limited slip differential standard on all versions. The only competitor that offers a standard limited slip differential as well is the more expensive Aston Martin Rapide. Regarding acceleration performance, its competitors need a much larger engine with more cylinders and/or turbocharging or supercharging to match or improve on the Quattroportes acceleration.

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Aston Martin Rapide main technical characteristics:

Technical Benchmarking

6.0L V12 engine. Despite larger capacity, 4 more cylinders and more power, no faster acceleration than a Quattroporte Sport GT S. Front mounted engine, rear wheel drive. Rear mounted transaxle automatic 6-speed gearbox from ZF.

Despite the transaxle layout, there is still a slight weight emphasis on the front axle (51/49%).
Limited slip differential as standard. Despite the full aluminium body structure and crampy interior, its weight is only marginally lower than that of a Quattroporte (1.950 kg versus 1.990 kg).

Audi A8 main technical characteristics: V6 & V8 diesel and petrol engines. Top of the range W12 engine. This configuration is complex and can not reach the perfect natural balance of a true V12 engine. This solution is needed to be able to fit the engine in the front wheel drive chassis. Front mounted engine, fitted completely in front of the front axle. 8-speed fully automatic gearbox, all wheel drive standard on all versions. Despite the full aluminium body structure, its weight is only marginally lower than the that of a Quattroporte (1.915 kg versus 1.990 kg).

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BMW 7 main technical characteristics:

Technical Benchmarking

6 cylinder petrol and diesel engines, V8 and V12 petrol engines Only 6.0L V12 version (760i) has better acceleration than Quattroporte. Front mounted engine, rear wheel drive; all wheel drive available on some versions 6-speed fully automatic transmission, 8-speed fully automatic transmission for 760i model. No limited slip differential. Steel body structure, slightly heavier than the Quattroporte.

Jaguar XJ main technical characteristics: V6 diesel, 5.0L V8 petrol and 5.0L V8 supercharged petrol engines. Front mounted engine, rear wheel drive. Only the 5.0L V8 supercharged version has better acceleration than the Quattroporte models. 6-speed fully automatic transmission from ZF. Limited slip differential only optionally available on the 5.0L V8 supercharged version.

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Mercedes S main technical characteristics:

Technical Benchmarking

V6 diesel and petrol engines, V8 and V12 petrol engines, V8 biturbo for AMG version. Front mounted engine, rear wheel drive; all wheel drive available on some versions. 7-speed fully automatic transmission for the versions with smaller engines

5 speed automatic transmission for S600 since their 7-speed transmission can not cope with higher engine torque.
No limited slip differential. Steel body structure, depending on the version comparable or heavier weight than Quattroporte.

Porsche Panamera main technical characteristics: V6 diesel and petrol, V8 petrol and V8 turbo petrol engines.

Only the V8 Turbo version has better acceleration than the Quattroporte.
Front mounted engine, above the front axle. 6-speed manual and 7-speed double-clutch (PDK) transmissions. 8-speed automatic gearbox for diesel version. Rear wheel drive, optional all wheel drive. Limited slip differential as optional.

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Quattroporte Competitor Comparison

Technical Benchmarking

Model

Quattroporte S V8

Quattroporte Sport GTS V8

Porsche Panamera S V8

Porsche Panamera Turbo V8

Aston Martin Rapide V12

Engine cylinder layout Displacement Litres Power HP/rpm Torque Nm/rpm Transmission Kerb weight Kg Power / Weight HP/100Kg Top speed Kph / mph 0 100 kph Fuel Consumption l/100km Urban

4.7 430/7000 490/4750 Automatic 1990 21.61

4.7 440/7000 490/4750 Automatic 1990 22.11

4.8 400/6500 500/3500 Manual or PDK 1845 or 1875 21.68 or 21.33 285 or 283/ 177 or 176 5.6 or 5.4

4.8 500/6000 700/2250 PDK 2045 24.45

5.9 477/6000 600/5000 Automatic 1950 24.46

280/174 5.4

285/177 5.1

303/188 4.2

296 /184 5.2

23.2

23.2

18.8 or 16

18.0

22.6

Extra urban
Combined

10.5
14.7

10.5
14.7

8.9 or 7.9
12.5 or 10.8

8.9
12.2

10.4
14.9

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Technical Benchmarking

GranTurismo and GranCabrio

Technical highlights of the GranTurismo and GranCabrio compared to its competitors : The GranTurismo and GranCabrio are the only cars in their class that have an ideal weight distribution with a slight emphasis on the rear axle. The only competitor that comes close on this point of view is the Aston Martin DB9. This characteristic gives the GranTurismo/GranCabrio a superior dynamic balance amongst its competitors. The GranTurismo (4.2L and 4.7L) and GranCabrio (4.7L) engines have the highest specific power output of all naturally aspirated engines in their class. The only competitor that in certain variants offers a slightly higher specific power output is the more sports car and less GT Porsche 911. This is a characteristic of a true racebred engine that contributes to enthusiastic driving pleasure. The GranTurismo S is the only 4-seat coup on the market that offers the sensation and the performance of a quick gearshift technology (MC-Shift). The only competitor that can match this gearshift performance is the Porsche 911 with the optional PDK transmission. Then, the 911 is not a full 4-seater and the PDK has been much criticized on other points. Limited slip differential standard on all versions. The only competitor that offers a standard limited slip differential as well is the more expensive Aston Martin DB9. Regarding acceleration performance, its competitors need a much larger engine with more cylinders and/or turbocharging or supercharging to improve on the GranTurismo/GranCabrio acceleration. The only exception on this point is the Porsche 911 which is more a sports car than a luxury GT.

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Technical Benchmarking

Aston Martin DB9 and DB9 Volante main technical characteristics: 6.0L V12 engine. Despite the 4 extra cylinders and a substantially larger capacity, its power output is only 27 hp more than that of Maseratis 4.7L engine. Front mounted engine, rear wheel drive, transaxle construction, limited slip differential.

Manual 6-speed gearbox and optionally automatic 6-speed gearbox from ZF.
Automatic version has lower performance than manual version, no high-tech gearbox with optimized shift performance as in GranTurismo S available. Weight distribution of 50/50 %. Aston Martin claims this is perfect. Maseratis view is that a slight emphasis on the rear axle is better for driving dynamics. This view seems to be confirmed by most independent comparative road tests. Full aluminium body structure. The DB9 is 120 kg lighter than the GranTurismo, but this is also due to its smaller overall dimensions and smaller cabin space (no full rear seats).

Aston Martin V8 characteristics:

Vantage

and

V8

Vantage

Roadster

main

technical

4.7L V8 engine, front-mid mounted Rear wheel drive, transaxle construction, limited slip differential. Manual 6-speed transmission, rear mounted, optional robotized six-speed transmission (like Cambiocorsa),. Lighter than a GranTurismo, but also much smaller. No rear seats. Despite similar engine size and much lower weight, its performances are not better than those of GranTurismo S.

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Technical Benchmarking

Bentley Continental GT and Continental GTC main technical characteristics: 6.0L W12 engine, fitted entirely in front of the front axle. The W12 configuration is complex and can not reach the perfect natural balance of a true V12 engine. This solution is needed to be able to fit the engine in the front wheel drive chassis.

6-speed automatic transmission from ZF, all wheel drive.


Massive kerb weight of 2,320 kg (GT) and 2,540 kg (GTC).

BMW 6-series and 6-series convertible main technical characteristics: 3.0L 6-cylinder and 4.4L V8 turbo petrol engines, front mounted. 8-speed automatic gearbox from ZF, rear wheel drive. No limited slip differential. 6-series coup is slightly lighter than the GranTurismo, 6-series convertible is slightly heavier than the GranCabrio.

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Technical Benchmarking

Jaguar XK and XK Convertible main technical characteristics: 5.0L V8 engine, front mounted. 6-speed automatic gearbox from ZF, rear wheel drive. No limited slip differential. Despite its bigger engine, the performance is behind on the GranTurismo/ GranCabrio models.

Porsche 911 and 911 Cabriolet main technical characteristics: 3.6L & 3.8L flat 6 engine, dry sump, rear mounted. Rear wheel drive, all wheel drive available. Manual 6-speed gearbox or dual-clutch 7-speed gearbox (PDK) Limited slip differential available as optional only. Front suspensions are of the McPherson type, this is a simple and more economic technical solution that is mostly used on small cars with low performance. Strong weight emphasis on the rear axle because of the rear mounted engine. This offers optimal traction but compromises the dynamic balance of the vehicle. Therefore the 911s behaviour is often described as tricky when driven to the limit.

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GranTurismo Competitor Comparison

Technical Benchmarking

Model

GranTurismo

BMW 650i

Bentley Continental GT W12

Aston Martin Vantage S

Porsche 911 GTS

Engine cylinder layout Displacement Litres

V8

V8

V8

Flat 6

4.7

4.8

6.0

4.7

3.8

Power HP/rpm
Torque Nm/rpm Transmission Kerb weight Kg Power / Weight HP/100Kg Top speed Kph / mph 0 100 kph Fuel Consumption l/100km

440/7000
490/4750 Robotized/Aut omatic 1880 23.40

367/6300
490/3400 Automatic 1725 21.28

575/6000
700/1750 Automatic 2320 24.78

436/7300
490/5000 Automatic 1610 27.08

407/7300
420/42005600 Manual/PDK 1420 28.66

295/183 4.9

250/155 5.2

318/198 4.6

305/190 4.9

306/190 4.6

Urban
Extra urban Combined

25.2
11.4 15.8

15.5
7.9 10.7

25.4
11.4 17.1

19.2
9.3 12.9

15.9
7.6 10.6

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GranCabrio Competitor Comparison

Technical Benchmarking

Model

GranCabrio

BMW 650i convertible

Bentley Continental GTC W12

Aston Martin V8 Vantage S

Porsche 911 GTS Cabriolet Flat 6

Engine cylinder layout Displacement Litres Power HP/rpm Torque Nm/rpm Transmission Kerb weight Kg Power / Weight HP/100Kg Top speed Kph / mph 0 100 kph Fuel Consumption l/100km Urban Extra urban Combined

V8

V8

V8

4.7 440/7000 490/4750 Automatic 1980 22.22

4.4 407/55006400 600/17504500 Automatic 2015 20.20

6.0 559/6100 650/16006100 Automatic 2485 22.49

4.7 436/7300 490/5000 Automatic 1690 25.80

3.8 407/7300 420/42005600 Manual/PDK 1515 26.86

283/176 5.4

250/155 5.0

306/190 5.1

305/190 4.9

306/190 4.8

Chapter title
23.9 10.4 15.4 15.5 7.9 10.7 25.3 11.6 16.6 19.2 9.3 12.9 16.2 7.7 10.8

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Technical Benchmarking

GranTurismo MC Stradale

Technical highlights of the GranTurismo MC Stradale compared to its competitors : The GranTurismo MC Stradale is the only front-engined car in its class that has an ideal weight distribution with a slight emphasis on the rear axle. The only competitor that comes close on this point of view is the Aston Martin DBS. This characteristic gives the MC Stradale a superior dynamic balance amongst its competitors. The GranTurismo MC Stradales engine has the highest specific power output of all naturally aspirated engines in its class. The only competitors that offer a higher specific power output are the Audi R8 and Porsche 911 GT3RS 4.0. These cars however are more hardcore sports car and less GT. The GranTurismo S is the only car in its class that offers the sensation and the performance of a superfast gearshift technology (MC-Race). No competitor can match this shift performance. A curious detail is that Porsche does not offer its PDK transmission on its most sporty model variants. Regarding acceleration performance, its competitors need a much larger engine with more cylinders and/or turbocharging or supercharging to improve on the MC Stradales acceleration. The only exception on this point is the Porsche 911 GT3RS 4.0 which is a hardcore sports car and not a GT.

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98

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Aston Martin DBS main technical characteristics:

Technical Benchmarking

6.0L V12 front mounted engine, rear wheel drive, transaxle construction, limited slip differential. Manual 6-speed gearbox and optionally automatic 6-speed gearbox from ZF. From the performance point of view this is no match for the MC Stradales MC-Race shift technology. Weight distribution with a slight emphasis on the front axle with respect of a slight emphasis on the rear axle for all Maserati vehicles. Full aluminium body structure. The DBS is 75 kg lighter than the GranTurismo MC Stradale, but this is also due to its smaller overal dimensions and smaller cabin space. Carbon Ceramic brake technology as standard. 0-100 km/h acceleration time is only 0,3 seconds faster than the MC Stradale, despite a much larger engine, more power and lower weight.

Audi R8 and R8GT main technical characteristics:


V8 and V10 engines, mid-rear mounted. 6-speed manual gearbox or 6-speed robotized gearbox (R tronic). The robotized gearbox option does not improve the vehicles acceleration performance with respecty to the manual version. No superfast shift technology. Quattro all wheel drive for all versions. Despite its full aluminium body structure and very compact dimensions (designed as a two-seater), its weight is only 70 kg lower than that of the MC Stradale. Carbon Ceramic brake technology only for the R8GT version.

Maserati Academy

99

Technical Training Light

Technical Benchmarking

Jaguar XK-R and XK-RS main technical characteristics: 5.0L V8 supercharged engine, front mounted. 6-speed automatic gearbox from ZF, rear wheel drive. No fast gearshift technology available. Limited slip differential standard. Carbon Ceramic brake technology not available. Despite its bigger engine and more power, the performance of the XK-R is behind on the GranTurismo MC Stradale.

Porsche 911 GT3RS 4.0 main technical characteristics: 4.0L flat 6 engine, dry sump, rear mounted Rear wheel drive. Manual 6-speed gearbox, limited slip differential. Manual gearbox only, no fast gearshift technology available. Carbon Ceramic brake technology as optional available only. Front suspensions are of the McPherson type, this is a simple and more economic technical solution that is mostly used on small cars with low performance. Strong weight emphasis on the rear axle because of the rear mounted engine. This offers optimal traction but compromises the dynamic balance of the vehicle. Therefore the 911s behaviour is often described as tricky when driven to the limit.

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100

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Technical Benchmarking

Bentley Continental Supersports main technical characteristics: 6.0L W12 engine, fitted entirely in front of the front axle. The W12 configuration is complex and can not reach the perfect natural balance of a true V12 engine. This solution is needed to be able to fit the engine in the front wheel drive chassis.

6-speed automatic transmission from ZF, all wheel drive.


Quickshift strategy performs gearshifts in 200ms, or more than three times the time needed by the MC-Race technology of the MC stradale. Massive kerb weight of 2,240 kg. Weight saving of only 90 kg over the standard model (removed rear seats) is marginally given the vehicles total weight. Carbon Ceramic brake technology as standard.

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101

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GranTurismo MC Stradale Competitor Comparison

Technical Benchmarking

Model

GranTurismo MC Stradale V8

Audi R8 GT

Bentley Continental Supersports W12

Aston Martin DBS V12

Porsche 911 GT3 /GT3 RS Flat 6

Engine cylinder layout Displacement Litres Power HP/rpm Torque Nm/rpm Transmission Kerb weight Kg Power / Weight HP/100Kg Top speed Kph / mph 0 100 kph Fuel Consumption l/100km Urban Extra urban Combined

V10

4.7 450/7000 510/4750 Cambiocorsa 1770 25.42

5.2 560/8000 540/6500 Manual 1525 36.72

6.0 630/6000 800/1700 5600 Automatic 2240 28.13

5.9 517/6500 570/5750 Manual 1695 30.50

3.8 435/7600 450/7900 430/3250 430/6750 Manual 1395 / 1370 31.18 / 32.85

301/187 4.6

320/199 3.6

329/204 3.9

302/188 4.3

312/194 310/193 4.1 / 3.9

22.7 9.7 14.4

21.0 9.9 13.9

24.5 11.6 16.3

24.3 11.7 16.4

19.2 / 19.4 9.0 / 9.6 12.6 / 13.2

Maserati Academy

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Vehicle Functionality Overview

Vehicle Functionality Overview


NIT Blaupunkt NIT Magneti Marelli NIT Bose Maserati driving modes Guidelines for a correct se of the gearbox Acoustic signals 104 106 110 112 123 124

Heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC)

125

Maserati Academy

103

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Vehicle Functionality Overview

Blaupunkt NIT (Quattroporte up to MY08)

The Blaupunkt NIT (Infotelematics Node) is an integrated device with a 7 screen and incorporated controls. The NIT is built in the centre console. All the Quattroporte vehicles from 2003 up to MY08 are equipped with the Blaupunkt NIT.

The Blaupunkt NIT features the following functions: 7 TFT display RDS radio CD-player CD-changer (optional, external device) Satellite navigation Telephone (optional, external device) On-board computer Vehicle settings (setup) Analogue TV tuner (optional, external device) Rear Seat Entertainment system (optional, external device)

Note: For the Blaupunkt NIT without telephone option, a Bluetooth retrofit kit is available from the Maserati Spare Parts Department. For further information, see the Technical Information Bulletin No. 200922.

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Blaupunkt NIT controls

Vehicle Functionality Overview

1. ON/OFF knob and volume adjuster 2. Info button 3. Radio button for access to the radio function 4. Slot for telephone SIM card (optional) 5. Control button for CD or CD-changer operation 6. Trip button for the onboard computer 7 to 12. Controls for navigation/selection in the various menus 13. NAV button, to start navigating 14. TV button for access to the TV function (only with the vehicle stationary, OPT) 15. TEL button for access to the telephone function (optional) 16. Track selection or tuning to the next radio station 17. SETUP button for the NIT and vehicle settings 18. Track selection or tuning to the previous radio station 19. CD / CD-ROM eject button

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Vehicle Functionality Overview

Magneti Marelli NIT (GranTurismo, Restyling, GranCabrio)

Quattroporte

Overview The GranTurismo, GranCabrio and Quattroporte Restyling models are equipped with the Multi Media System (MMS) developed by Magneti Marelli: a 7 high-resolution TFT colour display positioned in the centre of the dashboard allows the user to view the functions relating to the satellite navigation with TMC Premium (where available), CD player, car radio with USB port, Bluetooth and onboard computer. The complete equipment can be further enriched with an optional iPod interface. System performance is enhanced by using a 30 GB internal memory, capable of supporting the entire cartography and the jukebox function, which replaces the CD changer. The Magneti Marelli NIT features the following functions: 7 TFT display RDS radio CD player with MP3 Integrated 30GB hard disk with Jukebox mode Satellite navigation TMC/TMC Premium Traffic information Telephone (only for NIT HW 7, optional) Bluetooth (only for NIT HW 8.0 and 8.1) USB port with recharge function (optional for NIT HW 7 and standard for NIT HW

8.0 up to introduction of USB Full)

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Vehicle Functionality Overview

USB Full port (data reload and exchange) (initially optional and then standard for NIT HW 8.0; Always standard for NIT HW 8.1; not available for NIT HW 7) AUX-IN socket (only in combination with USB Recharge or USB Full) iPod interface (optional, only for NIT with USB Full) Voice controls On-board computer Vehicle settings (setup) Rear Seat Entertainment (optional, external device) SIRIUS satellite radio (external device, only for HW 8.1)

Press = ON/OFF/To stop the audio source Eject Rotate = to adjust CD the volume

RPT Voice command repetition

ESC Press = to cancel the operation in progress. Eject SIM card Audio adjustments

Source

To open the telephone menu

MODE Changes the function

SIM port (only for HW 7)

Band TA/PTY DARK Press once = to keep the top bar viewed Press twice = the function display disappears Press three times = to go back to the function displayed Menu button Press and hold (2s) = to display the Help menu

End call

LIST List of the radio stations List of the Jukebox albums List of the CD tracks

Alphanumeric keypad

Press = to confirm the function contextual menu of the function displayed Rotate = to select the menu on the screen to adjust to zoom the map

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Vehicle Functionality Overview

AUX-IN and USB connection of the Magneti Marelli NIT

USB Recharge USB Full

The AUX-IN/USB socket is housed in the glove compartment and there may two types. The type fitted is recognisable from the symbol shown next to it. USB Recharge socket (optional for NIT HW 7 and for the first vehicles with NIT HW 8.0) This socket is exclusively dedicated to powering the external source, of course, if this source has been designed for this use (e.g. iPod). This socket cannot be used for data exchange.

USB Full socket (optional for the first NIT HW 8.0 versions, standard for the most recent NIT HW 8.0 versions; always fitted on the NIT HW 8.1)
This socket allows to both exchange data and power the connected source. If using an USB key with MP3 music files stored on it, they will automatically start playing after inserting the key. This will not occur if you are already listening to a music source; in this case, you need to select the USB function by repeatedly pressing the SRC button. The music will only start playing after the system has scanned the key. The scanning time depends on the number of files stored on the key; during this time, the message Please wait is displayed. AUX-IN socket (always present in combination with the USB socket) The AUX-IN auxiliary input allows you to connect any audio player to the NIT, provided it has an analogue audio output with a 3.5mm jack-type connector.

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Connecting an iPod to the Magneti Marelli NIT

Vehicle Functionality Overview

Using the iPod cable harness available at the Maserati Spare Parts Department, an iPod can be easily connected to the USB/AUX-IN socket located inside the glove compartment.

iPod cable harness

If the NIT has a USB Recharge socket: the iPod cannot be controlled via the NIT but needs to be controlled from the device itself. The AUX-IN socket receives the analogue audio signal while the USB socket is used only to power the device.

If the NIT has a USB Full socket (only for NIT HW 8.0 and HW 8.1): in this case, the iPod can be controlled via the NIT (depending on the iPod version, the compatibility can be partial only). Important note: To enable this function, the NIT must satisfy the following conditions: 1. Software version BR2 or later 2. Function enabled in the Proxy of the vehicle (by means of the Proxy configuration procedure)

CAUTION

The iPod connecting cable allows the playing of audio files from an iPod device. Maserati does not guarantee the playing of audio files when connecting different devices (for example: iPhone).

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Bose NIT (Quattroporte Restyling MY09 & MY10)

Overview The new Bose Multi Media System differs from the standard system in the following functions: DVD player; wav, wma, acc files reading; user interactive; UMusic function Music Library; proximity sensors for display; radio station tuning system; system customisation via the preferences option. In addition, the iPod interface and TV tuner are available for this system. The basic equipment of the new Quattroporte range consists of a Bose Surround Sound audio system with 11 speakers and an integrated 4x25 Watt RMS equalizer, specifically designed and built for this vehicle acoustics. The entire sound system becomes an integral part of the car, to offer a music quality quite similar in depth, clarity and sensations to that of the best concert halls. Moreover, the AudioPilot technology detects and measures the ambient noise and continuously adjusts a number of acoustic signal parameters accordingly, in order to ensure optimal sound quality levels inside the passenger compartment. The Bose NIT features the following functions: 7 TFT display

RDS radio
CD/DVD player supporting MP3, WAV, WMA, MPEG2 ACC files Integrated 30GB hard disk with U-Music mode (virtual DJ) Satellite navigation Traffic information Bluetooth AUX-IN socket USB port

iPod interface

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Voice controls On-board computer Vehicle settings (setup) Analogue TV tuner (optional, integrated device) Rear Seat Entertainment (optional, external device) XM satellite radio (only for USA and Canada markets) Reverse gear camera (optional)

Notes: The Bose NIT is available as option for the Quattroporte Restyling (MY09 & MY10) The Bose NIT is a standard equipment for the Quattroporte Restyling model (MY09 & MY10), for the USA and Canada markets. Since February 2010, the Bose NIT is no longer available for all the markets.

Preset

Ambient light sensor

Zoom in

Cancel/Back
Upper proximity sensor

LH knob

RH knob

LH dial Zoom out

RH dial Options/Menu

Radio
Media Soft Key

Telephone Navigation

Lower proximity sensor

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Vehicle Functionality Overview

Maserati Driving Modes


Maserati models offer a variety of driving modes, each tailored to meet specific requirements: sport, ice (low grip), manual mode with all electronic controls disabled, etc. Selecting each specific mode provides specific effects, described below model-bymodel: Cars with robotized transmission: Maserati Quattroporte Duoselect Maserati GranTurismo S Maserati GranTurismo MC Stradale Cars with automatic transmission: Maserati GranTurismo Maserati GranTurismo S Automatic Maserati GranCabrio Maserati GranCabrio Sport

Maserati Quattroporte Duoselect


The robotized transmission of the Maserati Quattroporte Duoselect offers a total of five gear shift modes: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Manual Normal Manual Sport Auto Normal Auto Sport Ice

MANUAL NORMAL Mode

In MANUAL NORMAL mode the gear is chosen by the driver only.


For the most thrilling driving experience, the system does not shift gear even when the rev limiter setting is reached.

MANUAL SPORT Mode

If the SPORT button is pressed in MANUAL mode, the gearbox control system switches to a higher-performance gear shifting control strategy, with significantly less time taken to shift between ratios; no automatic up-shifting when reaching the rpm limiter; the damper setting adopted is intended to reduce rolling and pitching for more sporty handling.

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(Quattroporte Duoselect continued)

Vehicle Functionality Overview

AUTO NORMAL Mode


In AUTO mode, gear shifting is managed completely automatically by the electronic gearbox control system. The control unit decides the rpm and time when the gear shift takes place, and its speed, on the basis of parameters such as the car's velocity, the engine rpm and the torque and power being requested by the driver. A gear can be requested manually even in AUTO mode using the paddles behind the steering-wheel.

AUTO SPORT Mode In AUTO SPORT gear shifting is still automatically controlled by the gearbox control system, but the speed with which gears are disengaged, selected and engaged, and with which the clutch is released, changes. Gears are shifted down sooner (i.e. at higher rpm) than in AUTO NORMAL mode. The damper setting adopted is intended to reduce rolling and pitching for more sporty handling.

ICE Mode This mode can be used in conditions with poor grip. It is activated by pressing the ICE button on the central tunnel, and when it is activated the car starts in second gear and the engine speed in all gears is limited to 2,900 rpm. ICE mode takes priority over SPORT and MSP OFF modes.

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Technical Training Light Maserati GranTurismo S

Vehicle Functionality Overview

The robotized transmission of the Maserati GranTurismo Duoselect offers a total of six gear shift modes: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Manual Normal Manual Sport Manual Sport with MC-SuperFast shift Auto Normal Auto Sport Ice

MANUAL NORMAL Mode In MANUAL NORMAL mode the gear is chosen by the driver only. For the most thrilling driving experience, the system does not shift gear even when the rev limiter setting is reached. MANUAL SPORT Mode If the SPORT button is pressed in MANUAL mode, the gearbox control system switches to a higher-performance gear shifting control strategy, with significantly less time taken to shift between ratios. Above 4,000 rpm, with the pedal 80% depressed, the fuel cut-off strategy (the engine switches off with the fuel supply stopped) is activated during gear shifting.

In MANUAL SPORT mode the air valves in the exhaust are also opened.
Down-shifting is accompanied by a more noticeable double declutch effect. The damper setting adopted is intended to reduce rolling and pitching for more sporty handling (if the Skyhook OPTIONAL is installed).

MC-SuperFast Shift MC-SuperFast shifting is a mode that exploits the elastic energy of the transmission components to achieve extremely swift gear changes and stunning performance. The result is a gear shifting time cut to an amazing 100 ms. Above 4,000 rpm, with the pedal 80% depressed, the fuel cut-off strategy (the engine switches off with the fuel supply stopped) is activated during gear shifting.

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(GranTurismo S continued) MC-S SPORT SuperFast Shift. When?

Vehicle Functionality Overview

In Manual Sport mode, when the gearbox control system and the engine coolant reach their normal operating temperature the MC-S icon lights up on the display. SuperFast gear shifting is only available in MANUAL SPORT mode with the following conditions met: Engine speed > 5,500 rpm Accelerator pedal fully depressed (> 80%) Lateral acceleration < 0.9 g ASR not in operation No wheel spin AUTO NORMAL Mode In AUTO mode, gear shifting is managed completely automatically by the electronic gearbox control system. The control unit decides the rpm and time when the gear shift takes place, and its speed, on the basis of parameters such as the car's velocity, the engine rpm and the torque and power being requested by the driver. A gear can be requested manually even in AUTO mode using the paddles behind the steering-wheel. AUTO SPORT Mode Pressing the SPORT button on the central console with the system in automatic mode activates AUTO SPORT mode: gear shifting is still automatically controlled by the gearbox control system, but the speed with which gears are disengaged, selected and engaged, and with which the clutch is released, changes. Compared to AUTO NORMAL mode, gear shifts take place at higher rpm, while the double declutch effect at downward shifts is more accentuated. Above 4,000 rpm, with the pedal 80% depressed, the fuel cut-off strategy (the engine switches off with the fuel supply stopped) is activated during gear shifting. The damper setting adopted is intended to reduce rolling and pitching for more sporty handling (if the Skyhook OPTIONAL is installed). The exhaust air valves are also opened when the SPORT button is pressed in AUTO mode: apart from making the engine sound fuller and deeper, the reduction in backpressure generated allows the rpm to climb faster, and enables the engine to achieve a higher maximum power.

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ICE Mode This mode can be used in conditions with poor grip. It is activated by pressing the ICE button on the central tunnel, and when it is active the car starts in second gear and the engine speed in all gears is limited to 2,900 rpm. ICE mode takes priority over SPORT and MSP OFF modes. Easy Exit automatic mode" strategy The system switches mode whenever the car is started, automatically setting AUTO mode. If the engine is stopped with SPORT mode set, next time it is started AUTO mode is automatically selected with the simplified exit automatic function" strategy active ("AUTO" icon flashes on the display). This strategy allows the driver to return to SPORT mode by just performing the first gear shift manually (using the UP and DOWN paddles). If the driver has not shifted gear within two minutes after the car starts moving, the system automatically sets AUTO mode.

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Technical Training Light Maserati GranTurismo MC Stradale

Vehicle Functionality Overview

The robotized transmission is controlled by the paddles on the steering-wheel for gear shifting and the switches on central tunnel and dashboard for engaging 1st gear, reverse and the four main functions: 1. AUTO 2. SPORT 3. RACE

4. ESC

Automatic Mode The transmission control strategy adopted means that the car is always started in automatic mode. In this mode, gear shifts take place fully automatically on the basis of shift mapping programmed in the Robotized Transmission Node (NCR). The gear shifting strategy is tailored to obtain the best compromise between driving comfort, fuel-saving and performance. In this mode, the gear engaged appears on the info display with the AUTO icon. Note: when driving the car in Automatic mode, gear shifts can also be performed in manual mode using the steering-wheel paddles. When the paddles are used, the gearbox temporarily switches back to Manual mode, and during this time the AUTO icon on the display flashes for about 5 seconds. The system then returns to Automatic mode. Easy Exit automatic mode" strategy The system switches mode whenever the car is started, automatically setting AUTO mode. If the engine is stopped with SPORT or RACE mode set, next time it is started AUTO mode is automatically selected with the simplified exit automatic function" strategy active ("AUTO" icon flashes on the display). This strategy allows the driver to return to SPORT mode by just performing the first gear shift manually (using the UP and DOWN paddles). If the driver has not shifted gear within two minutes after the car starts moving, the system automatically sets AUTO mode.

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SPORT Mode

Vehicle Functionality Overview

In SPORT mode, the gearbox control system switches to a higher-performance gear shifting control strategy, with significantly less time taken to shift between ratios, depending on engine rpm and the position of the accelerator pedal. In SPORT mode the exhaust air valves are opened: apart from making the engine sound fuller and deeper, the reduction in backpressure generated allows the rpm to climb faster, and enables the engine to achieve a higher maximum power. Down-shifting is accompanied by a more noticeable double declutch effect. Above 4,000 rpm, with the pedal 80% depressed, the fuel cut-off strategy (the engine switches off with the fuel supply stopped) is activated during gear shifting: this function reduces the time taken for the torque to be discharged and the engine rpm to fall during gear shifting, providing faster shifts. RACE Mode RACE gearbox control mode is the latest innovation to be made to the robotized transmission system: it is a mode that exploits the elastic energy of the transmission components to achieve extremely swift gear changes and stunning performance. The result is a gear shifting time cut to 60 ms (measured as the gap in acceleration), a value that ensures absolute racing performance and a thrilling driving experience. The exhaust bypass valves are always open.

Above 4000rpm and with the accelerator pedal above 80% depressed, a Fuel cut-off startegy is activated (complete interruption of fuel injection) during gearshifting. SuperFast gear shifting is only available in RACE mode.
When the gearbox control system and engine coolant reach their normal operating temperature and RACE mode is selected, the MC-R icon lights up on the display. This means that the vehicle is ready for a SuperFast shift. Moreover, the following conditions must be met: Engine speed > 5,000 rpm Accelerator pedal fully depressed (> 65%) Lateral acceleration < 0.9 g ASR not in operation

No wheel spin
SEQUENTIAL DOWNSHIFTING Strategy

This function can be set with the gearbox in either SPORT or RACE mode; keep pulling the DOWN paddle and depress the brake pedal to obtain sequential downshifts. The number of downshifts performed and their speed depend on how hard the brake pedal is depressed.

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Technical Training Light Maserati Quattroporte Automatic

Vehicle Functionality Overview

The automatic transmission of the Maserati Quattroporte offers a total of five gear shift modes: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Manual Normal Manual Sport Auto Normal Auto Sport Ice

MANUAL NORMAL Mode

In MANUAL NORMAL mode the gear is chosen by the driver only. For the most thrilling driving experience, the system does not shift gear even an engine speed higher than that set in AUTO mode is reached.
MANUAL SPORT Mode If the SPORT button is pressed in MANUAL mode, the gearbox control system switches to a higher-performance gear shifting control strategy, with less time taken to shift between ratios. Above 4,000 rpm, with the pedal 80% depressed, the fuel cut-off strategy (the engine switches off with the fuel supply stopped) is activated during gear shifting.

The damper setting adopted is intended to reduce rolling and pitching for more sporty handling.
On the Quattroporte Automatic sport GTS, in MANUAL SPORT mode the air valves in the exhaust are also opened. Down-shifting is accompanied by a more noticeable double declutch effect.

AUTO NORMAL Mode

Select this mode when you wish to use the vehicle in full automatic driving mode.
With this mode selected, the ECU controls automatic engagement of the six gears. The gears will be selected in relation to the travelling speed, engine RPM, accelerator pedal angle and depressing speed, as well as the travelling conditions (uphill, downhill, curves).

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AUTO SPORT Mode

Vehicle Functionality Overview

Pressing the SPORT button on the central console with the system in automatic mode activates AUTO SPORT mode: gear shifting is still automatically controlled by the gearbox control system, but the speed with which gears are engaged changes. Above 4,000 rpm, with the pedal 80% depressed, the fuel cut-off strategy (the engine switches off with the fuel supply stopped) is activated during gear shifting. Compared to AUTO NORMAL mode, gear shifts take place at higher rpm, while the double declutch effect at downward shifts is more accentuated. The damper setting adopted is intended to reduce rolling and pitching for more sporty handling.

The exhaust air valves are also opened when the SPORT button is pressed in AUTO mode: apart from making the engine sound fuller and deeper, the reduction in backpressure generated allows the rpm to climb faster, and enables the engine to achieve a higher maximum power.
ICE Mode This mode can be used in conditions with poor grip. It is activated by pressing the ICE button on the central tunnel, and when it is active the car starts in second gear and the engine speed in all gears is limited to 2,900 rpm. ICE mode takes priority over SPORT and MSP OFF modes.

Maserati GranTurismo
The automatic transmission of the Maserati GranTurismo offers a total of five gear shift modes:
1. Manual Normal

2.
3. 4. 5.

Manual Sport
Auto Normal Auto Sport Ice

MANUAL NORMAL Mode In MANUAL NORMAL mode the gear is chosen by the driver. For a more thrilling driving experience, the system keeps the manually selected gear even at an engine speed higher than when AUTO mode would be selected.

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Vehicle Functionality Overview

MANUAL SPORT Mode If the SPORT button is pressed in MANUAL mode, the gearbox control system switches to a higher-performance gear shifting control strategy, with less time taken to shift between ratios. The damper setting adopted is intended to reduce rolling and pitching for more sporty handling.

AUTO SPORT Mode Pressing the SPORT button on the central console with the system in automatic mode activates AUTO SPORT mode: gear shifting is still automatically controlled by the gearbox control system, but the speed with which gears are engaged changes. Compared to AUTO NORMAL mode, gear shifts take place at higher rpm, while the double declutch effect at downward shifts is more accentuated. The damper setting adopted is intended to reduce rolling and pitching for more sporty handling. The exhaust air valves are also opened when the SPORT button is pressed in AUTO mode: apart from making the engine sound fuller and deeper, the reduction in backpressure generated allows the rpm to climb faster, and enables the engine to achieve a higher maximum power.

ICE Mode This mode can be used in conditions with poor grip. It is activated by pressing the ICE button on the central tunnel, and when it is active the car starts in second gear and the engine speed in all gears is limited to 2,900 rpm. ICE mode takes priority over SPORT and MSP OFF modes.

Maserati GranTurismo S Automatic


The automatic transmission of the Maserati GranTurismo S offers a total of five gear shift modes:
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Manual Normal Manual Sport Auto Normal Auto Sport Ice

The various operating modes are exactly as described for the GranTurismo S, except that: In Manual Sport mode, the exhaust bypass valves are opened by a specific strategy depending on the engine speed and the accelerator pedal angle. Down-shifting is accompanied by a more noticeable double declutch effect.

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Vehicle Functionality Overview

Maserati GranCabrio and GranCabrio Sport


The automatic transmission of the Maserati GranCabrio and GranCabrio Sport offers a total of five gear shift modes: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Manual Normal Manual Sport Auto Normal Auto Sport Ice

The various operating modes are exactly as described for the GranTurismo S Automatic. Note: for the GranCabrio Sport, the opening of the exhaust bypass valves is managed in the following way: With the gearbox in N the valves are always open. In Manual Sport mode the valves are always open In Auto Sport the valves open depending on the engine speed and the accelerator pedal angle.

MSP
Maserati vehicles are equipped with the MSP (Maserati Stability Program) stability control system, which incorporates all the various individual control systems: ABS, EBD, ASR and MSR. It includes a model which provides an extremely accurate forecast of the car's behaviour and can therefore predict when the driver is about to lose control of the car. Deactivating the MSP: Deactivates ASR (traction control) Deactivates stability control Deactivates MSR DOES NOT deactivate the ABS and EBD system

ESC
The Maserati GranTurismo MC Stradale is equipped with the ESC (Electronic Stability Control) anti-yaw control system, which incorporates all the various individual control systems: ABS, EBD, ASR and MSR. This system controls all the car's dynamic functions relating to braking, cornering stability and traction control. Deactivating it has the same effects as the MSP OFF setting.

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Vehicle Functionality Overview

Guidelines for a correct use of the gearbox


Robotized Gearbox A number of important precautions are required to ensure that the robotized gearbox system operates correctly over a long working life: 1. When the clutch is new, a running-in period during which the transmission should not be over-strained is necessary. 2. Do not lower revs to below 1,800 rpm after starting off. Allowing the clutch to slip for long periods in the PIS zone may cause wear and deterioration. 3. If the car is parked on slopes, do not reverse uphill or start too suddenly (always allow the rpm to climb above the PIS zone) with Sport mode active. 4. Do not depress the brake and the accelerator pedals simultaneously.

Automatic Gearbox A number of important precautions are required to ensure that the automatic gearbox system operates correctly over a long working life: 1. Do not push the rpm too high until the gearbox oil has heated to the operating temperature, and especially not at very low temperatures. There is the risk of irreparable damage to the torque converter. 2. Do not engage the parking lever P until the car is at a standstill; otherwise, this may damage the parking lever inside the gearbox. 3. Do not rev the engine to high rpm in neutral and then engage a gear: the kick-back on the hydraulic system might damage the solenoid valves. 4. Do not keep the engine at high revs and at the same time hold down the brake pedal with a gear engaged for a racing start. This may damage the gearbox's internal components.

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Acoustic signals
Vehicles with Automatic gearbox: 1. If you turn off the engine with the gearshift lever in a position different from P, an acoustic signal will sound for a few seconds. 2. If you open the drivers door with the gearshift lever in a position different from P, an acoustic signal will sound for a few seconds. 3. With the lever in R, the system emits an acoustic signal for a few seconds to warn anyone in the vicinity that you are about to reverse. Vehicles with Robotized gearbox: 1. In case of clutch overheating, a sound signal accompanies the warning indicator on the instrument panel.

2. When selecting reverse gear, the system emits a beep for a few seconds.
3. When a gear is engaged, and the drivers door and/or the vehicles bonnet is opened, the system emits an acoustic signal to inform the driver that the gear is disengaged.

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Heating, Ventillation and Air Conditionning (HVAC)


The vehicle is equipped with an automatic dual-zone air conditioner/ heater. This systems adjusts the air temperature, distribution and flow in the passenger compartment, in two separate zones: left-hand side and right-hand side. The system can be set through the control panel, located on the centre console.

The system has been designed to assure comfort in all possible weather conditions.

Modifications for MY07 and Quattroporte Automatic: With the introduction of the Quattroporte Automatic and MY07 (from assemby number 27860 onwards), a number of important modifications were made to the HVAC system in order to improve its performance. The air conditioning/heating system of the Quattroporte Automatic and MY07 provides enhanced ventilation obtained with new and suitably dimensioned air lines. Also various parts of the front air distribution unit have been redesigned or modified. The heating radiator is new, as well as the anti-pollen filter. The blower motor is new and is now more powerfull while it is at the same time less noisy. The NCL unit has new software. Thanks to these modifications, the overall performance of the ventilation system has increased by 50% (370 m/h instead of 240 m/h previously). All Maserati since MY07 (exception for the Quattroporte with 4.2L engines) are equipped with the new type dehydrator filter. with this solution the system is maintenance free.

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Emergency and Service

Emergency and Service Related Guidelines


Fluid checks for vehicles with Dry Sump Engine Fluid checks for veghicles with Wet Sump Engine Battery disconnect / reconnect charge maintainer EPB unlocking procedure Shiftlock / Keylock procedures Emergency opening functions Emergency engine starting procedure Towing the vehicle GranCabrio roof emergency closing procedure Inertia switch TPMS calibration Fuse boxes Warning lights 127 129 131 133 133 135 136 137 138 140 140 141 142

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Emergency and Service

Fluid checks for vehicles with Dry Sump Engine


Applied vehicles: Coup, Spyder, GranSport model range Quattroporte Duoselect

1. Engine oil 2. Engine coolant 3. Windscreen washer fluid 4. Brake fluid 5. Power steering fluid

Engine oil level check (dry sump engine) The oil level must be checked with the car on level ground and the engine warm and idling. The oil level must be between the MIN and MAX level notches on the dipstick (1). The gap between the MIN and MAX marks is equivalent to about 1 litre of oil.

Engine coolant level The coolant level must be checked with the engine cold and must be between the MIN and MAX notches on the tank (2). If the level is low, slowly pour the prescribed fluid through the filler neck on the tank, until the level is close to the MAX notch.

N.B.: Do not take the cap off the tank when the engine is very hot: risk of burns.

Windscreen/headlight washer fluid level To top up with fluid, open the cover D, pull out the filler neck extension (3) and pour in a mixture of water and detergent fluid, in the proportions indicated on the product packaging.

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Brake fluid level Check that the fluid in the tank (4) is up to the maximum level. If the level drops below the minimum, the warning light on the dashboard lights up when the ignition key is turned to MAR.

Emergency and Service

Power steering fluid level Check the fluid level with the car on level ground and the engine cold; it must be on the MAX notch on the dipstick of the tank (5). To check, unscrew the cap, clean the dipstick, screw the cap fully down again, unscrew once more and check the level.

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Emergency and Service

Fluid checks for vehicles with Wet Sump Engine


Applied vehicles: Quattroporte models with automatic transmission GranTurismo model range GranCabrio model range

1. Engine oil 2. Engine coolant 3. Windscreen washer fluid 4. Brake fluid 5. Power steering fluid

Engine oil level check (wet sump engine)


The level must be checked with the car on level ground and the engine off, after proceeding as follows: Warm up the engine until the coolant reaches the normal operating temperature. Stop the engine, remove the filler cap and wait 5 minutes to allow the oil to drain back into the sump. Check the level using the dipstick (1) and top up if necessary by removing the cap (A). The oil level must be between the MIN and MAX level notches on the dipstick.

Engine coolant level The coolant fluid level must be checked with the engine cold and must be between the MIN and MAX reference notches visible on the tank (2). If the level is low, slowly pour the prescribed fluid through the filler neck on the tank, until the level is close to the MAX reference notch.

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Windscreen/headlight washer fluid level To top up with fluid, open the cover D, pull out the filler neck extension (3) and pour in a mixture of water and detergent fluid, in the proportions indicated on the product packaging.

Emergency and Service

Brake fluid level Check that the fluid in the tank (4) is up to the maximum level. If the level drops below the minimum, the warning light on the dashboard lights up when the ignition key is turned to MAR.

Power steering fluid level Check the fluid level with the car on level ground and the engine cold; it must be on the MAX notch on the dipstick of the tank (5). To check, unscrew the cap, clean the dipstick, screw the cap fully down again, unscrew once more and check the level.

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Emergency and Service

Battery disconnect/reconnect - charge maintainer


The battery is a low maintenance type, and is located in the luggage compartment. To access the battery, remove the cover.

All Maserati Quattroporte models

All Maserati GranTurismo and GranCabrio models

Reconnecting the battery on Maserati Quattroporte models:

1. Open the boot using the key.


2. Connect the battery. 3. Close the trunk/boot 4. Unlock and lock the doors using the remote control. 5. Switch on the ignition to activate the Multi Media System. 6. Adjust the date and time settings following the instructions in the Multi Media System manual (*). ATTENTION: Whenever the battery is reconnected, before starting the engine wait for at least 30 seconds with the ignition key on MAR to allow the electronic system to perform the self-learning routine. (*) if the car is equipped with the Blaupunkt NIT, enter the Key Code.

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Emergency and Service

Reconnecting the battery on Maserati GranTurismo and GranCabrio models: 1. Open the boot using the emergency cable. 2. Connect the battery. 3. Close the trunk/boot 4. Unlock and lock the doors using the remote control. 5. Switch on the Multi Media System. 6. Adjust the date and time setting following the instructions in the Multi Media System manual. Following any power cut-out (e.g. after using the battery master switch or flat battery), check the seats to ensure that they are operating properly when the power supply is available: perform the following procedures on both seats in the event of a malfunction. With the ignition key in position STOP and the door on the side of the seat concerned closed, open the door and begin the following procedure within 5 seconds, then complete it within 10 seconds: Forward STOP Backward STOP Forward STOP Backward STOP Tilt the seatback fully forward and wait until the seat performs two complete travels (forward and backward) Move the seatback to its normal upright position

ATTENTION: Whenever the battery is reconnected, before starting the engine wait for at least 30 seconds with the ignition key on MAR to allow the electronic system to perform the self-learning routine. Battery charge maintainer for lengthy vehicle storage If the car is to be out of use for some time, a battery charge maintainer can be used to prevent the battery from running down and leading to loss of all the self-learning data from the electronic systems. It can be simply connected to the car battery and an ordinary power socket and left connected for several months, without any risk of damage to the car. It keeps the charge level constant between 95% and 100% of capacity, increasing the battery's life cycle.

A battery charge maintainer selected by Maserati, is available from the parts catalogue.

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Emergency and Service

EPB emergency unlocking procedure


In the event that the electric parking brake jams or in the event of a total system failure, the parking brake can be manually disengaged by using the special tool provided in the toolkit. Proceed as follows: 1. Remove the toolkit and spare wheel compartment covering panel from the luggage compartment. 2. Remove the covering panel containing the toolkit and the tyre repair kit, found in front of the battery compartment. 3. 4. 5. 6. Remove the cap on the right-hand side of the EPB control unit. Insert the special tool into place. Turn the handle clockwise until the system is fully unlocked. Remove the tool from its seat and replace the cap.

The special tool for EPB unlocking is located in a dedicated toolkit

Shiftlock / Keylock procedure


These procedures apply on Maserati vehicles with automatic transmission only. Key-Lock This function allows you to remove the key from the ignition switch only when the gearshift lever is in position P and within a maximum time of 30 seconds; when this time has elapsed, the key can no longer be removed. How can the key be removed? Remove the cap G using a pen or sufficiently pointed tool, then press the button just uncovered and at the same time extract the key. Once the key has been removed, refit the cap G.

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Shift-Unlock

Emergency and Service

In the event of a battery failure, move the gearshift lever from P to another position before moving the vehicle. To do this, follow the emergency procedure described below: 1. Remove the covering plate H in front of the gearshift lever. 2. Using a small tool, push on the gearshift lever locking mechanism through the hole. 3. At the same time slightly shift the gearshift lever towards the N position, in order to free the lever locking mechanism. 4. Remove the small tool from the hole, being careful not to move the gearshift lever. 5. Shift the lever fully into N. 6. Close the hole using the covering plate H.

While moving the gearshift lever, remember to press the button on the lever. WARNING: Work extremely carefully so as not to damage the trim panels. Another possibility to move the gearshift lever from P to another position is to power the vehicles electrical system by using a jump pack connected to the main cable of engine fuse board. The fuse board is located on the passenger side of the engine bay.

Remove the cover A and the top of the fuse box, connect the positive of a booster on the joint indicated in the red circle, the negative to a good earth elsewhere in the engine compartment. In this way its possible to have a temporary power supply and move the gearshift lever.

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Emergency and Service

Emergency opening functions


Opening the fuel tank lid in an emergency Maserati Quattroporte If necessary, the lid can be opened by pulling the cable C inside the luggage compartment.

Maserati GranTurismo, GranCabrio MC Stradale

If necessary, the fuel tank lid can be opened by pulling the small cable C inside the luggage compartment. To reach the cable, you must remove the small panel D turning the screw E by a quarter of a turn. Emergency opening trunk lid (only for GranTurismo and GranCabrio)

If necessary, the trunk lid can be unlocked by pulling the small cable C located underneath the rear seats.

Emergency starting with auxiliary battery If the battery is flat, the engine can be started using another battery having the same or slightly higher capacity than the flat one. Follow the instructions below: 1) Connect the positive terminals (+) of the two batteries with a special cable. 2) Connect the negative terminals (-) of the two batteries with a special cable. 3) Start the engine. 4) When the engine starts, remove the cables in reverse order. If the engine does not start after few attempts, do not continue but consult the Maserati Service Network!

WARNING: Never use a battery charger for emergency starting under any circumstances: this could damage the electronic systems and in particular the ECUs that control ignition and fuel supply functions.

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Emergency and Service

Emergency Engine Starting Procedure


If the MASERATI CODE fails to deactivate the engine immobilizer, the CODE warning light will illuminate permanently, while the EOBD warning light will go off after four seconds to turn on again immediately afterwards: the engine will not start. To start the engine, follow the emergency starting procedure. Note: We recommend to carefully read the entire procedure before performing it. In case of a mistake, turn the ignition key to STOP and repeat the operations from step 1. This procedure can be repeated an unlimited number of times. 1. Read the 5-digit electronic code found on the KEY CODE CARD. 2. Turn the key to MAR: at this moment the CODE and EOBD warning lights are on. 3. Push and hold down the accelerator pedal. Approximately 8 seconds later, the EOBD warning light will go off. Release the accelerator and get ready to count the number of times the EOBD warning light flashes.

4. Wait until the number of flashes is equal to the first digit of your CODE CARD, then push and hold down the accelerator pedal until the EOBD warning light goes off, after about 4 seconds, then release the accelerator pedal.
5. The EOBD warning light starts flashing again. As soon as the displayed number of flashing is equal to the second digit of your CODE CARD, press down the accelerator pedal and hold it. 6. Proceed in the same manner for the remaining digits in the code on the CODE CARD. 7. When the last digit has been entered, hold the accelerator pedal pushed down. The EOBD warning light comes on for 4 seconds and then goes off; you can now release the accelerator pedal. 8. When the EOBD warning light flashes fast (for about 4 seconds) it confirms that the procedure has been performed correctly. 9. Start the engine by turning the key from position MAR to position AVV. If the EOBD warning light remains on, turn the key to STOP and repeat the procedure from step 1.

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Emergency and Service

Towing of the vehicle


How to tow the vehicle with automatic transmission When it is necessary to tow the vehicle, observe the following recommendations: If possible, have the vehicle transported on a vehicle equipped with loading platform and specific for roadside assistance and recovery. If this is not possible: Tow the vehicle for a distance of less than 100 km (62 mi) at a speed below 60 Km/h (37 mph).

Tow the vehicle using the towing hook found in the toolkit. Screw the towing hook down tightly in its seat, on the lower, right-hand side of the front bumper. In order to tow the vehicle, turn the key to MAR and engage Neutral by shifting the gearshift lever to N. Should the EPB be applied, it must be disengaged first.

How to tow the vehicle with robotized transmission Screw the towing hook down tightly in its seat on the lower, right-hand side of the front bumper. To tow the vehicle: 1. Turn the ignition key to MAR without starting the engine. 2. Engage neutral (N) by simultaneously pulling the UP and DOWN gearshift paddles with the brake pedal depressed. 3. Return the ignition key to STOP.

The towing hook fixing point of Maserati vehicles is located on the lower, righthand side of the front bumper

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Emergency and Service

GranCabrio roof emergency closing procedure


A manual procedure allows to close the roof in the event of a system failure. Important note: the manual closing procedure can only be performed after the hydraulic pressure has been released. When the hydraulic roof movement is interrupted at any stage, the system will remain under pressure, and therefore the roof will stay in position, for 10 minutes. After this time the NCP will release all solenoid valves, and by consequence also the system pressure. Only after this time it is possible to manually move the roof. Alternatively, disconnection of the battery earth terminal results in the same effect. Notes:
CAUTION

Make sure all side windows are lowered before executing the procedure. Given the weight of the roof structure, it is recommended to perform this procedure with two persons.

Closing procedure: Turn the ignition key to the Off position and wait for 10 minutes. Open the boot compartment and remove the covers at both sides in the boot in order to access the tonneau cover emergency release cables. Pull both cables to unlock the tonneau cover and close the boot lid.

Open the tonneau cover and hold it in the vertical position.

Lift up the soft top until about half way position so that it stays in an equilibrium position.

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Lift the rear part of the roof and lower the tonneau cover until its fully closed.

Emergency and Service

Lower the rear part of the roof to make it rest on the tonneau cover.

Approach the front part of the roof to the windscreen frame.

Insert the roof lock tool (present in the vehicles tool kit) and rotate the tool clockwise to lock the roof to the windscreen frame.

The lock tool for the soft top can be found in the emergency tool kit

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Emergency and Service

Inertia switch
For resetting the switch turn the ignition key to position STOP. Check that there is no leakage from the fuel system. If no leaks are found, reset the inertia switch which stops the fuel pump operation, by pressing button A on the switch. Turn the ignition key to position MAR, wait a few seconds and move it to ACC. Check that the warning light on the display is off. Check once again that there are no fuel leaks.

The inertia switch of all Maserati models is located under the drivers seat

TPMS Calibration
Old version type (all vehicles up to MY10 included) To calibrate the system, press and hold button A, located on the inside roof, for a time ranging between 4 and 10 seconds. The system takes a maximum of 20 minutes to complete the calibration procedure with the vehicle in motion. A green symbol will appear on the display together with the message Calibration activated. If the user recalls the information page showing the pressure levels of each tyre, dashes . will be viewed in the place of the values.

New version type (all vehicles from MY11)


To calibrate the system, select the screen page TPMS Calibration by pressing the MODE button B. Then press and hold the button beside - to activate the calibration procedure. This operation may be performed with key at MAR and engine OFF. The system will take few seconds to complete the process.

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Emergency and Service

Fuse boxes
The fuses/relays are located in various parts of the vehicle, namely: 1. In the engine bay, at passengers side of the vehicle.

All models

2. Behind the glove compartment, next to the steering wheel.

GranTurismo and GranCabrio model range

Quattroporte

3. In the luggage compartment next to the battery, in the spare wheel housing.

GranTurismo GranCabrio MC Stradale

Quattroporte

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Emergency and Service

Warning lights
Indicators and warning lights within the gauges
Rear fog lights Passenger airbag OFF warning light Immobilizer Low oil pressure (*) ABS failure warning light Low brake fluid level

Fog lights Position lights/ Low beams

Brake pads worn Parking brake applied Parking brake failure MSP system failure Right-hand Direction indicators Left-hand Direction indicators

High beams

Tyre pressure

Parking lights Alternator /battery failure Engine control system failure(EOBD) (*) Gearbox failure Automatic (*) (*) Icons repeated on the central info display

Seat belts not buckled Airbag system failure

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Warning icons on the central info display
Inertia switch, fuel cut-out enabled Windscreen washer fluid Cruise Control Lighting system failure

Emergency and Service

Power steering failure Low engine oil level Low automatic /robotized gearbox oil level

ALC system failure


ASR system failure

Stop light failure Twilight sensor failure

Rain sensor failure Parking sensor failure

Soft top failure Excessive temperature in the catalytic converters Shock absorber failure

Doors and lids open

Ice hazard

MSP system failure Vehicle set to SPORT mode Deactivation of EPB automatic operating mode Automatic gearbox Mode selected

"Low grip mode

Seat heating
Scheduled maintenance

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Maserati Technical Dictionary

Maserati Technical Dictionary

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ABS

Maserati Technical Dictionary

AQS

Anti-lock Braking System. ABS prevents the wheels from locking during braking and thus to maintain the steering capability, ABS is especially useful in low grip circumstances. Air Quality Sensor. AQS is a dedicated sensor that measures air pollution in order to close the recirculation flap of the vehicles ventilation system when high pollution levels are detected. Used on Quattroporte only. Adaptive Shift Strategy. ASIS is a specific strategy of the automatic gearbox that constantly monitors the driving style in order to automatically adapt the gearbox shift strategy to the driver's preferences. Anti Slip Regulation. ASR is often called traction control. It ensures the vehicle's stability by preventing the driven wheels from spinning during acceleration. This is the sequential number of vehicle assembly on the production line. Also referred to as 'Spare parts number' or 'Number for spare parts'.

ASIS

ASR Assembly number

Automatic gearbox A gearbox that can automatically change gear ratios as the vehicle moves. This unit typically has a torque converter, planetary/epicyclic gear sets, wet clutches and bands. AWS Advanced Weight Sensing system. AWS is designed to detect the presence of a child seat on the front passenger's seat in order to disable the front passenger's airbag. AWS is used on certain USA specification vehicles only. Body Computer The Body Computer or NBC is the heart of the vehicle's electronic system. It can be best described as the "brain" of the vehicle. It manages information exchange between different vehicle systems and communication networks and it controls a large number of body related functions. The Body Computer is fitted underneath the vehicle's dashboard at driver's side and is also used as a vehicle diagnostic interface. Bore Bore indicates the diameter of the engine's cylinders. Together with the stroke and the number of cylinders it defines the total capacity of an engine. Camber The camber angle is the vertical inclination of the vehicle's wheels seen in transversal direction. It is part of the vehicle's wheel geometry and has a strong impact on vehicle's stability, lateral grip and tyre wear. Cambiocorsa Cambiocorsa commercial name used to indicate the robotized transmission of the Spyder, Coup and GranSport models (M138). Cambiocorsa is Italian for "race shift". CAN Controller Area Network. CAN is a serial communication network using multiplex technology. It connects different vehicle systems for information exchange and diagnostic purposes. CAN reduces the amount of wiring in a car and allows integrated electronic vehicle functions. Caster The caster angle is the inclination of the steering axis of each front wheel in longitudinal direction. It is part of the vehicle's wheel geometry and has a strong influence on the vehicle's stability and steering behaviour. Catalytic converter A device in the exhaust system that uses a catalyst (Platinum, Palladium, Rhodium) to convert harmful compounds of the exhaust gas (HC, CO, NOx) into harmless compounds (CO2, H2O). CCM Carbon Ceramic Material. CCM is a new technology in vehicle breaking systems, combining carbon fibre and ceramic materials into brake discs. CCM eliminates brake fading.

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Centre of gravity

Maserati Technical Dictionary

The center of gravity refers to the mean location of the gravitational force acting on a body. Engineers try to design a sports car's center of mass as low as possible to make the car handle better. Barycenter or barycentre may also refer to the center of mass. A differential allows each of the driving road wheels to rotate at different speeds, while for most vehicles supplying equal torque to each of them (Open Diff). displacement is the volume swept by all the pistons inside the cylinders of an internal combustion engine in a single movement from top dead centre (TDC) to bottom dead centre (BDC). It is commonly specified in cubic centimeters (cc), litres (l), or (mainly in North America) cubic inches (CID). Refers to the electronic throttle control system. The accelerator pedal is not mechanically connected to the throttle by a cable or linkage. The accelerator pedal is instead an electronic sensor that provides input to the engine management ECU. Dry sump is a lubricating motor oil management method for internal combustion engines that uses external pumps and a secondary oil reservoir. Dry sump technology is mainly used in race cars because of it's capacity to guarantee lubrication in extreme circumstances Commercial name for the robotized transmission used in the Quattroporte model Electronic brake force distribution distributes the brake force between the front and the rear axle. On-Board Diagnostics, or OBD, in an automotive context, is a generic term referring to a vehicle's self-diagnostic and reporting capability. EOBD = European On Board Diagnostics, OBD II = 2nd generation North American On Board Diagnostics Eletronic Stability Program is a generic term for MSP Fiat Luxury car ORiented Network Control Electronics - The multiplex computer communication network used in Maserati vehicles Hydraulic Brake Assist increases the braking pressure when the brake pedal is depressed fast but with insufficient force to reduce braking distances. High Intensity Discharge headlamps. Light is generated by applying high intensity electric arc to a gas, usually Xenon gas. Hill Holder system is integrated in the ABS/ESP and allows the driver to start off when standing on uphill roads, without the vehicle involuntarily rolling back. Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning - The climate control system. The kiss point is the actual thrust bearing position at the moment of clutch engaging, also referred to as PIS. Lambda () is the ratio of actual AFR (Air/Fuel Ratio) to stoichiometry for a given mixture. Lambda of 1.0 is at stoichiometry Most practical AFR (Air/Fuel Ratio)devices actually measure the amount of residual oxygen (for lean mixes) or unburned hydrocarbons (for rich mixtures) in the exhaust gas. Also referred to as Oxygen sensor.

Differential Displacement / Capacity

Drive by wire

Dry sump

Duoselect EBD

EOBD

ESP Florence HBA HID Hill Holder HVAC Kisspoint Lambda

Lambda sensor

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Limited slip differential

Maserati Technical Dictionary

LRD Maserati Diagnosi

In a Limited Slip Differential, if one wheel slips, torque is transferred to the wheel with most grip through a multi-disc clutch generating friction inside the differential. A limited slip differential offers superior traction over a traditional differential ('open diff'). Low Risk Deployment airbag. A new-generation passenger-side airbag system that uses an intelligent technology. LRD allows the elimination of AWS. The latest Maserati diagnostic system consisting of a Laptop, and Vehicle Communication Interface (MDVCI), and Vehicle Measurement Module (MDVMM / PICO Scope). Fast gearshift strategy of the Robotized transmission of the GranTurismo S model, reduces gearshift times to 100ms. 2nd generation fast gearshift strategy of the robotized transmission, used in the GranTurismo MC Stradale model. Reduces gearshift times to 60ms. Maserati Multimedia System, commercial name for the NIT. The Bosch term for the engine management ECU used in Maserati vehicles. Maserati Stability Program. It controls each individual wheel to ensure vehicle stability in all driving conditions. A group of multiple (Multiplexed) networks connected together to share data. Nodo InfoTainment, the infotelematics node - commonly referred to as the Maserati Multimedia System or MMS. On-Board Diagnostics, or OBD (See EOBD). The tendency of an automobile to steer sharper into a turn than the driver intends sometimes with a thrusting of the rear to the outside. In extreme cases oversteer can lead to a spin. Power Assisted Steering - Power Steering PIS (Punto Incipiente Slittamento or slip beginning point) is a parameter that defines the nominal value of the clutch engagement point in the gearbox control module (NCR). See Kisspoint. Power is a measure of how quickly you can produce torque. Usually expressed in kW or HP. Power = Torque/Time Proxi can best be described as the DNA of the vehicle. It is a file which contains information on how a vehicle is configured and is specific for each different vehicle. The Proxi file defines the actual content of the vehicle. It is stored inside the Body Computer. The robotized gearbox control system is composed of an electro-hydraulic servo system which manages the gearshift and clutch operation. rollover protection system (ROPS) consisting of an active roll bar. Rear Seat Entertainment system, contains an analogue TV receiver and DVD player (Factory Installed) A type of tire designed to operate safely after loosing air pressure The semi active suspension system installed as an option on Maserati vehicles. This system simulates the presence of a skyhook damper to control sprung weight by continuously varying control of the dampers(shocks).

MC-Shift MC-Race MMS Motronic MSP Multiplex NIT OBD Oversteer

PAS PIS

Power Proxi

Robotized gearbox ROPS RSE Run flat Skyhook

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Sofast stroke TCS Timing variator Toe in & Toe out

Maserati Technical Dictionary

Soft + Fast gearshift strategy. The different Sofast generations refer to the various levels of Robotized gearbox system evolution (software and hardware). The distance a piston travels in the cylinder from top to bottom. Together with the bore and the number of cylinders it defines the total capacity of an engine. Traction Control System. Used to control wheel slip during acceleration, Maserati term - ASR The actuator for the hydraulically controlled valve timing system of an engine. See VVT. Toe refers to the parallelism between the wheels as viewed from above and is usually measured in inches or millimeters. Toe in & toe out has an important impact on steering and handling characteristics, as well as on tire wear. It is an important element of the wheel geometry. Torque is Force x Distance, usually measures in Lb Ft of Nm. Torque is also referred to as 'Work'. A device usually located between the engine and the automatic gearbox. This is the fluid coupling that allows a vehicle equipped with and automatic to idle in gear. The torque converter also multiplies torque at low vehicle speeds. Tire Pressure Monitoring System. A system that monitors tire pressures and alerts the driver if pressure falls below a certain threshold. A combined gearbox and final drive unit, or a combined transmission and axle. In the case of Maserati it indicates the layout of the engine at the front and the gearbox together with the differential at the rear of the vehicle. A clutch is a mechanical device which provides for the transmission of power (and therefore usually motion) from one component (the driving member or engine) to another (the driven member or transmission). A twin plate clutch has 2 friction discs to allow more torque to be transmitted and yet have a small diameter for high RPM capability. Understeer is what occurs when a car steers less than the amount commanded by the driver. The opposite of oversteer. Vehicle Identification Number. The VIN can be found at the bottom of the front windscreen and indicates a factory created vehicle specification code followed by a serial number Variable Valve Timing. A system to allow engine valve timing to be varied dynamically while the engine is running. An engine with VVT usually has a broader operating range. Wet sump is a lubricating motor oil management method for internal combustion engines that uses an internal pump and a sump or oil pan attached to the bottom of the engine. Procedure of correcting or adjusting the wheel geometry to specifications. Refers to the geometrical relationship of the wheels to the vehicle itself, to each other and to the road. Wheel geometry affects handling, steering and tyre wear. The gas used in HID headlamps. Xenon is a noble gas.

Torque Torque converter

TPMS Transaxle

Twin plate clutch

Understeer VIN

VVT

Wet sump

Wheel alignment Wheel geometry Xenon

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Maserati Academy May 2011 Maserati reserves the right to make any modification to the vehicles described in this manual, at any time, for either technical or commercial reasons. All rights reserved. This document must not be reproduced, even partially, without the written consent of Maserati S.p.A.

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