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Gambia: Banjul Urban Profile

Gambia: Banjul Urban Profile

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The Banjul Urban Profiling consists of an accelerated, action-oriented assessment of urban conditions, focusing on priority needs, capacity gaps, and existing institutional responses at local and national levels. The purpose of the study is to develop urban poverty reduction policies at local, national, and regional levels, through an assessment of needs and response mechanisms, and as a contribution to the wider-ranging implementation of the Millennium Development Goals.
The Banjul Urban Profiling consists of an accelerated, action-oriented assessment of urban conditions, focusing on priority needs, capacity gaps, and existing institutional responses at local and national levels. The purpose of the study is to develop urban poverty reduction policies at local, national, and regional levels, through an assessment of needs and response mechanisms, and as a contribution to the wider-ranging implementation of the Millennium Development Goals.

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GAMBIA: BANJUL URBAN
PROFILE
2
Copyright © United Nations Human Settlements Programme (UN-Habitat), 2012
All rights reserved
United Nations Human Settlements Programme publications can be obtained from
UN-Habitat Regional and Information Ofces or directly from:
P.O. Box 30030, GPO 00100 Nairobi, Kenya.
Fax: + (254 20) 762 4266/7
E-mail: unhabitat@unhabitat.org
Website: http://www.unhabitat.org
Tis Banjul report was prepared by Joseph Guiebo and Kerstin Sommer.
Te urban profling in Te Gambia was managed by Juldeh Ceesay and Lamin Jobe.
HS Number: HS/093/11E
ISBN Number (Series): 978-92-1-132023-7
ISBN Number (Volume): 978-92-1-132383-2
DISCLAIMER
Te designation employed and the presentation of the material in this publication does not imply the expression of any
opinion whatsoever on the part of the Secretariat of the United Nations concerning the legal status of any country, territory,
city or area, or of its authorities, or concerning delimitation of its frontiers or boundaries, or regarding its economic system
or degree of development.
Te analysis, conclusions and recommendations of the report do not necessarily refect the views of the United Nations
Human Settlements Programme (UN-Habitat), the Governing Council of UN-Habitat or its Member States.
Tis document has been produced with the fnancial assistance of the European Union. Te views expressed herein can in no
way be taken to refect the ofcial opinion of the European Union.
Excerpts from this publication may be reproduced without authorization, on condition that the source is indicated.
Photo credits: © UN-Habitat
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
Design and Layout: Florence Kuria

3
FOREWORD 5
BACKGROUND 7
GOVERNANCE 11
SLUMS, SHELTER AND LAND 12
GENDER AND HIV/AIDS 14
ENVIRONMENT 16
LOCAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT 18
BASIC URBAN SERVICES 20
URBAN SAFETY AND DISASTER MANAGEMENT 22
PROJECT PROPOSALS
GOVERNANCE 25
SLUMS, SHELTER AND LAND 28
GENDER AND HIV/AIDS 31
ENVIRONMENT 34
LOCAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT 37
BASIC URBAN SERVICES 40
URBAN SAFETY AND DISASTER MANAGEMENT 43
TABLE OF CONTENTS
UNITED NATIONS HUMAN SETTLEMENTS PROGRAMME
GAMBIA: BANJUL URBAN
PROFILE
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5 5
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FOREWORD
According to
research published
in UN-Habitat’s
1

fagship report, Te
State of the World’s
Cities 2010-2011,
all developing
regions, including
the African,
Caribbean and
Pacifc states, will
have more people
living in urban than
rural areas by the
year 2030. With
half the world’s
population already living in urban areas, the challenges
we face in the battle against urban poverty, our quest for
cities without slums, for cities where women feel safer,
for inclusive cities with power, water and sanitation,
and afordable transport, for better planned cities, and
for cleaner, greener cities is daunting.
But as this series shows, there are many interesting
solutions and best practices to which we can turn. After
all, the fgures tell us that during the decade 2000 to
2010, a total of 227 million people in the developing
countries moved out of slum conditions. In other
words, governments, cities and partner institutions have
collectively exceeded the slum target of the Millennium
Development Goals twice over and ten years ahead of
the agreed 2020 deadline.
Asia and the Pacifc stood at the forefront of successful
eforts to reach the slum target, with all governments
in the region improving the lives of an estimated 172
million slum dwellers between 2000 and 2010.
In sub-Saharan Africa though, the total proportion
of the urban population living in slums has decreased
by only 5 per cent (or 17 million people). Ghana,
Senegal, Uganda, and Rwanda were the most successful
countries in the sub-region, reducing the proportions of
slum dwellers by over one-ffth in the last decade.
Some 13 per cent of the progress made towards the
global slum target occurred in Latin America and the
Caribbean, where an estimated 30 million people have
moved out of slum conditions since the year 2000.
Yet, UN-Habitat estimates confrm that the progress
made on the slum target has not been sufcient to
counter the demographic expansion in informal
settlements in the developing world. In this sense,
eforts to reduce the numbers of slum dwellers are
neither satisfactory nor adequate.
1 UN-Habitat - United Nations Human Settlements Programme
As part of our drive to address this crisis, UN-Habitat
is working with the European Commission and the
Brussels-based Secretariat of the African, Caribbean
and Pacifc (ACP) Group to support sustainable urban
development. Given the urgent and diverse needs, we
found it necessary to develop a tool for rapid assessment
and strategic planning to guide immediate, mid and
long-term interventions. And here we have it in the
form of this series of publications.
Te Participatory Slum Upgrading Programme is based
on the policy dialogue between UN-Habitat, the ACP
Secretariat and the European Commission which dates
back to the year 2002. When the three parties met at
UN-Habitat headquarters in June 2009, more than 200
delegates from over 50 countries approved a resounding
call on the international community to pay greater
attention to these urbanization matters, and to extend
the slum upgrading programme to all countries in the
ACP Group.
It is worth recalling here how grateful we are that the
European Commission’s 9th European Development
Fund for ACP countries provided EUR 4 million (USD
5.7 million at June 2011 rates) to enable UN-Habitat
to conduct the programme which now serves 59 cities
in 23 African countries, and more than 20 cities in six
Pacifc, and four Caribbean countries.
Indeed, since its inception in 2008, the slum upgrading
programme has achieved the confdence of partners at
city and country level in Africa, the Caribbean and in
the Pacifc. It is making a major contribution aimed
at helping in urban poverty reduction eforts, as each
report in this series shows."
I wish to express my gratitude to the European
Commission and the ACP Secretariat for their
commitment to this slum upgrading programme. I
have every confdence that the results outlined in this
profle, and others, will serve to guide the development
of responses for capacity building and investments in
the urban sector.
Further, I would like to thank each Country Team for
their continued support to this process which is essential
for the successful implementation of the Participatory
Slum Upgrading Programme.
Dr. Joan Clos
Executive Director, UN-Habitat
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Te Participatory Slum Upgrading Programme is one
of the most vibrant projects in Te Gambia today and
is involved in poverty alleviation and the fght against
social exclusion. It involves the profling of urban
conditions in the capital city of Banjul.
By its very nature, the programme will improve
local democratic governance by increasing citizen
participation. Te proposed action will contribute
towards the decentralization and Government reform
programme. Te country strategy poverty alleviation,
the Millennium Development Goals and Vision 2020
of Te Gambia, support a participatory approach to
development and poverty alleviation.
Te Participatory Slum Upgrading Programme will also
strengthen the capacity for sustainable development
in local communities. As part of its proposed actions,
it will explore, through public private dialogue, the
citizens’ potential role in combating urban poverty to
compliment more traditional forms of assistance to the
poor and help in achieving the Millennium Development
Goals. It will further seek to explore and consolidate
public-private partnerships at local government level
aimed at strengthening local communities in sustainable
development. Tis has been exemplifed by the focus
group discussions that were held in each of the nine
wards within Banjul.
On behalf of the participating municipalities, I wish
to thank those who have contributed, immensely, to
the realization of this project. Special mention should
be made of the Government of Te Gambia and UN-
Habitat, without whose support the programme could
not have been implemented.
As benefciaries, we appreciate the eforts put into the
conceptualization of the programme and as such we
shall not falter in the realization of its goals for the
betterment of our communities and for the beneft of
our people.

Samba Faal
Mayor of Banjul
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BACKGROUND
INTRODUCTION
Urban Profling
Urban profling of Banjul consists of an accelerated,
action-oriented assessment of urban conditions,
focusing on priority needs, capacity gaps, and existing
institutional responses at local and national levels. Te
purpose of the study is to develop urban poverty reduction
policies at local, national and regional levels, through an
assessment of needs and response mechanisms, and as a
contribution to the wider-ranging implementation of
the Millennium Development Goals. Te study is based
on analysis of existing data and a series of interviews
with all relevant urban stakeholders, including local
communities and institutions, civil society, the private
sector, development partners and academics. Te
consultation typically results in a collective agreement
on priorities and their development into proposed
capacity-building and other projects that are all aimed
at urban poverty reduction. Urban profling is being
implemented in over 20 African and Arab countries,
ofering an opportunity for comparative regional
analysis. Once completed, this series of studies will
provide a framework for central and local authorities
and urban actors, as well as donors and external support
agencies.
METHODOLOGY
Te Participatory Slum Upgrading Programme
consists of three phases:
Phase one consists of the rapid profling of urban
conditions at the national and local level. Te capital
city, a medium-sized city and a small town are selected
and studied to provide a representative sample in each
country. Information is collected through standard
interviews and discussions with institutions and key
informants, in order to assess the strengths, weaknesses,
opportunities, and threats of the national and local
urban set-ups. Te fndings are presented and refned
during city and national consultation workshops and
consensus is reached regarding priority interventions.
National and city reports synthesize the information
collected and outline ways to reduce urban poverty
through holistic approaches.
Phase two builds on the priorities identifed through
pre-feasibility studies and develops detailed capacity-
building and capital investment projects.
Phase three implements the projects developed
during the two earlier phases, with an emphasis on
skills development, institutional strengthening and
replication.
Tis report presents the outcomes of urban profling
phase one at the national level in Banjul.
URBAN PROFILING IN BANJUL
In Te Gambia, urban profling focuses on Banjul,
the Kanifng Municipal Council and Brikama town
in the Western Region. Trough desk reviews, focus
group discussions and institutional questionnaires,
the profling targets municipalities, government
departments, private institutions, non-governmental
organizations and the academia within the selected
cities.
A focus group discussion was held in each of the 29
wards within the three municipalities covered in the
profling efort. In each ward, the session brought
together 20 participants discussing urban poverty
issues. Discussions were guided by a team of moderators
comprised of a facilitator, secretary and an observer.
Te purpose of the various data collection mechanisms
was to obtain information on public perception regarding
the causes, efects and possible solutions to urban
poverty. Tis brought together a cross section of youth,
adults, men, and women for interactive discussions at
each stage of the assessment. Te discussions allowed
interaction among all participants, which encouraged
them to express detailed opinions on the gains and
issues hindering urban poverty eradication.
REPORT STRUCTURE
Tis report consists of:
1. a general background of the urban sector in Banjul
based on the fndings of the national assessment
report, a desk study, interviews, and a consultation
held in the city in 2005. Te background includes
data on administration, urban planning, the
economy, the informal sector, the private sector,
urban poverty, infrastructure, water, sanitation,
public transport, street lighting, energy, health and
education.
2. a synthesis of seven main thematic areas - governance,
slums, gender and HIV/AIDS, environment, local
economic development, basic urban services, as
well as urban safety and urban disaster management
- in terms of the institutional set-up, regulatory
framework, resource mobilization, and performance.
(Tis second section also highlights agreed priorities
and includes a list of identifed projects).
3. a Strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats
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analysis and an outline of priority project proposals
for each theme. Te proposals include benefciaries,
partners, estimated cost, objectives, activities, and
outputs.
DEMOGRAPHY
According to the Atlas of the 2003 Population and
Housing Census, there were 1,360,681 Gambians in
2003. Reports clearly showed that between the 1993
and 2003 censuses, the national population grew 31
per cent from 1,038,145 to 1,360,681. (Population and
Housing Census, 2003, p.11).
Banjul sits on St. Mary’s Island at the mouth of the
River Gambia. Because Banjul is an island, its physical
growth tends to be limited. Because of this perceived
limitation, there are a record number of households
migrating out of Banjul into the peri-urban areas of the
Kanifng Municipality and Brikama. With a population
of 35,061 (2003 census), Banjul is considered densely
populated.
Te Banjul City Council is the administrative organ of
the city with a mayor as its head. Te city is divided into
nine wards each headed by an elected councillor. Te
city’s attractiveness to Gambians has been largely due to
the opportunities it ofers for education, employment
and modern living. As the capital, it hosts the largest
number of administrative structures and businesses in
the country.
Banjul is a crowded multi-ethnic city burdened by the
rapid infow of rural migrants seeking a better life.
THE SOCIO ECONOMIC
DEVELOPMENT
Economy
Banjul is the nation’s capital and administrative seat
of Government. It attracts many businesses and is the
main headquarters of many trading frms. Economic
activities in Banjul are mostly banking, fshing and
wholesale trading which contribute to the economic
performance of the country.
Tere is a major market in Banjul that hosts all types of
businesses and is the trading hub of the country. Many
goods that are available in this market cannot be found
in other regions. Most of the revenues are collected in
the form of market duties and capital gains tax.
Te rapid increase in urban population has brought
with it several environmental and socioeconomic
problems which include pollution; waste generation and
management; and pressure on health care, education
and employment services. Tere are no farming
activities in Banjul due to the surrounding mangroves.
Being a low-lying island, the city is under threat: it will
be submerged with just a one-meter rise in sea level.
TABLE 1:
LOCAL GOVERNMENT
AREA
DIVISION /
MUNICIPALITY
MALE FEMALE BOTH
SEXES
NUMBER OF
HOUSEHOLDS
Banjul Banjul City Council 18,906 15,922 34,828 6,744
Kanifng Kanifng Municipal
Council
164,054 158,536 322,410 49,564
Brikama Western Region 197,566 195,421 392,978 45,396
Mansakonko Lower River Region 34,689 37,857 72,546 8,474
Kerewan North Bank Region 83,386 89,420 172,806 18,458
Kuntaur Central River
Region
38,313 40,785 79,098 7,155
Janjangbureh Central River
Region
51,698 55,103 106,799 10,244
Basse Upper River Region 88,116 94,917 183,033 12,454
THE GAMBIA 676,726 687,781 1,364,507 158,489
Adapted from the 2003 population and housing census
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Poverty Level
Te proportion of the population with below USD
1 purchasing power parity per day is 7.6 per cent in
Banjul, 37.7 per cent in Kanifng and 56.7 per cent in
Brikama. Te national average is 55.5 per cent (Poverty
Head Count Index, 2009 Projections). Te poverty
gap in Banjul is 0.8 per cent compared with Kanifng’s
6.8 per cent and Brikama’s 13.7 per cent. Banjul’s low
rate of poverty could be as a result of job opportunities
and the availability of income generating activities.
Te major pressing needs for Banjul are infrastructure
development and environmental management in the
form of good roads, drainage and sewage systems, and
provision of proper housing for the poor.
Transport
Te most efcient and most ubiquitous mode of
transport is the motor vehicle. However, commuters to
and from Banjul are served by a poor public transport
system. Taxi services are also available but they are too
expensive for most of the city residents. As a result,
many people within the city prefer to walk to their
destination. A modern, low-cost transport system is
needed in the city.
Challenges
Te major challenges facing Banjul are coastal erosion,
the poor state of roads and the lack of a proper drainage
system to protect roads from damage during the rains.
Health Services
Te country’s leading hospital is Te Royal Victoria
Teaching Hospital in Banjul. It is stafed by highly
qualifed medical personnel and provides care for the
critically ill patients in the area. In addition, there are
two minor public health facilities and private clinics
within in the city.
Banjul has lower rates of HIV/AIDS than other parts
of the country, due to a high-level of awareness of the
disease.
Te major challenges of the health care sector are the
high migration rates of qualifed medical personnel
seeking greater salaries in developed countries, and
a low-capacity to train and retain adequate numbers
of medical personnel. More fnancial and equipment
support is needed to complete some of the ongoing
upgrades within the Royal Victoria Teaching Hospital.
Education and Literacy Rate
Te Ministry of Education sits in Banjul. Tere are
three senior secondary schools in the city and many
upper and lower basic schools. Several nursing schools
and kindergartens are also available.
In 2008, Banjul had the highest school enrolment rate
(108 per cent) when compared with Kanifng (93 per
cent) and Brikama (76 per cent). Banjul also recorded
the highest literacy rates of people aged 15-24, at 75.1
per cent literacy rate; then Kanifng (69.7 per cent)
and Brikama (69 per cent). Despite the high literacy
rate, adult literacy programmes are conducted in Banjul
through the Community Skills Initiative Project funded
by African Development Bank and implemented by the
country’s Department of Basic Education. Tis gives
education opportunities to the less fortunate.
Te major challenges facing schools in Banjul are:
· Inadequate teachers and infrastructure
· Dimculty in transporting students to and from
Banjul
· Low quality education
· Shortage of learning materials
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GOVERNANCE
Te Gambia adopted a policy on decentralization of
local government systems in compliance with section
193 and 194 of the Constitution of Te Republic
of Te Gambia (1997). Current local government
legislation provides for the self-administration of
local governments by elected council. Te country’s
democratic local government authorities have now
established a common arrangement for the viability of
decentralization.
In Banjul, there exists a functioning decentralized city
government system headed by a mayor and deputy
mayor, as well as municipal structures composed of Ward
Development Communities headed by councillors. Te
municipal authority has the following institutional
arrangement:
· In Banjul there are nine wards.
· Te Ward Development Community is an entry
point for development in each of the wards
· Ward Development Communities, through
democratically-elected members, select
representatives known as councillors. All plans at the
ward level are presented at the community meetings
for further transmission to the Municipal Council
(local authority) for possible funding.
· Te need for capacity-building for the leadership of
Ward Development Communities is a priority. Te
leaders need training in project development and
management and in the understanding of the whole
process of the government reform programme, as
well as on the roles and responsibilities of Ward
Development Community members.
THE INSTITUTIONAL SET-UP
· Te Banjul City Council. Te municipality makes
provisions for the functions, powers and duties of
the local authorities
· For the implementation of decentralization,
arrangements have been made to establish or
strengthen the Community Development Ofcers
and Community Development Assistance as
feld extension resources to set up a Municipal
Development Fund, a Local Government Pension
Scheme, a Local Government Service Scheme, and
develop the Local Government Communication
Strategy
· Decentralization from central Government to
municipalities has occurred in education, health,
water resources, roads, planning, and monitoring
and evaluation
· Tere are Ward Development Communities,
women groups and sports committees.
Development Communities in each ward are
democratically elected through general meetings.
Tey are composed of various sub-committees.
Tese institutions play an important role in the
formulation and implementation of development
projects. Tey are held accountable to the rest of the
citizenry for any failures or under performance of
projects
· Te elected councillor of each ward serves as the
chairperson of the Development Committee in
accordance with the constitution and the Local
Government Act 2002
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CHALLENGES
· A number of wards indicated they lack information
on published statements on citizen’s rights. Tis has
resulted in poor performance and accountability
· Presently, most of these institutions are dormant
and lack capacity to organize meetings and mobilize
resources
REGULATORY FRAMEWORK
· Te City of Banjul, through an Act of Parliament,
has a well-articulated decentralization programme.
It also has a city development strategy to ensure
appropriate actions are carried out towards achieving
the Millennium Development Goals and Poverty
Reduction Strategy Paper
· Under the administrative structure of development,
the mayor has established a Technical Advisory
Committee Task Force comprising heads of
institutions, diferent sectors within Banjul, non-
governmental and civil society organizations chaired
by the chief executive ofcer of the Municipal
Council. Tis is an indication of the central
Government’s commitment to implement a good
governance strategy at all levels in Te Gambia
· Te Technical Advisory Committee has a role in
coordinating municipality programmes respective
of diferent sectors and endorsing programme
implementation, resource allocation and monitoring
· At the community level, there is the formation of
Development Committees composed of councillors,
Ward Development Communities, women groups,
the youth and elderly representatives who coordinate
the development of the community
RESOURCE MOBILIZATION AND CAPACITY-
BUILDING
· Trough the Gambia Priority Employment
Programme agency (or Gamworks) in Te Gambia
(December 2008), some capacity-building eforts
were conducted aimed at improving good governance
and accountability. Tis was intended to improve
the management of budgeting, procurement and
fnancial accounting of the local governments as
well as to promote a participatory approach to
development at local government levels
· Revenue collection is the main source of income for
the City Council. It collects fees daily from markets,
car parks, business licences and rates
· Te city wards need training and capacity-building
in project planning and implementation and on
the process of decentralization and the government
reform programme
· Te City Council plays a crucial role in complementing
government’s eforts in terms of education scholarships,
road maintenance, decentralized planning, fscal
decentralization, as well as monitoring and evaluation,
with support of partners
· Need for training to increase sense of awareness
among community leaders/members on reform and
policy programmes.
GOVERNANCE
N°1
Project proposal Page 25
Design a mechanism for public
participation
GOVERNANCE
N°2
Project proposal Page 25
Design a framework to improve
links between the Malaita Provincial
Authority departments, the Ministry
of Lands, Housing and Survey and
NGOs
GOVERNANCE
N°3
Project proposal Page 26
Construction of resource centres for
skills and income generation
AGREED PRIORITIES
· Training on institutional capacity-building: for
example of Ward Development Communities
on their roles and responsibilities as part of the
sensitization
· Enhance sustainability through the construction
of a resource centre for all skills and income
generating activities
· Te proposed mechanism for efective
collection of revenue is to improve supervision,
eliminate all forms of corruption, and to improve
the collection system
· Tere is need for the municipal authority to
sensitize its communities and wards on policy-
related issues and reform programmes; for
example on local government Acts and other
publicized statements on the citizen’s rights of
access to basic services
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SLUMS, SHELTER AND LAND
Although there are no huge slums in Banjul, there are
several informal settlements that lack access to basic
urban services. Amenities like schools, health and skill
centres, and infrastructure - for example drainage,
sewerage, electricity and piped water - are a major
requirement in the “slums”.
LAND
Land in Banjul is acquired through purchase and
inheritance and is expensive. It has been suggested that
wetlands (such as swamps and mangrove) be reclaimed
and that old buildings be renovated and converted
into fats (apartments) so the poor can access land and
housing.
LAND ADMINISTRATION
Diferent organizations keep separate land registration
records. Te municipal authorities keep records but
without maps; the Department of Physical Planning,
Housing, Lands and Surveys relies only on maps.
Te land registration by the municipal authorities is
about 90 per cent while for the Department of Physical
Planning, Lands and Survey it is 50 per cent.
Te plans need to be updated but land records are
generally efcient. Te costs for land transactions is
generally high, particularly at the transfer stage where
GMD 4,000 is paid to the municipal authorities per
transfer and an average of GMD 40,000 as capital gains
tax. Te objectives of the land registration process are
therefore difcult to meet, because many people decline
to register their plots due to the high cost.
Te difculties of the current land administration
are numerous; e.g. the master plans are outdated and
people are not well sensitized with regard to land
registration and acquisition. Land encroachment has
become uncontrollable, even though there is the State
Lands Act.
LAND USE AND PHYSICAL PLANNING
Planning
Physical Development Plans were introduced to
ease land administration. Te maps are zoned for
diferent uses; for example residential, commercial and
agricultural. Te maps are outdated because the last
revisions were in 1989, even though they should be
updated every fve years.
Human resource development
One of the major tasks that remain unaccomplished
due to lack of skills and knowledge is the upgrading
of the master plans and standards. Tese tasks could
not be done because the ofce responsible, the
Department of Physical Planning and Housing, is
seriously understafed. Te Department of Lands and
Survey also faces stafng problems. If all the vacancies
are flled, and adequate training provided, all the land
related duties and responsibilities would be signifcantly
addressed. Because the Government cannot do
everything, technical assistance may be required to help
bridge the capacity gaps.
INSTITUTIONAL SET-UP
· Te Physical Planning and Development Control
Unit falls under the municipality. Te Unit handles
the processing of approval of physical development
plans and control of developments (including
buildings) for creating a better environment and
proper use of land in Banjul
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REGULATORY FRAMEWORK
· Land use plans exist and promote equal access to
land by women and men
· Municipal authorities do not allocate land, thus
they do not have land use policies
· One of the roles of municipal authorities in the local
economic development of Banjul is the provision of
basic urban services; for example, electricity and
water supply
· People who live in slums in Banjul, particularly
those who encroach on water bodies or Government
reserves, do not have title deeds and are vulnerable
to Government evictions
· All the organizations agree they have lots of capacity
gaps at managerial and lower levels. Although the
Government, under the Personnel Management
Ofce, is responsible for staf training on physical
and town planning, the municipal authorities
and non-governmental organizations should
complement Government’s eforts
· Te only projects municipal authorities undertake
in slum areas are road maintenance and provision of
infrastructure and social amenities. Terefore, there
is a need for slum upgrading projects in Banjul
CHALLENGES
· Land is unafordable to the poor and securing it is
very difcult. Very few women can aford to buy
land so they depend on their male partners
· Municipal authorities pay little attention to slum
dwellers. Very little assistance, if any, is given to slum
dwellers to improve their livelihoods. Te only help
comes in the form of providing food and clothing
when disasters occur. No housing survey is carried
out in slum areas, thus little information is obtained
on the activities of slum dwellers
SECURITY OF TENURE
· When there is eviction, slum dwellers are not
protected, thus no compensation is usually paid.
Eviction is usually ordered by the courts and
sometimes by the Ministry for Local Government
and Lands
· No record is kept of such evictions and notices of
eviction are served before eviction. Illegal settlements
are usually allocated by traditional landowners who
cannot obtain documents for the said land
AGREED PRIORITIES
· Upgrading of roads
· Improvement of drainage and sewerages
· Reclaiming of swampy and mangrove areas
· Compulsory acquisition of land
· Review of land policies
· Rehabilitation of old buildings
· Decentralization of land acquisition system
SLUMS,
SHELTER
AND LAND
N°1
Project proposal Page 28
Upgrading of access roads
SLUMS,
SHELTER
AND LAND
N°2
Project proposal Page 28
Decentralization of land acquisition
system
SLUMS,
SHELTER
AND LAND
N°3
Project proposal Page 29
Reclamation of swamps and mangroves
areas
RESOURCE MOBILIZATION AND CAPACITY-
BUILDING
· Very little service is given to slum dwellers, even
though they pay rates and other taxes to the
municipal authorities
· Te little assistance municipal authorities give come
from rates and taxes they collect from residents
· No organization is given fnancial or technical help
to upgrade housing for women-headed households.
Very few credit opportunities are available, because
of lack of collateral. Te little credit that is given
goes into economic activities such as farming
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GENDER AND HIV/AIDS
GENDER AND POVERTY
Poverty is a major challenge in Banjul. Studies have
indicated that it is on the rise and increasingly has a
feminine face. Gender inequality is one of the main
causes of poverty in Gambia.
Te majority of the women are also illiterate and have
limited access to, and control of economic resources in
Banjul. Tey do not normally own land or other forms
of collateral that would enable them to apply for bank
loans. Te only loans for women are normally acquired
through microcredit initiatives, of which the interest
rates are very high. Tis has been aggravated by lack of
innovation and capacity of such women to start and run
businesses successfully. Tus, economic empowerment
is key for the socioeconomic advancement of women.
In an attempt to reduce poverty rates in the country,
the second Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper builds
on the long-term development objectives for attaining
the Millennium Development Goals, and the country’s
Vision 2020. Te strategy also mainstreams gender as
one of the cross-cutting issues in alleviating poverty.
GENDER AND EDUCATION
Te majority of women are illiterate due to factors such
as poverty, early marriage and teenage pregnancy. Tis
has resulted in their limited advancement in education
and professionally. Te Government of Te Gambia
and development partners have intensifed their eforts
to increase formal and informal education for girls
and women. Te city council also plays a greater role
in helping the girl child by assisting mothers to set up
businesses that would enable them to educate their
children. Te city council also gives scholarships to the
poor. According to the 2003 census, the literacy rate
of females aged b etween 15 and 24 years was 75.1 per
cent for Banjul, 70.6 per cent for Kanifng and 69.9 per
cent for Brikama.
GENDER AND HEALTH
Health services in Banjul are very good and accessible.
However, women and children are more vulnerable to
disease and infection, especially HIV/AIDS. Maternal
mortality rates are also high.
VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN
Te inefective implementation of international
women’s rights conventions and laws has left women
unable to protect themselves from domestic and sexual
violence. Te Government and development partners
have attempted to deal with this issue; for example,
the courts impose lifetime imprisonment sentence for
rapists. Rape is the most common crime committed
against young girls and women. Due to the culture
of silence and shame towards rape, many cases go
unreported. Cases of domestic violence are also a major
concern.
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AGREED PRIORITIES
· Construction of skills training centres
· Creation of market outlets
· Increased income-generating activities for women
· Provision of credit facilities with low interest rates
to women entrepreneurs
· Introduction of adult literacy classes for illiterate
women
· Provision of counselling services and security
measures for women who are victims of domestic
and sexual violence
· Encouraging the participation of women in
politics
· A women’s bureau was established as an
implementation arm of the Ministry of Women’s
Afairs through regional structures empowering
women and enhancing their capacities
WOMEN AND THE ECONOMY
Most women in Banjul are engaged in petty trading
but access to microcredit is their main challenge. Te
absence of entrepreneurial and innovative livelihood
skills also hinders women’s economic development.
WOMEN AND GOVERNANCE
Because women participate fully in politics and
administration, they should be allowed to voice their
concerns and given as much audience as their male
counterparts. In the area of politics, there is a steady
increase in the number of women contesting elections.
With four of six of its councillors being women, Banjul
faired better in this gender representation than the rest
of the country. (MDG 2009 Status Report)
WOMEN AND THE ENVIRONMENT
It is mostly women who are involved caring for the
environment. Te lack of solid environment policies
and regulations; indiscriminate dumping of waste;
rapid urbanization; and pollution are just some of the
major factors leading to environmental degradation.
Because women are largely responsible for the
household management, they need to be sensitized on
the necessity of proper waste disposal.
INSTITUTIONAL SET-UP
A Women’s Bureau was established, as an implementation
arm of the Ministry of Women’s Afairs, through
regional structures empowering women and enhancing
their capacities.
RESOURCE MOBILIZATION AND CAPACITY-
BUILDING
· Tere is signifcant donor support through
sector intervention and non-governmental
organizations in line with the Poverty Reduction
Strategy Paper implementation (2007 - 2011) plans
and programmes.
· A signifcant number of civil society and non-
governmental organizations are involved in the
development of the city. Tey provide resources and
assist in implementing relevant activities.
REGULATORY FRAMEWORK
· Te Ministry of Women’s Afairs has been set up
to formulate policy and other issues related to the
advancement of women in the country. Te main
bureau is located in the city of Banjul.
· Partnerships have been built with key stakeholders
(public, private sectors and non-governmental
organizations as well as civil society) to respond to
the HIV/AIDS epidemic.
GENDER AND
HIV/AIDS
N°1
Project proposal Page 31
Micro-credit lending with low interest
GENDER AND
HIV/AIDS
N°2
Project proposal Page 31
Creation of income generating
activities
GENDER AND
HIV/AIDS
N°3
Project proposal Page 32
Market outlets
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ENVIRONMENT
INFORMATION DISSEMINATION ON THE
ENVIRONMENT
Te National Environmental Agency is the lead
institution in disseminating information on
environmental issues, in addition to the media. Specifc
groups trained on environmental management also
conduct sensitization. Sensitization is conducted
through community gatherings, radio and television.
INSTITUTIONAL SET-UP
· Tere are few bodies such as municipal authorities,
non-governmental organizations like Action Aid, and
the National Environmental Agency which assist in
waste management and sanitation. Tey collaborate
through the National Disaster Management
Committee, a coordinating body, whose activities
are usually broadcast on radio and television
· Te National Environmental Agency proposes to
the city council to form environment committees
responsible for environmental awareness issues,
waste management and public cleaning eforts, held
at the end or each month, known locally as “Set-
Setal”
REGULATORY FRAMEWORK
· Environmental policies are well known by
communities. However, their implementation is
slow due to lack of proper and regular monitoring
of the implementation process by the National
Environmental Agency, and to the lack of strict law
enforcement
· Te Environment Impact Assessment regulation and
guidelines aim to integrate environmental
concerns into all development planning and
construction of infrastructure such as roads, drainage
and sewage systems
· Te municipality hosts a Monitoring and Evaluation
Unit responsible for observing environmental
quality at the regional level. In addition, the Public
Health Act (1990) grants wider powers to public
health inspectors to examine premises; close down
those deemed to be public hazards; enforce food and
hygiene controls; and prevent harmful products
entering the country through the main sea port
· Te Water Division of the Department of Water
Resources and the National Water and Electricity
Company are responsible for monitoring water
quality in Banjul
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AGREED PRIORITIES
· Provision of cleaning material
· Provision of parking spaces for vehicles and
removal of those abandoned on the streets
· Rehabilitation of drainage and sewage system, as
well as the waste management system
· Regular collection of waste
· Demolition of old and run-down structures
· Promotion of wider sensitization campaigns on the
importance of good environmental practices
· Strengthening environmental management and
institutional capacity-building, supported by
additional measures in terms of fnance and
technical aid to implement environmental policies
CHALLENGES
· Lack of proper management of waste disposal
· Lack of modern transport for waste disposal
· Lack of proper sewage system
· Environmental pollution
· Poor enforcement of environmental laws on
indiscriminate waste dumping
· Lack of capacity-building and training on proper
waste management techniques
· Inadequate materials and equipment f o r
embarking on monthly cleaning efort
· Low awareness level and lack of coordination on
environmental issues
RESOURCE MOBILIZATION AND CAPACITY-
BUILDING
· Training programmes are conducted on cleanliness,
hygienic practices and environmental management.
Specifc groups trained in environmental
management also conduct training programmes
through the National Environmental Agency. City
Councils also conduct similar training in joint
collaboration with the National Environmental
Agency. Tese trainings sessions are usually funded
by development partners.
ENVIRONMENT
N°1
Project proposal Page 34
Construction of drainage system
ENVIRONMENT
N°2
Project proposal Page 35
Rehabilitation of the sewage system
ENVIRONMENT
N°3
Project proposal Page 35
Improve the waste management
system
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LOCAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT
Although many Banjul residents are employed in the
formal sector, informal activities such as petty trading,
tie and dye, and soapmaking were found to be important
sources of income. However, the opportunities to access
capital or credit to start up or expand businesses are
limited and interest rates are too high.
Tere are many business opportunities in Banjul. Albert
Market is the capital’s largest market and is a hive of
activity, ofering a large selection of local and imported
goods.
Te sea port generates much employment and re-export
trade opportunities are also available in Banjul, making
it a very lucrative commercial city.
In terms of employment promotion, the City Council
in collaboration with the Gambia Priority Employment
Programme and the National Enterprise Development
Initiative are engaged in employment creation, targeting
women and youth.
INSTITUTIONAL SET-UP
· Te Social Development Fund, fnanced by
the African Development Bank, also supports
entrepreneurship and microfnance activities
including skill development and capacity-building
programmes, through the Community Skill
Initiative Project located in Banjul. Tis project is
also funded by the African Development Bank and
assists women and other vulnerable groups in Banjul
to acquire skills and start up businesses
REGULATORY FRAMEWORK
· Flexible macroeconomic policy regime to facilitate
access to credit for productive investments and
employment creation
· Te Government plays a key role in creating a
more enabling environment for the private sector
to thrive. Tis begins with the adoption of policies,
programmes and projects that encourage the
development of new markets; accelerates the use
of new technologies; and improves the managerial
skills of businessmen and women at all levels
RESOURCE MOBILIZATION AND CAPACITY-
BUILDING
· Donor support through sector interventions, the
private sector, and non-governmental organizations
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in line with the Poverty Reduction Strategy
Paper implementation (2007 - 2011) plans and
programmes
· A signifcant number of Civil Society and non-
governmental organizations are involved in the
development of the city, providing resources and
implementing relevant activities
· Banjul lacks a comprehensive waste management,
treatment and disposal system through efective
drainage and sewage systems
· Capacity-building in policy analysis and advocacy to
ensure the efective implementation of policy areas
and extended to the community actors
· Te Gambia’s formal employment sector is very
small, providing work for just over 10 per cent of
the labour force in Banjul
· Unemployment among the women and youth make
them more vulnerable to poverty
· Acute unemployment and poverty among the youth
results in them resorting to desperate measures, such
as dangerous seaborne attempts to immigrate to
Europe
· An efcient tax collection system needs to be put in
place in the City Council
· Lack of adequate capacity to implement the strategic
plan owing to the weak agency stafng, in terms of
quality and quantity
· Lack of enough funding for the City Council is a
concern, as without enough resources it could not
execute its development strategies
AGREED PRIORITIES
· Establishment of a multipurpose skills training
centre to impart skills to the youth to enable
them to earn a source of livelihood
· Set up an educational scholarship scheme for poor
children
· Establishment of a microfnance credit schemes to
provide low interest loans to the poor to enable
them to start up businesses
· Establishment of a fsh processing industry
· Creation of market outlets and storage facilities
CHALLENGES
· Limited employment opportunities
· Lack of fnancial support to small and medium
enterprises
· Inadequate markets
· Lack of market outlets
· Lack of farming implements
· Unemployment
LOCAL
ECONOMIC
DEVELOPMENT
N°1
Project proposal Page 37
Scholarship schemes and centre for
students
LOCAL
ECONOMIC
DEVELOPMENT
N°2
Project proposal Page 37
Fishing and fsh processing
LOCAL
ECONOMIC
DEVELOPMENT
N°3
Project proposal Page 38
Marketing and storage facilities
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BASIC URBAN SERVICES
Some of the key issues facing the city include:
· Te lack of a proper sewerage connection
· Continuous raw sewage blockages
· A dilapidated road network
· An inadequate and unreliable transport network
· Poor and blocked drainage systems
· Inefcient waste collection and management system
Te population of Banjul has quadrupled since
independence. Terefore, the provision of social
utilities, housing and recreational grounds needs to be
improved and expanded.
Presently there is a slight improvement in terms of access
to safe drinking water, although there is need to ensure
more people are able to access this precious commodity.
REGULATORY FRAMEWORK
Te City Council draws its revenue from the following
main sources:
· Government contribution to the municipalities
· Taxation and levies
· Capacity-building support received for training of
councillors for better service delivery by donors, such
as the Department of Community Development
CHALLENGES
· Tax evasion by business owners resulting in shortage
of revenue in the City Councils
· Corruption by City Council ofcials which
negatively afects the provision of basic urban
services
· Inadequate technical and human resource capacity
to deal with the challenge of improving basic urban
service delivery in the city
· Te City Council’s primary role is the management
of the provision of basic urban services
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AGREED PRIORITIES
· Improved collection and disposal of solid
waste
· Provision of safe and afordable water to all
households
· Capacity-building of councillors for better
service delivery
· Training of civil servants on project
implementation, monitoring and evaluation
· Rehabilitation of the existing drainage system
· Improved revenue collection system by the
municipal authorities
· Construction of roads
· Improvement in water and electricity supply
BASIC URBAN
SERVICES
N°1
Project proposal Page 40
Training on development of ward
plan
BASIC URBAN
SERVICES
N°2
Project proposal Page 40
Training of council staff on waste
management
BASIC URBAN
SERVICES
N°2
Project proposal Page 41
Training on project
implementation, monitoring
and evaluation
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URBAN SAFETY
Te focus group discussion held in the wards reveal
that a large number of people are unaware of any
urban safety policy. Te reason is that Te Gambian
Government does not have such a policy. However, the
police regularly use radio and television programmes to
sensitize the public on safety and security. Coordination
during disasters is done at community-level using
community volunteers.
Te main safety and security issues include:
· High occurrence of crimes such as burglary, mugging
and pickpocketing
· Poor street lighting in the town and residential areas
· Increase in drug abuse among the youth
Te main underlying causes of safety and security issues
are:
· High levels of poverty and unemployment
· Increase in drug use and drug addiction among the
youth
URBAN DISASTER RISK
Disaster risk reduction is associated with the Ofce of
the Vice President and the Banjul City Council.
Although the City Council has a Disaster Management
Committee, similar structures for the wards are yet
URBAN SAFETY AND URBAN DISASTER MANAGEMENT
to be set up. Te main disaster risks in the wards are
fre outbreaks, water shortages, seasonal foods, ferry
disasters, automobile accidents and falling exposed
overhead electrical cables.
INSTITUTIONAL SET-UP
· Presence of the National Police Headquarters. Its
key role is the maintenance of internal security,
dependance and creating safety measures.
· Te development of the National Disaster
Management Policy and Disaster Management
Agency under the Ofce of the Vice President’s
Ofce. Te legal and institutional framework in
2008 provides a basis for the prevention and control
of disaster with its coordinating body present in
Banjul
· Te National Intelligence Agency responsible for
protecting state security, collecting intelligence, and
conducting covert investigations reports directly to
the President and is located in Banjul
REGULATORY FRAMEWORK
· Develop an efcient response mechanism to disaster
management and make available the necessary
resources
· Development of institutional frameworks and
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structures capable of preventing, preparing for and
responding to disasters at regional and local levels
RESOURCE MOBILIZATION AND CAPACITY-
BUILDING
Lack of an efective waste management, treatment and
disposal system
CHALLENGES
· Inadequate community policing
· Limited number of working fre hydrants in the
wards to respond to fre outbreaks
· Shortage of ambulances
· No urban public safety policy
· Lack of income generation activities and or
employment
· Poor environmental management
AGREED PRIORITIES
· Tere is need for increased transparency in law
enforcement
· Widen and intensify police patrols in the
communities, as well as reintroducing
community policing
· Job creation by the government
· Develop the skills of the youth to enable them to
start up businesses and to be self-sufcient
· Improve the drainage system for storm runofs
· Improvement of the sewage system
· Insulation of overhead electrical cables
· Sensitization of the community on how to react
in case of fre outbreaks
· Lack of an efective waste management, treatment
and disposal system
URBAN SAFETY
AND URBAN
DISASTER
MANAGEMENT
N°1
Project proposal Page 43
Rehabilitation of the
electricity system
URBAN SAFETY
AND URBAN
DISASTER
MANAGEMENT
N°1
Project proposal Page 43
Community sensitization
on risk reduction
URBAN SAFETY
AND URBAN
DISASTER
MANAGEMENT
N°1
Project proposal Page 44
Improve drainage system
for storm water run-off
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GOVERNANCE
STRENGTHS WEAKNESSES OPPORTUNITIES THREATS
GOVERNANCE AND DECENTRALIZATION
Amendments of the Local
Government Act.
Availability of human
resources.
Availability of NGOs and
CSOs.
Current projects in place to
improve the road network.
Lack of motivated staff.
Poor partnership between
NGOs and CSOs.
Lack of awareness about
the existing Urban Safety
and Urban Disaster Risk
Policies and Acts.
Poor monitoring and
evaluation and unplanned
projects.
Training facilities on urban
safety and urban disaster.
Over dependency on the
river Gambia for water
supply.
High population growth.
PERFORMANCE AND ACCOUNTABILITY
Existence of the Technical
Advisory Committee
taskforce
Inadequate mechanisms
for programme monitoring
and evaluation
Availability of capable staff
to monitor programmes
RESOURCE MOBILIZATION AND CAPACITY BUILDING
Affordability of electricity
and water.
Poor drainage system. Easy movements of goods
and services.
Busting of water pipes
during foods due to a poor
drainage system in place.
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GOVERNANCE
N°1
Project proposal
Capacity-building for city councillors
/ Ward Development Committees on
their roles and responsibilities
GOVERNANCE
N°2
Project proposal
Awareness and sensitization on
government reform policies and
programmes
LOCATION: Banjul.
DURATION: 9 months.
BENEFICIARIES: Banjul City Council.
IMPLEMENTING PARTNERS: Ministry of Local
Government and Lands, Banjul City Council, Gambia
Association of Local Government Authorities, Ministry
of Finance, and local consultants.
ESTIMATED COST: USD 500,000.
BACKGROUND: Banjul is divided into three
constituencies which are further divided into nine
wards. All three constituencies have a national assembly
member who represents them at the National Assembly.
All the nine wards also have a councillor each who
represents the ward at the City Council. Each ward
has a Development Committee chaired by a councillor.
Te role of the National Assembly members, the ward
councillors and the Ward Development Committees are
vital to the advancement of the city, as their functions
are interlinked. Teir key functions include needs
assessment training, project identifcation, planning,
development, as well as monitoring and evaluation.
OBJECTIVE: To build the capacities of the councillors
and Ward Development Committee members so they
can be efective in the development of the communities
they represent.
ACTIVITIES: (1) Conduct training on the roles
and responsibilities of ward councillors and Ward
Development Committees. (2) Institutional
strengthening of Ward Development Committees.
OUTPUTS: To put in place well organized and highly
trained structures within the wards.
PROJECT IMPLEMENTATION: Te project could
be implemented in one go and training conducted at
ward level.
EQUIPMENT TO BE PROCURED: Training
stationery and other logistics.
LOCATION: Banjul.
DURATION: 3 months.
BENEFICIARIES: Banjul City Council.
IMPLEMENTING PARTNERS: Ministry of Local
Government and Lands, Ministry of Information,
media practitioners, and local consultants.
ESTIMATED COST: USD 200,000.
BACKGROUND: For the decentralization process to
be achieved there is an urgent need for capacity-building
within local communities and to raise awareness of
their roles and responsibilities. Te Local Government
Act and policy documents that deal exclusively with
decentralization are essential to the attainment of a fully
decentralized government.
OBJECTIVE: Train the local communities to be aware
of their roles and responsibilities in the achievement of
the decentralization process.
ACTIVITIES: Conduct training programmes in all the
wards so as to achieve the above objective.
OUTPUT: Emplace a more transparent and efcient
system of administration.
PROJECT IMPLEMENTATION: Te project has to
be implemented in a series of stages.
EQUIPMENT TO BE PROCURED: (1) Training
stationery and other logistics. (2) Hiring of training
halls
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GOVERNANCE
N°3
Project proposal
Construction of resource centres for
skills and income generation
LOCATION: Banjul.
DURATION: 6 - 9 months.
BENEFICIARIES: Banjul City Council.
IMPLEMENTING PARTNERS: Ministry of Local
Government and Lands, Ministry of Finance, Banjul
City Council, Department of Physical Planning and
Housing, National Environmental Agency, Department
of Community Development, and Local Consultants.
ESTIMATED COST: USD 900,000.
BACKGROUND: Banjul is divided into three
constituencies which are further divided into nine
wards. Under normal circumstances, all nine wards
should have been provided with a resource centre for
skills and income generation. Unfortunately, only Banjul
North has this facility. Tis centre was constructed
through the support of the City Council and the Social
Development Fund. Groups of women were trained
and a committee was set-up to run the centre but not
much has been achieved. Te centre lacks facilities, a
proper maintenance policy and skilled managers.
OBJECTIVE: To provided a resource centre for skills
and income generation activities in each ward of the
City of Banjul.
ACTIVITIES: (1) Land reclamation. (2) Mobilization
of resources for the construction of the resource centre.
(3) Provision of training equipment and capital.
OUTPUT: (1) To put in place properly equipped and
trained personnel who would help in restructuring the
existing resource centre. (2) To put in place proper
monitoring and evaluation mechanisms.
PROJECT IMPLEMENTATION: Te project will
be implemented in three phases:(1) Land reclamation
and resource mobilization.(2) Construction of resource
centres for skills and income generation. (3) Training,
monitoring and evaluation.
EQUIPMENT TO BE PROCURED: (1) Building
materials. (2) Land. (3) Skill training equipment and
learning facilities. (4) Monitoring and evaluation tools.
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INSTITUTIONAL SET-UP AND REGULATORY FRAMEWORK
Existence of the Ministry
of Local Government and
Lands.
Existence of a Department
of Physical Planning.
Government Policies in
place.
Availability of a master plan
for the city.
Non involvement of the area
council in land allocation.
Inadequate staff and man-
power.
Inadequate training of staff.
Non-payment of rates by
land owners.
Low wages of staff.
Minimal sensitization on
land usage.
Complex land acquisition
processes.
Shortage of land for slum
upgrading.
Access to micro-credit for
women groups to enable
them to start up businesses.
Construction of pro-poor
housing schemes.
Training and capacity
building for city council staff
has been made available by
the Government.
Inadequate capacity by
the city council to enable
implementation of policies
and projects.
Poor service delivery.
Poor housing facilities.
Slow development of
housing reforms.
REGULATORY FRAMEWORK
Government Policies and
Acts are in place.
Construction of pro-poor
housing schemes.
Availability of a master plan
for the city.
An outdated land master
plan.
Low level of awareness on
the Land Act.
Build capacities of the city
council to implement the
Land Act and sensitize
communities on the Land
Act.

RESOURCE MOBILIZATION AND CAPACITY BUILDING
Presence of a city council
standing committee.
Availability of a donor pool
fund.
Resource mobilization by
the city council.
Presence of national security
agents.
Limited technical and
human resources.
Limited capacity of the city
council.
Training and capacity
building for city council staff
has been made available by
the Government.
Diversion of funds.
Bribery and corruption.
Poor resource management
skills.
SLUMS, SHELTER AND LAND
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LOCATION: Banjul.
DURATION: 24 months.
BENEFICIARIES: Banjul City Council.
IMPLEMENTING PARTNERS: Ministry of Local
Government and Lands, Banjul City Council, Gambia
Association of Local Government Authorities, Ministry
of Works, Construction and Infrastructure, Ministry
of Finance, local consultants, Department of Physical
Planning and Housing, and the Gambia Priority
Employment Programme (Gamworks).
ESTIMATED COST: USD 30,000,000.
BACKGROUND: In early 2001 and 2002, a study
was conducted by a consulting frm (Planning and
Development Collaborative International, Inc.) under
the Poverty Alleviation and Capacity Building Project
to look into the municipal data base of all councils in
Te Gambia. Tis report revealed that almost three-
quarters of roads in Banjul were unpaved. Most of these
roads were excavated during the laying of sewage pipes,
telecommunication cables and water connections. Since
then very little road rehabilitation work has been done.
Heavy rain and the continuous overfow of sewage
water that settles along the road, coupled with heavy
trafc, has led to the dilapidation of roads. Terefore,
there is a need to improve the city’s road, drainage and
sewage infrastructure.
OBJECTIVES: (1) Improve the road network. (2)
Improve the drainage and sewage system in the city.
ACTIVITIES: To rehabilitate and reconstruct all roads
in the city of Banjul that are not in good condition.
OUTPUT: Te project is expected to improve the living
conditions of all its inhabitants.
PROJECT IMPLEMENTATION: Te project
could be implemented in three phases; Phase 1 - re-
construction of roads in Banjul North. Phase 2 - re-
construction of roads in Banjul Central. Phase 3 - re-
construction of roads in Banjul South.
EQUIPMENT TO BE PROCURED: (1) Sand. (2)
Cement. (3) Basalt. (4) Steel. (5) Labour.
SLUMS,
SHELTER AND
LAND
N°1
Project proposal
Upgrading of access roads
LOCATION: Banjul.
DURATION: 6 months.
IMPLEMENTING PARTNERS: Ministry of Local
Government and Lands, Banjul City Council, Gambia
Association of Local Government Authorities, Ministry
of Finance, Local Consultants, Department of Physical
Planning and Housing, Public Utilities Regulatory
Authority, and National Water and Electricity Company.
ESTIMATED COST: USD 300,000.
BACKGROUND: Land in the city of Banjul is owned
and administered by the central government through
the Department of Lands and Surveys who keep records
of all land registrations, transfers, leases, and master
plans. It is also the central government that decides
and allocates land in the city and gives approval for
land development. Under normal circumstances, the
city council should be in charge when it comes to land
allocation and development in the city of Banjul.
OBJECTIVES: To create transparency in the land
acquisition system and to properly defne the roles and
responsibilities of the city council in the allocation of
land.
ACTIVITIES: To formulate Policies/Acts that will
empower the city council to allocate/distribute land in
Banjul.
OUTPUT: Te project is expected to put in place a well
defned and transparent land acquisition system.
PROJECT IMPLEMENTATION: Te project will
be implemented in three phases; Phase 1 - Review of
the existing Policies/Acts on land acquisition. Phase 2 -
Sensitization of all stakeholders. Phase 3 - Formulation
of new Policies/Acts.
EQUIPMENT TO BE PROCURED: Base maps.
SLUMS,
SHELTER AND
LAND
N°2
Project proposal
Decentralization of land acquisition
system
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LAND
N°3
Project proposal
Reclamation of swamps and
mangroves area
LOCATION: Banjul.
DURATION: 12 months.
BENEFICIARIES: Banjul City Council.
IMPLEMENTING PARTNERS: Ministry of
Local Government and Lands, Banjul City Council,
Ministry of Forestry and Natural Resources, National
Environmental Agency, Department of Parks and
Wildlife, Department of Lands and Surveys, Ministry
of Agriculture, and Local Consultants.
ESTIMATED COST: USD 800,000.
BACKGROUND: Banjul is the capital city of the
Gambia and is located on St Mary’s island which is
situated at the mouth of the River Gambia. Te city
has an area of 12.23 square kilometres consisting of 4.2
square kilometres of dry land and 8 square kilometres of
wetland. Because of the shortage of dry land, there is a
record number of households migrating out of Banjul
into the peri-urban areas (Kanifng and Brikama). Tere
is need for the government to reclaim some parts of the
wetland for future expansion. Te government should
also put measures to control massive encroachments
taking place in the wetlands.
OBJECTIVES: (1) To plan for future expansion of the
city. (2) To protect the mangroves and swamps from
human interference which negatively afects the areas
ecosystem.
ACTIVITIES: To map out/demarcate the wet lands
that need to be reclaimed.
OUTPUT: (1) Land set aside for the expansion of the
city. (2) Wet lands reclaimed.
PROJECT IMPLEMENTATION: Te project could
be implemented in two phases; Phase 1 - Mapping/
demarcation of wetlands. Phase 2 - Reclamation.
EQUIPMENT TO BE PROCURED: (1) Base maps.
(2) Suitable fencing material. (3) Building materials.
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STRENGTHS WEAKNESSES OPPORTUNITIES THREATS
INSTITUTIONAL SET-UP
City wide gender and HIV/
AIDS sensitization and
awareness.
Increase in access to
education.
Presence of National AIDS
Secretariat and donor support
for gender and HIV/AIDS
awareness.
The presence of the
Department of Community
Development that promotes
gender equality and women’s
participation in all sectors of
the economy.
The formation of the National
Women’s Policy and Act
to improve the position of
women in society.
Convention on the
elimination of all forms
of discrimination against
women.
High rates of poverty.
Lack of skills mostly among
women to enable them to
start their own businesses.
Gender imbalance in
administration.
Gender mainstreaming is
currently being carried out in
government offces.
Presence of strong political
will to improve women’s
position in society e.g. their
is a National Women’s Policy
and Act in place.
High rates of drug abuse
which contribute to the
increase in HIV/AIDS.
High cases of gender based
violence especially against
women have been reported.
Illicit activities such as
prostitution are a major
challenge in the fght against
HIV/AIDS.
Most people hold negative
attitudes towards people
living with HIV/AIDS.
REGULATORY FRAMEWORK
Increased women’s
participation in the formation
of the National Women’s
Policy and Act.
Convention on the
elimination of all forms
of discrimination against
women.
Gender imbalance in
administration.
The existence of National
AIDS Secretariat.
Presence of strong political
will to improve women’s
position in society e.g. their
is a National Women’s Policy
and Act in Place.
Rising cases of HIV/AIDS due
to drug abuse, prostitution
and increased sexual violence
against women.
Most people hold negative
attitudes towards HIV/AIDS.
RESOURCE MOBILIZATION AND CAPACITY BUILDING
Human resources available
to carry out sensitization and
awareness campaigns among
the people.
Effective Ward Development
Committees to help with
creation of gender and HIV/
AIDS awareness.
Availability of donor funds to
support gender and HIV/AIDS
sensitization and awareness
campaigns.
Inadequate resource
mobilization skills.
Inadequate fnancial
management skills.
President’s Trust Fund and
Banjul City Council Trust Fund
to assist in the awareness
campaigns.
Inappropriate management
and embezzlement of
funds meant for carrying
out gender and HIV/AIDS
sensitization and awareness.
GENDER AND HIV/AIDS
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LOCATION: Banjul.
DURATION: 12 months.
BENEFICIARIES: Banjul City Council.
IMPLEMENTING PARTNERS: Ministry of Local
Government, Ministry of Finance, Banjul City
Council, National Youth Service Scheme (NYSS),
Social Development Fund, Local Consultants, Ministry
of Social Welfare and Women’s Afairs, Gamjobs, and
Ministry of Youth and Sports (National Enterprise
Development Initiative Project).
ESTIMATED COST: USD 15,000,000.
BACKGROUND: Banjul is the capital city of the
Gambia and is located on St. Mary’s island which is
situated at the mouth of the River Gambia. Banjul
has a population of about 34,828 inhabitants (2003
census). Te City of Banjul is a cosmopolitan city and
every day more than 300,000 people enter the city
by road or by sea to carry out business transactions.
Te main economic activity taking place in Banjul is
fshing which remains widely dominated by foreigners.
Te island is partly surrounded by the Atlantic Ocean,
mangroves and wetlands, and as a result the soil is very
salty and acidic making its unfavourable for farming.
A large percentage of the population earns an income
from informal sector activities.
OBJECTIVE: (1) To promote the development of
all economic sectors of Banjul. (2) Skills training for
women and youth.
ACTIVITIES: To build the capacities of the local
industry and create low interest credit facilities and
market outlets.
OUTPUTS: (1) A well organized and highly skilled
labour force. (2) Increased employment opportunities.
GENDER AND
HIV/AIDS
N°1
Project proposal
Micro-credit lending with low interest
GENDER AND
HIV/AIDS
N°2
Project proposal
Creation of income generating
activities
LOCATION: Banjul.
DURATION: 6 months.
BENEFICIARIES: Banjul City Council.
IMPLEMENTING PARTNERS: Ministry of
Local Government and Lands, Banjul City Council,
Department of Community Development, National
AIDS Secretariat, Ministry of Finance, Ministry of
Social Welfare and Women Afairs, NGOs, and Local
Consultants.
ESTIMATED COST: USD 10,000,000.
BACKGROUND: Banjul, the capital city of the Gambia,
is located on St. Mary’s island which is situated at the
mouth of the River Gambia. Banjul has a population
of about 34,828 inhabitants (2003 census) and most
women are illiterate due to limited advancement of
women in education. Te governments of the Gambia
and development partners have intensifed their eforts
to increase both formal and informal education for
girls and women by introducing free education for
girls. Te PAGEP Project is a clear manifestation of
this commitment. In this project, the president of the
republic of Te Gambia pays school fees for over 35,000
girls. Te city council also plays a role in helping the girl
child by assisting mothers to set up businesses in order to
pay for their children’s school fees. Te main challenges
facing women entrepreneurs in Banjul is access to credit
facilities to enable them to grow and expand and the lack
of entrepreneurial and managerial skills.
OBJECTIVES: To increase the earning capacity of
women entrepreneurs especially those that are engaged in
informal business activities.
ACTIVITIES: (1) Skills training for women
entrepreneurs. (2) Setting up micro-fnance institutions
that will provide low interest loans to women
entrepreneurs. (3) Encouraging existing banks and
micro-fnance institutions to lower their interest rates for
women entrepreneurs.
OUTPUT: Sustainable micro-fnance institutions that
will support women entrepreneurs to set up businesses.
PROJECT IMPLEMENTATION: Te project could be
implemented in three phases; Phase 1 - Establishment of
micro credit institutions, Phase 2 - Training of business
women, Phase 3 - Giving of credit and monitoring and
evaluation.
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LOCATION: Banjul.
DURATION: 24 months.
BENEFICIARIES: Banjul City Council.
IMPLEMENTING PARTNERS: Ministry of Local
Government and Lands, Ministry of Finance, Banjul
City Council, Department of Physical Planning, Local
Consultants, Ministry of Public Works, and the Ministry
of Interior.
ESTIMATED COST: USD 20,000,000.
BACKGROUND: Banjul is the capital city and
administrative seat of Government and is the centre of
business activities in the country. Banjul is also where the
main port in Te Gambia is situated. Some of the economic
activities in Banjul are banking, fshing and import and
export trade. Te main market in Banjul hosts all types of
businesses and is the trading hub of the country, providing
goods and services to most parts of the country. Te other
market is the Lasso Wharf Market which is also a major
trading hub. Te Gambian government has a policy in
place on free market economy as part of the Vision 2020
goal of a private sector led economy. But for the above to
be achieved, there must be some form of protectionism to
allow the local industries to grow.
OBJECTIVE: To provide more market outlets for
entrepreneurs to market their goods and services.
ACTIVITIES: (1) To complete the construction of the
Lasso Wharf Market (Phase 2). (2) To build the capacities
of the local entrepreneurs.
OUTPUTS: More market outlets constructed leading to
increased business activities in the city.
PROJECT IMPLEMENTATION: Te project will be
implemented in four phases; Phase 1 - Completion of the
Lasso Wharfs Market, Phase 2 - Building the capacities of
the local entrepreneurs, Phase 3 - Provision of equipment
and other logistics, Phase 4 - Monitoring and Evaluation.
GENDER AND
HIV/AIDS
N°3
Project proposal
Market outlets
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ENVIRONMENT
STRENGTHS WEAKNESSES OPPORTUNITIES THREATS
INSTITUTIONAL SET-UP
Presence of Banjul City
Council cleaning services.
Presence of the National
Environmental Agency.
Limited staff to assist
with implementation of
environment policies.
Monthly cleaning exercises
with support from the
community.
Poor drainage and sewage
systems.
City wide road rehabilitation
exercise.
Indiscriminate dumping of
waste.
Lack of awareness on
the importance of good
environmental practices.
Unsecured overhead
electricity cables which
create risk of electrocution.
Poor drainage system
leading to frequent fooding
when it rains.
Dilapidated roads.
Indiscriminate dumping.
REGULATORY FRAMEWORK
Anti-littering law in place. Weak enforcement of
environment policies.
Unawareness of
environmental policies.
Existence of environmental
Acts and Policies.
Sensitization on
Environmental policies.
Lack of awareness
among the public on
the importance of good
environmental practices.
RESOURCE MOBILIZATION AND CAPACITY BUILDING
Resources available to fund
environmental projects.
Limited technical capacity
to implement and manage
environmental projects.
Inadequate training on
environmental issues.
Availability of donor
funds for environmental
awareness activities.
Increasing environmental
advocacy groups.
Poor resource management.
Poor attitude on
environmental conservation.
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LOCATION: Banjul.
DURATION: 24 months.
BENEFICIARIES: Banjul City Council.
IMPLEMENTING PARTNERS: Ministry of Local
Government, Banjul City Council, Gamworks,
Ministry of Public Works, Ministry of Finance,
National Environmental Agency, National Planning
Commission, and Local Consultants.
ESTIMATED COST: USD 13,000,000.
BACKGROUND: Banjul’s drainage system was
constructed in the colonial days. All streets are provided
with one or two side drains which collect storm water
and empty into the main collector drains which are
linked to the stream. Tere were three pumping
machines that were linked to the system which facilitated
the evacuation of storm water during the rainy season.
Because of lack of good maintenance, these machines
can no longer function efectively and have fallen prone
to vandalism. Te structure in which these machines
were housed is in a dilapidated state.
Drains. A large number of the side road drains have
collapsed. Other factors that afect the drains are the
lack of paved roads and drain covers. As a result people
sometimes dump solid waste into the drains causing
blockages. Furthermore, the dysfunctional pumping
station has caused serious water stagnation and
eventually dried-up the ring drain.
OBJECTIVES: To provide the city of Banjul with a
proper drainage network system that will allow for the
smooth fow of storm water.
ACTIVITIES: (1) To rehabilitate the pumping
machines. (2) Reconstruction of collapsed drains. (3)
Provision of drain covers for the collector drains. (4)
Dredging of canals. (5) Excavation of main outlets.
ENVIRONMENT
N°1
Project proposal
Construction of drainage system
OUTPUTS: Te project is expected to provide a proper
and functioning drainage system in the city of Banjul
and to improve environmental sanitation.
PROJECT IMPLEMENTATION: Te project will be
implemented in four phases; Phase 1 - Reconstruction
of inner city collector drains and provision of drain
covers, Phase 2 - Construction of boundary walls for
all main outlets with covers, Phase 3 - Rehabilitation of
the pumping machine and the dredging of canals, and
Phase 4 - Paving of roads.
EQUIPMENT TO BE PROCURED: (1) Pumping
machines. (2) Building materials. (3) Waste management
equipment. (4) Paving blocks.
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LOCATION: City of Banjul.
DURATION: 18 months.
BENEFICIARIES: Banjul City Council.
IMPLEMENTING PARTNERS: Ministry of Local
Government and Lands, Banjul City Council, Ministry
of Public Works, National Environmental Agency,
Ministry of Finance, National Water and Electricity
Company, Department of Physical Planning and
Housing Corporation, and Local Consultants.
ESTIMATED COST: USD 10,000,000.
BACKGROUND: Te city of Banjul has had a
complete sewage connection since 1990. All areas of
Banjul are connected to the system. Te system however
developed technical problems because of lack of regular
maintenance. Tere are also a lot of solid waste materials
and sand particles that get into the system causing
frequent blockage and overfow of sewage along the
streets. Te system has also developed serious structural
defects and some of the pipes are not functional thereby
causing National Water and Electricity Company to
often hire bowers to evacuate sewage water from the
manholes along the roads.
OBJECTIVE: To rehabilitate and expand the existing
sewage system in the city.
ACTIVITIES: (1) Replacement of broken pipes. (2)
Construction of new sewage pipes.
OUTPUTS: A properly functioning sewage system.
PROJECT IMPLEMENTATION: Te project will be
implemented in three Phases: Phase 1 - Replacement
of all damaged pipes, pumping equipment/tanks and
fltering gears; Phase 2 - Raising the level of all manholes
on the streets; Phase 3 - Community sensitization and
capacity building for staf.
EQUIPMENT TO BE PROCURED: (1) Sewage
pipes. (2) Pumping machines/tanks. (3) Protective gear.
ENVIRONMENT
N°2
Project proposal
Rehabilitation of the sewage system
ENVIRONMENT
N°3
Project proposal
Improve the waste management
system
LOCATION: City of Banjul.
DURATION: 12 months.
BENEFICIARIES: Banjul City Council.
IMPLEMENTING PARTNERS: Ministry of Local
Government, Banjul City Council, Gambia Association
of Local Government Authorities, Ministry of Public
Works, Ministry of Finance, National Environmental
Agency, and Local Consultants.
ESTIMATED COST: USD 5,000,000.
BACKGROUND: Te solid waste management
system in the City of Banjul has registered signifcant
improvement during the last two years. However there
are certain challenges that need to be addressed, such
as the lack of trained personnel, lack of equipment and
proper landfll sites, and the shortage of staf.
OBJECTIVE: To upgrade the waste management
system in Banjul City Council.
ACTIVITIES: (1) To build the capacities of the staf. (2)
Provide safe working gear and equipment. (3) Increase
the number of staf in the waste management unit for
better collection and disposal of waste. (4) Sensitization
on the importance of proper waste management.
OUTPUTS: An efcient waste management system in
place in Banjul.
PROJECT IMPLEMENTATION: Te project will be
implemented in two Phases; Phase 1 - Procurement of
equipment and training of staf, Phase 2 - Upgrading of
the landfll site, depot and salaries.
EQUIPMENT TO BE PROCURED: (1) Heavy
duty equipment. (2) trucks. (3) Working gear. (4)
Compactors. (5) Building materials.
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STRENGTHS WEAKNESSES OPPORTUNITIES THREATS
INSTITUTIONAL SET-UP
Availability of market and
market outlets.
Creation of job
opportunities.
Improved health care
system.
Lack of capital. Existence of market outlets.
Presence of micro-fnance
institutions.
Infux of immigrants into
the cities.
Global economic crisis.
REGULATORY FRAMEWORK
Good economic policies
to aid local economic
development are in place.
Poor implementation of
economic policies.
Existence of regional
economic bodies (ECOWAS/
AGOA).
High tax rate.
High cost of setting up a
business.
High interest rates on loans.
Lack of entrepreneurial
skills.
RESOURCE MOBILIZATION AND CAPACITY BUILDING
Existence of micro-fnance
institutions.
Poor business management
skills among local
entrepreneurs.
Presence of micro-fnance
institutions.
High rate of taxation.
LOCAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT
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LOCATION: City of Banjul.
DURATION: 12 months.
BENEFICIARIES: Banjul City Council.
IMPLEMENTING PARTNERS: Local Government
Ministry, Banjul City Council, Department of
Fisheries, National Environmental Agency, and Local
Consultants.
ESTIMATED COST: USD 30,000.
BACKGROUND: Banjul is the capital city of Te
Gambia and is located on St. Mary’s island which is
situated on the mouth of River Gambia. Fishing is the
main economic activity and it is widely dominated by
foreigners. Banjul is partly surrounded by the Atlantic
Ocean, mangroves and wetlands.
OBJECTIVE: To strengthen the capacity of the line
ministry to enable it to properly monitor and coordinate
the fshing industry.
ACTIVITIES: To provide the required equipment
(fshing gear, fsh processing equipment) and training
to stakeholders in the fshing industry.
OUTPUTS: A more organized and efcient fshing
industry.
EQUIPMENT TO BE PROCURED: (1) Fishing gear.
(2) Fish processing machines. (3) Storage facilities.
LOCAL
ECONOMIC
DEVELOPMENT
N°1
Project proposal
Scholarship schemes and centre for
students
LOCATION: City of Banjul.
DURATION: 12 months.
BENEFICIARIES: Banjul City Council.
IMPLEMENTING PARTNERS: Ministry of
Education, Banjul City Council, Physical Planning and
Lands, and Local Consultants.
ESTIMATED COST: USD 10,000,000.
BACKGROUND: Banjul is the capital city of Te
Gambia and has a population of 34,828 people. Almost
60 - 65 percent of the population is of school going age.
Te Ministry of Education is located in the capital city
of Banjul. Tere are fve senior secondary schools in the
city and many upper and lower basic schools serving the
children from Banjul and surrounding areas.
OBJECTIVES: To provide scholarships to school
children.
ACTIVITIES: To identify and build a centre that will
take care of the afairs of students.
OUTPUT: To put in place a well organized and
sustainable support centre for students within the city
of Banjul and its surroundings.
PROJECT IMPLEMENTATION: Te project
could be implemented in two Phases; Phase 1 -
Identifcation and preparation of site and Phase
2 - Resource mobilization and construction of
centre.
EQUIPMENT TO BE PROCURED: (1) Building
materials. (2) Furniture. (3) Computers.
LOCAL
ECONOMIC
DEVELOPMENT
N°2
Project proposal
Fishing and fsh processing
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LOCAL
ECONOMIC
DEVELOPMENT
N°3
Project proposal
Marketing and storage facilities
LOCATION: City of Banjul.
DURATION: 24 months.
BENEFICIARIES: Banjul City Council.
IMPLEMENTING PARTNERS: Local Government
Ministry, Banjul City Council, Department of Fisheries,
National Environmental Agency, Ministry of Finance,
and Local Consultants.
ESTIMATED COST: USD 200,000.
BACKGROUND: Te main storage and marketing
outlet for fsh products in Banjul is the Albert Market.
Tere are other private fsh marketing and storage
outlets such as the National Partnership Enterprise
(NPE) and International Pelican Sea Food.
OBJECTIVES: To create more marketing outlets and
storage facilities for operators in the fshing industry.
ACTIVITIES: (1) To build additional public storage
and marketing facilities for fsh products. (2) To
strengthen capacities of the public and private frms
involved in fshing activities.
OUTPUTS: To put in place well organized and highly
skilled fshing structures.
PROJECT IMPLEMENTATION: Te project could
be implemented in four phases; (1) Identifcation
of strategic areas for the construction of additional
storage and marketing facilities. (2) Capacity
building for fshermen. (3) Provision of additional
equipment and fnancial support to fshermen.
(4) Monitoring of project activities.
EQUIPMENT TO BE PROCURED: (1) Building
material. (2) Fish processing machines.
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BASIC URBAN SERVICES
STRENGTHS WEAKNESSES OPPORTUNITIES THREATS
INSTITUTIONAL SET-UP
Public Transport
Human resource base
available.
Infrastructure in place.
Lack of funds to improve on
the provision of basic urban
services.
Availability of market.
Rapid population growth.
Public private partnership.
High operational cost.
Electricity and Water
Highly skilled personnel.
Effective management
structure.
Inadequate outlets for the sale
of electricity.
Lack of funds for investment
and expansion.
The introduction of prepaid
meters.
High demand for the service.
Untimely payment of bills.
Exposure of water pipes due
to erosion thereby causing
pipe bursts.
Illegal water and electricity
connections by consumers.
Roads and Drainage
Non existence of road
maintenance team in place.
Poor planning (engineering
work).
Poor drainage system.
Rehabilitation of roads by
Gamworks Agency.
Poor drainage system.
Dysfunctional pumping station
and sewerage system.
Waste Management
Existence of cleaning services.
Existence of anti-littering
bill and monthly cleaning
exercises.
Inadequate capacity.
Shortage of waste
management equipment e.g.
refuse collection bins and
trucks.
Inadequate public
sensitization, waste
management and disposal.
A Waste Management Unit
has already been set up in the
city council.
Development of bio-gas.
Indiscriminate dumping of
waste.
Sewerage System
Existence of sewerage
infrastructure.
The infrastructure in place is
dilapidated.
Irregular maintenance of
sewage pipes which has led to
their degradation.
Already existing sewerage
infrastructure that only needs
to be rehabilitated.
Sewage overfows present
a major health hazard to
the people and can result in
disease outbreaks.
REGULATORY FRAMEWORK
Existence of the National Road
Authority (NRA) through an
Act of Parliament to help with
the rehabilitation of roads and
public transport.
Lack of enforcement of the
anti-littering bill.
Lack of enforcement of the
anti-littering bill.
RESOURCE MOBILIZATION AND CAPACITY BUILDING
Existence of Gamworks
Agency.
Inadequate funds to
implement infrastructure
development policies.
Limited capacity.
Donor intervention.
Community participation in
infrastructure development.
Low infrastructure
development.
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BASIC URBAN
SERVICES
N°1
Project proposal
Training on development of ward
plan
LOCATION: City of Banjul.
DURATION: 18 months.
BENEFICIARIES: Banjul City Council.
IMPLEMENTING PARTNERS: Ministry of Local
Government, Banjul City Council, Department of
Community Development, National Youth Service
Scheme, Ministry of Finance, Local Consultants,
Ministry of Trade, Ministry of Economic Afairs, and
Gambia Technical Training Institution.
ESTIMATED COST: USD 1,800,000.
BACKGROUND: Banjul is divided into three
constituencies and these constituencies are further
divided into nine wards. All three constituencies
have a member who represents them at Te National
Assembly. All the nine wards also have a councillor who
represents the ward at the city council. In each ward,
a Ward Development Committees is in place which is
chaired by the ward councillor. Te role of the national
assembly members, the ward councillors and the
Ward Development Committeess are very vital in the
development of the city as they are interlinked. Needs
assessment training, project identifcation, planning,
development, and monitoring and evaluation are key
functions of the national assembly members, the ward
councillors and the Ward Development Committeess.
According to Local Government Act of 2002, every
ward is mandated to identify and develop priority
projects which are to be submitted to the council for
implementation on a yearly basis.
OBJECTIVE: To build the capacities of the Ward
Development Committees, the ward councillors and
national assembly members to be able to identify and
develop a good and comprehensive development plan
and monitor and evaluate projects.
ACTIVITIES: To sensitize and train all councillors /
Ward Development Committees members on their
roles and responsibilities in the communities.
OUTPUT: To put in place highly equipped and trained
Ward Development Committees in the City of Banjul.
EQUIPMENT TO BE PROCURED: (1) Hall /
resource centre. (2) Stationery. (3) Monitoring and
evaluation tools. (4) Logistics.
BASIC URBAN
SERVICES
N°2
Project proposal
Training of council staff on waste
management
LOCATION: City of Banjul.
DURATION: 12 months.
BENEFICIARIES: Banjul City Council.
IMPLEMENTING PARTNERS: Ministry of Local
Government, Banjul City Council, Gambia Association of
Local Government Authorities, National Environmental
Agency, Ministry of Finance, Ministry of Health, Ministry
of Environment and Natural Resources, and Local
Consultants.
ESTIMATED COST: USD 500,000.
BACKGROUND: Waste management is one of the major
challenges in the country. Banjul is the capital city of Te
Gambia with a population of over 34,828 inhabitants
(2003 census). Banjul is a centre for business and over
30,000 people enter the city daily either from the Kombos
and its surroundings or by river from the North Bank
Region, to work and conduct businesses. Te amount of
waste that is generated in the city of Banjul is very high.
Banjul City Council is tasked with the collection and
disposal of all the waste that is generated in the city. Te
city council therefore in its set-up has a Waste Management
Unit that deals with collection and disposal of waste
in the city. Tis unit is headed by a cleaning manager
assisted by an assistant manager, supervisors, headmen,
and support staf. Te efcient collection and disposal of
waste generated every day in the city of Banjul requires
a well structured Waste Management Unit. During the
data collection exercises, a lot of people commended the
city council on their eforts in dealing with the waste in
Banjul. Major challenges in the collection and disposal
of waste include lack of adequate equipment, lack of a
proper landfll site, inadequate capacity, and lack of proper
planning /programmes.
OBJECTIVE: To improve on the efciency of the Waste
Management Unit.
ACTIVITIES: To conduct staf training on proper waste
management strategies, upgrading of the land fll site and
provision of equipment.
OUTPUTS: A highly trained and efective Waste
Management Unit in place in the city council.
PROJECT IMPLEMENTATION: Te project could
be implemented in three phases; Phase 1 - Training of
manager and support staf, Phase 2 - Upgrading of landfll
site and Phase 3 - Provision of equipment.
EQUIPMENT TO BE PROCURED: (1) Waste
management equipment. (2) Construction material.
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BASIC URBAN
SERVICES
N°3
Project proposal
Training on project implementation,
monitoring and evaluation
LOCATION: City of Banjul.
DURATION: 6 months.
BENEFICIARIES: Banjul City Council.
IMPLEMENTING PARTNERS: Ministry of Local
Government, Banjul City Council, Gambia Association
of Local Government Authorities, Gambia Technical
Training Institute, and Local Consultants.
ESTIMATED COST: USD 800,000.
BACKGROUND: Banjul is the capital city and
administrative seat of government. It is also the centre
for business activities in Banjul. Banjul is also where
the main port is which serves not only Te Gambia but
other part of the region. Some of the economic activities
in Banjul are banking, fshing and import and export.
Te main market in Banjul hosts all types of businesses
and attracts traders from all over the country. Since
Banjul is a centre for business and the headquarters for
a lot of trading frms and public and private fnancial
institutions including the main port, the city must
have good infrastructure and facilities (i.e. good roads,
electricity, drainage system, sewage system, and waste
management system) that would facilitate the economic
activities taking place. In order for the council to be
in a position to provide these services there must be a
very strong Technical Service Unit in place. According
to the council, a Technical Service Unit which monitors
the development programmes taking place in the city
is in existence. However this unit lacks capacity and
equipment.
OBJECTIVE: To build the capacity of the Technical
Service Unit in project planning, implementation and
monitoring and evaluation.
ACTIVITIES: To conduct training of staf in this unit
on project planning, implementation and monitoring
and evaluation.
OUTPUTS: To put in place a highly trained technical
unit that will be able to plan for, implement, monitor,
and evaluate any development work that takes place
within the city.
PROJECT IMPLEMENTATION: Te project will
be implemented in three Phases; Phase 1 - Training
of Technical Service Unit staf on project planning
and implementation, Phase 2 - Training in project
monitoring and evaluation and Phase 3 - Provision of
working equipment.
EQUIPMENT TO BE PROCURED: (1) Building
materials. (2) Planning tools. (3) Monitoring and
evaluation tools.
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STRENGTHS WEAKNESSES OPPORTUNITIES THREATS
INSTITUTIONAL SET-UP
Regional Disaster
Management Committee.
Presence of the National
Disaster Management
Agency (National Disaster
Management Agency).
Inadequate fnancial
resources.
Inadequate capacity.
Lack of public sensitization.
Untimely disaster
interventions.
Shortage of fre hydrants in
case of fre outbreaks.
Weak enforcement of urban
disaster and management
policies.
Inaccessibility of areas prone
to disasters e.g. poor road
infrastructure in the slums
make them inaccessible
during disasters.
Government support.
National Disaster
Management Agency
support.
The National Policy and Act
on disaster management.
Donor support.
Poor resource management.
Misuse of funds meant for
disaster management.
REGULATORY FRAMEWORK
National Disaster
Management Agency (Act
and Policy) established.
National Security Unit in
place.
Weak enforcement of
disaster management
policies.
Limited technical and human
resources.
Lack of transparency
and accountability in
government.
Government support.
International donor support.
Presence of National Disaster
Management Agency
support and coordinating
offces.
Inadequate fre hydrants.
Poor wiring and electricity
connection.
Bribery and corruption
among government offcials.
RESOURCE MOBILIZATION AND CAPACITY BUILDING
Availability of funds from the
government and donors for
disaster management.
Availability of the National
Disaster Management
Agency Fund for disaster
preparedness and
prevention.
Ineffcient management of
limited resources.
Limited capacity.
Low involvement of the
community.
Available funding from the
government and donors.
Poor resource management.
Lack of transparency
and accountability in the
management of funds.
Corruption among
government offcials.
URBAN SAFETY AND URBAN DISASTER MANAGEMENT
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URBAN SAFETY
AND URBAN
DISASTER
MANAGEMENT
N°1
Project proposal
Rehabilitation of the
electricity system
LOCATION: Banjul.
DURATION: 24 months.
BENEFICIARIES: Banjul City Council.
IMPLEMENTING PARTNERS: Ministry of Local
Government, Banjul City Council, National Water
and Electricity Company, Public Utilities Regulatory
Authority, and Local Consultants.
ESTIMATED COST: USD 10,000,000.
BACKGROUND: Te electricity network in place is
an old system of wiring consisting of running overhead
cables. Tese cables are exposed resulting in high risks
of electrocution for Banjul residents. Te electrical
poles erected in most streets are metals poles which
sometimes catch fre especially during the rainy season.
Te street lights are old and dysfunctional. In addition,
there are many illegal electrical connections which cause
electricity shortages.
OBJECTIVES: To improve the standards of the street
lighting system in Banjul.
ACTIVITIES: To replace all worn out fuorescent
fttings with new energy saving bulbs, insulation of over
head cables, concrete poles (to replace metal poles), and
rehabilitation of existing power sub-stations.
OUTPUTS: To put in place a safe electricity network.
EQUIPMENT TO BE PROCURED: (1) Heavy duty
cables (covered). (2) Energy saving bulbs. (3) Fittings.
(4) Building materials.
URBAN SAFETY
AND URBAN
DISASTER
MANAGEMENT
N°2
Project proposal
Community sensitization
on risk reduction
LOCATION: City of Banjul.
DURATION: 4 months.
BENEFICIARIES: Banjul City Council.
IMPLEMENTING PARTNERS: Ministry of Local
Government and Lands, Banjul City Council, Regional
Disaster Management Ofce, National Environmental
Agency, Ministry of Finance, National Water and
Electricity Company, Department of Physical Planning
and Lands, Private/Public Agencies, and Public Utilities
Regulatory Authority.
ESTIMATED COST: USD 800,000.
BACKGROUND: During the data collection exercise
in all nine wards in the city of Banjul, the community
complained about the unsafe overhead electrical cables
that National Water and Electricity Company had not
been replacing and which were a serious health hazard.
Te community also complained about the inadequate
supply of electricity that forced residents to use candles
for lighting. Te problem of open drainage systems and
the indiscriminate dumping of waste into the drainage
system resulted in blockage of the system. Crime rate
in the city is also very high due to the rapid increase
in population, unemployment and drug and alcohol
abuse.
OBJECTIVES: To sensitize the community on disaster
risk reduction.
ACTIVITIES: To conduct sensitization programmes
on disaster awareness and management.
OUTPUT: Te project is expected to increase awareness
among the people on disaster risk reduction and
formulate and enforce disaster management policies.
PROJECT IMPLEMENTATION: Te project could
be implemented in three Phases: Phase 1 - Sensitization
campaign; Phase 2 - Improvement of road network,
drainage system and sewage system; and Phase 3 -
Improvement of electricity supply.
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URBAN SAFETY
AND URBAN
DISASTER
MANAGEMENT
N°3
Project proposal
Improve drainage system
for storm water run-off
LOCATION: Banjul.
DURATION: 24 months.
BENEFICIARIES: Banjul City Council.
IMPLEMENTING PARTNERS: Ministry of Local
Government, Banjul City Council, Gamworks, Ministry
of Works, Ministry of Finance, National Environmental
Agency, Local Consultants, and Ministry of Economic
Afairs.
ESTIMATED COST: USD 10,000,000.
BACKGROUND: Banjul’s drainage system was
constructed in the colonial days. All streets are provided
with one or two side drains which collect storm water
from the residential areas and streets and empty into the
main collector drains which are linked to the stream.
Tree pumping machines are linked to the system and
facilitate the evacuation of storm water during the rainy
season. However, due to lack of good maintenance,
these machines are no longer functioning efectively
and have fallen prone to vandalism. Te structure in
which these machines are housed is dilapidated.
Drains: A large number of the side road drains have
collapsed. Te existing drains lack drain covers. As
a result people sometimes dump solid waste into the
drains which leads to blockages. All the existing main
drain outlets are not covered, they lack the proper
concrete basements (invert levels) and the boundary
walls are not in place.
OBJECTIVE: To provide the city of Banjul with a
proper drainage network that will allow the smooth
fow of storm water.
ACTIVITIES: (1) Reconstruction of all collapsed drains
and replacement of drain covers. (2) Construction of
boundary walls for the drains. (3) Dredging of canals.
(4) Rehabilitation of the pumping machines.
OUTPUT: Te project is expected to improve and
provide smooth run-of for storm water during the
rainy season and also prevent formation of stagnant
water which acts as a breeding ground for mosquitoes.
PROJECT IMPLEMENTATION: Te project will be
implemented in three phases: Phase 1 - Reconstruction
of inner city collector drains and provision of drain
covers, Phase 2 - Construction of boundary walls for
all the main drainage outlets, Phase 3 - Rehabilitation
of the pumping machines and the dredging of canals.
EQUIPMENT TO BE PROCURED: (1) Pumping
machines. (2) Building materials. (3) Waste management
equipment.
48
UNITED NATIONS HUMAN SETTLEMENTS PROGRAMME
P.O Box 30030 - 00100, Nairobi, Kenya
Tel: +254-20-7623120
Fax: +254-20-7623426/7 (Central Offce)
infohabitat@unhabitat.org
www.unhabitat.org/publications
HS Number: HS/093/11E
ISBN Number (Series): 978-92-1-132023-7
ISBN Number (Volume): 978-92-1-132383-2
BANJUL URBAN PROFILE
The Banjul Urban Profling consists of an accelerated, action-oriented assessment of urban conditions, focusing on priority needs,
capacity gaps, and existing institutional responses at local and national levels. The purpose of the study is to develop urban
poverty reduction policies at local, national, and regional levels, through an assessment of needs and response mechanisms, and
as a contribution to the wider-ranging implementation of the Millennium Development Goals. The study is based on analysis
of existing data and a series of interviews with all relevant urban stakeholders, including local communities and institutions,
civil society, the private sector, development partners, academics, and others. The consultation typically results in a collective
agreement on priorities and their development into proposed capacity-building and other projects that are all aimed at urban
poverty reduction. The urban profling is being implemented in 30 ACP (Africa, Caribbean and Pacifc) countries, offering an
opportunity for comparative regional analysis. Once completed, this series of studies will provide a framework for central and
local authorities and urban actors, as well as donors and external support agencies.

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