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Shared Reading

January 22, 2014

1. Lesson Goals  Essential Question/”Big Idea”: - How can you retell the story using the important parts from the beginning, middle, and end?  Objectives: SWBAT… - Retell the main event from a story read aloud (BME). - Identify elements of story including setting, character, and key events. Why have you chosen these objectives? Retelling is one of the foundational skills that students need to learn and develop in, so that it can help them with their reading comprehension. Standards: - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.K.2 With prompting and support, retell familiar stories, including key details. - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.K.3 With prompting and support, identify characters, settings, and major events in a story. - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RF.K.2a Recognize and produce rhyming words.

2. Content Knowledge  Students will be reading a book called, “Is It Alive?” by Kimberlee Graves and illustrated by Robin Konntz. The purpose of reading this book is to identify what is alive and what is not alive.  Students will need to know the names of the characters (if any) as the story is being read to them. While the teacher is reading the book, she will stop and think about the characters’ names mentioned in the book and what happened so far in the story. Students can use pictures in the text to help them recall the story/information. By doing this, teachers can model how students should think when they are reading a book. With much practice and modeling, students will eventually do the same naturally.  After the story is read to them, students will list words that rhyme with the word “tree.” Students will listen to the ending sound (-ee) and think of words that make the –ee sound. Breaking words into smaller parts and recognizing them in words can help students improve on their reading, spelling, and writing skills. As students are learning about rhyming words, they are able to identify the patterns and structures in both spoken and written words.  It is important for students to learn this concept (retelling) because they build on their knowledge of recalling important details. When students learn to retell, they can use the knowledge to write a story and build comprehension. Also, retelling information requires students to listen and be able to tell a story in a logical sequence.  Misconceptions: students retelling the story might turn into a summary. Retelling and summary are not the same thing! 3. Levels of Differentiation  How does your lesson connect to the interests and cultural backgrounds of your students? Retelling requires students to not only listen, it also requires them to talk. This can help students who are mostly silent because it can increase their social skills through literacy activities.

How will you differentiate instruction for students who need additional content support during this lesson? For students who need additional content support, I would create Retelling Cards (picture will be on the cards) for them. On the cards, there are questions that require the students to think about the story (BME), the characters, and so on. How will you differentiate instruction for students who need additional language support during this lesson? I can create a mini-lesson that requires them to look at the pictures and associate it with the words in the story. By using the pictures, students can place in order of the story. Afterwards, students can point to the pictures and explain in their own words what happened in the story. How will you differentiate instruction for students who need additional challenge during this lesson? For students who need additional challenge, I can create a question that requires the student to write three events from the story.

4. Methods  What teaching method(s) will you use for this lesson? The Five Finger Retelling: 1. Who/what was the story about? 2. Where did it take place? 3. What happened in the beginning? 4. What happened in the middle? 5. What happened at the end of the story?  Why have you chosen this method or these methods? This strategy can help students remember what they need to think about when retelling a story/information.

5. Activities  Students will be given an informal assessment. Students will have a paper, pencil, and a clipboard. Students will draw a picture of what event they remember in the story. This leads up to the next activity.  Before doing the next class activity, I will have the students stand in the middle of the room and go over rules that apply to this activity. I will also have them practice their “I agree/disagree with ___” statement. There will be four picture cards that are from the book (BME). Four students will be chosen to stand in front of the room and show to the class the cards they have in their hands (the cards will be mixed up). Students will have to discuss with each other where to place the four students in order. (5 minutes) Once all the students have come to an agreement, they will return to the rug. The four students will stay in order and will stand in front of the students in the rug area. The students and I will go over the book and placement order. Students will look at the word “tree” in the book. I will repeat the word and point to it three times so that the students can listen and associate the letter sounds to the word. Students will repeat the word twice. I will write the word on a chart paper and say the word again. I will inform the students to think of words that rhyme with the word “tree.” Students will turn and talk to each other. As the students are thinking and talking to their partner, I will remind the students what rhyming means. Once the students have the answers, I will write the words on the chart paper.

6. Materials:  “Is It Alive?” by Kimberlee Graves and illustrated by Robin Konntz  Picture cards (4)  Chart paper (Double –ee Rhyming Words)  Marker(s)  Paper  Pencil  Clipboard 7. Evaluation Plan:  Before reading: I will ask students what the story is going to be about. This will help me understand if the students are able to make connections between the title of the book and picture on the front cover. Also, I want to see if they make connections between new information and what they already know.  During reading: I will stop in the middle of the book and ask students questions regarding the book (i.e. “What two objects are alive?”) This will help me know if the students comprehend and if they are using the pictures to help them answer the question. End of reading: Students will draw a picture of what event they remember in the story (informal assessment). Also, students will be doing a class activity to help me observe which students are participating and able to retell the story.

8. Resources http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RF/K http://www.howtolearn.com/2012/01/rhyming-improves-reading-spelling-writing/ http://www.liketoread.com/retell.html

Shared Reading

January 23, 2014

2. Lesson Goals  Essential Question/”Big Idea”: - How can you retell the story using the important parts from the beginning, middle, and end?  Objectives: SWBAT… - Retell the main event from a story read aloud (BME). - Identify elements of story including setting, character, and key events. Why have you chosen these objectives? Retelling is one of the foundational skills that students need to learn and develop in, so that it can help them with their reading comprehension. Standards: - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.K.2 With prompting and support, retell familiar stories, including key details. - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.K.3 With prompting and support, identify characters, settings, and major events in a story. - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RF.K.2a Recognize and produce rhyming words.

2. Content Knowledge  Students will be reading a book called, “When I was Little Like You” by Jill Paton Walsh and Stephen Lambert.  Students will need to know the names of the characters (if any) as the story is being read to them. While reading the book, I will stop and think about the characters’ names mentioned in the book and what happened so far in the story. Students can use pictures in the text to help them recall the story/information. By doing this, teachers can model how students should think when they are reading a book. With much practice and modeling, students will eventually do the same naturally.  After the story is read to them, students will list words that rhyme with the word “van.” Students will listen to the ending sound (-an) and think of words that make the –an sound. Breaking words into smaller parts and recognizing them in words can help students improve on their reading, spelling, and writing skills. As students are learning about rhyming words, they are able to identify the patterns and structures in both spoken and written words.  It is important for students to learn this concept (retelling) because they build on their knowledge of recalling important details. When students learn to retell, they can use the knowledge to write a story and build comprehension. Also, retelling information requires students to listen and be able to tell a story in a logical sequence.  Misconceptions: students retelling the story might turn into a summary. Retelling and summary are not the same thing! 3. Levels of Differentiation  How does your lesson connect to the interests and cultural backgrounds of your students? Retelling requires students to not only listen, it also requires them to talk. This can help students who are mostly silent because it can increase their social skills through literacy activities.

How will you differentiate instruction for students who need additional content support during this lesson? For students who need additional content support, I would create Retelling Cards for them. On the cards, there are questions that require the students to think about the story (BME), the characters, and so on. How will you differentiate instruction for students who need additional language support during this lesson? I can create a mini-lesson that requires them to look at the pictures and associate it with the words in the story. By using the pictures, students can place in order of the story. Afterwards, students can point to the pictures and explain in their own words what happened in the story. How will you differentiate instruction for students who need additional challenge during this lesson? For students who need additional challenge, I can create a question that requires the student to write three statements that support the main idea of the story.

4. Methods  What teaching method(s) will you use for this lesson? The Five Finger Retelling: 1. Who/what was the story about? 2. Where did it take place? 3. What happened in the beginning? 4. What happened in the middle? 5. What happened at the end of the story?  Why have you chosen this method or these methods? This strategy can help students remember what they need to think about when retelling a story/information.

5. Activities  Students will draw pictures that happened in the beginning, middle, and end of the story. Students will also label their pictures.  Students will look at the word “van” in the book. I will repeat the word and point to it three times so that the students can listen and associate the letter sounds to the word. Students will repeat the word twice. I will write the word on a chart paper and say the word again. I will inform the students to think of words that rhyme with the word “van.” As the students are thinking, I will remind the students what rhyming means. Once the students have the answers, the students will come up and write the words on the chart paper.

6. Materials:  “When I was Little Like You” by Jill Paton Walsh and Stephen Lambert Picture cards  Chart paper (-ig Rhyming Words)  Marker(s)  Paper  Pencil  Clipboard

7. Evaluation Plan:  Before reading: I will ask students what the story is going to be about. This will help me understand if the students are able to make connections between the title of the book and picture on the front cover. Also, I want to see if they make connections between new information and what they already know.  During reading: I will stop in the middle of the book and ask students questions regarding the book (i.e. “What two objects are alive?”) This will help me know if the students comprehend and if they are using the pictures to help them answer the question. End of reading: Students will draw a picture of what event they remember in the story (informal assessment). Also, students will be doing a class activity to help me observe which students are participating and able to retell the story.

8. Resources http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RF/K http://www.howtolearn.com/2012/01/rhyming-improves-reading-spelling-writing/ http://www.liketoread.com/retell.html

Shared Reading

January 24, 2014

3. Lesson Goals  Essential Question/”Big Idea”: - How can you retell the story using the important parts from the beginning, middle, and end?  Objectives: SWBAT… - Retell the main event from a story read aloud (BME). - Identify elements of story including setting, character, and key events. Why have you chosen these objectives? Retelling is one of the foundational skills that students need to learn and develop in, so that it can help them with their reading comprehension. Standards: - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.K.2 With prompting and support, retell familiar stories, including key details. - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.K.3 With prompting and support, identify characters, settings, and major events in a story. - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RF.K.2a Recognize and produce rhyming words.

2. Content Knowledge  Students will be reading a book called, “Mud Walk” by Joy Cowley and illustrated by Elizabeth Fuller. The purpose of reading this book is to find out what happened to the animals in the story. However, I won’t tell the students that they are going to retelling.  While the story is being read, students will help me read the words by using the reading strategies: looking at the pictures to associate to the words, sounding out the letters, and chunking it.  Students will need to know the names of the characters (if any) as the story is being read to them. While reading the book, I will stop and think about the characters’ names mentioned in the book and what happened so far in the story. Students can use pictures in the text to help them recall the story/information. By doing this, teachers can model how students should think when they are reading a book. With much practice and modeling, students will eventually do the same naturally.  After the story is read to them, students will list words that rhyme with the word “pig.” Students will listen to the ending sound (-ig) and think of words that make the –ig sound. Breaking words into smaller parts and recognizing them in words can help students improve on their reading, spelling, and writing skills. As students are learning about rhyming words, they are able to identify the patterns and structures in both spoken and written words.  It is important for students to learn this concept (retelling) because they build on their knowledge of recalling important details. When students learn to retell, they can use the knowledge to write a story and build comprehension. Also, retelling information requires students to listen and be able to tell a story in a logical sequence.  Misconceptions: students retelling the story might turn into a summary. Retelling and summary are not the same thing!

3. Levels of Differentiation  How does your lesson connect to the interests and cultural backgrounds of your students? Retelling requires students to not only listen, it also requires them to talk. This can help students who are mostly silent because it can increase their social skills through literacy activities.  How will you differentiate instruction for students who need additional content support during this lesson? For students who need additional content support, I would create Retelling Cards for them. On the cards, there are questions that require the students to think about the story (BME), the characters, and so on. How will you differentiate instruction for students who need additional language support during this lesson? I can create a mini-lesson that requires them to look at the pictures and associate it with the words in the story. By using the pictures, students can place in order of the story. Afterwards, students can point to the pictures and explain in their own words what happened in the story. How will you differentiate instruction for students who need additional challenge during this lesson? For students who need additional challenge, I can create a question that requires the student to write three statements that support the main idea of the story.

4. Methods  What teaching method(s) will you use for this lesson? The Five Finger Retelling: 1. Who/what was the story about? 2. Where did it take place? 3. What happened in the beginning? 4. What happened in the middle? 5. What happened at the end of the story?  Why have you chosen this method or these methods? This strategy can help students remember what they need to think about when retelling a story/information.

5. Activities  Students will look at the word “pig” in the book. I will repeat the word and point to it three times so that the students can listen and associate the letter sounds to the word. Students will repeat the word twice. I will write the word on a chart paper and say the word again. I will inform the students to think of words that rhyme with the word “pig.” As the students are thinking, I will remind the students what rhyming means. Once the students have the answers, the students will come up and write the words on the chart paper.  Before doing the next class activity, I will have the students stand in the middle of the room and go over rules that apply to this activity. I will also have them practice their “I agree/disagree with ___” statement. There will be picture cards that are from the book (BME). Students will be chosen to stand in front of the room and show to the class the cards they have in their hands (the cards will be mixed up). Students will have to discuss with each other where to place the students in order. (5-7 minutes) Once all the students have come to an agreement, they will return to the rug. The students will stay in order and will stand in front of the students in the rug area. The students and I will go over the book and placement order.

Students will be given an informal pre-assessment. Students will have a paper, pencil, and a clipboard. Students will draw a picture of what they remember (they have read this book back in September).

6. Materials:  “Mud Walk” by Joy Cowley and illustrated by Elizabeth Fuller  Picture cards  Chart paper (-ig Rhyming Words)  Marker(s)  Paper  Pencil  Clipboard 7. Evaluation Plan:  Before reading: Students will draw a picture of what they remember about the story (informal preassessment). Also, students will be doing a class activity to help me observe which students are participating and able to retell the story.  During reading: I will stop on several pages of the book and ask students questions regarding the book. This will help me know if the students comprehend and if they are using the pictures to help them answer the question. End of reading: Students will use the picture cards to place them in order of the story (informal assessment).

8. Resources http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RF/K http://www.howtolearn.com/2012/01/rhyming-improves-reading-spelling-writing/ http://www.liketoread.com/retell.html