You are on page 1of 1

Chrism or Unction?

 
Chrism is usually olive oil (although other plant oils can be used in cases when olive oil is unavailable) and is 
scented with a sweet perfume, usually balsam.  Chrism is used in the administration of certain sacraments 
and ecclesiastical functions including baptisms, confirmations, ordinations, foot washing and some 
blessings of altars and other church fixtures. 

 
Unction is the process of anointing someone with consecrated oil for religious purposes.  Episcopalians use 
unction when referring to the Holy oil used to anoint the sick for the purpose of making them well (see 
James 5:14).  The term “unction” is derived from the Latin word “unguere” which means to anoint.  Unction 
differs from Chrism in that balsam is never added to oil used for unction. 
 

Holy Oil is oil that has been consecrated (or “set aside”) for Chrism.  The Holy anointing oil described in 
Exodus 30:22‐25 was created from: 

 500 shekels (about 6 kg) of myrrh (musk)  
 half as much (about 3 kg) of Ceylon (a variety of cinnamon used for fragrance) 
 250 shekels (about 3 kg) of fragrant cane (calamus)  
o Calamus has been an item of trade in many cultures for thousands of years. Calamus has been used 
medicinally for a wide variety of ailments, and its smell makes calamus essential oil valued in the 
perfume industry. 
 500 shekels (about 6 kg) of cassia, (a variety of cinnamon used as a spice) and 
 a hin (about 4 L) of olive oil. 

The title Christ/Messiah means literally “covered in oil” or “anointed”. 

The photograph on the left depicts a Chrismatory (container for ritual 
oil) from Germany, 1636 (silver‐gilt, Victoria and Albert Museum, 
London)