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168 River Street

Montpelier, Vermont 05602
FREE Mobile Service!
Direct Insurance Billing
Back Glass
Windshield Replacement
Custom Cut Glass
Stone Chip Repair
Door Glass • Foreign or Domestic • Antique • Classic •Heavy Equipment
802-225-6339 NEautoglass@yahoo.com
EMPTY BOWL BENEFIT
FILL A BOWL, FEED OUR COMMUNITY
A BENEFIT FOR THE VERMONT FOODBANK
Sunday, February 16, 2014, 4:30 – 7pm
At The Mud Studio, 961 Route 2, Middlesex
Pick out a handcrafted bowl of your choice and then enjoy a
hearty supper of home-made soup, bread, cheese & more.
Dine in or take out.
$25 minimum donation per adult. Children 5 – 18 $5, under 5 free (meal only)
RSVP: Bonnie Seideman, samandbonnie@gmail.com
C3UCt CI83m8Iy º CClO HCllCW ClO8I Mlll º DCQ Plv8I F3Im
HUnQ8I MCUnt3ln CCCµ º NCIth BI3nCh C3f8 º P8t8'8 CI88n8
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Special Thanks to:
AD SPONSORED BY:
NOYLE W. JOHNSON INSURANCE GROUP • 223-7735 • 479-3366 • 684-3924
WE GET RESULTS!
FREE DOOR-TO-DOOR DELIVERY IN CENTRAL VERMONT
Vol. 42, No. 40 403 US RTE 302 - BERLIN, BARRE, VT 05641 • 479-2582 OR 1-800-639-9753 • Fax (802) 479-7916 February 5, 2014
On the Web: www.vt-world.com Email: sales@vt-world.com
Feb 6 – 9:
the Vagina
Monologues
Eve Ensler’s powerful, poignant & often
hilarious collection of women’s stories.
Benefts CIRCLE.
help stop violence
against women
3 great shows. 3 weekends
LNT’s Winterfest also includes:
Intake / Adapted from Samuel Beckett
Th–Su, Feb 6–23: City Hall Arts Center
ad courtesy of THE WORLD
229-0492 / lostnationtheater.org
2014
Tickets: $20
$15 student/senior
7:30pm Thu-Sat / 2pm Sun
(802) 229-0492
lostnationtheater.org
SPONSORS: Capitol Copy
City of Montpelier
Eternity Web
National Life Group
The Times Argus
The Point!-FM
Vermont Arts Council
WDEV
ad courtesy of The World
See
page 24
for details
Feb. 6-Feb 23
3 Great Shows. 3 Great Weekends.
Feb
6-9
802 Honda Opens Jan. 31
page 2
Thinking About Elephants
by Tom Herzig
page 16
CVMC Auxiliary
Names
Jean Rubalcaba
Auxilian of
the Year
page 22
Do You Qualify for Earned
Income Tax Credit?
page 10
Elks Host State Hoop Shoot
page 15
page 2 The WORLD February 5, 2014
PERRY'S OIL SERVICE
Call 1-800-654-3344
For Price and Delivery Date
Minimum 100 gal. delivery




CALL
FOR
CURRENT
PRICE
nwjinsurance.com
A Full Service
Insurance Agency
Noyle W. Johnson
I N S U R A N C E
NOYLE JOHNSON GROUP
119 River Street • P.O. Box 279 • Montpelier, Vermont 05602
Ph. 223-7735 • nwjinsurance. com • Fax 223-7515
HOME • AUTO • COMMERCIAL
HEALTH • LIFE
FINANCIAL SERVICES
Feb. 2 Sun Groundhog Day
Feb. 2 Sun Super Bowl XLVIII
Feb. 12 Wed Lincoln’s Birthday
Feb. 14 Fri Valentine’s Day
Feb. 17 Mon Presidents Day and
Washington’s Birthday
Full Moon
Full moon date is expressed in Coordinated Universal Time
Snow Moon 2014 Feb 14 23:53 Fri
American Heart Month
Bake for Family Fun Month
Chinese New Year Festival
International Boost Self Esteem Month
International Expect Success Month
Library Lovers’ Month
Marfan Syndrome Awareness Month
National African American
History Month
National Bird Feeding Month
National Black History Month
National Cherry Month
National Children’s
Dental Health Month
National Condom Month
National Mend a Broken Heart Month
National Parent Leadership Month
National Pet Dental Health Month
National Time Management Month
National Women Inventors Month
Spay / Neuter Awareness Month
Sweet Potato Month
Wise Health Care Consumer Month
Youth Leadership Month
February 2014
Monthly Events
119 River Street, P.O. Box 279
Montpelier, VT 05602
Ph. 223-7735 • Fax 223-7515
83 Washington Street
Barre, VTT 05641
Ph. 479-3366 • Fax 479-2761
P.O. Box 195 Danville, VT 05828
Ph. 684-3411 • Fax 684-3924
A Full Service
Insurance Agency
Noyle W. Johnson
I N S U R A N C E
NOYLE JOHNSON GROUP
119 River Street • P.O. Box 279 • Montpelier, Vermont 05602
Ph. 223-7735 • nwjinsurance. com • Fax 223-7515
HOME • AUTO • COMMERCIAL
HEALTH • LIFE
FINANCIAL SERVICES
nwjinsurance.com
~ THIS AD SPONSORED BY~
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Barre-Montpelier Rd. • 476-6580
(across from Fassetts bread store)
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2 PIONEER STREET • MONTPELIER
• 229-0563
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802 Honda was born after the 802Cars.com dealer group pur-
chased Town and Country Honda from long-time owner, Robert
Aughey. 802 Honda is an automobile dealership representing the
Honda franchise providing sales, service and parts for new and
used vehicles.
According to President and General Manager Dave Birmingham,
“We plan on continuing the strong legacy Town and Country
Honda has of excellent customer satisfaction and combine that
with the drive to become Vermont’s #1 volume Honda dealer. We
believe that low prices combined with high customer satisfaction
deliver what our customers want.”
The 802Cars.com dealer group owns 802 Toyota and Twin City
Subaru, also in Berlin, Vt. 802 Honda will continue to operate at
224 Paine Turnpike North in Berlin, just off Interstate 89 exit 7. A
facility addition and remodel is planned in the next 24 months.
Town and Country Honda was established in 1984 and had an
excellent reputation for customer satisfaction. The decision to
change the name did not come easy according to Birmingham,
“With three Honda dealerships named “Town and Country” in the
US, it can get a bit confusing for customers.
We Ship
Anywhere
“A
Quality
Family
Farm
Shop”
802-223-5757
Vermont
Handcrafts
Gifts
Vermont
Cheese
Maple Farm
Tour
Maple
Products
1 mile north of E. Montpelier Village on Rt. 14N (follow signs)
OPEN EVERY DAY 8:30AM to 6:00 PM
Maple Syrup Savings
$
4
00
off Gallon
$
3
00
off 1/2-Gallon
$
2
00
off Quarts
ALL
GRADES
Includes Mail Order, Thru Feb. 23
with this ad
American Lung Association Issues State of Tobacco Control 2014 Report
In 2013, Vermont took some steps forward to reduce tobacco
use in some areas, but fell short in adequately funding prevention
programs to protect children and curb tobacco-related disease. The
good news is that Vermont expanded coverage of tobacco cessa-
tion counseling to all Medicaid enrollees and remains one of the
only states to not receive any failing grades.
Those were the findings of the American Lung Association’s
State of Tobacco Control 2014 report released last week. Less than
a week after the release of the 50th anniversary U.S. Surgeon
General’s report on smoking and health, State of Tobacco Control
2014 issues an urgent call to action to policymakers across the
country to reverse their present course and commit to eliminating
tobacco-caused death and disease. The latest Surgeon General’s
report warns 5.6 million of today’s youth will die from tobacco
use unless swift action is taken.
“Despite great strides in reducing smoking rates in America,
tobacco use remains the leading cause of preventable death and
illness in the U.S.,” said Corey Hevrin, Leadership Board Chair
for the American Lung Association in Vermont. “We must renew
our commitment to stopping tobacco from robbing another gen-
eration of Americans of their health and future. We cannot afford
another 50 years of tobacco use.”
Vermont received the following grades for 2013:
Tobacco Prevention Control and Spending: D
Smokefree Air: A
Cigarette Tax: B
Cessation: C
The failure of the federal and state governments to implement
proven policies resulted in 20 million preventable deaths from
tobacco use from 1964-2014, including 2.5 million from second-
hand smoke. The 2014 Surgeon General’s report found that almost
half a million lives are unnecessarily lost each year due to tobacco,
as well as $280 billion in healthcare costs and lost productivity.
The Lung Association’s State of Tobacco Control 2014, its 12th
annual report, tracks yearly progress on key tobacco control poli-
cies at the federal and state level, assigning grades based on
■ ■ ■
“We also want everyone to know that 802 Honda will never lose
a deal over price. We want to give the customer low prices with
high satisfaction”
For more information, contact Dave Birmingham directly at
802-224-7211 or by email dave@vtcars.com
whether laws are adequately protecting citizens from the enor-
mous toll tobacco use takes on lives and the economy. Tobacco-
related diseases, such as lung cancer, chronic obstructive pulmo-
nary disease (COPD), other cancers, heart disease and stroke kill
almost half a million Americans each year.
“With Friday’s release of the 50th anniversary Surgeon General’s
report on Smoking and Health, Acting U.S. Surgeon General Rear
Admiral (RADM) Boris D. Lushniak, M.D., M.P.H declared
“enough is enough” and that we must do more if we are going to
protect Americans from the burden of tobacco use,” said Jeff
Seyler, President & CEO of the American Lung Association of the
Northeast. “Smoking is responsible for almost 500,000 deaths in
this country annually and our state leaders must act now so that we
may prevent more Americans from getting sick and dying from
tobacco-related disease. The battle against the tobacco epidemic is
not over.”
Tobacco causes an estimated 830 deaths in Vermont annually
and costs the state’s economy $434 million in healthcare costs and
lost productivity.
“Vermont has done a good job at reducing youth smoking rates
and Vermonters’ exposure to secondhand smoke, however, there
needs to be a commitment to sustained funding to make further
progress,” continued Hevrin. “The Governor’s FY15 budget rec-
ommendation proposes to empty the state’s Tobacco Trust Fund
and use millions of dollars the state received from a recent lawsuit
with the tobacco giant, RJ Reynolds, to help close the state budget
gap. We urge lawmakers to preserve the Tobacco Trust Fund by
keeping the small, but remaining balance in the fund and to direct
the $8.3 million from the lawsuit to the trust fund. Without a long-
term investment in proven measures to prevent and reduce tobacco
use, smoking and healthcare spending will rise.”
Meanwhile, the tobacco industry continued its ruthless pursuit
of addicting new users and keeping current users from quitting in
2013. This included efforts at the federal and state levels to exempt
their products from meaningful public health protections.
The three largest cigarette manufacturers—Altria, Reynolds
American, and Lorillard—continued their aggressive expansion
into other tobacco products in 2013. As cigarette use continues to
gradually decline, these companies continue to maintain their
power over America’s youth and reap profits from smokeless
tobacco, cigars and now e-cigarettes.
“We urge everyone in Vermont to join with the American Lung
Association in renewing their commitment to preventing another
50 years of tobacco-caused death and disease,” continued Seyler.
802 Honda Opens January 31
Dave Birmingham and Robert Aughey
February 5, 2014 The WORLD page 3
REACH
750,000
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Call June (NOW!) at
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FOR
A CVMC Medical Group Practice / www.cvmc.org
Central Vermont Women’s Health
30 Fisher Road / Medical Office Building A, Suite 1-4 / Berlin VT 05602 / 371-5961

Pregnancy is so much more than
just your due date.
The providers at Central Vermont Women’s
Health know that every step on your path to
childbirth is an important one
and that a healthy pregnancy starts before conception.
It’s a great idea to get a medical checkup
before getting pregnant to make sure your
body is ready to have a baby.
We’ll talk together about:
• your family history
• medicines you take – including herbs
• whether your vaccinations are up-to-date
• medical conditions you have, like diabetes
or high blood pressure.
Here are 9 things to do before
getting pregnant:
• Plan when you want to have a baby.
• Use reliable birth control until then.
• Take a daily multivitamin with 400
micrograms of folic acid to help reduce
the risk of neural tube birth defects.
• Stop smoking, drinking alcohol and
taking illegal drugs.
• Get a medical checkup.
• Eat healthy and get to your optimal weight.
• Do something active every day.
• Avoid exposure to harmful substances.
• Learn to manage your stress.

There is nothing more important to
us than your health and the health
of your baby.
Please call Nicole, Emma or Pam at 371.5961
to schedule a time for us to get together.
My partners and I look forward to
meeting you to talk about your
plans to grow your family.
Rebecca Montgomery, CNM, MSN




Bella Capelli Al Sole
174 River Street • Montpelier
223-0033
Caitlyn B. Therrien
~Cosmetologist~
joins the staff at
Bella Capelli Al Sole
on River Street
in Montpelier.
Caitlyn specializes in
cuts for women, men
and children; color;
highlights and waxing.
During the month of
February, Caitlyn will
be offering a wash, cut
& blow dry for the special price of $20.00
~Call today for an appointment~
Caitlyn’s hours are Mon., Thurs., Fri. 9-6;
Wed. 9-4; and every other Saturday 10-4;
Walk-ins Always Welcome
PLEASE PUBLISH THE FOLLOWING VALENTINE AD:
___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
YOUR NAME ______________________________________________________________________________________________________
YOUR BILLING ADDRESS ___________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
YOUR TELEPHONE _________________________________________________________________________________________________
$9.95 prepaid
Make check payable
to The WORLD
TO USE
CALL 479-2582 OR
1-800-639-9753
CLIP & MAIL OR BRING THIS FORM TO:
THE WORLD LOVELINES
403 RT. 302-BERLIN
BARRE, VT 05641-2274
ONLY
$
9.95
prepaid
It’s easy to compose
your own
Valentine ad.
Here are some examples:
Tell It To The WORLD
with a Valentine Message.
Marry me,
Maureen?
Love,
John
Tommy & Jenny
are Little Sweethearts!
Love,
Grammy &
Papa
To be published in our February 12 edition
DEADLINE IS THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 6
How Special Is Someone To You?
Americorps Supports Just Basics’s Montpelier Food Pantry
Eight Americorps volunteers
hit the ground running at the
Montpelier Food Pantry on
Monday, January 20 as part of
their Martin Luther King Day
of Service.
The volunteers cleaned,
secured and stabilized shelving
units and organized and packed
hundreds of pounds of non-
persishable foods. What
Americorps accomplished in
three hours would have taken
Pantry volunteers a few weeks
to complete.
The Montpelier Food Pantry
and FEAST, the senior citizen
meal program, are programs of
Just Basics Inc. a non-profit
dedicated to providing basic
food needs through just and
sustainable solutions. The MFP
provides an emergency food
supply to residents of East
Montpelier, Adamant, Calais,
Berlin, Worcester, Middlesex
and Montpelier.
The FEAST program, (Mon-
Sun Meals on Wheels, Tues/Fri
congregate meals, Thurs com-
munity “To Go” meal fund-
raiser) in partnership with the
Central VT “Empty Bowl Benefit” Raises
Funds for the Vermont Foodbank
Homemade soup and handcrafted bowls by
local potters will be the highlight at the Central
Vermont Empty Bowl Benefit, a fundraiser for
the Vermont Foodbank, on Sunday, February 16
from 4:30pm to 7pm at The Mud Studio in the
Red Hen complex on Route 2 in Middlesex.
Those attending the event will select a ceramic
bowl to take home and will be offered two
choices of soup to either eat at the studio or carry
out.
“We thought that if people took their empty
bowl home with them, it would serve as a
reminder that there are many Vermonters whose
bowls are literally empty every day,” said Mike
Sullivan, owner of The Mud Studio. The studio,
which is organizing and sponsoring the event,
offers classes for all ages and provides gallery
space for the work of local artists and craftspeo-
ple.
The Vermont Foodbank, the state’s largest
hunger-relief organization, distributed food to
some 86,000 Vermonters in 2013 through its
network of food shelves, meal sites, shelters,
senior centers and youth programs. According to
Vermont Foodbank Executive Director, John
Sayles, one out of seven Vermonters struggles
with food insecurity every day, including more
than 25,000 children. “We are thrilled to be part-
nering with The Mud Studio for this event,” said
Sayles. “These are tough times for Vermonters
and every bit helps to ensure that everyone in our
community has enough to eat.”
A number of businesses have already stepped
up to support the event. Cabot Creamery, Cold
Hollow Cider Mill, Dog River Farm, Hunger
Mountain Coop, North Branch Café, Pete’s
Greens, Red Hen Bakery, Sarducci’s, Willow
Moon Farm, and several professional area pot-
ters have all signed on to make this event a huge
success for the Vermont Foodbank.
The minimum adult donation is $25, which
includes a bowl, soup and accompaniments.
Children under 5 are free and tickets for ages 5
to 18 are $5 for a meal only. All proceeds will go
the to the Vermont Foodbank.
City of Montpelier, runs out of
the Montpelier Senior Activity
Center.
The Montpelier Food Pantry
welcomes all unexpired non-
perishable and perishable food
items and cash donations.
For more information on Just
Basics Inc, the Montpelier
Food Pantry and the FEAST
program go to justbasicsvt.org
or call Theresa Murray-Clasen
802-595-9991 or mtme@
myfairpoint.net
■ ■ ■
page 4 The WORLD February 5, 2014
Seedling Heat Mats
by Hydrofarm
3 sizes
Starting at:
$
25
49
Let’s Get
Growing
with peat-free products!
19 Barre St., Montpelier 229-0567
Monday-Friday 8-6 Saturday 8-5
Farm
& Yard
GMO-Free
Seeds
by High Mowing,
New England Seed
and Botanical
Interests
The Vegetable
Gardener’s
Container BIBLE
How to Grow a Bounty
of Food in Pots,
Tubs, and Other
Containers
Also by Ed Smith
Hydrofarm
Germination Station
includes
Heat Mat,
72 Cell Seed Tray,
Under a 2” Dome
$
29
99
$
19
95
Jump Start
Grow Light System
Light system for
starting seeds,
propagating
cuttings, and
growing indoor
flowers and
houseplants
2’ & 4’

$
55
95
Organic Sprouts
Sprouts are a great way to get more flavor, texture, and
nutrition into your diet! Sprouts are plants in their smallest
form - miniature seedlings that emerge upon germination
from the seed. Sprouts are loaded with easy-to-assimilate,
highly-digestible nutrients, including vitamins, minerals,
proteins, and enzymes. Sprouting is easy, and can be done
anywhere, without soil or light. And, they’re delicious! Each
with its own texture and flavor, there is a sprout for every
dish. All our seeds are tested for salmonella and e-coli O157.
Organic Pea Shoots
Organic Sunflower Shoots
Organic Wheatgrass Shoots
Organic Red Clover Sprouts
Organic China Rose Radish Sprouts
Organic Alfalfa Sprouts
Organic Broccoli Blend Sprouts
Organic Mung Beans Sprouts
Organic Spicy Salad Sprout Mix
Organic Sandwich Booster Sprout Mix
Organic Crunchy Bean Mix Sprouts
Organic Broccoli Sprouts
Organic Ancient Eastern Blend Sprouts
$
4
95
each
Sprout Jar Lid
The easy-to-use Handy Pantry Sprout Jar Lid fits
most wide mouth mason jars. This sprouting lid is
made of a durable food-grade
plastic with mesh holes in
the lid, big enough to drain
well but small enough to
hold in tiny
seeds such
as alfalfa!
$
3
95
Starting at
Starting
at
The Vegetable
Gardener’s BIBLE
Ed Smith, Author
Cabot, Vermont

$
24
95
802.223.2740 www.morsefarm.com
1168 County Road Montpelier
just 2.7 miles up Montpelier’s Main St. from the roundabout...
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39
¢
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COLOR
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Volunteer at the Vermont History Museum
Norwich University to Host Symposium on
Community Art and Identity
Each year, over 3,500 students from across the
state visit the Vermont History Museum in
Montpelier. They come to learn about how
Vermont became a state and to see the stuffed
catamount. For many of the students, it is their
first trip to the state capital. The field trip brings
their study of Vermont to life. One third-grade
student reported, “I had a lot of fun on the trip.
There is a lot of cool stuff like the wigwam in the
museum.”
A dedicated corps of volunteers guides these
students through the Freedom & Unity exhibit.
Volunteer tour guides, also called History
Helpers, share wonderful stories about our state
with students. They explain why Dr. Samuel
Adams is hanging in a chair outside the
Catamount Tavern. They demonstrate how to
send a message in Morse code on the telegraph
and encourage the students to tap out a few let-
ters. When students explore the World War II
living room, some of the guides share their own
memories of growing up during the war.
These tour guides are crucial to the success of
the field trip for many of the students who visit
the museum. Working with the children is also a
highlight for the volunteers. Johannah Currier, a
tour guide from Barre, says “I find interacting
with the small groups of school-aged children
stimulating and rewarding. By giving tours, I
have learned more about Vermont history from
the students’ perspective.”
The museum is recruiting additional volunteer
tour guides for the busy spring season. No expe-
rience is necessary and training is provided. If
you are enthusiastic about history and interested
in working with children, consider becoming a
volunteer History Helper at the museum. An
information session will take place on Tuesday,
February 11th, from 10:30-11:30 at the Vermont
History Museum, located at 109 State Street in
Montpelier. Learn more about the program and
the benefits of volunteering at the Vermont
Historical Society. If you are not able to attend
the session or if you want more information,
please contact Victoria Hughes at (802) 828-
1413 or victoria.hughes@state.vt.us.
Norwich University School of Architecture +
Art will host a symposium on Community Arts:
Authenticity and Identity on Friday, Feb. 7, from
2pm to 4pm in the Chaplin Hall Gallery.
Anni Mackay, who has devoted her energies
for 10 years to bringing art and community
together as owner and director of the Bigtown
Gallery in Rochester, will moderate a panel
exploring how the arts can meaningfully contrib-
ute to the evolution of a community’s physical,
cultural and natural environment and celebrate
authenticity.
“Authenticity is emerging as a fundamental
value for discussion within all areas of architec-
ture and the arts. It is a value that is particularly
relevant to Vermont, a state which is so attentive
to its public identity. Authenticity is essential to
an understanding of true identity and vitality
within our communities,” says Mackay.
Panelists from Vermont and Rhode Island,
among them a professional arts administrator,
working artist, activist, architect, educator, histo-
rian and journalist, will discuss their experiences
on how the arts create community vitality.
“It is our hope that everyone will leave the
symposium inspired by the depth and the com-
mitment of our panelists’ leadership in the arts,”
says Mackay.
Panelists include:
· Manuel Cordero Alvarado, Architect and co-
founder and president, DownCity Design,
Providence, R.I.
· Pieter Broucke, Director of the Arts/
Middlebury College art historian, Middlebury,
Vt.
· Jay Craven, Filmmaker, Kingdom County
Productions, Barnet, Vt.
· Anne Galloway, Political editor, former art
critic and founder, VT Digger, Montpelier
· Robert McBride, Community arts activist
and downtown developer, Rockingham Arts and
Museum Project, Bellows Falls, Vt.
“Cultural institutions and artists animate our
communities,” says Cara Armstrong, interim
director of the School of Architecture + Art.
“They bring disparate people together to share
common experiences, stimulate our imaginations
and help foster a rich and varied quality of life. It
is critical that we have events like this sympo-
sium so we can better understand how to support
and create art, architecture, and culture as tools
for revitalizing communities.”
This event is free and open to the public.
■ ■ ■
February 5, 2014 The WORLD page 5
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Equipment - Berlin
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Mid-Winter Kubota Service Specials
on the B, BX and L series Tractors
Special includes: ✔Change Engine Oil & Filter ✔Air Filter and
Fuel Filter ✔Check all fluids ✔Grease tractor and loader
✔Check and adjust tire pressures ✔Check safety features
BX Oil Filter Air Filter Fuel Filter Oil $205
B Oil Filter Air Filter Fuel Filter Oil $220
L Oil Filter Air Filter Fuel Filter Oil $240
Does not constitute 50 hour service
*Must be scheduled by March 15, 2014 and cannot be combined with any other
offer. *Plus Tax if applicable.
Alternatively, choose half price trucking rates within 30 mile radius.
Call Today & Schedule Your Appointment 802-223-0021
EFFECTIVE UNTIL MARCH 15, 2014
Special Pre-Spring Savings
for Our New & Existing Customers
Receive a 5% discount on any in-stock parts orders,
and save an additional 5% by opening a CNH revolving charge
account to save time and money.
We are in the process of stocking New Holland and Kuhn parts.
If there is something you would like us to stock in the store,
feel free to make a request of items frequently used so we can
serve you better. Check out our great Polaris service packs.
Please contact Dylan in the Parts Dept.
We appreciate your business.
223-0021
72 Kubota Dr., Berlin
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“Yes, we’re still
here with the
same quality
service we’ve
offered for
over 30 years”
Small Dog Electronics will
donate $14,466 to the Vermont
Foodbank as a result of its holi-
day giving effort during
December. The certified Apple
Specialist donated 1% of every
purchase to three non-profit
organizations - one in each of
the states where Small Dog has
a retail store, which includes
Vermont, New Hampshire, and
their newest location in Key
West, Florida.
“Small Dog’s holiday promo-
tion demonstrates their state-
wide commitment to supporting
people in need,” said John
Sayles, CEO of the Vermont
Foodbank. “Customers appreci-
ate and value a business that gives back to their
communities, and the 43,000 meals this gift helps
to provide gives hope to those struggling with
food hardship.”
Vermont Foodbank is the state’s largest hun-
ger-relief organization, serving Vermont through
a network of 270 food shelves, meal sites, shel-
ters, senior centers and youth programs. In
FY2013, the Vermont Foodbank distributed near-
Small Dog’s Holiday Giving Program
Nets $14k for the Vermont Foodbank
Pictured (l to r): Stephani Kononan, Marketing & Promotions Manager,
VT Foodbank; Christine Foster, Chief Development Officer, VFB; Judy
Stermer, Director of Communications & Public Affairs, VFB; and Kali
Hilke, Director of Marketing, Small Dog Electronics.
ly 8.2 million pounds of food to thousands of
Vermonters.
Charitable giving is an integral part of Small
Dog’s corporate social mission. “We’re thrilled
to have helped the Vermont Foodbank, the
Manchester (NH) Animal Shelter, and the Florida
Keys SPCA,” says Don Mayer, CEO of Small
Dog Electronics. “Helping those in need is what
the holiday season is really all about.”
■ ■ ■
Feb. 11 Event To Focus On State Education Finance System
Three speakers will be addressing the impact
of the state education system on local school
budgets at a public presentation and discussion at
6:30pm on Tuesday, Feb. 11 at the Montpelier
High School library. The public is invited to
attend, ask questions, and join in the discussion.
Montpelier’s proposed school budget is pro-
jected to drive up local residential school prop-
erty taxes by 13% this year, but over half of the
increase is due to factors involving the state
funding system, and is thus out of the control of
the school board. Rising property tax rates
caused by the state system are also a concern in
other towns this year, and the subject is being
discussed in the Legislature as well.
The speakers at the event, which is being orga-
nized by Vibrant and Affordable Montpelier, will
be:
• Dr. Brian Ricca, Superintendent of Montpelier
Schools
• Mark Perrault, an education finance fiscal
analyst in the Legislature’s Joint Fiscal Office,
and a Montpelier resident
• Phil Dodd, editor of the Vermont Property
Owners Report newsletter, and a Montpelier
resident
They will address, respectively, how
Montpelier’s school budget was impacted this
year, how the state education finance system
works, and what modifications could be made to
the system.
The focus of the evening will be on the state
education finance system rather than the specif-
ics of the proposed Montpelier school budget.
Citizens interested in learning more about the
budget itself may want to attend Montpelier’s
official Pre-Town Meeting at 7pm on Thursday,
Feb. 20 in the High School cafeteria, when both
city and school officials will be present.
Plans are being made for ORCA to broadcast
both events on Channel 17.
Montpelier Memory Café
By Lisbeth Dodd, Volunteer, Montpelier
Memory Café
The Montpelier Memory Café held its first
gathering at the Montpelier Senior Activity
Center in January. Even icy roads did not deter
participants and volunteers from gathering for a
morning of music, companionship and fun.
Volunteers from the Montpelier Memory Café
met recently at the Alzheimer’s Association
Vermont Chapter in Williston to share their expe-
rience of starting the Café with other volunteers
seeking to establish new Memory Cafes in
Chittenden and Franklin counties. Psychologist,
Dr. Bere Meisen, started the first memory café at
Leiden University in the Netherlands in 1997.
Since then the movement has spread throughout
Europe, the United Kingdom, and across the
United States. Cafes can be found in a variety of
settings – such as restaurants, bookstores, and
senior centers.
The Montpelier Memory Café goals are to:
encourage peer interaction; offer a positive and
enjoyable group socialization experience; con-
vey information about Alzheimer’s disease and
related disorders; and provide an opportunity to
interact with volunteer staff in a safe, supportive,
and judgment and stress-free setting. The Café
features musical performances, refreshments,
and activities such as board games. Guest speak
■ ■ ■
continued on next page
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page 6 The WORLD February 5, 2014
8th Grade High Honors
Nicholas Adams, Rebecca Clark-Blouin, Connor Coache, Damion Colgrove, Orion Colgrove,
Whitney Renaud, Boris Simonenko
8th Grade Honors
Zoe Atkins, Tamieka Austin, Jack Caple, Anna Clark-Blouin, Dylan D’Agostino, Colin
Dickinson, Isaac Donahue, Tazlynn Emmons, Ericka Felch, Lauren Folland, Reilly Flye, Angela
Garcelon, Peter Huang, Marilyn Kelley, Matthew Knorr, Muskan Lajeunesse, Chloé Lamphere,
John M Lindley V, Noah Luce, Hannah McMahon, Jasmine Sawyer, Jeffrey Steinman, Kloey
Taylor
7th Grade High Honors
Makayla Chouinard, Colleen Couture, Samantha Gill-Owen, Calista Hanna, Carmelitta Le, Zoe`
Macdonald, Akshar Patel, Faith Redmond, Lillian Riddle, Lia Rubel, Parker Spaulding, Brianna
Storti
7th Grade Honors
Alexis Atkins-Leslie, Abigail Haigh, Kyle Harris, Chantel Hough, Corey John, Zachary Millette,
Camryn Murphy, Grace Pierce, Thomas Royea, Abigail Spencer, Tina Taylor,
Taylor Winter
6th Grade High Honors
Julian Lopez, Madison Henderson, Emma Riddle
6th Grade Honors
Teagan Atkins-Leslie, Alexander Boozan, Caleb Carrien, Iris Carter, Taylor D’Agostino, Vanessa
Greig, Samantha Hays, Damian Lawton, Aliza Lindley, Jada MacDonald,
Emily McMahon, Hayleigh Pollard, Kaile Roberts
5th Grade High Honors
Camden Boucher, Brooke Corrow, Dylan Estivill, Katrina Favreau, Allyson Felch, Casey Flye,
Savannah LaFlower, Noah Partridge, Raven Premont, Emma Proteau, Olivia Rousse, Anastasiya
Simonenko, Zachary Stabell, Amer Verem, Navaeh West
5th Grade Honors
Kathryn Anton, Haley Austin, Aiden Blouin, Kailey Craig, Josie Diego, Caitlin Dodge-Prescott,
Indira Dzano, Gabriel Emmons, Allison Everett, Sandra Fajobi, Natalie Folland, Tyler Guyette,
Seth Jackson, Oliver Johnson, Audrey Jones, Shayne Kelley, Mallory Kiniry, Annie Linendoll,
Hannah Luce, Amina Malagic, Madison Meacham, Sabrina Metcalf, Justin Orr, Colby Paquet,
Willem Pontbriand, Paige Quintin, Jasmine Sayah, Jenna Sawyer,
Richard Torre
BARRE CITY MIDDLE &
ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
2nd Quarter Honor Roll • 2013-2014
CONGRATULATIONS STUDENTS ON YOUR HARD WORK!
VALSANGIACOMO, DETORA
& MCQUESTEN, P.C.
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Personal Injury
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8th Grade High Honors
Nicholas Adams, Rebecca Clark-Blouin, Connor Coache, Damion Colgrove, Orion
Colgrove, Whitney Renaud, Boris Simonenko
8th Grade Honors
Zoe Atkins, Tamieka Austin, Jack Caple, Anna Clark-Blouin, Dylan D’Agostino,
Colin Dickinson, Isaac Donahue, Tazlynn Emmons, Ericka Felch, Lauren Folland,
Reilly Flye, Angela Garcelon, Peter Huang, Marilyn Kelley, Matthew Knorr, Muskan
Lajeunesse, Chloe’ Lamphere, John M Lindley V, Noah Luce, Hannah McMahon,
Jasmine Sawyer, Jeffrey Steinman, Kloey Taylor
7th Grade High Honors
Makayla Chouinard, Colleen Couture, Samantha Gill-Owen, Calista Hanna, Carmelitta
Le, Zoe` Macdonald, Akshar Patel, Faith Redmond, Lillian Riddle, Lia Rubel, Parker
Spaulding, Brianna Storti
7th Grade Honors
Alexis Atkins-Leslie, Abigail Haigh, Kyle Harris, Chantel Hough, Corey John, Zachary
Millette, Camryn Murphy, Grace Pierce, Thomas Royea, Abigail Spencer, Tina Taylor,
Taylor Winter
6th Grade High Honors
Julian Lopez, Madison Henderson, Emma Riddle
6th Grade Honors
Teagan Atkins-Leslie, Alexander Boozan, Caleb Carrien, Iris Carter, Taylor
D’Agostino, Vanessa Greig, Samantha Hays, Damian Lawton, Aliza Lindley, Jada
MacDonald, Emily McMahon, Hayleigh Pollard, Kaile Roberts
5th Grade High Honors
Camden Boucher, Brooke Corrow, Dylan Estivill, Katrina Favreau, Allyson Felch,
Casey Flye, Savannah LaFlower, Noah Partridge, Raven Premont, Emma Proteau,
Olivia Rousse, Anastasiya Simonenko, Zachary Stabell, Amer Verem, Navaeh West
5th Grade Honors
Kathryn Anton, Haley Austin, Aiden Blouin, Kailey Craig, Josie Diego, Caitlin Dodge-
Prescott, Indira Dzano, Gabriel Emmons, Allison Everett, Sandra Fajobi, Natalie
Folland, Tyler Guyette, Seth Jackson, Oliver Johnson, Audrey Jones, Shayne Kelley,
Mallory Kiniry, Annie Linendoll, Hannah Luce, Amina Malagic, Madison Meacham,
Sabrina Metcalf, Justin Orr, Colby Paquet, Willem Pontbriand, Paige Quintin, Jasmine
Sayah, Jenna Sawyer, Richard Torre
The following honors list is provide from the school. Any questions or concerns
should be addressed directly to the school
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Nominated for Best Documentary
The Act of Killing
HHH1/2
V
ery few Americans get away with mur-
der.
The vast majority of killers are prompt-
ly arrested and serve time. The handful who are
not caught probably can’t rest easy. They have
to spend the rest of their lives sleeping with one
eye open, fearful that the blond lady from “Cold
Case” is tracking them down.
So what does it feel like to kill people and get
off completely scot free? Brave documentarian
Joshua Oppenheimer travelled to Indonesia to
fnd out.
In 1965, a military coup swept a new regime
into power. Indonesia’s new leadership viewed
Communists as a mortal threat to their govern-
ment. So they killed them all.
The government couldn’t identify every single
Communist in the vast island nation. So Jakarta
enlisted the aid of paramilitary groups and gang-
sters to help with the slaughter. Nobody knows
how many 100,000s of people were killed in that
one terrible year, but by the end there were virtu-
ally no Communists left in Indonesia. Most Chi-
nese immigrants, left-wingers, and intellectuals
were eliminated, too.
Unfortunately, plenty of countries had periods
of political and ethnic cleansing during the 20th
Century. The difference with Indonesia is that
the country and the perpetrators are basically
proud of what they’ve done.
“The Act of Killing” introduces us to a few
of the self-proclaimed gangsters who took part
in the 1965 purge. To them, Gangster is a proud
profession. They defne Gangster as “free man”
- a person who is above the law. A person who
does what needs to be done for the country when
the government can’t.
One of the 1965 killers that Oppenheimer
interviews is blissfully unaffected by guilt. His
family leads a normal, upper-class life and he
has a thoughtful defense for every accusation
Oppenheimer throws at him.
When told that the Geneva Convention con-
siders his actions war crimes, the gangster
quickly fres back: “defnitions of war crimes
change. And what right do westerners have to
defne the rules for Indonesia?”
The real star of the movie is Anwar Congo: an
unusually energetic and jovial mass murderer.
He takes us to the roof where he did most of his
killing and shows us the methods that he devel-
oped to kill most effciently without spilling too
much messy blood. He is beaming with pride
about his accomplishments.
However, Congo also admits that he doesn’t
sleep very well at night. He regularly has night-
mares in which he is haunted by the ghosts of the
men he killed.
It sounds pretty depressing. But “The Act
of Killing” becomes an interesting and unique
documentary when Joshua Oppenheimer gives
the Indonesian gangsters a professional video
camera and a small budget and urges them to
write and produce a movie: a Hollywood-style
movie about their 1965 killing spree.
The gangsters are all flm-buffs, and they are
delighted to participate. The results are macabre,
upsetting, and weird. And also really funny if
you have a dark sense of humor like me.
“The Act of Killing” is a vivid reminder that
morality, justice, and human decency are not
universal concepts; they are cultural and situ-
ational and often ignored. Murder has been a
popular vice since Cain and Abel, and it isn’t
going away any time soon.
ers may also introduce participants to a subject
related to the issues surrounding dementia.
Featured speaker at the inaugural Montpelier
Memory Café was Mick Byers, RN, founder of
the first Memory Café in Vermont at the Valley
Terrace residential facility in White River
Junction. Mick shared with the enthusiastic par-
ticipants who braved a January ice storm his,
“high hopes that this well spent time will help us
understand the journey this disease has put us on
and to experience some joy, love and peace with
our loved ones along the way.”
The Montpelier Memory Café is free and open
to the public; a care partner must accompany
participants. Participants and volunteers are wel-
come and encouraged to attend the Café, as well
as its Steering Committee meetings. The next
Montpelier Memory Café will be held February
8th, 10am to 11:30am at the Montpelier Senior
Activity Center, 58 Barre Street, Montpelier. It
will be an early nod to St. Patrick’s Day with a
musical performance by harpist Hilari Farrington,
and refreshments including soda bread. The
March 8th Café will feature poet Geof Hewitt
and guest speaker will be Jessie Cornell, MSW,
Community Outreach Specialist, Alzheimer’s
Association Vermont Chapter.
For further information contact: Lisbeth Dodd,
229-9630.
continued from previous page
Montpelier Memory Café
Central Vermont Rotary
Valentine
Dinner - Raffle
Silent Auction
STEAKHOUSE RESTAURANT
Friday, Feb. 7, 2014
$2500 First Prize
$500 Second Prize
$150 Third Prize
Two Other Prizes of $100
PLUS Merchandise and
Dinner Prizes
And Other Surprises!
GREAT BUFFET DINNER!
Tickets $100 each
includes 2 Dinners & Raffle
Call Gary Hass at
802 479-2582 for
more Info/Reservation
A FEW OF THE
ITEMS IN OUR
SILENT RAFFLE...
•New England Patriots
autographed photo of
Stevan Ridley
•Boston Red Sox
autographed baseball
by Dave Ross
•Boston Bruins
autographed puck by
Goalie Chad Johnson
•Lake Monster
Bobblehead
•UVM Men’s
Basketball Tickets
•Champlain Orchard
(Shoreham, VT)
Gift Basket
•Morse Farm
Gift Certificate
•Midstate
Dodge/Hyundai
Seasonal
Tire Changeover
And Many More
Items &
Certificates!
February 5, 2014 The WORLD page 7
The PlayCare Center
at Berlin now has infant
spaces available.
Mention this ad and
get 10% off
your first 4 weeks
of enrollment.
Call Jenny now at
229-2869 for more information
and to schedule a tour.
Your Local
Office Solution Center

59 North Main St.- Barre, VT
www.CopyWorldVT.com &
info@CopyWorldVT.com
802 476-3615 - Fax 888-647-1615
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And Expanded Retail & More Printing Services
The Heritage Pellet has one of the highest heat outputs in
the market – up to 51,000 BTUs – and it is also one of the
cleanest burning and most efficient pellet stoves in the in-
dustry – up to 86%.
The Heritage Pellet is able to heat up to 2,000 square feet
and has a capacity for up to 50 pounds of pellets into its
sealed fuel hopper. Its operation is quiet and fully auto-
matic, and the variable heat settings can be managed
through the programmable, thermostat-ready controller.
The fan and the auger speeds are electronically operated.
All the controls are conveniently located for easy access.
Twin City Plaza
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Dinner Dance & Auction
Saturday, February 22, 2014
Barre Elks Club
Cocktails from 5:00pm - 6:00pm
Roast Pork Dinner to follow
Live Music
Tickets are $25.00 per person
For tickets call Barre Elks (479-9522)
or Corey (249-0827).
Remember our Dinner Dance generally raises 25%
of our proceeds. This year we are selling only
300 tickets, so get yours soon.
Tournament
Entry Fee $250
Deadline Feb. 22
15th Annual
Winter Coed
Softball
Tournament
Feb. 28 - Mar. 2, 2014
Barre Town Rec. Fields
Sponsored by:
Barre Elks, Gustos, Mulligans, Aubuchon Hardware
To Benefit
www.freezingfunforfamilies.com
To Make a donation: PayPal -
www.freezingfunforfamilies.com
or Make checks payable to
Freezing Fun For Families
Mail To:
Corey Touchette
37 Bolster Road
Barre, VT 05641
802-249-0827
For tickets call Barre Elks (479-
9522) or orey (249-0827).
Brantley Brooks
Almost 2 years old. Battling the very rare HLH
Mike, Williamstown Ben, Williamstown
I’m not
staying
warm.
I’m freezing.
I have to work
outside part
of the day.
Layers
Layers
Layers
What
are you
doing to
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I am
going to
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soon.
Amy, East Montpelier
I play
hockey.
Joyce, Barre Town
The Orleans Southwest Supervisory Union District Supports
Publicly Funded Pre-Kindergarten (preschool) Education
for children between the ages of 3 and 5 years who reside in the towns of:
Craftsbury, Greensboro, Hardwick, Stannard, Wolcott, and Woodbury
Applications for the 2014-2015 school year are due February 21, 2014
What is publicly funded preschool education?
Publicly funded pre-school is defined as:
Six to ten hours per week of developmentally appropriate early development and
learning experiences that are based on Vermont’s Early Learning Standards. Children
who reside in the Orleans Southwest Supervisory Union and are between the ages of
three-five are eligible. Pre-school education is limited to the academic year (September
2014-June 2015).
Where are these publicly funded preschool programs?
The Orleans Southwest S.U.’s publicly funded preschool programs are located in community
private early care and education programs that meet specific quality standards and two district
classrooms, one in Hardwick Elementary School and one at Depot Center in Wolcott. The
community early care and education programs that Orleans Southwest S.U. partners with are:
Four Seasons of Early Learning •
Hardwick Head Start •
Wee Explorers •
Mud City Kids •
Orchard Valley Waldorf School •
East Hill Preschool •
Is this 6-10 hours/ Preschool program tuition free?
The preschool programs, Village Center at Hardwick Elementary School, Depot Center in
Wolcott, and Hardwick Head Start are free. The preschool program offered through a partner
early care and education program may charge families the difference between the actual costs
of providing the 6-10 hour program and what the Orleans Southwest S.U. pays. Families would
continue to be charged fully for whatever care and education program the child needs beyond
the 10 hours/week during the academic year.
Is my child eligible for publicly funded preschool?
If your child is 3 or 4 years old by September 1, 2014 and resides in Orleans Southwest S.U.,
then your child is eligible. Each program listed above has specific age requirements; please
check the program’s criteria.
Please Note: If we receive more applications that we have funding to support, then we will
need to use a random selection process to determine which children receive publicly funded
pre-school education. We will inform you whether your child has a slot by March 30, 2014.
How do I apply?
Applications will be available at each public school and at partner programs beginning
February 1-21, 2014. The form will also be available online at www.ossu.org. All applications
must be submitted by 2:30 on Friday, February 21, 2014 to either the partner programs or at
one of the public schools.
Community Cinema: The Trials of Muhammad Ali:
Wednesday, February 5, 7pm
This film covers the famed boxer’s toughest bout of all: his
battle to overturn the five-year prison sentence he received for
refusing U.S. military service. The film explores Ali’s exile years
when he was banned from boxing and found himself in the
crosshairs of conflicts concerning race, religion, and wartime dis-
sent. A panel discussion will follow.
LGBTQ Reading & Discussion: Why Be Happy When You
Could Be Normal? Monday, February 10, 7pm
This discussion is part of a series launched by the Kellogg-
Hubbard Library and the Unitarian Church in Montpelier, to focus
on issues in the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and trans communities.
Copies of this New York Times Notable Book are available to bor-
row at the adult circulation desk. “One of the most entertaining
and moving memoirs in recent memory… A coming-of-age story,
a coming-out story, and a celebration of the act of reading… A
marvelous gift of consolation and wisdom.” —The Boston Globe
First Wednesdays: Speak to Me: A Program of Words and
Chamber Music: Wednesday, February 12, 7:30pm
A piano quartet from the acclaimed Craftsbury Chamber
Players ensemble performs music inspired by literature. A Farmers’
Night Series event, AT THE STATE HOUSE. Sponsored by Cabot
Creamery.
Cabin Fever Spelling Bee: Saturday, February 15, 7pm
Join us for the second annual Cabin Fever Spelling Bee! There
will be two teams this year: Writers and Readers. The “Writers”
team will consist of local authors. Patrons can sign up for the
“Readers” team lottery at the adult circulation desk. Tickets are on
sale now for $10. (Tickets at the door will cost $12.)
Cinema Borealis: Documenting the North: Tuesday, February
18, 5:30 to 7:30pm
In the western imagination, the word “Eskimo” often conjures
images from Robert Flaherty’s 1922 docudrama Nanook of the
North. But thinking of Nanook as representative of the northern
world is reductive; Arctic cultures are more complex than they
might first appear. What is the role of the documentary filmmaker
in making distant unknowns more accessible?
Navigating the New Vermont Health Care Exchange
Meet with Peter Sterling, Executive Director of the Vermont
Campaign for Health Care Security, to help you find the plan that
is just right for you.
- Friday, February 7, 11am to 2:30pm
- Wednesday, February 12, 1:30pm to 5pm
- Thursday, February 13, 10am to 2pm
- Tuesday, February 18, 1:30pm to 5pm
- Friday, February 21, 11am to 2pm
Kellogg-Hubbard
Library News
Montpelier
page 8 The WORLD February 5, 2014
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Healthy Community
Classes
Community Reiki Clinics
Reiki is a gentle Japanese healing art, which supports
health, balance and well-being. Reiki also is a
wonderful way to support healing from physical or
mental illness, or for recovering from surgery. Using
������� ���� ���������� ��� ������� ����� ������������ 
places her hands on or above the body, as the
recipient relaxes on a massage table, fully clothed.
Reiki can help reduce and manage stress, nurturing
the body’s own healing ability. Community Reiki
sessions are 20-30 minutes in length. Call to reserve
� ����� �� ������� �� � ���� ����� ���� ����� ������ 
For more information, contact Sylvia Gaboriault at
249-1218 or email sylviag.vt@gmail.com.
When: Saturday, February 15
10:00 am - Noon
Where: 141 Main Street (Suite One), Montpelier
Cost: $10
Healthy Eating / Healthy Living
for Kids
A fun way for families with children who struggle with
weight issues to learn about healthy food choices and
lifestyle changes. Join other families with similar issues
and receive information and support, both for kids and
parents. Kids help prepare healthy snacks and learn new
games to increase activity at home. Each session includes
private one-on-one time with a nurse practitioner as
well as meeting as a group with a dietitian and a nurse
practitioner. Shared medical visits are billed to your
��������� ������� ���� �� ��� ������� ����� ������ ��� 
deductibles and co-pays apply. To register call Associates
in Pediatrics at 371-5950.
When: Tuesdays, March 18 to April 22
5:00- 6:30 pm
Where: Associates in Pediatrics, Berlin
Tax Preparation
abacusvt.com 79 River Street, Suite 204
Montpelier, VT 05602 • 225-8907
Abacus Bookkeeping
& Tax Service
Denice K. Brown, EA
Accountant, Owner, Tax Specialist
Justine Macris, RTRP, ERO
Phone: (802) 479-1040

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taxmax.vt@gmail.com
VERMONT
PROFESSIONAL TAX &
FINANCIAL SERVICES LLC
• PERSONAL & BUSINESS
TAX PREPARATION
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CONSULTING
GERARD M. GALVIN, JD CPA
802-839-6929
max@vtprotax.com
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INCOME TAX PREPARER
802-476-6327
802-477-2368 (C)
39 YEARS EXPERIENCE
Senior Discounts
(62 & over)
william.hull@charter.net
343 E. Cobble Hill Road
Barre, VT 05641
TAX PREP
RESOURCES
Cutler Memorial Library
Book Club News
The Food for Thought Book Club and potluck meets every 2nd
Monday at 6:30pm, with discussion at 7pm. On February 10th, the
group discusses Quiet by Susan Cain and Social Intelligence by
Daniel Goleman.
The Plainfield Book Club meets every 3rd Monday at 7pm. On
February 17th, the group discusses Zorro by Isabel Allende.
Kitchen Medicine Workshop: Saturday, Feb. 22, 2-3:30pm
Herbs and spices have been used for centuries to enhance the
flavor of our foods. But did you know that these plants also have
healing properties? Join Community Herbalist Emily Wheeler in
meeting these plants from an herbalist’s perspective, discussing
their chemistry and why they have the power to support health,
from soothing a sore throat or anxiety, to relieving the common
cold or nausea. Leave with the knowledge of how to use your
home spice rack as an herbal first aid kit! Class is open to all ages,
no experience necessary. $2-$5 suggested donation. No one turned
away for lack of funds.
Storytime with Leda Schubert: Tuesday, Feb. 25, 2:30pm
Plainfield’s own Leda Schubert, former Children’s Librarian
and faculty member at the Vermont College of Fine Arts, has cre-
ated several celebrated books for kids. Most of her books have
received national acclaim, and she was this year’s winner of the
Orbis Pictus award for her most recent book, Monsieur Marceau.
Maybe you’ve borrowed Princess of Borscht or Here Comes
Darrell or Ballet of the Elephants or Feeding the Sheep or Reading
to Peanut from your library... here’s a chance to hear them read by
the author herself! All ages welcome.
Introduction to Amateur Radio: Thursday, Feb. 17, 3-5pm
The many facets of amateur radio attract practitioners with a
wide range of interests. Many amateurs begin with a fascination of
radio communication and then combine other personal interests to
make pursuit of the hobby rewarding. Some of the focal areas
amateurs pursue include radio contesting, radio propagation study,
public service communication, technical experimentation, and
computer networking. With licensed shortwave radio operator
David Ferland, for independent-aged youth & adults.
Cutler Memorial Library is located at 151 High St. (Route 2),
Plainfield. For more info: 802-454-8504, info@cutlerlibrary.org,
or www.cutlerlibrary.org.
Groton Free
Public Library
Crafts 4 Kids. Friday, Feb. 7, from 3-6pm. All materials pro-
vided for “Mitten Mates.” ‘Tis the season! Make a paper mitten
wreath, mobile, or magnet. Free - drop in anytime!
Crafts 4 Kids. Friday, Feb. 14, from 3-6pm. All materials pro-
vided for “All Things Heart.” Crafts + plus cookie decorating =
Happy Valentine’s Day! Free - drop in anytime!
Between the Covers: YA Book Discussion. Monday, Feb. 17
at 6:30pm. This month’s featured read: 2013-2014 Green Mountain
Book Award nominee Beauty Queens by Libba Bray. New folks
welcome! Copies available at the library.
Book Discussion. Monday, Feb. 24 at 7pm. This month’s fea-
tured read: How the Garcia Girls Lost their Accents by Julia
Alvarez. New folks welcome! Copies available at the library.
Crafts & Conversation. Every Wednesday from 1-3pm. Join
us with your ideas and projects-in-process – or – just join us!
All of our programs are free and open to the public. Find us on
Facebook (Groton Free Public Library) or contact Anne: grotonli-
braryvt@gmail.com, 802.584.3358.
Open Hours: Mon 2:30-7pm, Wed 10am-4pm, Thurs 10am-
12pm, Fri 2:30-7pm. Visit us on Facebook: www.facebook.com/
GrotonFreePublicLibrary
Sofia Shatkivska:
Standing for Human Dignity
Standing for Human Dignity, an exhibit of drawings by local
artist Sofia Shatkivska, is now on display at the Milne Room of the
Aldrich Public Library in Barre, through February 14.
Shatkivska, a Washington resident who is originally from
Ukraine, was both horrified and inspired by the popular non-vio-
lent uprising initiated by young Ukrainians in late November,
2013 and continuing through the present. “I started this suddenly,”
she said about her charcoal drawings, “not with special paper or
materials, but because I needed to show what was happening
there.”
The strong black and white drawings depict huge crowds gath-
ered in freezing temperatures in downtown Kiev (between 400,000
and 800,000 on the weekends of December 1 and 8, according to
Wikipedia), as well as the phalanxes of police behind curved
shields who have been accused of brutal beatings and assassina-
tions of protesters. Red lights and a recording of the din of protest-
ers beating on metal cans enhance the intensity of the exhibit.
“People are supposed to have some opinion,” Shatkivska
asserted at the opening, “some protest.” This exhibit, inspired by
her passionate identification with these unfolding events, is an
opportunity for central Vermonters to have something very close
to a ringside seat at a historical event. Don’t miss it.
February 5, 2014 The WORLD page 9
Missing a connection to your career field
and our young adults? Then come on in
to the Barre Technical Center and
share your expertise in your field as a
substitute in one of our Tech Programs!
This will give you a chance to remain
connected to your field and assist students
with applying the skills they are learning in
a Real World environment!
If interested, please call Penny
Chamberlin, Director for more
information and an interview.
Contact:
802-476-6237, ext. 1138
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The following free events all take place at the
Jaquith Public Library, Old Schoolhouse
Common, 122 School St., in Marshfield. For
more information or for the titles of the movies,
e-mail: jaquithpublibrary@gmail.com, call 802-
426-3581 or visit our website: marshfield.lib.
vt.us.
Film: Do the Math: Friday, February 7, 7pm
The film highlights the world-wide efforts by
Bill McKibben and students on climate change.
The film presents three basic figures that define
the problem of keeping our world from becoming
an uninhabitable by us. It also promotes the
divestment of all fossil fuel related investments
in pension, funds, endowments, etc.
Movies for Everyone Series: Saturday,
February 8, 11am
Films that are fun for all ages, that deserve a
big screen, and that you might not have seen a
hundred times already.
This 1997 film is The Wind in the Willows as
enacted by the Monty Python lads and friends.
Classic Film Night with Rick Winston and
Tom Blachly: Wednesday, February 12, 7pm
Our viewing experience will be greatly
enriched by Rick’s presentation of each film fol-
lowed by a lively discussion after the viewing.
This film, made in 2000 is directed by Kenneth
Lonergan, and stars Laura Linney, Matthew
Broderick, and Mark Ruffalo. The life of a single
mother (Linney) is thrown into turmoil after her
struggling, rarely-seen younger brother (Ruffalo)
returns to town. Beautifully acted, this charming
and unpretentious snapshot of small-town life and
family ties is both heart-warming and bitter-
sweet.
Industrial History of Marshfield: Tuesday,
Feb. 18, 6:30pm
An illustrated talk about the places where
things were made or processed in Marshfield dur-
ing the self-sufficient 1800s (from bricks, to logs,
cheese, starch, shoes, butterboxes, liniments, and
worm elixir). Audience input is welcome. Janet
Nielsen is the presenter for the Marshfield
Historical Society. Free, open to all.
Song Circle: Community Sing-A-Long:
February 19, 6:45pm
This very popular program with Rich and
Laura Atkinson happens the third Wednesday of
every month. A singing background is not neces-
sary and song books will be provided. Rich and
Laura use a variety of instruments to accompany
the singers.

Writing and Reading Film Series: Thursday,
Feb. 20, 7pm
In this 2012 French comedy, a high school
teacher encourages a student with a talent for
writing. This film tickles the brain as narrative
and “reality” invade each other’s territory, and the
cost of a good story turns out to be high.

Central Vermont New Directions Coalition
& Vermont Department of Liquor Control
wish to congratulate these local businesses
for successfully passing 2012-2013
Alcohol and Tobacco compliance checks.
Adamant Coop
Barre Street Market
Belladonna (Montp. Beverage)
Berlin Street Mobil
C.P. Dudley Store
Cam-Mar (Yankee Spirits)
Champlain Farms
Charlie O’s
Cumberland Farms #8024
East Calais General Store
Fastop
Kinney Drugs #11
Kurrle Fuels
Maplewood Convenience Store
McGillicuddy’s Irish Pub
Meadow Mart
Ming Moon VT
Parker’s Quick Stop
Perry’s Service Station
��������� ��������
Price Chopper
Rite Aid Pharmacy #4581
Shaw’s Berlin
Shaw’s Montpelier
Short Stop
Simon’s Berlin Store
Simon’s Montpelier Store
VFW Post #792
Waheguru Corp. (LBJ’s)
Wal-Mart Store #2682
www.cvndc.org � 223-4949
Thank you for helping to keep our youth safe and
preventing underage sales of alcohol and tobacco.
Lost Nation Theater
winter classes & camps
beginner to advanced. good for performance. good for life!
Ferdinand the Bull THEATER Camp
PERFORMANCE for ages 9 and up
Mon-Fri, 9am–Noon, Feb 24–28; show: 1pm Sat Mar 1
immerse yourself in physical theater to create original staging of
the classic story. Led by actor-choreographer Taryn Noelle.
802.229.0492
lostnationtheater.org
Just Say YES!
IMPROV for students & adults ages 13+
Saturdays, February 15 & 22
11am-1pm: Beginners / 2-4pm: Experienced
explore character, spontaneity, confidence and creativity with
noted director & comic guru Margo Whitcomb.
AUDITION Workshop
BOOK IT! for students & adults ages 15+
Saturday, February 8
advice, do’s & don’ts, + monologue coaching from LNT’s
artistic directors who’ve seen tens of thousands of auditions.
Music-Theater CABARET Intensive
PERFORMANCE for ages 12 – 21
Mon-Fri, 1–5pm, Feb 24 – 28; show: 4pm Sat Mar 1
vocal technique, interpretation, staging, patter. solo & group work
culminate in original Cabaret focused on the american song book.
Directed by Taryn Noelle & Dan Boomhower
classes & camps
spring & summer too!
call for scholarship
assistance
ad courtesy of The World
Norwich Writers Series Presents Memoirist
Norwich University’s 2014 Writers Series
will host acclaimed memoirist Jaed Coffin,
author of A Chant to Soothe Wild Elephants and
of the forthcoming book, Roughhouse Friday,
for a public reading on Monday, Feb. 10, at
4:30pm in Milano Ballroom.
Coffin’s first memoir, A Chant to Soothe Wild
Elephants, chronicles his move as a 21-year-old,
half-Thai American from Middlebury College to
his mother’s native village in Thailand in pursuit
of being ordained as a Buddhist monk.
Coffin’s forthcoming memoir, Roughhouse
Friday, is a memoir of his time as a barroom
boxer in Juneau, Alaska, where he won a mid-
dleweight title.
This is the first event in the 2014 Writers
Series, which is presented by the College of
Liberal Arts and the Department of English &
Communications.
All events in this series are free and open to
the public. Books will be available for sale, and
a signing will follow the reading.
■ ■ ■
page 10 The WORLD February 5, 2014
We now accept
~Financing Available To Qualified Buyers~
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Boilers - Furnaces - Water Heaters
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PREFERRED PREFERRED
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DENNIS SMITH
802-476-8278
Locally Owned & Operated
Buying gold, silver
and coins
We will evaluate your estate jewelry, sterling
flatware, tea sets and coin collections.
We will answer any question you have about
your item. If you are unsure if your estate jewelry
is authentic or costume, we will test your gold,
platinum, silver and diamonds to find out its purity
and if it's real. We base the value on the piece,
and the current market price of gold, silver and
platinum when you walk in the door.
John Kirby, Owner • (802) 777-5550
9 South Main Street, Waterbury (Next Door to Arvad's)
Owner John Kirby is a 1997 graduate of the American Numismatic Association,
Colorado Springs, for coin grading, certification and authentication.
Green Mountain
Coins & Estate Jewelry
Receive the highest payout in the area...GUARANTEED.
WANTED TO BUY
Older Items & Antiques
Call before you have a tag sale!
We Buy: Older Mixing Bowls, Pottery, China, Glass, Vases,
Candlesticks, Sterling, Coins, Costume Jewelry, Toys, Jugs, Crocks,
Canning Jars & Bottles, Lamps, Prints, Paintings, Knick-Knacks,
Holiday Decorations, etc., etc.
Full House - Attic/Basement Contents - Estate Liquidations
Rich Aronson • 802-563-2204 • 802-595-3632 CELL
www.edwardjones.com
Member SIPC
Having More Retirement
Accounts is Not the Same
as Having More Money.
When it comes to the number of retirement accounts you have,
the saying “more is better” is not necessarily true. In fact, if you
hold multiple accounts with various brokers, it can be difcult to
keep track of your investments and to see if you’re properly
diversified.* At the very least, multiple accounts usually mean
multiple fees.
Bringing your accounts to Edward Jones could help solve all
that. Plus, one statement can make it easier to see if you’re
moving toward your goals.
*Diversification does not guarantee a profit or protect against loss.
To learn why consolidating your retirement accounts
to Edward Jones makes sense, call your local finan-
cial advisor today.
IRT-1435B-A
Cathy Systo, AAMS®
Financial Advisor
.
236 South Main Street
Barre, VT 05641
802-476-2398
www.edwardjones.com
Member SIPC
Having More Retirement
Accounts is Not the Same
as Having More Money.
When it comes to the number of retirement accounts you have,
the saying “more is better” is not necessarily true. In fact, if you
hold multiple accounts with various brokers, it can be difcult to
keep track of your investments and to see if you’re properly
diversified.* At the very least, multiple accounts usually mean
multiple fees.
Bringing your accounts to Edward Jones could help solve all
that. Plus, one statement can make it easier to see if you’re
moving toward your goals.
*Diversification does not guarantee a profit or protect against loss.
To learn why consolidating your retirement accounts
to Edward Jones makes sense, call your local finan-
cial advisor today.
IRT-1435B-A
Cathy Systo, AAMS®
Financial Advisor
.
236 South Main Street
Barre, VT 05641
802-476-2398
www.edwardjones.com
Member SIPC
Having More Retirement
Accounts is Not the Same
as Having More Money.
When it comes to the number of retirement accounts you have,
the saying “more is better” is not necessarily true. In fact, if you
hold multiple accounts with various brokers, it can be difcult to
keep track of your investments and to see if you’re properly
diversified.* At the very least, multiple accounts usually mean
multiple fees.
Bringing your accounts to Edward Jones could help solve all
that. Plus, one statement can make it easier to see if you’re
moving toward your goals.
*Diversification does not guarantee a profit or protect against loss.
To learn why consolidating your retirement accounts
to Edward Jones makes sense, call your local finan-
cial advisor today.
IRT-1435B-A
Cathy Systo, AAMS®
Financial Advisor
.
236 South Main Street
Barre, VT 05641
802-476-2398
“Central Vermont’s Newspaper”
403 Route 302-Berlin
Barre, VT 05641
Tel.: (802)479-2582
1-800-639-9753
Fax: (802)479-7916
email: editor@vt-world.com
or sales@vt-world.com
web site: www.vt-world.com
Publisher: Gary Hass and Deborah
Phillips. Classified Manager: Ruth
Madigan. Bookkeeping: Lisa Companion.
Receptionist: Darlene Callahan. Copy
Editor: Laura Rappold. Production
Manager: Christine Richardson.
Production: Kathy Gonet, Laura Rappold.
Sales Representatives: Kay Roberts,
Robert Salvas, Mike Jacques. Circulation:
Aeletha Kelly. Distribution: Jim Elliot,
Gary Villa, Elliot Ackerman, Stephen
Daniels.
The WORLD is published by WORLD
Publications, Inc. in Berlin, Vermont. The
WORLD is distributed free, and serves
the residents of Washington and north-
central Orange counties. The WORLD is
published every Wednesday.
The WORLD assumes no financial
responsibility for typographical errors in
advertising but will reprint in the following
issue that part of any advertisement in
which the typographical error occurred.
Notice by advertisers of any error must
be given to this newspaper within five (5)
business days of the date of publication.
The WORLD reserves all rights to
advertising copy produced by its own
staff. No such advertisement may be
used or reproduced without express per-
mission.
Office Hours: Monday-Friday 8:00 a.m.-
5:00 p.m.; Closed Saturday and Sunday.
Subscriptions: $8.00/month, $48.00/6
months, $96.00/year. First Class.
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achieve Gold Standard scoring in future audits you may continue to
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Distribution: Jim Elliot, Gary Villa,
Elliot Ackerman, Stephen
Daniels.
distributed free, and
serves the residents of
Washington and north-cen-
tral Orange counti
VERMONT SUPERIOR COURT
WASHINGTON UNIT
PROBATE DIVISION
DOCKET NO. 1053-8-13-Wnpr
IN RE ESTATE OF:
BEVERLY A. FISHER
LATE OF:
MONTPELIER, VERMONT
NOTICE
TO CREDITORS
To the creditors of the estate of
BEVERLY A. FISHER,
late of Montpelier, Vermont.
I have been appointed a personal
representative of the above-named
estate. All creditors having claims
against the estate must present
their claims in writing within four
(4) months of the date of the first
publication of this notice. The claim
must be presented to me at the address
listed below with a copy filed with
the register of the Probate Court. The
claim will be forever barred if it is not
presented as described above within
the four (4) month deadline.
Dated: January 27, 2014
Signed: Faye Sweet
693 U.S. Route 2
Middlesex, VT
(802) 229-9814
Name of Publication: The WORLD
First Publication Date: 2/5/2014
Second Publication Date: 2/12/2014
Address of Probate Court:
Vermont Superior Court
Washington Probate Unit
10 Elm Street, Unit 2
Montpelier, Vermont 05602
Contacting Congress
U.S. Rep. Peter Welch
Mailing address: 30 Main St., Third Floor, Suite 350,
Burlington, VT 05401
Web site: www.welch.house.gov
Phone: (888) 605-7270 or (802) 652-2450
U.S. Sen. Bernard Sanders
Mailing address: 1 Church St., Second Floor,
Burlington, VT 05401
Web site: www.sanders.senate.gov
Phone: (802) 862-0697
U.S. Sen. Patrick Leahy
Mailing address: 199 Main St., Fourth Floor,
Burlington, VT 05401
Web site: www.leahy.senate.gov
Phone: (802) 863-2525
The WORLD welcomes
Letters to the Editor concern-
ing public issues. Letters
should be 400 words or less
and may be subject to editing
due to space constraints.
Submissions should also con-
tain the name of the author
and a contact telephone num-
ber for verification. For letters
of thanks, contact our adver-
tising department at 479-2582;
non-profit rates are available.
Heroes Wanted!
Editor:
Is there an unsung Hero in
your community? We need your
help so that we can tell their
story.
At its first ever Heroes
Breakfast, the Vermont & New
Hampshire Upper Valley
American Red Cross will honor
community members who have
demonstrated heroism through
extraordinary acts of courage or
kindness. The Heroes Breakfast
is a celebration of spirit and
community. Whether it’s help-
ing someone escape a burning
building or changing a life
through acts of generosity and caring, heroism happens in our
community every day.
Honorees will be recognized at a celebration on April 29, 2014.
But first, help us learn about the heroes in our community by
nominating someone to receive an award in one of the following
categories: Armed Forces/Military Hero, Animal Hero, Youth
Good Samaritan, Adult Good Samaritan, First Responder,
Community Impact, Blood Services/Gift of Life, and Spirit of the
Red Cross.
■ ■ ■
Do You Qualify for Earned Income Tax Credit?
Tax Facts Provided by Tax Max
The income tax season has arrived and many people who qual-
ify may not be aware of the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC)
available from both the federal and state governments. It was
established a few years ago as a sort of reward for working people.
Thousands are missing out on this credit each year because they
do not request it when completing their income taxes. The IRS
estimates that 20% of all eligible taxpayers do not file for EITC.
Green Mountain United Way actively promotes this program for
the benefit of those who might qualify. Assisting them in learning
how to acquire this tax credit is part of its initiative to creating
more financial stability in our communities.
Who qualifies? Generally, taxpayers may be able to claim the
credit if their incomes in 2013 did not exceed the following lim-
its:
• $14,340 (or, $19,680 if married and filing jointly with no quali-
fying children)
• $37,870 (or, $43,210 if married and filing jointly with 1 qualify-
ing child)
• $43,038 (or, $48,378 if married and filing jointly with 2 qualify-
ing children)
• $46,227 (or, $51,567 if married and filing jointly with 3 or more
qualifying children)
Is it worth filling out the one form if you qualify? Many people,
until they see what they can actually receive for a tax credit or
refund, think not. However, the following shows the maximum
credits available for those who qualify based on the same catego-
ries as shown above:
• $487.00
• $3,250.00
• $5,372.00
• $6,044.00
For those who qualify, requesting the credit can mean a signifi-
cant amount that reduces their tax burden or assists them in paying
bills and putting some aside as savings. In 2012, more than 45,000
Vermonters claimed EITC on their taxes and received a combined
average refund of more than $2,000. It is definitely worth request-
ing the credit if you qualify. It could mean money in your pocket.
Keep EITC in mind when completing your taxes. You might be
very happy you did.
Green Mountain United Way is pleased to make this informa-
tion available to all in its five-county service area. For more infor-
mation, contact them at 802-229-9532 or www.gmunitedway.org.
The heroic act or activities must have occurred in the past 16
months, occurring September 2012 or later, to be eligible for an
award at the April event. Nominations will be accepted through
February 24th, 2014. To nominate a Hero and for more informa-
tion, please visit: www.redcross.org/vermontheroes or call (802)
660-9130 ext., 111.
Larry Crist
American Red Cross Regional Executive
Vermont & the New Hampshire Upper Valley Region
The following questions and answers are provided to clarify the
tax implications of financial issues faced by workers who have
lost their jobs.
Is severance pay taxable? Yes, severance pay is taxable in the
year that you receive it. Your employer will include this amount on
your Form W-2 and will withhold appropriate federal and state
taxes.
What about accumulated leave or vacation pay and sick
pay? Yes, annual, or vacation pay, and sick pay are calculated as
wages by your employer and will be included in your Form W-2.
Is unemployment compensation taxable? Yes, your state
unemployment insurance benefits (up to 26 weeks) and your
extended benefits (up to an additional 13 weeks) are taxable. You
may choose to have 10% withheld for federal taxes by completing
Form W-4V. The State will provide you with a Form 1099-G prior
to January 31st of each year, showing the amount of taxable ben-
efits paid in the prior year.
What about gifts of cash and property from family or
friends? Generally, the person who receives the gift is not liable
for any taxes on the gift. If the gift produces income like interest,
dividends or rent payments, the receiver would be responsible for
taxes on that produced income. Each year there is a specific
maximum amount that may be given that will not create a taxable
event to either the giver or the receiver. Gifts in excess of this
maximum may be subject to gift taxes by the gift giver.
When will I get my final Form W-2 from my employer? Your
employer must provide your Form W-2 by January 31st after the
close of the calendar year. As an example, 2013 Forms W-2 are
due to employees by January 31, 2014.
What if my employer filed bankruptcy or went out of busi-
ness, how do I get my Form W-2? In either case the employer
must file and report your wages and withholding on a Form W-2
at year’s end. If you do not receive your Form W-2, try to contact
your employer or their representative. If you are unsuccessful,
your tax preparer or the IRS can assist you in filing a substitute
Form W-2 using your records. A good precaution is to keep year-
to-date records or pay stubs until you receive your Form W-2.
Can I file an early tax return and receive any refund due?
No. Individual income tax returns are based on a calendar year and
cannot be filed and processed earlier than January 1st of the next
calendar year. The earliest filing date in 2014 is January 31 for
2013 returns.
■ ■ ■
February 5, 2014 The WORLD page 11
Websterville Fire District No. 3
105 Church Hill Road
P.O. Box 155
Websterville, VT 05678
WARNING
ANNUAL MEETING OF THE
WEBSTERVILLE FIRE DISTRICT #3
OF THE TOWN OF BARRE, VERMONT
The inhabitants of the Websterville Fire District
#3 of the Town of Barre, Vermont who are voters
in the Town Meeting of Town of Barre, are hereby
duly warned that the Annual Meeting of the
Websterville Fire District #3 of the Town of Barre,
Vermont will be held at the Websterville Baptist
Church in said Town of Barre on Wednesday,
February 11, 2014 at 6:00 P.M. Please make note
of the location change
Prudential Committee
Websterville Fire District #3
ORLEANS SOUTHWEST
SUPERVISORY UNION
Announces the following
KINDERGARTEN
REGISTRATION SCHEDULE
FEBRUARY 1-21, 2014
For children who will be 5 years of age before September 1, 2014,
and reside in Craftsbury, Hardwick, Greensboro, Stannard,
Wolcott, or Woodbury
Please bring a copy of child’s birth certificate and immunization record.
Craftsbury: by appointment- contact Nan or Jane at 586-2541
Hardwick: drop by anytime between 8am-3pm see Tess or call 472-5411
Lakeview: by appointment-contact Lorelei at 533-7066
Wolcott: by appointment-contact Dawn at 472-6551
Woodbury: by appointment-contact Noreen at 472-5715
ORLEANS SOUTHWEST SUPERVISORY UNION
Announces the following
PRE-SCHOOL REGISTRATION SCHEDULE
FEBRUARY 1-21, 2014
For children who will be 3 or 4 years of age before September 1, 2014, and reside
in Craftsbury, Hardwick, Greensboro, Stannard, Wolcott, or Woodbury
Please bring a copy of your child’s birth certificate and immunization record.
The following publicly funded preschool programs provide up
to 10 hours a week for 35 weeks of preschool programming.
Registration forms will be available during the weeks of February 1-21, 2014
at the main office in any of the public schools within OSSU and at the sites
identified with a star beside their name below. The registration form is also
available on-line at www.ossu.org. Print registration form and submit to any
of the public schools. All registration forms must be submitted by 2:30 on
Friday, February 21 to the administrative assistant in each public school office
or starred preschool site with a copy of birth certificate and immunization
record.
For more information about individual programs, you may contact:
OSSU Preschool Programs- Open to 4 year olds
Depot Center – Barb Strong 888-1770
Village Center- Jessica Lamberton-Brown 472-5411
*Head Start- Open to 3 and 4 year olds Contact Denise Hill at 472-5496
*Four Seasons of Erly Learning –Open to 3 and 4 year olds
Contact Michelle LaFlam at 533-2261
*Wee Explorers Preschool- Open to 3 and 4 year olds
Contact Gail Beck at 888-2087
*Mud City Kids- Open to 3 and 4 year olds
Contact Tracy Patnoe at 888-1881
*Orchard Valley Waldorf School Contact Deb Reed at 456-7400
*East Hill Preschool - Open to 3 and 4 year olds (4 year olds will have
priority) Contact Melissa Jacobs at 586-8079
The following is a private provider:
Wee Tots-Open to 3 and 4 year olds
Contact Jennifer Whitney at 472-6775 for information/availability
CITY OF
MONTPELIER
Pre-Town Meeting
A Pre-Town Meeting has
been scheduled for Thursday,
February 20, 2014, at 7:00 P.M. in the Montpelier
High School Cafeteria. Both City and School
offcials will make presentations, followed by
an opportunity for questions and discussion. It
is important for voters to know that this is an
opportunity to ask questions about Warning
Articles on the ballot; copies of the ballot will be
available that evening. All municipal meetings
are accessible to people with disabilities and are
held in accordance with the public meeting and
public records laws. ORCA will be televising
this event on Channel 17 as well. Questions:
223-9502.
Offce of the City Manager
I
have had so many people talk to me
about their childhood and how different
things are today that I really began to
think about it. And I have to tell you that I
also believe that things are different today
and I am still not quite sure if the “good ole
days” were really that good!
I know that back when I was growing up, children were defi-
nitely not considered the “stars” of their families. All of us knew
that there were certain rules that could never be broken. You were
always told to be polite and when you first met an adult, you had
to be polite and never ever try to take over the conversation, what-
ever it might be. As I think back to those days, I think that the rule
“children should be seen and not heard” was still considered
appropriate. Actually, when I was grown up, had a baby and was
living in Waitsfield, I was introduced to a young girl who actually
curtsied when she was introduced to me. Now, even I thought that
was not only not necessary but embarrassing! And if you were
either sent home or to the principal’s office while in school, your
parents never, ever blamed the teacher. And if you got in trouble
in school, it was nothing compared to what would happen when
you got home! Respect was given to the teacher, regardless of how
bad you thought she or he was. It seems today that this is consid-
ered so old-fashioned that it isn’t even thought about. How could
a child be wrong?
As I try to remember my childhood, probably the biggest rule
that I remember that doesn’t appear to hold true today is that we
had to eat everything on our plates. In our house, this was a rule
that couldn’t be broken. If it was served to you, you ate it! No
complaining and no discussion. And at my grandmother’s, she also
went with the “eat everything on your plate” rule, but she made
sure that what she put on your plate was something you would
eat!
One of my favorite memories about this eating thing was when
I was about 12 and I was invited to stay and have dinner at a
friend’s house. Of course, back then, you would have never said
that you didn’t like something. There I was sitting at their dining
room table and when I received my plate, there was a big serving
of lima beans. I hated lima beans then and I still do. And I can
remember trying to figure out how to eat them. I also had a big
portion of mashed potatoes, so I took those beans, one at a time
and covered it with the potatoes and finally was able to finish
them. I was very proud to have cleaned my plate without faint-
ing!
During the years that I brought my children up, Malcolm used
to tell them that they didn’t have to clean their plates but that they
had to try everything, and I think that worked pretty well. As the
mother, I also knew who liked what, so I would make sure that the
item that someone didn’t like was a very small portion. But I also
remember various friends of theirs who would come and eat and
let me know what they liked and what they wouldn’t eat. Boy, that
would never have happened in my growing up time.
Now that I have grandchildren and many friends of grandchil-
dren, I am amazed at what they will and won’t eat. Instead of
cooking and giving them what you prepared, they are offered
many suggestions on what they would like. And they are allowed
to get up from the table and walk around and do whatever they
want while dinner is being served. And as long they will eat some-
thing, they can carry it around and eat on the fly. Sometimes when
I see them away from the table and eating whatever they decided
they wanted (after three or four suggestions), I am sure that I can
hear my grandmother twirling in her grave!
It is truly amazing to me that in only one generation we have
gone from “children should be seen and not heard” to children
taking over their world. And I for one don’t think that either way
of raising children is correct. I always think that moderation and
common sense should be the watch word. I firmly believe that an
adult has earned the right to be the head of the family. And grand-
parents should be loved fiercely but also with respect because they
also have earned to be treated that way. I can remember telling my
child whenever he or she complained about our rules that they just
had to wait and when they were the parents, they could make the
rules. And I really think that they understood.
I think that if you make rules that make sense, common sense,
even if the child doesn’t like them, you have to remember that you
are the adult and parent and you have earned the right to rule! And
again, I firmly believe that your child will not only understand
where the rule is coming from, but they will respect you as the
parent.
C
onsuelo Northrup
Bailey was Ver-
mont’s frst wom-
an to hold the offce of
Speaker of the House.
When she was 15 years old, Bailey was a
spectator at an inheritance trial of a promi-
nent St. Albans woman. The basic argument
against the woman who deserved the money
was that she was too small a woman to inherit
a large amount of money.
The case appalled Bailey, and must have
been in the back of her mind when she gradu-
ated from law school and became Burlington’s
Grand Juror. It also must have been in the
back of her mind as she became Speaker of
the Vermont House and Lieutenant Governor
of Vermont. Bailey was the second woman in
the nation to be elected Speaker and the frst
woman in the nation to be elected Lieutenant
Governor.
She was born in 1899 in Sheldon, Vermont, and received strong
support from her father to pursue a legal career. She graduated
from the University of Vermont and afterwards taught Latin, read-
ing and history in Shelburne. In 1925, she graduated from the Bos-
ton University School of Law and was appointed Grand Juror of
Burlington. She passed the Vermont Bar Exam in 1925, the sev-
enth woman in Vermont to be an attorney.
From 1926 to 1928, she was elected Chittenden County’s State’s
Attorney, and prosecuted cases, including illegal dance halls and
bigamy. Her political career began in 1930 when she was elected
to the Vermont Senate. In her book, Leaves Before the Wind, an
autobiography, she wrote this about her Senate experience:
“As I walked down from the Capitol to my room on State
Street, I was glad the sun was reducing the snow banks
which had been with us for so long. Tiny streams were run-
ning in the streets and the smell of the moist, warm earth
arose from the ground which had at last been released from
the bonds of winter. It is small wonder that this smell for
us in the north country produces a feeling of delight and
satisfaction, for it renders the verdict that Vermonters have
‘wintered’ again and will soon enjoy the full meaning of
spring. This assurance also reduced somewhat the ache in
my heart, for I was saddened by our parting. I had been
blessed by the kindness and friendship of the thirty splendid
men who comprised the Senate. Like
leaves, they have fallen from the tree of
life. But with their passing, they have
added beauty to the pattern of the land
they served and dearly loved.”
Bailey was elected to the Vermont House
in 1951 and 1952, representing South Bur-
lington. In 1953, she won the speakership,
and in her address to the House of Repre-
sentatives, she said, “I want to say that this
is no time for any of us to think of any-
thing except one thing at all times. I hope
you will bear it in mind from now on until
the close of the session. There should be
only one question in our minds, in other
words, we should put aside all feeling. We
should put aside all unsatisfed desires and
ambitions and keep before us at all times
the one paramount issue - what is best for
the state of Vermont.”
In her autobiography, she referred to
Senator George Aiken’s nomination of Senator Margaret Chase
Smith for President of the United States in this way:
“The primary importance was that her achievements
were not the result of a woman’s liberation movement.
What she had gained was by her own effort. She had not
expected favors because she was a woman. She had earned
her own way from start to fnish. She had proved, as many
other pioneers had, that nothing is impossible to those who
do not count the cost of labor and sacrifce.”
In another part of her book, Bailey wrote:
“I devoutly hope that I may reveal the character of the
Vermont I dearly love and the spirit of Vermonters I have
known. For what is really important is Vermont’s glorious
history, her rich traditions, her precious scenery, which
brings tears to the eyes of all who love her, the everyday,
common, honest people who unknowingly salted down
the Vermont way of life with a favor peculiar only to the
Green Mountains.”
Senator Bill Doyle serves on the Senate Education Committee
and Senate Economic Affairs Committee, and is the Senate Assistant
Minority Leader. He teaches government history at Johnson State
College. He can be reached at 186 Murray Road, Montpelier, VT
05602; e-mail wdoyle@leg.state.vt.us; or call 223-2851.
Reiss’s Pieces
By Judy Reiss
Senate Report:
Consuelo Northrup Bailey: Vermont’s First Woman Speaker
by Senator Bill Doyle
n n n
n n n
page 12 The WORLD February 5, 2014
SCANDALITO, HAZEL MARIE, 96, passed
away peacefully at Woodridge Health and Rehab
Center in Berlin on January 14. Born in Port Huron,
Mich., on July 5, 1917, she was the daughter of the
late Hugo and Carrie (Ringler) Kuehn. Hazel was the
beloved wife of the late Anthony "Tony" Scandalito
of Port Huron, Mich. Hazel and Tony were married
for over 50 years and made a loving home in Fort Lauderdale, Fla.
She was the loving mother of Caroline Castellaneta, married to the
late Marc Castellaneta of Oyster Bay, N.Y. She was a devoted
grandmother of five, great-grandmother of nine and also a great-
great-grandmother of one. She was a sister to five brothers; the
youngest, Don, is the last surviving sibling and was the apple of
her eye. Hazel moved to Barre about five years ago. We all will
remember her with a smile on our faces and love in our hearts. She
will be missed every day.
COOKSON, RAMONA JANET "MONIE"
COPPING, of Cabot, passed away peacefully in her
home January 24, and is awaiting the return of our
Lord and savior, Jesus Christ. Ramona was born in
Barre, Aug. 31, 1936, the youngest of six children of
Edward Dean and Mae Eva (Martell) Copping. She
spent her childhood in East Montpelier and gradu-
ated from Spaulding High School in 1954. In July 1956, she mar-
ried her faithful and loving husband, Daniel "Bunchy" Cookson
Jr., of Woodbury, and they settled in Cabot. Ramona was the lov-
ing and devoted mother of their three children, the proud grand-
mother of six grandchildren, and the very blessed great-grand-
mother of two great-grandchildren. She loved helping others,
enjoyed homemaking, her flower garden and was a kindhearted
and caring friend to many. She is predeceased by her parents, a
brother, Roland Copping, and a sister, Norma Bashaw. She is sur-
vived by her beloved husband, her children, Michael and wife,
Ann Cookson, of Cabot, Becky Willenburg, of Barre, and Mark
Cookson, of Hanover, N.H. Ramona also leaves behind two broth-
ers, Paul Copping, of Montpelier, and Clayton Copping, of Barre
Town, and a sister, Elva Martin, of Waterbury.
KERIN, KAREN ANN, 69, formerly of Montpelier,
passed away January 25, in her home in South
Royalton, with her wife, Mary Aschenberg, at her
side. Born Charles P. Kerin Jr., Feb. 3, 1944, in
Barre, the oldest child of Charles P. Kerin Sr. and
Ellen (Douglass) Kerin. Charles grew up as an Army
brat and lived in Munich, Germany, as well as
Virginia and Massachusetts, graduating high school at 16 years old
from Hingham High School. Married to Regina Stone in June
1963, they had six children and divorced in 1989. Charles changed
his name to Karen Ann Kerin and married Mary Aschenberg in
November 1996. Karen was a civil engineer and worked for
Chicago Bridge & Iron for many years while living in New Castle,
Del. She returned home to Vermont in 1989 and got her law degree
from Vermont Law School. She went on to get several postdoctor-
ate degrees from other institutions. Survivors include her wife,
Mary, and stepdaughter, Faith Lopez, and sons Charles P. Kerin,
of Delaware, Ill., Shawn Kerin, of Ohio, Ian Kerin, in Australia,
Eric Kerin, of Vermont, and daughter, Shelia Wooten, of Ohio. She
leaves 13 grandchildren and one great-grandchild. She leaves her
brothers Douglass Kerin, of Northfield, and Ronald Kerin, of
Waterbury Center; and her sister, Susan Houle, of Montpelier. She
leaves many nieces and nephews. She is predeceased by her par-
ents and brother Andrew Kerin and her son Mark Kerin.
EDSON, SUE A., 70, of Barre Town, went to be
with the Lord on January 21, at her home. Sue was
born in Chester, West Virginia, December 20, 1943;
she was the daughter of Lola (Skinner) and Lloyd
Norman. On December 21, 1964, she married James
R. Edson of Hattiesburg, Miss. They moved to Barre
Town in 1966. She was a devoted Christian, wife,
mother and friend. She was a capacitor welder at Sprague Electric
for over 20 years and then a day care provider in her home until
she retired. Sue attended church at New Life Worship Center.
Survivors include her husband of Barre Town; two daughters,
Sonya Heath of Waterbury and Wendy Hannigan of Barre; one
son, Gabriel Edson and wife Nicole (Cuthbertson) Edson of Barre;
four brothers, Bud Norman, Lawrence, Lester and Leslie Norman;
three sisters, Jean Robinson, Myra Hagedorn and Lola Olinski.
She was predeceased by Mary Dagan and Robert Norman.
LANGLOIS-KRAG, JERILYN, of Williston, left us on January
13, to rejoin the love of her life, Ernest Krag, who predeceased her
in 1995. She lost her brief battle with pneumonia, but she won
many hearts and minds throughout a life spent helping others
while working in the fields of nursing, human services and teach-
ing. Jeri was born in Potsdam, N.Y., in 1942, and grew up in and
around Malone, N.Y., graduating from Franklin Academy in 1959.
She attended Albany Medical Center to earn her nursing degree,
various community colleges to complete her bachelor's degree,
and Bryn Mawr College, where she received a master's degree in
social work. Being ahead of the curve came naturally to Jeri. She
was the director of the first adult day center in Connecticut in the
1970s (Elderhouse), served as the first ombudsman for long-term
care in New Hampshire in the 1980s, and was one of the first
professors at SUNY Canton (Canton, N.Y.) to develop and teach
online classes. She continued to teach online for about 10 years,
after retiring on disability due to a degenerative spinal condition.
Jeri moved to Vermont for the final years of her life to be closer to
her daughter, and was able to thoroughly enjoy her granddaughter,
Willa, when she joined the family. Jeri will be missed by her
daughter, Leslie Pelch, son-in-law, Peter Schoen, and granddaugh-
ter, all of Bolton, as well as her "other daughter," Katrinka
DeGenova, of Belleville, Ontario, and nephew, Scott Langlois, of
Potsdam, N.Y. She will also be missed by her siblings: Marcia
Sleeper, of East Syracuse, N.Y., Milton Langlois, of Massena,
N.Y., and Bill Langlois, of Vancouver, British Columbia, and their
families. Her cat, Tinkerbell, hopes that Jeri has fun getting
together with all of the cats who went before her.
MANIATTY, WILLIAM A., 74, of Treasure Island, Fla., died
January 13. He was born and raised in Barre. He moved to Florida,
where he was active in the insurance business for over 40 years,
and was the proprietor of Ensure, Inc. He was a long-time member
of the Seminole Lake Country Club. He is survived by a brother,
George S. (Elvira) Maniatty, three nephews and a niece.
CARBONNEAU, ALFRED JOSEPH "FRED,"
82, of Barre Town, passed away peacefully at
Central Vermont Medical Center on January 25, with
his family by his side. Born on September 20, 1931,
he was the son of the late Edouard and Rosalie
(Bourget) Carbonneau. Alfred married Janet Poirier
in September 1954. He attended school at the Holy
Ghost Grade School in Graniteville. Fred enjoyed spending time
with his family. He was a member of St. Monica Catholic Church,
Moose Club and American Legion. Survivors include a daughter,
Susan Wilbur, of Barre Town and a son, William Carbonneau, of
Tucson, Ariz.; six grandchildren; one sister, Lucille Halman, of
Plymouth, Mass.; several great-grandchildren, nieces and neph-
ews. Fred is also survived by his companion, Yvette Blair. Besides
his parents, Fred was predeceased by his wife, Janet Carbonneau;
three sisters, Adrienne Breton, Yvette Breton and Lorraine
Gutantes; four brothers, Adrian, Lionel, Edmond and Raymond
Carbonneau.
PEPIN, SHARON ANN, 70, of Barre Town, died
January 21, at Fletcher Allen Health Care. Her fam-
ily had been at her bedside. Born Oct. 14, 1943, in
Montpelier, she was the daughter of Philip and
Frances (Alger) Maunsell. She attended Montpelier
Elementary School and graduated from Montpelier
High School in 1961. On March 26, 1966, she mar-
ried Raymond C. Pepin in St. Monica Catholic Church in Barre.
Following their marriage, they lived in Montpelier, and since 1969
they have resided at their present home. She enjoyed bowling,
ceramics, shopping, traveling, entertaining her grandchildren,
boating and the family cottage on Lake Champlain in Colchester.
Her memberships included the former Ruth Chapter 33 Order of
the Eastern Star of Barre and the Jaycee-Anns. Besides her hus-
band, Raymond, she is survived by her two sons, John Pepin and
wife, Ruth, of Williamstown, and P. Scott Pepin and wife, Laurie,
of Barre Town; three grandchildren; and one great-granddaughter.
Also surviving is her brother, Bradley Maunsell, and his wife,
Margaret, of Colchester, and her niece, Christina Berman. She was
predeceased by her parents.
BARQUIN, VIOLET M. "VI," 97, formerly of
Montpelier and most recently of Mayo Manor in
Northfield, died January 10, at Central Vermont
Medical Center. She was born in Graniteville, Feb.
13, 1916, the daughter of Donald and Annie
(MacLeod) Murray. After graduating from
Williamstown High School, she went on to complete
nurse's training at Heaton Hospital in 1940. She began her nursing
career at Heaton Hospital, then later as a private duty nurse. She
retired from the Vermont College infirmary after 12 years of ser-
vice. On June 26, 1940, she married Ralph F. Barquin. She met her
future husband while at a dance at the former Montpelier
Community Hall. Mr. Barquin predeceased her on Feb. 7, 1978.
Mrs. Barquin enjoyed golfing and square dancing. She was a
member of the Trinity United Methodist Church and the Barre
Country Club, where she was very proud of the only "hole-in-one"
she made. She loved to travel, antiques, refinishing and upholster-
ing furniture, sewing, knitting and playing bridge. Survivors
include her daughters Joan "Tara" Veno and husband Joe, of
Hamilton, Mass., Donna Courtney and husband Mike, of The
Dalles, Ore., and Deborah Gurule, of Berlin; five grandchildren;
several nieces and nephews. She was predeceased by her son,
Terry Barquin, on Feb. 17, 1980; twin children, James Barquin in
1942 and Jackie Barquin in 1943; a grandson, Jacob Gurule; sib-
lings Chris Murray, Ann Stone, Dee Callahan, Betty Lesell and
George Murray.
LANGEVIN, MARIE JEANETTE, died
surrounded by family and friends on
January 23, from complications of non-
small cell, stage 4 lung cancer. Jeanette
was a gifted, humble supportive mother,
wife and friend. Her loving energy reminds
us all to maintain a positive outlook in life
– to live life with purpose and an adventurous spirit, to be kind and
considerate towards all, to have no regrets. She could always rec-
ognize the beauty in everything and everybody with a strong sense
of empathy. Jeanette had a contagious positive outlook and energy
and shared her enthusiasm with everyone. With her passionate
curiosity, Jeanette turned others on to nature’s beauty through her
photography. She enjoyed the outdoors, kayaking, camping at
Holland pond, cruising with Dad on the motorcycle, and time near
the ocean. Jeanette worked for Johnson Elementary School for ten
years as a para-educator professional providing supportive ser-
vices to students. After her para-educator years she worked as an
interior painter. She has recently cared for loved ones and their
struggles with cancer and other physical challenges. After her
working years she explored other passions and interests to the full-
est. During this time Jeanette fought off thyroid cancer, renewing
her appreciation of life in general. Jeanette is survived by her lov-
ing husband, Paul; sons, Daniel and David; daughter, Mary; her
mother, Jeanette Fecteau and siblings, Jim, Ted and Bernadette. A
Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated Saturday, February 8,
2014 at 1pm at St. John the Apostle Church in Johnson. A recep-
tion at the church will immediately follow the service. White-Fiess
Funeral Home is assisting with arrangements.
CATTANACH, DONNA JANE MEHNE, 92,
passed away on January 23. Born Nov. 14, 1921, in
Duluth, Minn., to Fred and Grace Mehne. She was
predeceased by her parents; her brother, Fred; and
her husband, Bill. Donna lived in Portage, Wisc.,
until she married Bill in 1943, when they moved to
Montpelier. They spent 62 wonderful years together,
until Bill passed away in 2005. In 2011, she moved to Florida to
be closer to immediate family. She is survived by her two loving
daughters, Cindy (John) Raspen, Trinity, Fla., and Jane (Terrence)
Riley, Bahamas; her two cherished grandchildren; one very special
great-granddaughter; one aunt; several nieces and nephews; and
one former son-in-law, Jay Harding. Donna was a sports enthusi-
ast from the time she was a little girl, worshipping the Green Bay
Packers and the Boston Red Sox. She was a member of Bethany
Congregational Church, Montpelier, a lifetime member of The
Eastern Star and Delta Gamma sorority. She will rejoin Bill in
Vermont and spend eternity with him.
SLORA, JAMES ROBERT, 92, of Barre
Town, died January 25, at the Woodridge Nursing
Home in Berlin. His family had been by his bedside.
Born March 14, 1921, in Orange, he was the son of
James and Mabel (Isham) Slora Jr. He graduated
from Spaulding High School in 1941, and later
attended a trade school in Connecticut. He also worked as a
machinist at a machine shop in New Britain, Conn., prior to World
War II. Jim was a veteran of U.S. Navy service during World War
II, serving from 1943 to 1946, and had been stationed in the
Pacific theater of operations. Following his military service, he
worked as a machinist and foreman at Dessureau Machines for 19
years, and later became superintendent and tool designer at the
Trow and Holden Company, retiring after 19 years in 1985. He
also was a licensed gunsmith. On March 28, 1946, he married
Norma Abbiati in Barre City, where they lived for several years.
In 1954, they moved to their Pine Hill Road home, where they
have since resided. Norma died Dec. 30, 2010. An avid band musi-
cian, he played trumpet in the Spaulding High School band, which
he helped organize in 1938, and drummer in the Barre City band,
Mt. Sinai Shrine band, and Arab Patrol, as well as several local
dance bands. He also was an instructor, drum sergeant and man-
ager of the Barre American Legion Post #10 Drum and Bugle
Corps, and enjoyed hunting, fishing, and his large vegetable gar-
den. Jim's memberships included Granite Masonic Lodge #35,
Granite Chapter 26 RAM, Barre Council #22 and RSM, and St.
Aldemar Commandery #11 K.T., all of Barre, and Mt. Sinai Shrine
Temple #3 of Montpelier. He also belonged to Barre American
Legion Post 10, MacKenzie-Webster VFW Post 790, Barre Elks
Lodge 1535, and the National Rifle Association. Survivors include
his son, Russell Slora and wife, Susan of Barre Town; one grand-
son; his sister, Jean Flor of Napa, Calif.; his stepbrother, Louis
Dindo and wife, Joan of Groton, Mass.; and nieces and nephews.
He was predeceased by his parents; his wife, Norma; and brother,
William.
PALMER, DELBERT W., 79, a lifelong resident of
Waitsfield, passed away peacefully at his home on
January 25, surrounded by his loving family and
dog. Born Aug. 22, 1934, the only son of Everett and
Kathryn Palmer, of Waitsfield, Delbert began his life
on his family farm on the East Warren Road. He
grew up working on the farm and helping with the
production of maple syrup for the well-known family business.
Delbert graduated from Waitsfield High School in 1951 and
shortly after began his studies in agriculture at Vermont Technical
College, where he graduated in 1953. On Oct. 25, 1958, he mar-
ried his lifelong partner, Sharlia (Bohannon). He lived his life a
short distance from his childhood residence with his wife and
three children. As he welcomed his grandchildren into the world,
they too lived within a short distance. In 1995, Delbert and his
wife took over the six-generation family maple sugar business,
Palmer Maple Products, that won prestigious awards and was
known all over the world during its duration. He made sure the
business had a large emphasis on family and all members had a
specific job, no matter how young they were. He was a local meat
cutter for 26 years and enjoyed interacting with the many com-
munity members that counted on his skill and attention to detail.
He was well known for "running the roads," looking for someone
to talk to in town, as his wife never really knew his exact location.
Whether a conversation over coffee, or a meeting at the fire sta-
tion, he enjoyed talking with others within his community. He
never missed an opportunity to help others and would respond
quickly, even if he had to get there with red lights flashing and
siren blaring. His heart was dedicated to serving the community of
the Mad River Valley. He joined the Waitsfield Fire Department at
continued on next page
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800-950-3066 • 802-223-3502
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February 5, 2014 The WORLD page 13
age 17 and dedicated 62 years of service, 23 of those years as
chief. Delbert was instrumental in encouraging women to join the
fire department, having had both daughters part of the department.
Further down the road his granddaughter Shannon and his grand-
son Jared joined the department. He was so proud of the men and
women that he worked and served with on the fire department.
Delbert also served on the Mad River Valley Ambulance as a
driver for 25 years and was fire warden for 25 years. Delbert was
a loving husband, father and grandfather. Not a day would go by
where he didn't think of or see his grandchildren who all live on
the "hill." He is survived by his beloved wife of 55 years, Sharlia
(Bohannon); daughter Shawn Young and spouse Mark; daughter
Susan Burbank; five grandchildren; sister Joyce Rowe and spouse
Robert; sister Lois Richardson and spouse Alan; and many nieces
and nephews. He is predeceased by his daughter Shelah Palmer
and his parents.
STONIER, PETER PITT, of Montpelier, passed
from this life on December 12, 2013 at Central
Vermont Medical Center. Peter was born June 12,
1935 in Hamburg, Germany. He immigrated to
Brooklyn, NY with his family in 1939, and spent his
childhood there and at the Russell School in Phoenix,
Ariz. from age 7 ½ to 16. He spent his early adult-
hood in the financial services industry, and later years writing and
envisioning a world that in time will know how to be a peaceful
community that nurtures and helps the loving best in us all to
emerge. He spent the last 13 years of his life here in Vermont,
where so many enriched his life. His happiest moments were vol-
unteering with and enjoying the vibrant heritage music of the
Vermont Fiddle Orchestra, attending many concerts and hosting,
with a friend, at the front door of their concerts around the State of
Vermont. Peter constantly expressed gratitude and recognition for
the many kindnesses shown to him by his new friends the past 13
years in Hardwick, Montpelier, Barre, Williamstown, and neigh-
boring communities who shared intellectual discussions with him,
shared holidays with him, and who also gave him assistance in his
daily life as he progressed through a difficult series of health chal-
lenges. He leaves his greatest legacy to this world in his beautiful
adult daughter and three adult sons, two daughters-in-law, four
grandchildren, many beloved nephews and nieces and their chil-
dren. He was so fortunate to have had in his life his former wife,
Jean Stonier, who gave to him his two eldest children. He had a
host of many friends in Vermont, Brooklyn, N.Y., and New Jersey
who loved him, were challenged by him, laughed with him, and
who wish him God speed in his new reality that he believed was
his new journey. In addition he also leaves a special blessing in his
life, his greatest challenger and champion, teacher and companion,
his eternal inspiration and former wife Pam Stonier. A gathering
and celebration of remembrance will be held in the spring. If you
are interested in joining with us please send your contact informa-
tion to Pam Stonier at pstonier1@gmail.com.
DUPREY, KATHLEEN A., 62, of Northfield, died
January 27, at Fletcher Allen Medical Center, sur-
rounded by her family. She was born in Northfield,
Aug. 24, 1951, the daughter of Richard and Anna
(Gilpin) Lewis. Kathleen is a 1969 graduate of
Northfield High School. She married Bob Duprey at
St. Augustine's Church in Montpelier, April 29,
1972. Kathleen worked her entire career in the accounting field as
an administrative bookkeeper. She was employed by the Vermont
Highway Department in Montpelier, College View Dairy and
Norwich University, both of Northfield, and the past 20-plus
years, for Vermont Association of Snow Travelers (VAST) in
Berlin. She enjoyed camping, motorcycle riding, shopping, special
trips to Ogunquit, Maine with the "girls," and especially loved
spending time with her grandchildren. Survivors include her hus-
band, Bob Duprey of Northfield; two sons, Jamie Duprey and
wife, Samantha, of Northfield, and Jesse Duprey and wife, Rose,
of Montpelier; three siblings, Alan Lewis and wife, Melodie, of
Barre Town, Elaine Drought of West Berlin, and Ginny Richardson
of Montpelier; four grandchildren; many nieces, nephews, and
cousins. She is predeceased by a special aunt, Charlotte Brusa.
MCNALLY, FLOYD E. "MAC" JR., 76,
of Williamstown and formerly of Barre, died January
29, at his home, with his family at his side. Born
April 4, 1937, in Barre, he was the son of Floyd E.
and Sarah Evelyn (Cartland) McNally. He attended
local schools and graduated from Spaulding High
School in 1955. After graduation, Mac enlisted in the U. S. Navy,
serving from 1955 to 1975. He served during the Vietnam War and
was also stationed on several aircraft carriers as an aviation elec-
trician. On May 7, 1957, Mac married Jeannette C. McAuley in St.
Sylvester Church in Graniteville. Jeannette was a devoted Navy
wife. In 1975, he retired as a Chief Petty Officer and returned with
his family to settle in Barre. She died March 13, 2007. On Nov. 28,
2010, Mac married Elsie H. (Morrison) Anthony. They made their
home in Williamstown. For almost 20 years, Mac was in charge of
the boiler and heating plant at the Central Vermont Medical Center
in Berlin. He later worked for the E.F. Wall Company as a boiler
and heating plant operator. In earlier years, he was an on-call fire-
fighter and EMT for the Barre City Fire Department. His member-
ships included the Granite Masonic Lodge 35, American Legion
Post 10, and the Canadian Club of Barre; the American Legion
Post 3, VFW Brown-Johnson Post 792, and the Mount Sinai
Shrine #3, of Montpelier; and the Northeast Fiddlers Association,
where Mac and Elsie enjoyed dancing. Mac was an avid sports fan
and loved humor. He enjoyed camping, crossword puzzles, read-
ing and was a Civil War buff. In earlier years, he was a baseball
coach for Granite City Little League, Barre Babe Ruth League,
and the American Legion Post 10. He is survived by his wife, Elsie
McNally of Williamstown; three daughters, Lynn Ayer and hus-
band, James of Barre, Maureen Guinard and husband, David and
Kathleen Parry and husband, Justin, all of Barre Town; a son,
Michael McNally and wife, Debra of Phoenix, Ariz.; 12 grandchil-
dren; two sisters, Frances Williams and husband, Arthur of
Hardwick, and Donna McNally of Barre; a brother, Richard
McNally of Junction City, Kan.; a sister-in-law, Julie McAuley of
Leesburg, Fla.; numerous nieces, nephews and cousins. Besides
his first wife, Jeanette, he was predeceased by his son, Patrick
McNally.
WILSON, STEVEN C., 32, of Nashua, N.H.,
passed away unexpectedly January 22, at his home.
Steven was born in Berlin, Vt., Aug. 17, 1981, a son
of Steven C. Wilson of Salisbury, Mass., and Gale
Holmes of Nashua, N.H. Steven had been employed
by FJ Roberts as a flooring installer. Beside his par-
ents, Steven is survived by two sons, Amaurie
Camillo-Wilson and Keyori Camillo-Wilson, both of Nashua,
N.H.; two brothers, Nicholas Lawliss and wife, Brittney, of
Rochester, and Jesse Lawliss and wife, Jessika, of Northfield;
paternal grandmother, Betty Wilson of Newfoundland; maternal
grandmother, Mercedes Holmes of Oklahoma; six nieces and
nephews; and by several aunts, uncles and cousins.
ELBE, LINDA MAY, 61, of Berlin, died unexpectedly, January
28, at the Fletcher Allen Medical Center. She was born June 21,
1952, in Barre, the daughter of Carl L. and Stella (Powers)
Barteau. She graduated from Montpelier High School in 1971. In
July 1971, she married Robert F. Elbe. She worked primarily as a
homemaker, raising her two children, but she also worked with her
father, Carl at Barteau's Inc. and later for the Barrett family at
Honda Unlimited. She was a past president of the Montpelier
Emblem Club, as well as the Emblem Club's Past District Deputy
and Past President for the Vermont Chapter. Survivors include her
husband, Robert F. Elbe of Berlin; daughter, Wendy Elbe of
Hayes, Va,; son, David Elbe and wife, Flavia, of Las Vegas, Nev.;
mother, Stella Barteau of Berlin; sister, Dorothy Johnson of
Kerens, Tex.; brother, Carl Barteau of California; and three grand-
children.
HERSEY, HAROLD GEORGE, of Venice, Fla., passed away
January 21, with his wife and family at his side. Beloved husband
of Gloria Cecile (Hunter) Hersey for 65 years, Harold was a
devoted father of three surviving sons, Ronald Hersey and wife,
Penny, of Mashpee, Mass., Michael Hersey of Thomaston, Maine,
and Warner Hersey and wife, Christine, of Longmont, Colo. He is
survived by his seven grandchildren and eight great-grandchildren.
Harold leaves his cousins, Betty Sweet (Chase) and Frank (Sonny)
Tobin Jr. Born in Montpelier, April 14, 1928, Harold was the only
son of Lew Randall Waldo Hersey and Mary Rose Anzalone
(Converse). During his childhood years, he was raised in the
Hardwick and Calais area and attended high school in Plainfield.
After high school, he worked a number of years as an auto
mechanic for Perry Automotive, and was a salesman at Montgomery
Ward in Barre. Later, he and his wife became owner/operators of
Hersey Garage in Plainfield, and then Hersey Fuel Oil in Plainfield
and Barre. He worked as a volunteer fireman, was a member and
chairman of the Twinfield School Board, a lifetime member of the
Elks Club, and a member of the NE Fuel Institute. Later in life, he
moved to Venice, Fla. with his wife to be near her brother,
Leighton Hunter and his wife, Susan. Harold was a devoted hus-
band and father. He was happiest when surrounded by his family.
He was best known as a mechanic and salesman, and built many
successful businesses. He was a loving and caring person, and will
be missed by all his family and friends.
CHENEY, CLIFTON HOLMES, 60, formerly of
Northfield and Williamstown, died on December 30, 2013 at his
home in Landrum S.C. He had been in failing health and suffered
a fatal heart attack. He was born on March 30, 1953 in Perth
Amboy, N.J., the third son of Merton Lincoln Cheney and his wife
Lois (Holmes). He graduated in 1971 from Northfield High
School, in Northfield, Vt. Shortly after, he joined the US. Air
Force and became an MP serving in Okinawa. After the service, he
settled into the home his parents had owned on Mill Hill Road in
Northfield. He married Debra (Miller) on August 25, 1979. Clif
was a very hard worker and held a variety of jobs in Vermont. His
favorite job was as a school bus driver for the Northfield School
District, and he was well liked by the students and parents. He also
worked as a custodian at the high school. He and his family later
moved to Williamstown, but as his health began to decline, they
decided to move to the warmer climate of South Carolina. Clif was
predeceased by his father, Merton Cheney, his stepmother Janice
Cheney, and one grandson. He is survived by his loving wife
Debra, of Landrum, S.C., his mother Lois Hebert of Palm Bay,
Fla., his five sons: Raymond Cheney (wife Sonya) of Williamstown;
Theron Cheney (wife Amanda) of East Barre; Christopher Cheney
(wife Colleen) of Barre; Clifton Cheney, Jr, (wife Kelly) of
Northfield; and Leon Cheney (wife Deborah) of S.C.; two broth-
ers: Merton Cheney (wife Sheri) of Indio, Calif.; Theron Cheney
(wife Linda) of Palm Bay, Fla.; a sister, Lauren (husband Bruce)
Turner of South Royalton; a half-sister, Becky Dodge, and a half-
brother, Joshua Cheney both in Vt.; his father-in-law Wilbur
Miller of Landrum,S.C.: three sisters-in-law; and brother-in-law
Robert Hunnel in Landrum, SC.; ten grandchildren, and many
aunts, uncles, nieces and nephews. Clif was greatly loved by all
his relatives and friends. He was a wonderful, loving husband,
father, grandfather, and brother. Even in poor health he maintained
his cheerfulness and good nature; he was kindhearted, going out of
his way to help others in need. He was a man of deep faith, a
member of Jehovah’s Witness Congregation, always putting his
trust in Jehovah. He will be greatly missed by all who knew him.
A memorial service will be held at the home of Theron Cheney, 20
High St., East Barre on Sunday, February 23, 2014 at 3 pm with a
potluck supper to follow at 4pm.
continued from previous page
Salvation Army
Thrift Store
545 No. Main St.
Mon.-Sat. 9AM to 7PM
Clothes for the Whole Family
Household Items
Furniture • Toys • TVs
~All Clothing Accepted~
CLOTHING & HOUSEHOLD ITEMS
Treasures Unburied
Thrift Store
A Curiosity Shoppe
Clothes, Home Decor and More
415 N. Main St., Barre
(behind Beverage Baron)
New & Gently Used Items
Hours: Tuesday - Saturday 10-5
Check out our
Valentines Day
Novelty Section!
Candles, Jewelry, Body &
Bath Lotions, Perfume Sprays
New!
114 No. Main • Ste. 2 • Barre
476-4413
M-F 10:00am−5:30pm, Saturday 11:00am−3:00pm
FEBRUARY SALE
Children's Clothing ~ Infant to Size 14
1/2 OFF All Month!
Women &
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LOTS OF CLOTHING FOR THE WHOLE
FAMILY AT UNBEATABLE PRICES!
New Items Daily-Shop Often!
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15 Cottage St., Barre • 479-4309
Weekdays 10 AM to 4 PM • Saturday 9 AM to 12:30 PM
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172 N. MAIN ST.
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Open Everyday 6 am - 11 pm
342 N. Main St., Downtown Barre • 479-3675
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Rt. 302, between Barre & E. Barre
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and also at: Rte. 14, Williamstown • 433-1564
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American Rental
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Barre-Montpelier Rd. • 476-6580
(across from Fassetts bread store)
61 North Main St.
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Mon-Thurs 9-6, Fri 9-7, Sat 9-5
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921 US Rt. 302, Barre-Montpelier Rd. (across from Hooker’s) 479-2521
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Call 1-800-654-3344
For Price and Delivery Date
Minimum 100 gal. delivery




CALL
FOR
CURRENT
PRICE
15 Cottage St., Barre • 479-4309
The Benefit Shop
15 Cottage St., Barre 479-4309
Come check out our new look and shop for the holidays!
We look forward to seeing you soon, and thank you for
your patronage.
Closed for Renovations
The CVMC Auxiliary Bene-Fit Shop will be closed
October 29th through November 6th.
New Shop Hours
We will reopen Wednesday, November 7th with new shop hours:
Wednesday through Friday 10am-4pm
Saturday 9am-2pm.
New Shop Hours:
Wednesday through Friday 10am-4pm
Saturday 9am-2pm
Noyle Johnson Group
119 River St., Montpelier • (802) 223-7735
83 Washington St., Barre • (802) 479-3366
P.O. Box 195, Danville • (802) 684-3924
www.nwjinsurance.com
Denis, Ricker & Brown
Insurance & Financial Services
2 PIONEER STREET • MONTPELIER • 229-0563
~ THIS AD SPONSORED BY~
See Our Sign-Board For Specials!
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★DONATIONS ALWAYS WELCOME ★
VERMONT MUTUAL
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89 State St., Montpelier
Antique Antique is Unique,
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PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE
WITHOUT NOTICE
WE WILL BE DELIVERING
IN BARRE
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 8
Call 1-800-654-3344 by Noon Friday
Minimum 100 gal. delivery
$
4.09
9
GAL.
Additional
Recyclables
Collection
Center
Dollar Days - $1 per load
Tuesdays, Thursdays
12:30 – 5:30
3rd Saturdays 9 am – 1 pm
540 N. Main St, Barre
802-229-9383 www.cvswmd.org
page 14 The WORLD February 5, 2014
Quality Gifts For Every Occasion
124 North Main Street Barre, VT 05641
(802) 476-4031
www.richardjwobbyjewelers.com
Hearts On
Fire
86 No. Main St., Suite 1, Barre, Vermont
(802) 476-4342 www.bobscamerashop.com
Go to the camera guy who knows his stuff...
BOB’S
Camera & Video
Putting Bob’s 30+ years of experience to work for you!
84 N. Main St., Barre, VT
(802) 476-4342
www.bobscamerashop.com
FOCUS ON SAVINGS!
Barre
Everybody’s
Hometown
Barre Partnership
Member
Putting Bob’s 40+
years of experience
to work for you!
WE STILL
DO FILM!
CARDS
POSTERS AND
COLLAGES
CANVAS AND
FINE ART
CALENDARS PHOTO BOOKS
PERSONALIZED ITEMS
AND GIFT IDEAS
Gift Ideas for Valentine’s Day!
Combine your favorite photos with fun graphics
& text to create beautiful gifts!
WITH VALENTINE FLORAL DELIVERIES
IN BARRE, MONTPELIER &
SELECT SURROUNDING AREAS
DELIVERED BY FLOWERS BY EMSLIE & CO.
*$10 Gift Certificate will be in
every Valentine's Day arrangement
delivered early on Feb. 11, 12 & 13.
flowers by
8 So. Main St., Barre • 476-3126
www.emslieandco.com
LADDER GRILL
1
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TO
672 Rt. 302, Berlin • 476-4476 • www.SundaraDaySpa.com
Spoil your Valentine!
GOODFELLOWS
FINE JEWELERS
119 North Main St.
Barre, VT 05641
Phone: 802.476.4002
www.goodfellowsvt.com
PANDORA Valentine’s Day gift sets starting at $125.*
*While supplies last. See store for details.
Some jewelry displayed patented (US Pat. No. 7,007,507) • © Pandora • PANDORA.NET
136 No. Main St., Barre
802-479-5403
•Mon. 9-3 •Tues.-Wed.-Thurs. 9-7 •Fri. 9-5 •Sat. 9-3
Paraffin
Waxing
$10

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Orig. $90
$
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NOW OPEN
SUNDAYS BY
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Gift Certificates Available
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We offer many services...Pedicures, Mani-
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Relaxers, Make-up, Facial Waxing
Discovering Downtown Barre: Bob’s Camera and Video
Colin Quinn Brings His Off-Broadway Hit, “Unconstitutional,”
to The Barre Opera House on February 14
Barre Rotary’s guest speaker on January 22, was Bob Sager,
owner of Bob’s Camera and Video. Bob’s wife, Sue, is a former
Barre Rotarian. They bought the business (the former Country
Camera) and moved to Barre from Memphis in November 1986.
Bob and Sue had been looking to open their own camera business
and had been attracted to New England. Their choice came down
to Burlington or Barre, and Bob said Sue just liked Barre more and
so the rest is history!
The business was originally located next to the former Country
House Restaurant, before moving to its current location in 1991.
Bob talked about the many changes in the film, camera, and pho-
tography business, with its current focus on digital photography as
opposed to film photography. He did say that more and more
young people are re-discovering photography using film, and actu-
ally printing photographs rather than storing them in computers.
He said with film, you always had to know how to take a picture
to get the desired result, but with digital cameras today, you can
look at the picture immediately and if you don’t like it you shoot
it again.
He believes cameras are starting to become a thing of the past
with the existence of smart phones, which also double as cameras.
That has cut into digital camera sales, but there are limitations to
what they can do. Most users think the photos are “good enough,”
but as Bob put it “we need to teach them that with some effort you
can do better than just good enough.” He would like those in the
business to do a better job of educating people that better photog-
raphy is available. He indicated camera sales are down 30-40%
but he has diversified his business to include service and repair,
photo transfers, gifts and other things to stay relevant.
Bob majored in history in college and one of his real concerns
is the potential loss of family history without printed photographs
to pass down. He said we are printing digital photos, but not to the
extent we used to with film. As Bob put it, “We need to print it or
lose it.” Families need to make sure they leave something behind
for people to remember them by. Good words from a very active,
civic-minded business owner. Memphis’s loss is Barre’s gain!
On May 25th, 1787, fifty-five
delegates in wigs and tights sat
down to create a country from
scratch. In 2014, Colin Quinn
offers his unique comedic per-
spective on our national character.
From predator drones to the
Kardashians, he pulls no punches
in asking if this is what the found-
ing fathers planned. Quinn brings
his celebrated one-man show to
The Barre Opera House on Friday,
February 14 at 8pm. The perfor-
mance is sponsored by George &
Koch Dental Associates and Vermont Quick Lube.
Beginning with the U.S. Constitution’s Preamble and going
through the various amendments, Colin Quinn takes apart the
individual freedoms granted in America’s founding document and
delves into such subjects as political correctness, class status, and
the judicial system. He also looks at the evolution of politics and
political leaders, media outlets, celebrities and U.S. presidents.
The New York Times lauded Unconstitutional as a “A pleasingly
funny amble through American history. Mr. Quinn has always
been a little ahead of the curve.” Says The Hollywood Reporter,
“He’s like the best college history professor that you never had …
Hilarious! Wonderfully riotous!”
A native of Brooklyn, Colin Quinn began his stand-up career in
New York as a regular on the comedy club circuit. He made his
television debut as co-host of MTV’s popular game show Remote
Control. In 1995, Quinn landed a spot on the legendary late-night
show Saturday Night Live, where he entertained audiences for five
seasons. After SNL, Quinn tackled societal issues on Comedy
Central’s Tough Crowd With Colin Quinn, in which he served as
the show’s host, creator and executive producer, from 2002 - 2004.
In addition to his television work, Colin has appeared in many
films, including A Night at the Roxbury, Comedian, and Adam
Sandler’s Grown Ups.
Colin’s first one-man show, Sanctifying Grace, began off-
Broadway in 1994 and was later produced as Colin Quinn—An
Irish Wake and played at the Helen Hayes Theatre. In 2010, he
returned to the Helen Hayes Theatre and starred in the hit
Broadway show Colin Quinn - Long Story Short. Directed by Jerry
Seinfeld, the show was nominated for a Drama Desk Award and
was nominated for an Emmy as a HBO special in 2011. Colin is
currently the king of Twitter and will be back on the upcoming
season of HBO’s Girls.
“Unconstitutional” contains mature language and content.
Tickets for “Unconstitutional” are $34, $30 for seniors, students
and Opera House members. Order online at www.barreopera-
house.org or call the Barre Opera House at 802-476-8188. The
Opera House is handicapped accessible and equipped for the hear-
ing impaired.
■ ■ ■
❤DOWNTOWN BARRE ❤ VALENTINE’S DAY ❤ FEBRUARY 14 ❤
• In the United States, more
babies are born on Oct. 5 than
on any other day of the year. If
you do the math, you’ll find
that New Year’s Eve is 9
months and 5 days before that.
February 5, 2014 The WORLD page 15
Celebrate valentine’s day at
Barre elks Lodge
ASDNASDNASDNASDN

Saturday February 15, 2014
Cocktails 6:30 P.m.
five course dinner 7 p.m.
Tickets $20 till February 9 ~ after $25
Music by rpm entertainment
ASDNASDNASDNASDN
For tickets & menu call 479-9522
Proceeds benefit silver towers camp
Our Custom Facial:
There is no facial more personalized to your needs than
this. Each step is a fusion of science, natural botanicals,
aromatherapy oils and luxurious techniques customized
with clinical strength ingredients uniquely designed to
deliver results. The first step begins with a Skin Reading
to determine your concerns and skin goals, followed by
invigorating cleansing, exfoliation and skin sedation, a
custom blended aroma therapeutic facial massage, plus
a power treatment and mask targeted to your concerns.
Our Signature Manicure:
This guest favorite includes our signature luxurious
sugar exfoliation and a cream reflexology inspired mas-
sage, hydrating paraffin and finished with a beautiful
Essie nail color.
Our Signature Pedicure:
This guest favorite includes our signature sugar exfo-
liation, warm towel mask and a wonderful reflexology
inspired foot and lower leg massage with Essie's Ylang
Ylang massage oil. Finished with a beautiful Essie nail
color.
Finished with a Shampoo and Style.
$240
Includes a light snack and
a box of chocolates!
www.DoOrDyeSalon.com
229-4691
168 River Street • Montpelier
(above Sewing Basket)
Mon.-Thurs. 9AM - 7PM, Fri. 9AM - 5PM, Sat. 9AM - 2PM
Check
us
out
on
Owners:
Lowen Spooner
& Nealsa Welch 802•229•4691
Do or Dye Salon's Valentine's Day
Couples Special
...with a special singing
balloon delivery!
♥Many Romantic Songs & Styles♥
♥FREE Delivery in local area on Feb. 14th♥
Stuffed Balloons make the Best Gift!
Rubber Bubbles will make the RISE!
Rubber Bubbles
Balloon & Party Supply
802-476-6011 Barre-Montpelier Rd.
Tues.-Fri. 9:30-5:30, Sat. 9:30-2:00
LOVE NOVELTIES
SOFT
PLUSH
MASSAGE
OILS
STUFFED
BALLOONS
Open Feb. 14 ~ 9:30-5:30
V♥LENTINE'S DAY

Gift
Certificates
Available
Valentine’s Day Specials
Cupid’s Gift
Champagne & Roses Body Scrub
Champagne & Roses Body Wrap
la Petite Facial
Teeth Whitening
$220
Feelin’ Hot
Detoxifying Herbal Wrap
75 min. Hot Stone Massage
60 min. le Grande Facial
$214
Be My Valentine
Couples 60 min. Relaxation Massage
Couples Classic Pedicure
$190
672 Rte 302
Berlin, VT
476-4476
D
ipped
Chocolate Body Scrub
Chocolate Mousse Body Wrap
60 Minute Classic Massage
with chocolate scented massage oil
$182
Feelin’ H
ot!
75 minute Hot Stone Massage
60 minute Signature Facial
$150
Valentine’s Day Specials
Gift
Certificates
Available
www.sundaradayspa.com
672 Rte 302
Berlin, VT
476-4476
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ipped
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60 M
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assage
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2013
FEBRUARY
14
The story of Valentine’s
Day begins in the third
century. The oppressive
Roman emperor, Claudius,
ordered all Romans to wor-
ship 12 gods, but Valentinus
was dedicated to the ideals
of Christ. Not even the
threat of death could keep
him from practicing his
beliefs. He was arrested and
imprisoned. During the last
weeks of Valentinus’ life, a
remarkable thing happened.
Seeing that he was a man of
learning, the jailer asked whether his
daughter Julia might be brought to Valentinus for lessons.
She had been blind since birth. Valentinus read stories of
Rome’s history to her. He taught her arithmetic, and he
told her about God. She saw the world through his eyes,
trusted in his wisdom and found comfort in his quiet
strength.
“Valentinus, does God really hear our prayers?” Julia asked
one day.
“Yes, my child, He hears each one,” he replied.
“Do you know what I pray for every morning and every
night? I pray that I might see. I want so much to see every-
thing you’ve told me about.”
“God does what is best for us if we will only believe in Him,”
Valentinus said.
“Oh, Valentinus, I do believe,” Julia said fervently. “I do!”
She knelt and grasped his hand. They sat quietly together,
each praying. Suddenly there was a brilliant light in the
prison cell. Radiant, Julia cried, “Valentinus, I can see! I
can see!”
“Praise to God,” Valentinus exclaimed.
On the eve of his death, Valentinus wrote one last note to
Julia, urging her to stay close to God, and he signed it
“From Your Valentine.” He was executed the next day, Feb.
14, 270 A.D., and buried at what is now the Church of
Praxedes in Rome. It is said that Julia planted a pink-
blossomed almond tree near his grave. Today, the almond
tree remains a symbol of abiding love and friendship. On
each Feb. 14, St. Valentine’s Day, messages of affection and
love are exchanged around the world.
❤❤❤❤❤❤❤❤❤❤❤❤❤❤❤❤❤
❤❤❤❤❤❤❤❤❤❤❤❤❤❤❤❤❤
World’s Greatest
Love Story
Over 50 young children attended
the Barre Family Event at Barre
City Elementary School on
Saturday, Jan. 18th. The group
heard the story of Katy and the Big
Snow and had a visit from a red,
shiny snow plow. Activity, food
and busing was provided. The
next Barre Family Event is sched-
uled for Saturday, Feb. 15th at
Barre Town Elementary School.
Watch for more information on
Public TV and on Front Porch
Forum.
■ ■ ■
■ ■ ■
Elks Host Vermont State Hoop Shoot
First place Hoop Shoot winners with Vermont Hoop Shoot Director Steve Edgerley and Vermont State
President Keith Palmer.
On Saturday January 25, the Vermont State
Elks Association held its annual Vermont State
Hoop Shoot contest at Spaulding High School.
Ten of the state’s thirteen Elks Lodges were rep-
resented at the state competition.
The Hoop Shoot contest starts at the Lodge
level and is open to all girls and boys ages 8 to
13. First place winners at the Lodge level moved
on to the regional level and first place winners at
the regional level competed at the state level on
Saturday.
Each competitor took 10 practice shots and 15
competition shots; the competitor with the most
successful free throw shots was the Vermont
State winner and will compete at the New
England Regional Hoop Shoot in Maine in
March.
Boys 8 & 9 years old
First place: Sawyer Ramey (representing Rutland Lodge
#345)
Second place: Braedan Adams (Montpelier Lodge #924)
Third place: Luke Dudas (St. Johnsbury Lodge #1343)
Girls 8 & 9 years old
First place: Kaia Anderson (St. Johnsbury Lodge #1343)
Second place: Peyton Reynolds (Windsor Lodge #1665)
Third place: Natalie Norcia (Brattleboro Lodge #1499)
Boys 10 & 11 years old
First place: David Gratton (Newport Lodge #2155)
Second place: Gregory Fitzgerald (Brattleboro Lodge
#1499)
Third place: Eamon Cassels (Montpelier Lodge #924)
Girls 10 & 11 years old
First place: Katie Cushing (St. Albans Lodge #1566)
Second place: Shea Pickering (Bellows Falls Lodge
#1619)
Third place: Alyssa Slocum (Windsor Lodge #1665)
Boys 12 & 13 years old
First place: Jacob Cady (St. Johnsbury Lodge #1343)
Second place: Jackson Lane (Bennington Lodge #567)
Third place: Ronald Johnson (Barre Lodge #1535)
Girls 12 & 13 years old
First place: Emily Willis (Newport Lodge #2155)
Second place: Olivia Rockwood (Windsor Lodge #1665)
Third place: Nicole Norcia (Brattleboro Lodge #1499)
Cupcake Ladies
Now taking orders
for Valentine’s Day
Cakes & Cupcakes
Place your order today!
802522-8636 or 802461-5463
One Stop
Country Pet
Supply Event
to Benefit
Central VT
Humane
Society
On Friday and Saturday,
February 14 & 15, One Stop
Country Pet Supply, in the
Twin City Plaza on the Barre-
Montpelier Road, is celebrating
Valentine’s Day by showing
their love of animals! They will
be raising funds and collecting
donations and needed items for
the local animal shelter. Any
purchase on those two days
will benefit the shelter because
the store is donating 3% of all
sales to CVHS. They will also
be collecting items from a
“wish list” from CVHS. Stop
by the store for your own copy,
or find it on their website at
onestopcountrypet.com.
One Stop Country Pet Supply
was founded on the premise of
a love of animals. They spe-
cialize in specialty feeds and
supplies to keep your pet at its
best. The animals that they sell
are all from local breeders. One
Stop Country Pet Supply has
two sister stores, one in
Brattleboro, Vt. and one in
Keene, N.H. All three stores
are holding similar events to
raise money, goods, and aware-
ness for their local shelters.
They also help with shelter
placements. The Barre store
currently has two guinea pigs
from CVHS that need to find
their forever homes, their adop-
tion fee goes right back to
CVHS.
They are very excited about
this upcoming event and hope
to make it a new tradition. With
your help they hope to be able
to really help out the animals in
need in Central Vermont. The
weekend will be exciting and
will finish on Saturday, Feb. 15
with lots of fun, samples, and
prizes. Join them to show your
love of animals, too!!
page 16 The WORLD February 5, 2014
We Help Put the
Flame inRomance
We Help Put the
Flame inRomance
Special
Valentine's
Day
Menu
to share with
your loved one.
Make Your
Reservations Today!
100 State Street,
Montpelier
223-5222
Roses and Chocolates
in soaps, oils, bubbles
& more
Lovely Valentine’s Gifts
223-7752
68 N. Main St.
Montpelier
672 Rt. 302, Berlin • 476-4476 • www.SundaraDaySpa.com
Spoil your Valentine!
ALTERATIONS & REPAIRS
NEW LOCATION:
250 Main St., Suite 103
(former NECI Building)
MONTPELIER
Mon.-Fri 10AM to 5PM,
Saturday By Appointment
229-2400
Patty Morse
Something Sew Right Something Sew Right
Thinking About Elephants
By TOM HERZIG
The number of Vermonters and African elephants on the planet
is about the same – roughly 650,000, give or take. But we’re ahead
of the game – no one is shooting us down with machine guns so
as to smuggle our ivory tusks overseas.
Wildlife experts estimate that the present African elephant
population is down from the “several million” that roamed the
continent a hundred years ago.
Asian elephants are even more endangered. They are somewhat
smaller than their distant African cousins with smaller ears,
smoother skin and male-only tusks. They are also are more easily
domesticated. Their impending demise is more a function of dis-
appearing habitat than what African elephants are up against,
which is poaching to cash in on the global appetite for ivory.
Demand for ivory is through the roof in China fueled by its
expanding economy, a tradition of artistic carving and those age-
less human traits – greed, corruption and disregard. Elephants are
being slaughtered to make trinkets of elephants.
By many accounts, ivory is presently worth about $900/lb on
the shore in China, other Asian nations and the USA. Given an
average tusk weight of 7 lbs. – down from a reported 26 lbs. in
1970, African elephants are a target with a $12,000-plus price tag
as the bull’s-eye.
A well-known male elephant named Baghdad, living under
protection in a national park in Gabon, is one of 20 identified
African elephants whose tusks touch the ground, which, according
to the Park Director, makes him worth $100,000 – dead.
Governmental authorities have taken to publicized destruction
of ivory in recent months in an attempt to signal that trafficking is
going to meet with increasing resistance. Last June, Phillipine
officials destroyed five tons of ivory. In November, the USA
smashed six tons of confiscated tusks and ornaments. Three weeks
ago, China joined in and crushed six tons. In 2012, Malaysia
destroyed a 24-ton seizure. Over the next two years, Hong Kong
will embark on the world’s largest burn, setting 28 tons of ille-
gally harvested tusks aflame to signal a shift in its valuation of
elephants.
Whether the destruction of ivory stockpiles will actually help
stamp out the trade is a matter of some debate. Critics contend that
it may have the opposite effect and drive the price up as the supply
is reduced.
Peter Knights of WildAid, a non-governmental organization
based in San Francisco, addressed that concern. “People who
argue against the destruction of ivory stockpiles think that having
a legal supply is the answer to the poaching problem,” he said,
“but attempts to flood the market with ivory in the past have had
disastrous results. People need to understand this is just as heinous
a crime as consumption of heroin or something like that. We don’t
put heroin back on the market when we seize it.”
Dan Ashe, US Director of Fish and Wildlife Services, has said
that another problem with putting more ivory into the legal supply
chain is that it would create a smokescreen for illicit trade in ivory,
making law enforcement and effective prosecution of criminals
more difficult.
One aspect of the illegal ivory trade that has prompted a crack-
down is the increased involvement of terrorist organizations such
as Shabab, the Ugandan Lord’s Resistance Army and Darfur’s
Janjaweed, which are in search of funding sources.
Last week, the United Nations Security Council took a critical
step in tackling elephant poaching and illicit ivory trade by
addressing the link between instability in the Democratic Republic
of Congo and wildlife trafficking and approved sanctions against
both the DRC and the Central African Republic.
In November 2013, U. S. Secretary of State John Kerry offered
a $1 million reward for information leading to the dismantling of
the Xaysavang Network, a Laos-based criminal operation that
“facilitates the killing of endangered elephants, rhinos and other
species for products such as ivory.”
Elephants are not only majestic physical symbols of Africa and
the wild – adult males stand 13 feet at the shoulder and weigh 4 to
6 tons – they are highly social and intelligent creatures that display
complex thoughts, love, joy, anger, compassion and grief.
Elephants remember and mourn loved ones and exhibit a read-
ily apparent sense of self. Their average lifespan in the wild
approaches 70 years.
In his book, The Elephant Whisperer, acclaimed conservationist
Lawrence Anthony – who rescued animals from the Baghdad Zoo
in Iraq during the “Shock and Awe” military campaign, (see the
CBS video at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=46fQBDfYAJo)
writes, “Eelephants possess qualities and abilities well beyond the
means of science to decipher. They taught me that all life forms are
important to each other in our common quest for happiness and
survival.”
When Anthony died in March 2012, two small herds of South
African elephants that Anthony had rescued and rehabilitated and
later returned to the wild, showed up at his house.
Elephants can communicate with extremely low-frequency
sounds over distances as great as 20 miles or more, depending on
weather conditions. These low, far-carrying calls are especially
important in helping dominant bulls and estrous cows meet and
mate. Elephants can make these very low sounds because of their
great size and because of some special adaptations of their physi-
cal sound-production equipment.
According to the Association of Zoos and Aquariums, there are
between 250-300 elephants in the US. Three African elephants
(non-siblings) currently reside at the Roger Williams Zoo in
Providence, R.I.
National Geographic’s Battle of the Elephants documentary can
be viewed freely on the Internet at http://www.pbs.org/program/
battle-elephants/. Many worthwhile wildlife organizations can be
sourced on the internet, including: savetheelephants.org; The
International Fund for Animal Welfare – www.ifaw.org – 290
Summer Street, Yarmouth Port, Mass. 02765 800-932-4329.
WildAid – www.wildaid.org and the World Wildlife Fund – www.
worldwildlife.org.
Pictured (l to r): Ana Campanile, Assistant Director of Good Beginnings;
Jill Teeters and Aidan Lamothe, March of Dimes National Ambassador
Family; and Alison Lamagna, Executive Director of Good Beginnings.
Good Beginnings of Central VT
Receives Community Grant from VT
Chapter of March of Dimes
Good Beginnings of Central VT recently received a grant from
March of Dimes in support of its Family Home Visiting and
Support Program. The grant will assist Good Beginnings in pro-
viding education, resources, community connections and hands-on
support to expectant families and families of newborn birth and
adopted infants.
In celebration of this community grant, Good Beginnings wel-
comed the 2014 March of Dimes National Ambassador Family to
its community space on Wednesday, January 29th for a reception.
Six-year-old Aiden Lamothe, son of Jill Teeters and David
Lamothe, was born more than 11 weeks too early and is now trav-
eling the country to raise awareness of the need for research and
community programs to prevent premature birth and birth defects.
The community grant was formally announced at the reception
and the family shared their experience and how the March of
Dimes has touched their lives.
Good Beginnings provides free home visiting services to fami-
lies in central Vermont after the birth or adoption of a baby. The
Nest, a free, open resource center for expecting families or new
parents in the community, is open on Thursdays at the Good
Beginnings community space at 174 River St. in Montpelier. The
organization also offers free parenting education workshops and
free fatherhood events throughout the year. Their ‘Loving Arms’
program provides hands-on care to vulnerable infants at Central
VT Medical Center who are boarding after birth due to addiction,
premature birth or other health complications. Good Beginnings
also provides gently used baby and maternity clothing, baby gear
and infant carriers at no cost to families.
For more information about Good Beginnings, visit www.good-
beginningscentralvt.org or call (802) 595-7953. For information
about the Vermont Chapter of March of Dimes, please visit www.
marchofdimes.com/vermont/ or call them at 802-560-4822.
SHOP LOCAL
SHOP
MONTPELIER
Happy Valentine’s Day!
Send your Valentine quality flowers you can count on.
Support your local florist.
Call Janice 802-223-3413
pinkshutterflower@gmail.com | Find us on facebook
Inspired floral design, garden gifts & home décor
February 5, 2014 The WORLD page 17
McLEODS
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continued on page 18
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continued
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Just Good Autos!
EXTENDED WARRANTIES AVAILABLE
JUST GOOD
AUTOS
Rt. 14 N, 296 E. Montpelier Rd., Barre
802-479-0140
page 18 The WORLD February 5, 2014
Call Toll Free 800-691-3914
MON., TUES., THURS., FRI., 7 - 5 & WED. 7 - 7. OFFERS GOOD WITH AD TILL 6-30-12.
We Sell Tires
• We Service All Makes
& Models
• Fleet & Commercial
Accounts Welcome
• We Honor All Extended
Warranties
CAPITOL CITY
SERVICE CENTER
JUST EAST OF MONTPELIER ON RTE 2 • BERLIN, VT

BUICK
• Up to 5 qts. 5W30 oil, synthetics & diesels extra
• Most cars & light trucks
+ Plus FREE 27-Point Inspection!
SUMMERTIME SERVICE SAVINGS
TIRE ROTATION SPECIAL
$
39.95
LUBE, OIL & FILTER CHANGE
$
19.95
• Computer balance, rotate & mount 4 tires
• Most cars & light trucks
PLUS TAX
FRONT DIFFERENTIAL
FLUID FLUSH
VERMONT STATE
INSPECTION
REAR DIFFERENTIAL
FLUID FLUSH
• Most cars & light trucks
• Up to 2 qts. of
synthetic axle fluid
Special
$99.95
• Most cars & light trucks
• Up to 2 qts. of
synthetic axle fluid
Special
$99.95
• Most cars & light trucks
• Inspection only, repairs
are extra
Special
$19.95
WINTERTIME SERVICE SAVINGS
Call Toll Free 800-691-3914
MON., TUES., THURS., FRI., 7 - 5 & WED. 7 - 7. OFFERS GOOD WITH AD TILL 6-30-12.
We Sell Tires
• We Service All Makes
& Models
• Fleet & Commercial
Accounts Welcome
• We Honor All Extended
Warranties
CAPITOL CITY
SERVICE CENTER
JUST EAST OF MONTPELIER ON RTE 2 • BERLIN, VT

BUICK
• Up to 5 qts. 5W30 oil, synthetics & diesels extra
• Most cars & light trucks
+ Plus FREE 27-Point Inspection!
SUMMERTIME SERVICE SAVINGS
TIRE ROTATION SPECIAL
$
39.95
LUBE, OIL & FILTER CHANGE
$
19.95
• Computer balance, rotate & mount 4 tires
• Most cars & light trucks
PLUS TAX
FRONT DIFFERENTIAL
FLUID FLUSH
VERMONT STATE
INSPECTION
REAR DIFFERENTIAL
FLUID FLUSH
• Most cars & light trucks
• Up to 2 qts. of
synthetic axle fluid
Special
$99.95
• Most cars & light trucks
• Up to 2 qts. of
synthetic axle fluid
Special
$99.95
• Most cars & light trucks
• Inspection only, repairs
are extra
Special
$19.95
Call Toll Free 800-691-3914
MON., TUES., THURS., FRI., 7 - 5 & WED. 7 - 7. OFFERS GOOD WITH AD TILL 6-30-12.
We Sell Tires
• We Service All Makes
& Models
• Fleet & Commercial
Accounts Welcome
• We Honor All Extended
Warranties
CAPITOL CITY
SERVICE CENTER
JUST EAST OF MONTPELIER ON RTE 2 • BERLIN, VT

BUICK
• Up to 5 qts. 5W30 oil, synthetics & diesels extra
• Most cars & light trucks
+ Plus FREE 27-Point Inspection!
SUMMERTIME SERVICE SAVINGS
TIRE ROTATION SPECIAL
$
39.95
LUBE, OIL & FILTER CHANGE
$
19.95
• Computer balance, rotate & mount 4 tires
• Most cars & light trucks
PLUS TAX
FRONT DIFFERENTIAL
FLUID FLUSH
VERMONT STATE
INSPECTION
REAR DIFFERENTIAL
FLUID FLUSH
• Most cars & light trucks
• Up to 2 qts. of
synthetic axle fluid
Special
$99.95
• Most cars & light trucks
• Up to 2 qts. of
synthetic axle fluid
Special
$99.95
• Most cars & light trucks
• Inspection only, repairs
are extra
Special
$19.95
2-28-14.
CAPITOL CITY
Servi ce & Parts
Mon., Tues., Thurs., Fri. 7-5; Wed. 7-7
Toll Free: 1-800-731-4577
MUST PRESENT AD to receive advertised offers. May not be used in conjunction with
other advertised offers. Some models may be slightly higher. Prices do not include sales
tax and shop supplies. OFFERS END 2-29-12.
Lube, Oil & Filter Change
+ PLUS 27-Pt. Inspection
• Up to 5 qts. 5W30 oil.
• Most cars & light trucks.
• Synthetics & diesels extra.
THE CAPITAL REGION’S IMPORT SPECIALISTS

Vermont State Inspection
$
19.95
$
19.95
#2 Is Due, Call Today
• Most cars & light trucks.
• Inspection only, repairs extra.
We honor all service contracts • We service all makes & models
CORNER OF RT. 2 & GALLISON HILL RD. Montpelier, VT
February Service Specials
$
19
95
LOF & 4-Tire Rotation
• Most cars & light trucks.
• Free car wash with
every service.
$
34
95
802-262-2039
OFFERS END 2-28-14.
Lube, Oil & Filter Change
+Tax
FULL SERVICE BIKE/AUTO SHOP
Off Cox Brook Rd. Northfield
Pickup & Delivery Available
802485-3354
802498-8213
Owner:
Ed Barna
www.classiccyclesofvermont.com
Motorcycle Repair/Restoration/Racing
Major & Minor Repairs
State Inspections • Parts & Accessories
Tires • Batteries, Spark Plugs, Oil Filters,
Air Filters, Brake Pads & Shoes
Handlebars & Grips
Full Line of Spectro Lubricants
Still doing general repairs on cars & trucks!
YOKOHAMA GOODYEAR MICHELIN PIRELLI
WINTERMASTER HANKOOK WINTER FORCE
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G
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A
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FRED BUDZYN
TIRE
Corner No. Main &
Seminary Sts., Barre
479-1819
CALL FOR PRICES
Mounted &
Computer Balanced
Your Tires Or Ours
NO APPOINTMENT NECESSARY
New & Good Used Tires
All Season & Winter
TIRE
CHANGEOVERS
WE
ACCEPT
EBT
OR CASH
NO CHECKS
WE DO
FLAT
REPAIR
STORE HOURS
Mon. - Fri. 8:30-4:30
Saturday 8:30-1:00
Closed Sunday
•Servicing All Makes & Models
•Competitive Pricing on a Full Line of Tires
•Complete Auto Detailing
•Full Diagnostics On Imports & Domestics
•Courtesy Shuttle Available
SAAB Official Service Center
Barre-Montpelier Road
365 River Street, Montpelier, VT
Mon.-Fri. 7:30am-6pm, Sat. 9am-2pm
Open Saturday for Sales & Parts Needs
Open 24 Hours A Day @ crosswaysaab.com
802-223-9580 800-639-4095
sales@crosswaysaab.com service @crosswaysaab.com
FYI: SAAB started manufacturing vehicles for the
Swedish market in December 2013.
Full Line Of
Quality Pre-Owned
Vehicles
D
U
M
P TRAILE
R
S
★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★
★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★



TRAILER
SALES
www.luckystrailers.com
Exit 3, I-89 • So. Royalton, VT 05068
1-800-877-5854
Exit 17, I-89 • Colchester, VT 05446
1-877-201-9993
Get Ready For Snow!
We carry a
full line of
Fisher and Blizzard
Plows and Sanders
FREE ESTIMATES Call For Pricing
The Source
Foreign Car Specialists
Sales • Service • Repair
605 Route 2, Berlin, Vermont
802-229-1283
Thousands of New & Used
Subaru Parts In Stock!
*Not affiliated with Subaru of
America or Fuji Heavy Industries
For more info please visit us online
www.thesourceinvt.com
Other Subarus Arriving Weekly
RUST FREE, SOUTHERN SUBARUS
2006 Outback Wagon: Tan, Auto-
matic, CT car ...........................$9,995
2006 Outback Wagon: Silver, 5
Speed, CT car .........................$8,500
2005 Outback Wagon: Black,
Automatic
$5,500
2005 Outback Wagon: Silver, Auto-
matic, MA car, 1 owner ............$9,995
2004 Outback Wagon: Blue, 5
Speed, CT car .........................$7,500
2005 Legacy Sedan: Silver, Auto-
matic, 82k ................................$9,995
2003 Legacy Wagon: Silver, Auto-
matic ........................................$6,500
2007 Forester: Gold, 5 Speed, MA
car, 1 owner .............................$7,500
2006 Forester: Silver, 5 Speed, MA
car ............................................$7,995
2006 Forester: Silver, Automatic, 1
owner .......................................$8,500
2006 Forester: Blue, Automatic, MA
car, 1 owner .............................$7,500
2005 Forester: Gray, Automatic, MA
car, 99k ....................................$8,500
2005 Forester: Blue, 5 Speed, CT
car, 83k ....................................$9,995
2004 Forester: Silver, Automatic, MA
car, 1 owner .............................$6,995
2006 Impreza Sedan: Silver, Auto-
matic, MA car, 1 owner ............$7,995
New Arrivals Available Soon!
2008 Outback Wagon: Bronze,
Automatic, 99k
2005 Outback Wagon: Silver,
Automatic
2005 Outback Wagon: Black, 5
Speed, 1 owner
2003 Outback Wagon: Green, 5
Speed, MA car
2008 Forester: Silver, Automatic, MA
car, 1 owner
2005 Forester: Silver, Automatic, MA
car, 1 owner
2004 Forester: Green, Automatic,
MA car
1998 Forester: Green, Automatic,
no rust
VERMONT TIRE & SERVICE
The local tire store where your dollar buys more Family owned and Serving Vermont for over 30 years
$290.95 IN VALUE EVERY TIME YOU BUY 4 ALL SEASON TIRES!!
FREE WHEEL ALIGNMENT FREE ROTATION EVERY 5000 MILES FREE FLAT REPAIR
ALL THIS PLUS...
FREE TIRE MOUNTING FREE TIRE BAGS FOR TAKE-OFF TIRES FREE LOCAL SHUTTLE !!
Happy New Years!
We still have winter tires in all brands!
WINTER IS HERE!
VERMONT
I S DUE
2
FREE PICKUP &
DELIVERY
HOURS:
Mon-Fri. 7:30-5
Sat. 8-4
Montpelier
90 River St.
229-4941
1800-639-1900
South Burlington
1877 Williston Rd.
658-1333
1800-639-1901
2 CONVENIENT LOCATIONS SAME GREAT SER-
Not responsible for typographical errors
TRY OUR AWARD WINNING SERVICE!
2 CONVENIENT LOCATIONS SAME GREAT SERVICE
1996 CHRYSLER CONCORD
4DR One owner 34K miles, 3.5
V6, 4spd Auto, A/C, Leather
seats, All Power Options, plus 4
wheel disc brakes, factory install.
block heater, +/more recent work.
$3200 obo. Paul 802-595-7498
2003 SUBARU OUTBACK
Silver 4-Silver 4-Cylinder
B4, 2.5L; SOHC 866-928-
9370 East Barre Auto Sales
or Text EJU0 TO 27414
2004 HONDA ACCORD
EX, Auto, loaded. $8900.
Trades Welcome, juanita-
sauto.net 802-476-3900
2005 SUBARU OUTBACK
White 4-Cylinder B4, 2.5L;
SOHC $8,995 866-928-
9370 East Barre Auto Sales
or Text 36ZZ TO 27414
2006 CHEVROLET AVEO
Silver $8,995 Call 866-308-
5127 Lamoille Valley Ford
or Text 5UNS TO 27414
2006 NISSAN ALTIMA SE,
$4995 trades welcome. juani-
tasauto.net 802-476-3900
2009 CHEVROLET MALIBU LS
Sedan 4D Silver Moss 38,500
Miles $14,488 Cody Chev-
rolet-Cadillac 888-495-0672
2009 CHRYSLER 300-Series
TOUR Silver 3.5L V6 78,720
Miles $11,888 Text 55ZJ TO
27414 or Call 866-872-4706
2009 FORD FUSION SE
Dk. Red $15,995 Call 866-
308-5127 Lamoille Valley
Ford or text CQA1 TO 27414
2009 PONTIAC G5 Red
2.2L 4 cyls 79,867 Miles
$7,888 Text 83K8 TO
27414 or Call 866-872-4706
2010 KIA FORTE EX 2.0L 4 cyls
80,860 Miles $8,888 Text 2J2R
To 27414 or Call 866-872-4706
2011 KIA SOUL SPORT, Auto,
$11900. trades welcome.
juanitasauto.net 802-476-3900
2011 SUBARU IMPREZA
2.5iPR 2.5L 4 cyls 20,339
Miles $15,888 Text BNC6 TO
27414 or Call 866-872-4706
Donate Your Car to Veterans
Today! Help those in need! Your
vehicle donation will help US
Troops and support our Veter-
ans! 100% tax deduction Fast
Free pickup! 1-800-263-4713
ERASE BAD CREDIT FOR-
EVER!
Credit repair companies make
false claims and promises to
erase a trail of unpaid bills or
late payments from your credit
report. However, only time can
erase negative, but accurate
credit information. In addition,
federal law forbids credit repair
companies from collecting mon-
ey before they provide their ser-
vice. TIP: If you have questions
about your credit history or you
want to know how to get a free
copy of your credit report call
the ATTORNEY GENERAL’S
CONSUMER ASSISTANCE
PROGRAM at 1-800-649-2424.
Don’t send any money to a
credit repair company until you
check it out.
JUNK AUTO
PICK-UP
YOU CALL
I’LL HAUL
802-279-2595
NEW & USED TIRES
ALL SIZES, Used Rims,
8 0 2 - 8 8 3 - 5 5 0 6 / 2 7 2 - 6 6 11
USED AUTO GLASS
802-522-9140
WILL HAUL away for free: Scrap
metal, old appliances, car parts,
etc. Furnaces, boilers and demo-
litions for a fee. No job too big or
too small. Chad, 802-793-0885.
WILL PICK-UP Scrap cars &
scrap metal at your location. Cars
paying $50-$400 based on size
and condition. 802-279-2155
February 5, 2014 The WORLD page 19
EAST BARRE AUTO ■866-928-9370
Text the
4 DIGIT CODE
to 27414
for more
information
Instantly Access Inventory Available At
OVER 30 LOCAL DEALERS
and 100’S of Private Party Vehicles
1
CAPITOL CITY KIA ■866-872-4706
2009 CHRYSLER 300-SERIES
$11,888
Text 55ZJ to 27414 for more info
2010 KIA FORTE
$8,888
Text 2J2R to 27414 for more info
2013 KIA OPTIMA
$14,888
Text JY6Y to 27414 for more info
2013 KIA SOUL
$14,888
Text 1C3E to 27414 for more info
2013 KIA SOUL
$14,888
Text BO4I to 27414 for more info
2011 KIA SOUL
$13,888
Text 2E0R to 27414 for more info
2009 PONTIAC G5
$7,888
Text 83K8 to 27414 for more info
2011 SUBARU IMPREZA
$15,888
Text BNC6 to 27414 for more info
2011 GMC SIERRA 1500
$28,888
Text EII3 to 27414 for more info
2006 TOYOTA TACOMA
$11,888
Text IA31 to 27414 for more info
2012 KIA SORENTO
$22,888
Text 2J0I to 27414 for more info
2012 KIA SPORTAGE
$20,888
Text 81OH to 27414 for more info
2002 CHEVROLET PRIZM
$3,995
Text 87SE to 27414 for more info
2002 CHEVROLET CAVALIER
$3,995
Text 8879 to 27414 for more info
2004 CHEVROLET MONTE CARLO
$7,995
Text 1CUG to 27414 for more info
2000 HONDA ACCORD
$4,995
Text BGV0 to 27414 for more info
2004 HYUNDAI SONATA
$5,995
Text AL8Q to 27414 for more info
2005 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY
$5,995
Text 4DCX to 27414 for more info
2005 SUBARU OUTBACK
$6,995
Text FT1P to 27414 for more info
2004 DODGE DURANGO
$7,995
Text KC3P to 27414 for more info
2002 VOLKSWAGEN CABRIO
$3,995
Text 3AC4 to 27414 for more info
2002 DODGE RAM 1500
$10,500
Text 9Q7M to 27414 for more info
2006 SUBARU OUTBACK
$9,995
Text I5LB to 27414 for more info
2004 VOLKSWAGEN JETTA
$5,995
Text 9Q9J to 27414 for more info
2006 FORD FOCUS
$5,995
Text D11F to 27414 for more info
2010 CHEVROLET MALIBU
$11,900
Text Q6S4 to 27414 for more info
2007 KIA SEDONA
$7,995
Text DV6S to 27414 for more info
2006 VOLKSWAGEN JETTA
$7,995
Text DV9U to 27414 for more info
2003 VOLKSWAGEN PASSAT
$4,995
Text I29M to 27414 for more info
1999 JEEP CHEROKEE
$5,995
Text QY8D to 27414 for more info
2004 SUBARU IMPREZA
$5,995
Text Q6RU to 27414 for more info
2009 PONTIAC G5
$7,995
Text EH6G to 27414 for more info
2001 SUBARU FORESTER
$5,995
Text 29VE to 27414 for more info
2003 CHEVROLET CAVALIER
$3,995
Text 2A8F to 27414 for more info
2005 JEEP WRANGLER
$9,995
Text 29VB to 27414 for more info
2003 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE
Call
Text O0PA to 27414 for more info
page 20 The WORLD February 5, 2014
672 Rt. 302, Berlin • 476-4476 • www.SundaraDaySpa.com
A Happy Wife Equals a Happy Life!
Give her a gift she’ll remember...
A
G
ift
C
ertifi cate to
LAMOILLE VALLEY FORD • 866-308-5127
Text the
4 DIGIT CODE
to 27414
or call
866-308-5127
2012 FORD FOCUS
$15,860
Text O3VU to 27414 for more info
2011 FORD FUSION
$15,995
Text C4BX to 27414 for more info
2013 FORD F-150
$31,995
Text 5C6J to 27414 for more info
2013 FORD F-150
$44,995
Text 2MVD to 27414 for more info
2011 FORD F-150
$27,995
Text CK97 to 27414 for more info
2011 FORD SD F-250 SRW
$32,995
Text DP2B to 27414 for more info
2010 CHEVROLET EQUINOX
$16,995
Text 8F4M to 27414 for more info
2010 FORD ESCAPE
$21,995
Text 3B4D to 27414 for more info
2010 FORD ESCAPE
$18,995
Text 27TU to 27414 for more info
2008 FORD EXPEDITION
$23,995
Text 670F to 27414 for more info
2011 FORD TRANSIT CONNECT VAN
$14,995
Text F5K4 to 27414 for more info
REGULAR SEASON
WINNERS DRAWN
AFTER END OF SEASON:
wk 1 Annette Kripinski, Newbury
wk 2 Joe Safranek, Newbury
wk 3 Leonard Rix, Williamstown
wk 4 Nancy Andreoletti, Barre
wk 5 Dan Williams, Barre
wk 6 John Stone, Barre
wk 7 Margery Hudson, Montpelier
wk 8 Annette Krupinski, Newbury
wk 9 Nancy Andreoletti, Barre
wk 10 John Stone
wk 11 Fred Jacek Montpelier
wk 13 Wayne Hunter, West Berlin
wk 14 Ron Lafirira, Barre
wk 15 Joe Safranek, Newbury
wk 16 Fred Jacek, Montpelier
wk 17 John Stone, Barre
wk 18 Michael Cody, Barre
Nancy Andreoletti, Barre
Wayne Hunter, West Berlin
Darlene Colby, Montpelier
WEEK 17 SUN, DEC 29
■ Carolina @ ■ Atlanta 1:00 PM
■ Baltimore @ ■ Cincinnati 1:00 PM
■ Houston @ ■ Tennessee 1:00 PM
■ Jacksonville @ ■ Indianapolis 1:00 PM
■ NY Jets @ ■ Miami 1:00 PM
■ Detroit @ ■ Minnesota 1:00 PM
■ Washington @ ■ NY Giants 1:00 PM
■ Cleveland @ ■ Pittsburgh 1:00 PM
■ Green Bay @ ■ Chicago 4:25 PM
■ Denver @ ■ Oakland 4:25 PM
■ Buffalo @ ■ New England 4:25 PM
■ Tampa Bay @ ■ New Orleans 4:25 PM
■ San Francisco @ ■ Arizona 4:25 PM
■ Kansas City @ ■ San Diego 4:25 PM
■ St. Louis @ ■ Seattle 4:25 PM
TIE BREAKER
■ Philadelphia @ ■ Dallas 8:30 PM
SCORE _____________ SCORE _____________
Wild-Card Weekend
SAT, JAN 4
Kansas City at Indianapolis 4:35 PM
SCORE _____________ SCORE _____________

New Orleans at Philadelphia 8:10 PM
SCORE _____________ SCORE _____________
SUN, JAN 5
San Diego at Cincinnati 1:05 PM
SCORE _______________ SCORE _________________
San Francisco at Green Bay 4:40 PM
SCORE _____________ SCORE _____________

Division Playoffs
SAT, JAN 11
New Orleans at Seattle 4:35 PM
SCORE _____________ SCORE _____________
Indianapolis at New England 8:15 PM
SCORE _____________ SCORE _____________
SUN, JAN 12
San Francisco at Carolina 1:05 PM
SCORE _____________ SCORE _____________
San Diego at Denver 4:40 PM
SCORE _____________ SCORE _____________
Conference Championships
SUN, JAN 19
New England at Denver 3:00 PM
SCORE _____________ SCORE _____________
San Francisco at Seattle 6:30 PM
SCORE _____________ SCORE _____________
LAST
WEEK’S
WINNERS
MOSE SALM, MONTPELIER
JOHN STONE, NORTHFIELD
BILL KIRBY, MONTPELIER
Special thanks to everyone
who made this year’s
football contest so exciting.
POST-SEASON
WINNER DRAWN
AFTER END OF POST
SEASON:
END-OF-SEASON
WINNER:
Fred Jacek, Montpelier
Wayne Hunter, West Berlin
Annette Kripinski, Newbury
Nancy Andreoletti, Barre
John Stone, Bare
GAME
GAME
o
f

t
h
e

W
e
e
k
LIVE HIGH SCHOOL SPORTS
All Games Available At
www.wsno1450.com
Play-by-play
coverage with
Joe Salerno &
Carl Parton
Play-
by-play
coverage
with
Jim
Severance
& Tanner
Acebo
GAME
GAME
o
f

t
h
e

W
e
e
k
LIVE HIGH SCHOOL SPORTS
All Games Available At
www.wsno1450.com
Play-by-play
coverage with
Joe Salerno &
Carl Parton
Play-
by-play
coverage
with
Jim
Severance
& Tanner
Acebo
Tuesday, March 5, 4:45pm
Girls Hockey
Metro Division Quarterfinal
Burr & Burton at Spaulding
Tuesday, March 5, 6:45pm
Boys Hockey
Lake Division Quarterfinal
Woodstock at U32
Thursday, March 7
Boys Basketball
Division Three Semifinal
Rivendell vs Williamstown
2/6, Thursday, 7:00pm
Girls Basketball • Oxbow at U32
2/8, Saturday, 1:30pm
Girls Basketball • St Johnsbury at Spaulding
2/8, Saturday, 7:00pm
Boys Hockey • Brattleboro at U32
2/10, Monday, 7:00pm
Boys Basketball • CVU at Spaulding
2/6, Thursday, 7:00pm
Girls Basketball • Oxbow at U32
2/8, Saturday, 1:30pm
Girls Basketball • St Johnsbury at Spaulding
2/8, Saturday, 7:00pm
Boys Hockey • Brattleboro at U32
2/10, Monday, 7:00pm
Boys Basketball • CVU at Spaulding
2/6, Thursday, 7:00pm
Girls Basketball • Oxbow at U32
2/8, Saturday, 1:30pm
Girls Basketball • St Johnsbury at
Spaulding
2/8, Saturday, 7:00pm
Boys Hockey • Brattleboro at U32
2/10, Monday, 7:00pm
Boys Basketball • CVU at Spaulding
with Steve Poulin
■ During a ceremony last week that celebrated talents and person-
alities from a wide array of eras and racing levels, five legends added
their names – and astounding legacies – to the list of inductees to the
NASCAR Hall of Fame. Their induction – the fifth in the hall’s his-
tory – now puts the number of inductees at 25. Those inducted into
the NASCAR Hall of Fame in Charlotte, N.C., included Maurice
Petty, Fireball Roberts, Jack Ingram, Tim Flock and Dale Jarrett.
Maurice Petty, chief engine builder for Petty Enterprises, powered his
brother Richard Petty to most of his NASCAR premier series record
200 wins and all seven of his championships. Petty, who has the
honor of being the first engine builder inducted into the NASCAR
Hall of Fame, became the fourth member of the Petty family to be
enshrined – joining Richard, father Lee Petty and cousin Dale Inman.
Glenn “Fireball” Roberts, who was inducted by his grandson Matt
McDaniel, was considered by many as the first superstar of
NASCAR. Roberts was a seven-time winner at his home track of
Daytona International Speedway – including the 1962 Daytona 500.
Roberts passed away in 1964. Jack Ingram, arguably the greatest
driver in NASCAR Busch (now Nationwide) Series history, won
championships in two different series throughout his prolific career.
From 1972-74, he won three consecutive Late Model Sportsman –
the precursor to the current-day NASCAR Nationwide Series – and
two NASCAR Busch Series titles, including the inaugural champion-
ship in 1982. Overall, Ingram racked up more than 300 NASCAR
wins and 12 track championships. Tim Flock, another member of a
successful racing family, raced during NASCAR’s formative years –
and became only the second driver to win multiple championships.
Along with titles in 1952 and ’55, Flock scored 18 victories in 1955
– a single-season record until Richard Petty broke it with 27 wins in
1967. Flock passed away in 1998. Few have exceled on the big stage
like Dale Jarrett, the 1999 NASCAR premier series champion.
Among Jarrett’s 32 career premier series victories were three Daytona
500 wins (1993, ’96 and 2000) and two Brickyard 400 victories at
Indianapolis Motor Speedway (1996 and ’99). With his induction,
Jarrett joins his father Ned as the fourth father-son combination in the
NASCAR Hall of Fame. The others are Bill France Sr. and Bill
France Jr., and Lee and Richard/Maurice Petty. “I’m honored to
accept this induction into the NASCAR Hall of Fame,” said Jarrett.
“I have always considered it a privilege to represent NASCAR during
my career. … I am honored that many of you could join me here
tonight. Just know that if we worked together during my 31 years of
driving or the last six years in the world of television, I have thought
about you and appreciate the opportunity we had to work together.
Your efforts and sacrifices are the reason I’m here tonight.”
■ NASCAR announced a new championship format last week that
they say will put greater emphasis on winning races all season long,
expands the current Chase for the NASCAR Sprint Cup field to 16
drivers, and implements a new round-by-round advancement format
with a chance at the title, with the highest finisher among those four
capturing the prestigious NASCAR Sprint Cup Series championship.
In reality the new format doesn’t change a lot. A driver who is one of
the final four can still sandbag in the finale race at Homestead Miami
if in fact the other three contenders have dropped from the race for
any reason. In fact the new champion could effectively finish in 40th
position and claim the championship crown. , not complete all the
laps or ride around and coast if the other three members of the final
four fall out previously. In removing consistency in the championship
equation NASCAR may have committed its largest SNAFU to date
and opened the door for local small tracks to attract a legion of dis-
gruntled fans. The 36th and final race of the season will be the
NASCAR Sprint Cup Championship. Simply stated, the highest fin-
isher in that race among the remaining four eligible drivers will win
the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series title. Bonus points for laps led will
not apply in the season finale, so the official finishing position alone
will decide the champion. NASCAR feels this new format will make
the championship run much easier for the not so passionate fans to
understand. But what could be easier or more simple than the single
points system it has used from 1975 to 2003 which determined the
Sprint Cup champion based on results for the entire season, NASCAR
has now changed how its champion is determined four times in the
last 11 years. NASCAR adopted the 10-race, season-ending Chase
for the Sprint Cup in 2004. The sanctioning body expanded the Chase
field from 10 to 12 drivers in 2007, and revamped the points system
in 2011. The 2011 season ended with Tony Stewart and Carl Edwards
tied in points, but Stewart taking the title by virtue of a tiebreaker for
winning more races than Edwards. How do you improve on that?
Driver responses from the announcement: Carl Edwards: “You don’t
want a guy to win 35 races, blow a tire and not win the champion-
ship.” Matt Kenseth: “Hopefully, you’re one of those four.” Dale
Earnhardt: “…Coming down to Homestead with four guys, that’s
crazy. But its exciting -- so exciting.” Jeff Gordon: “Oh my gosh…
.I’m excited about it.” Ryan Newman:” I don’t think we can take
everything the NFL or NBA is doing and say, ‘We need to do it like
this’ because they’re doing it like that and it’s working. This is still
stock-car racing. This is NASCAR.”
Garage Garble
■ Claude Leclerc is a stock car racing legend. He was on the
NASCAR North Tour during its first season back in 1979. He com-
peted in each season on the North Tour and then joined ACT during
its inaugural season in 1986 through the final Pro Stock season in
1995. After competing in select ACT Late Model events, he joined
the Série ACT in its first season back in 2007. The 72 year old has
been racing full-time on the series since. Between the North Tour,
ACT Pro Stock Tour, ACT Late Model Tour U.S., the Série ACT QC,
and ACT special events, Leclerc has now started in 495 feature
events and will make his 500th start in 2014. The veteran holds the
record for the most career starts on the combined North/ACT Pro
Stock Tour with 397 and the record for Série ACT starts with 73. He
will be the first driver ever to make his 500th feature start with the
ACT organization. During the 2013 season, he proved he still has
what it takes and claimed a runner-up finish in the first event of the
season at Riverside Speedway in St-Croix, Quebec.
■For the first time ever, FOX Sports GO, the app that provides live
streaming video of FOX Sports content, is set to offer live, streaming
coverage of the DAYTONA 500 on Sunday, Feb. 23. FOX Sports GO
features two separate live streams of the 56th running of the Great
American Race.
■ The four race Vermont State Late Model Championship series,
which boasts an $11,000 point fund, will see changes in 2014. The
series, which features four events split between Vermont’s only two
paved oval speedways, will now include the Labor Day Classic at
Barre’s Thunder Road on the schedule, instead of the Vermont
Governor’s Cup as in years past. The Vermont State Late Model
Championship was created in 2012 and hosts two races each at
Devil’s Bowl Speedway in West Haven and Thunder Road in Barre.
Once again the series will kick off with the Mekkelsen RV Memorial
Day Classic 100 at Thunder Road on Sunday, May 25. The 1/4-mile
portion of the series will conclude with the Labor Day Classic 200 on
Sunday, August 31. The Labor Day event will also be the final
Thunder Road Late Model point-counting event for 2014. The
Devil’s Bowl 1/2-mile will host a 100-lap event on Friday, May 30
and conclude the series with another 100-lap event during the
Vermont 200 Weekend on Sunday, September 14. For the third sea-
son, the Vermont State Champion will be crowned following the
September event at Devil’s Bowl. Past VT State Champions were
Dave Pembroke in 2012 and Nick Sweet last season, both picked up
a $2,000 point fund check.
Veteran Claude Leclerc will make his 500th career ACT start in 2014.
Steve Poulin Photo
that ultimately will reward a
battle-tested, worthy champion.
Changes announced by France to
the championship format include:
- A victory in the first 26 races
all but guarantees a berth in the
10-race Chase for the NASCAR
Sprint Cup – a change that will
put an unprecedented importance
on winning a NASCAR Sprint
Cup Series race all season long
- Expanding the Chase field from
12 to 16 drivers, with those driv-
ers advancing to what now will
be known as the NASCAR Chase
Grid - The number of champi-
onship drivers in contention for
the NASCAR Sprint Cup cham-
pionship will decrease after
every three Chase races, from 16
to start in the Chase Grid; 12
after Chase race No. 3; eight
after Chase race No. 6; and four
after Chase race No. 9 with
points being reset after each
round. - The first three races of
the Chase (27-29) will be known
as the Challenger Round; races
30-32 will be known as the
Contender Round; races 33-35
will be the Eliminator Round
and race No. 36 will be the
NASCAR Sprint Cup
Championship - A win by a
championship-eligible driver in
any Chase race automatically
clinches the winning driver a
spot in the next Chase round -
Four drivers will enter the
NASCAR Sprint Cup
Championship (even in points)
February 5, 2014 The WORLD page 21
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COPING WITH HEART FAILURE
The term “heart failure” does not mean that the heart has stopped working.
Instead, heart failure refers to the inability of the heart to pump sufficient
amounts of blood to the other organs. Symptoms include persistent coughing
or wheezing, shortness of breath, constant fatigue, swollen feet/ankles/
abdomen, excessive urination at night, and lightheadedness or confusion.
As dire as the diagnosis of heart failure may seem, the outlook for people
with this condition has brightened considerably in recent years, largely due
to new and evolving strategies
for its management. Thanks
to medications such as ACE
inhibitors and beta blockers,
as well as to regular exercise,
proper weight maintenance, and
social support, those with heart
failure are living longer.
HINT: You can lower your
risk of heart failure by keeping
your cholesterol levels, blood
pressure, and weight levels in
check while avoiding alcohol,
tobacco, and the development
of diabetes.
Heart failure is the largest cause of
hospital admissions, and one of the keys to
survival in these situations is early action.
That’s why many caregivers choose to put
their loved ones in assisted living facilities,
where the staff can quickly respond in an
emergency situation. At ROWAN COURT
HEALTH & REHAB CENTER, our care
approach is patient-centered and involves
an integrated program of therapies that
address the total well-being of each
individual. For more information, please
call 476-4166. We are located at 378
Prospect St.
Kinesiology, Reiki III, Reflexology,
Chinese Cupping & Energy Healing
Constitutional remedies,
herbal profiling, herbal preparations,
formulation of medicinal plants
~Walk ins welcome~
Follow me on Facebook or
email me at Manywordsherbs@yahoo.com
MANY WORDS HERBS
CONSULTATIONS, HERBAL PRODUCTS, FORMULATOR
ROSALENE BUSSIERE
CERTIFIED THERAPEUTIC HERBALIST & REIKI III
Cell # 802-793-9371 Mon.-Fri. 9-5
Located at the First In Fitness building in Berlin
A
lmost a third of North
Americans -- more than 103
million of you -- are living single.
And despite the constant press
about the health benefits of mar-
riage (married people are 17 per-
cent more likely to catch cancers in
earlier, more-treatable stages and
20 percent more likely to survive
cancer than unmarried folks,
according to a new Harvard Medical School review of the health
histories of 1.2 million people), there’s no reason YOU can’t enjoy
healthy perks living on your own.
For example, one study found that couples in an antagonistic
relationship have 40 percent slower wound healing; so it’s not just
any old marriage that makes your immune system stronger! And
another shows that single people tend to work out more and gain
less weight over time, a surefire way to stay healthier and dodge
everything from dementia and depression to breast or prostate
cancer, diabetes and heart disease.
So if you’re looking for ways to boost your health and keep it
there on your own (whether you’re single, in a stressful marriage
or in a long-term, unmarried relationship), here are four steps that
give you the health-protecting power of the much-touted “mar-
riage health bonus.”
Step No. 1: Emphasize your single (or self-reliant) advantages.
Marriage increases a woman’s risk for being overweight by 3.9
percent, and a guy’s by 6.1 percent. The reason? People eat up to
41 percent more when they eat together! That translates into more
pounds and body fat. So don’t despair if you’re eating meals alone,
just make sure you take the time to cook for yourself all the
healthy, sizzling flavors and foods that you deserve to enjoy. Don’t
go the “zap a frozen dinner, watch TV, eat too fast, have ice cream
from the container” route!
Singles also have more time and more inclination to get physi-
cal activity. So make sure you’ve included time for exercise in
your daily schedule. If you enlist a workout buddy, you’ll stick
with it AND reap the benefits of companionship -- less stress, bet-
ter mental health and improved cardio health!
Plus, being single after a difficult marriage automatically
bestows a health boost by reducing chronic stress. (That former
stress amped up inflammation and raised your risk for heart dis-
ease, high blood pressure, depression, reduced immunity and even
diabetes.) So don’t focus on the negatives in your new life; do
whatever you can to sustain a more stress-free, healthier lifestyle.
Step No. 2: Cultivate close connections with others and
YOURSELF, and de-stress daily. Friends give life meaning, and
spending time with them switches on health-bestowing nerve
pathways. So make time to hang out with like-minded people in a
community group or club, at work or volunteer to help others.
People with close friends are more likely to live longer without
disability, keep their mental functions and have a healthy heart that
can tolerate the exercise of sex!
For stress reduction, practice a “loving kindness” meditation
(wish yourself, then others, a healthy, happy life). It will increase
your sense of connection to others -- an experience that tones up
your vagus nerve. That’s a good thing. The vagus nerve relays
information to your internal organs; when it’s tuned-up, it helps
you relax so your body can repair itself. Also, harness the stress-
reducing powers of exercise and of spending time with a pet, lis-
tening to music or laughing every day.
Step No. 3: Eat more fruits and vegetables. Studies show that
you munch less fruit and fewer veggies than your married pals.
Maybe because you’re busy, don’t want to cook spinach just for
one, hate the idea of uneaten produce going bad in the fridge or
have fewer food dollars to spend. Bump up your quota (aim for at
least five servings a day; nine is best) by investing in frozen veg-
etables and fruit (we love raspberries on oatmeal or in yogurt),
canned varieties that are low in sodium and sugar, and seasonal
goodies (usually riper and the best bargains in the produce aisle).
* * *
Mehmet Oz, M.D. is host of “The Dr. Oz Show,” and Mike Roizen,
M.D. is Chief Wellness Officer and Chair of Wellness Institute at
Cleveland Clinic. To live your healthiest, tune into “The Dr. Oz
Show” or visit www.sharecare.com.
(c) 2013 Michael Roizen, M.D. and Mehmet Oz, M.D.
Distributed by King Features Syndicate, Inc.
Single? Reach For These Health Bonuses
BY MICHAEL ROIZEN, M.D., AND MEHMET OZ, M.D.
Barre Area Senior Center 135 N. Main St., Barre • 479-9512
Thanks go out to the wonderful
team at Berlin Health & Rehab for
preparing a terrific turkey and bis-
cuit dinner for the seniors in
January and for giving an educa-
tional and informative presentation
about winter safety. The next luncheon at the
Barre Area Senior Center will be March 20 and
will feature a presentation from the Vermont
Association of the Blind.
February starts tax preparation season, and
the Barre Area Senior Center will be taking
appointments for seniors beginning February 10.
Appointments will be Mondays, 11am-4pm,
Tuesdays, 9am-4pm and Wednesdays 11am-
4pm. Please call 479-9512 for an appointment.
Special thanks to Jackie Isabelle and her tax
preparation helpers for providing this service.
Join us March 25, 2014 for our first ever trip
to the Saratoga Casino and Raceway! This trip
includes transportation to and from the casino,
$15 free play, deluxe luncheon at the Garden
Buffet and a $5 food voucher to Lucky’s Joe
Deli, all for just $55. Our next trip will be to
Foster’s Clambake in York, Maine. This trip will
include transportation to and from York, Maine,
a delicious meal of clam chowder, Maine lob-
ster, cultivated mussels, freshly dug clams and
more, live entertainment and a stop at the Kittery
Trading Post for shopping, all for just $85. All
trips are open to the public. Please stop by the
senior center at 135 North Main Street to pay for
and reserve your spot!
Stop by the Barre Area Senior Center to par-
take in our 50/50 raffle with a twist! Guess the
number of candies we have in our candy jar cor-
rectly and win 50% of the total money this
fundraiser brings in. A game of both luck and
skill, all funds raised will go to support our pro-
gramming and operations.
Join us February 14 for a Valentine’s celebra-
tion! Chocolate, games, prizes and fun, bring
your friends or your Valentine! This social starts
at 1pm and is guaranteed fun.
As always, we welcome all to stop by and
take part in activities at 135 N. Main St., call us
at 479-9512, visit our website, barreseniors.org,
or email us at director@barreseniors.org.
Military Kids Invited to Get Fit, Be Strong
Vermont’s military kids are invited to step up and accept the Get
Fit, Be Strong Challenge.
The challenge, which is sponsored by University of Vermont
Extension’s Operation: Military Kids (OMK) program, kicked off
on January 1 and will run through April 1. It is designed to pro-
mote a healthier lifestyle through physical fitness and healthy
habits, including getting adequate sleep and eating right.
Anyone with a parent or guardian in the military may register
for the challenge at www.eventbrite.com/e/omk-get-fit-be-strong-
challenge-registration-10222964161.
Everyone will receive a certificate of participation as well as
have a chance to win raffle prizes by completing a specified num-
ber of hours of physical activity and certain lifestyle goals at the
bronze, silver or gold level. In addition, if at least two hours of
activity a week are done together as a family, participants will be
eligible for the bonus prize raffle.
For the bronze level, kids must complete three to four hours of
physical activity per week and achieve one or two healthy lifestyle
goals throughout the challenge. These goals include eating three
servings of fruit or vegetables every day, limiting desserts to only
three times per week, decreasing weekly TV and electronics use,
increasing family activity time by one hour per week and going to
bed earlier.
The requirements for silver are five to six hours of physical
activity per week and three or four goals. For gold, participants
must complete at least seven hours of activity each week and
achieve all five of the healthy lifestyle goals.
Hours and goals should be tracked weekly and submitted to
OMK on a biweekly basis. Participants also are encouraged to
submit photos of their families showing how they are meeting
their health and fitness goals.
To learn more about the challenge and awards or to download
the tracking sheets, go to www.uvm.edu/extension/
youth/?Page=omk_getfit.html&SM=omk_menu.html.
■ ■ ■
■ ■ ■
Cloudy Apple Juice
Is Healthier
A study tested the antioxidant con-
tent of both clear and cloudy apple
juices and, regardless of the variety
of apple, the cloudy apple juice had
double the antioxidants. Both types
were pasteurized which is an impor-
tant step that protects against possi-
ble bacterial contamination in juices.
While the clear juice looks more
appealing and has a longer shelf life,
much of what is beneficial is lost in
the clarifying process. Word of cau-
tion: juices can be sugar-rich and
high in calories which is important
to remember in light of the increase
in childhood obesity. Health risks
from excess weight can override the
juice's benefits.
Weekly
Health Tip
20 South Main Street
Barre • 479-3381
M-F 8:30am-6pm, Sat. 8:30am-1pm
by Edward Ferrari Jr., R.Ph.
FOR 2-5-14
Cloudy Apple Juice
FOR 2-12-14
Omega-3s Slow
The Yankee Chef
TM
My name is James Bailey and I AM THE YANKEE CHEF! I have
been cooking since the age of 14 years, when my Dad opened his
third restaurant in Maine. I currently write food columns for sev-
eral New England newspapers, The Maine Edge (found online at
themaineedge.com) and the Villager Newspaper (found onlne at vil-
lagernewspaper.net). I have written several cookbooks and I blog at
theyankeechef.blogspot.com. Find me on Twitter and check out my
youtube videos. I am also a Yankee Food Historian and a profes-
sional genealogist. Visit my website at www.theyankeechef.com
Chicken Paprikash Soup
You will often find both Span-
ish and Hungarian paprikas on
store shelves but unless you really
REALLY have a discerning taste,
the flavor is almost inconsequen-
tial. But, having said that, Spanish
paprika is milder and less colorful
than its Hungarian counterpart.
Hungarian paprika is made from
special peppers that give it a deep,
rose red color and is considered
much warmer on the tongue. It is
said that paprika has more Vitamin
C, per ounce, than lemon juice.
1/2 cup flour
2 tablespoons paprika
1 teaspoon cayenne pepper
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon black pepper
1 lb. chicken breasts, cubed
3 tablespoons cornstarch
2 (15-ounce) cans chicken broth,
divided
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
1 small onion, peeled and
minced
1 tablespoon minced garlic in oil
12 - 14 ounces diced potatoes
Sour cream, optional
Combine flour, paprika, cayenne pep-
per, salt and black pepper in a large
bowl, mixing to blend well. Add the
cubed chicken; toss to evenly coat.
Cover bowl of chicken and flour mix-
ture with plastic wrap and refrigerate
for 30 minutes. Meanwhile, whisk to-
gether cornstarch and 1/4 cup of chick-
en broth to make slurry until smooth;
set aside.
In large skillet, heat oil over medium-
high heat until hot. Remove chicken
from refrigerator and separate from the
flour, discarding flour. Remove chicken
from flour, shaking off excess and add
to skillet to cook for 2-3 minutes, or un-
til browned. The chicken doesn’t have
to be completely cooked at this point.
Add onion and garlic to continue cook-
ing an additional 2 minutes, stirring
frequently. Add remainder of broth and
potatoes, reduce heat to medium and
lightly boil until potatoes are fork ten-
der, about 4-5 minutes longer.
Restir the cornstarch slurry to loosen
what has settled at the bottom of the
bowl and stir into the soup, blending
well. Let soup cook and thicken an ad-
ditional minute. Remove from heat and
serve in bowls, topped with a dollop of
sour cream and additional paprika or
cayenne pepper sprinkled on top.
page 22 The WORLD February 5, 2014
SAVE $$$$!
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near VT Granite Museum &
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in Barre
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Call Or Text 802-793-7417
160 N. Seminary St. in Barre
(near Yipes Stripes)
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Waterbury-Stowe Rd. Waterbury, VT 244-1116
46 N. Main Street, Barre 802-479-0671
Family Owned & Operated for 34 Years
Mike & Amanda Peyerl
97 US Rt. 302 Barre-Montpelier Road • 802-479-0671
Now On Sale!
In Loving Memory of
Priscilla C. Graves
December 29, 1930
February 1, 2010
You will never be
Forgotten
For though we are
Apart
You are always and
Forever
Alive within our
Hearts
My heart still aches in
Sadness
And secret tears still
Flow
What it meant to lose
You
No one will ever
Know
Your loving husband, Jack
and Family
Whoever said being
a parent is easy?
For help call
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“HAPPY ANNIVERSARY”
Mail this coupon to: The WORLD
c/o Happy Anniversary
403 U.S. Rt. 302 - Berlin, Barre, VT 05641
Just send in the entry blank below, and we will publish it in this space each week.
Plus, we will draw one (1) couple each week for a Gift Certificate from Botanica
Florals. No obligation, nothing to buy. Entries must be mailed two (2) weeks prior
to anniversary date. Telephone calls to The WORLD will not be accepted.
ANNIVERSARY
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ADDRESS________________________________
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like to help you wish a special couple
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plus, we’ll draw one (1) winner each
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buy. Just send anniversary names two
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The WORLD, c/o HAPPY ANNIVERSARY,
403 U.S.Rt. 302 - Berlin, Barre, VT 05641.
Please provide name, address & phone
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LUCKY WINNING COUPLE FOR THIS WEEK:
On FEBRUARY 8, TAMMY & RITCHIE SMITH
of BARRE Will Celebrate 7 Years of Marriage
FEBRUARY 11
Betty & Michael Sawyer, 3 yrs, Barre
2-15 Bruce & Theresa Bartlett,
45 yrs, Barre
Don’t forget...
2-12 Joe Richardson,
Moretown
2-13 Sandy Salvas, Barre
2-14 Laura Rappold, East
Montpelier
2-19 Kevin Lawson, 45, W.
Topsham
3-5 Rebecca Lefcourt, 34
3-16 Chubb Harrington, Barre
3-16 Roxie D. Gonet, 7,
Chelsea
3-17 Pat Wieja, Baltimore, MD
3-22 Nicholas Salvas, 21,
Barre
3-25 Zarek Michael Gonet, 6,
Charlestown, NH
4-1 Adam Lefcourt, 34
4-12 Daisy, 11
4-12 Meredith Page, 58,
Croyden, NH
4-20 Jessie Phillips, 22, E.
Mplr.
4-30 Lillian Kasulka, 4, E.
Montpelier
4-30 Darlene Callahan, 52,
Barre
5-4 Katie Hodgdon, 6,
Waterbury
5-6 Gary Villa, Washington
5-6 Jim Elliott, 47, Barre
5-13 Kristen Lee Evans, 26,
Mentor, OH
5-14 John, Chelsea
5-20 Bill Boyce, Chelsea
5-20 Mary Lefcourt, Burlington
5-22 Ruth Madigan P., Bethel
5-27 Candy McLeon
6-3 L’il Joey, Wby Ctr, 35
6-5 Rob Salvas, 52, Barre
6-6 Heather Holmes, 46,
Woodbury
7-7 Marti Elliott, Barre
7-9 Pierce Salvas, 29, Barre
7-11 Joslyn Richardson, 26,
Waterbury, VT
7-11 Marcus Hass, 25
7-12 Emily Rappold, Plainfield
7-16 Belle D. Gonet, 9,
Chelsea
7-18 Mike Jacques, So. Barre
7-24 Fran Houghton,
Lyndonville
7-28 Lew Perry, Lyndonville
8-2 Grace Hodgdon, 8, Jericho
8-2 Andy Fournier, Glover
8-8 Gary
8-8 Shirley Combs, Randolph
8-9 Bob Evans, 60, Clark, NJ
8-15 Dolly Fournier, Glover
8-16 CHARLOTTE EDWARDS,
BARRE TOWN
8-20 Rachel Salvas, 20, Barre
8-21 Chriiis
8/22 Tanya Bryan, 43, Barre
8-24 Terry Spaulding,
Lewiston, ME
8-26 Joshua McLeon, 24,
Hartford, CT
8-26 Darcy Hodgdon,
Waterbury
8-29 Connie Spaulding, Minot,
ME
9-5 Sally Fontaine, Walden
9-8 Arlo Benjamin Lefcourt, 4
9-15 Deborah Phillips
9-28 Jessica McLeon, 25,
Hardwick
10-4 Bret Hodgdon, Jericho
10-5 Lisa Companion,
Waterbury
10-6 Steven Lefcourt, 30,
Burlington
10-10 Chris McLean, 44,
Haverhill, NH
10-15 Gavin Hodgdon, 6,
Jericho
10-18 KAY
10-24 Joey’s Mommy
10-29 Eric Evans, 29,
Plymouth
11-7 Karen Evans, 60,
Plymouth
11-7 Jillian Hass, 24, E. Mplr.
11-15 Tyler Hass, 27
11-15 Bob Spaulding, Minot,
ME
11-15 Becky Hall, Greensboro
Bend
11-18 Stephen Wilson, 25,
Burlington
11-19 Henry Kasulka, 10, E.
Mplr
11-22 Ruth Pearce, 66,
Chelsea
11-23 Jason Lowe, 25, Wby
11-28 Neil, 25, Burlington
12-3 Peter Lefcourt, 41, Barre
12-3 DOT! 61, Calais
12-7 Armour Moodie, 60,
Stannard
12-8 Thelma Forkey, Waterbury
12-16 Lonny McLeon, 48,
Hardwick
12-25 Jenna Companion, 16,
Waterbury
12-31 Chelsea Phillips, 26,
Manassas, VA
1-4 Betsy Cody, 58, Barre
1-10 Curt McLeon, 47
1-14 Brandon McLeon, 23,
Hardwick
1-15 Peggy Zurla, 51, Mayaez,
Puerto Rico
1-15 Shawn Kasulka, E.Mplr
1-19 Kevn Sare, 33, Cabot
(no “I”)
1-27 Caitlyn Couture, 23,
Barre
1-31 Linda Couture, Barre
1-31 Wayne Michaud, 67,
Bristol
2-1 Nancy Prescott, Barre
2-6 Bob Edwards, 72
2-8 Warren Lanigan
Don’t forget to
change this date
to the Thursday
after issue
date...
FROM
BARRE-MONTPELIER RD.
Price Chopper (Berlin, VT) and The WORLD would like to help you wish someone special a
Happy Birthday. Just send their name, address & birthdate. We’ll publish the names in this
space each week. Plus, we’ll draw one (1) winner each week for a FREE BIRTHDAY CAKE
from Price Chopper (Berlin, VT). No obligation, nothing to buy. Just send birthday names two
(2) weeks prior to birthdate, to The WORLD, c/o BIRTHDAY CAKE, 403 U.S. Rt. 302 - Berlin,
Barre, VT 05641. Please provide your name, address & phone number for prize notification.
WINNER: Please call Price Chopper (Berlin, VT) at 479-9078 and ask for
Sharon Hebert (Bakery Mgr.) or Beverlee Hutchins or Penny Millette
(Cake Decorators) by Thursday, February 6 to arrange for cake pick-up.
PRICE CHOPPER
“BIRTHDAY DRAWING”
Mail this coupon to: The WORLD c/o Birthday Cake
403 U.S. Rt. 302 - Berlin
Barre, VT 05641
Open to people of all ages. Just send in the entry blank below, and we will
publish it in this space each week. Plus, we will draw one (1) name each week
for a FREE BIRTHDAY CAKE from the Price Chopper Super Center (Berlin,
VT). No obligation, nothing to buy. Entries must be mailed two (2) weeks prior
to birthdate. Telephone calls to The WORLD will not be accepted.
BIRTHDATE______________________________
NAME___________________________________
AGE (this birthday)_________________________
ADDRESS________________________________
________________________________________
PHONE__________________________________
JANUARY 31
Steven Bessette Ashford, 24, Groton
FEBRUARY 1
Nancy Prescott, Barre
FEBRUARY 4
Wyatt Aseltine, 6, Orange
FEBRUARY 4
Frieda Fortier, 82, Barre
FEBRUARY 5
Lilly Clark, Sweet Sixteen, Barre
FEBRUARY 6
Robert Edwards, Barre Town
This Week’s Cake Winner:
Feb. 7, BEVERLY TAPLIN of CHELSEA will be 75 YEARS OLD!
Happy Birthday!
2 x 6.3935
Sharon Dodge, 74, Barre
FEBRUARY 8
Warren Lanigan, Barre
Redic Baker, 12, West Berlin
Rita Rose (Carrier) Cyr, 90, Washington
Wayne Ashford, 54, Groton
Herb Woodard, 62, Montpelier
FEBRUARY 9
Ashley Nutbrown, 28, Barre
FEBRUARY 6
Nick Gagne, 30, Berlin
Open House
79
TH
Birthday Celebration
for
Frank Hickory
Feb. 18, 1935
VFW Montpelier
Saturday, February 15
5pm – 8pm
~Appetizers~
Come one, come all
Shapiro-Withrow
Mrs. Betsy A. Shapiro, of Waterbury, is pleased to announce the
engagement of her daughter, Emily Elizabeth Shapiro to Daniel
Walter Withrow, son of Richard and Deborah Withrow of Hilton,
New York. Emily is also the daughter of the late Andrew M.
Shapiro.
The future bride graduated from Union 32 High School in 2005,
and graduated from Norwich University in 2011 with a BA in
psychology. She will graduate in November with an MS in
Organizational Leadership. She is currently employed at Norwich
University as the Office Manager for Alumni and Family
Relations.
The future groom graduated from Hilton High School in 2006.
He attended Norwich University and is earning a degree in history.
He is currently employed as a police officer for Northfield Police
Department as well as the Washington County Sheriff’s
Department.
An August 2, 2014 wedding is planned at the Grand Hotel in
Killington, Vermont.
ARIES (March 21 to April 19)
Doing something nice for others is
typical of the generous Arian. But
be prepared for some jealous types
who might try to question one of
your more recent acts of kindness.
TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) You’re eager to take on new
responsibilities. But before you do, you might want to check out
exactly what would be required of you so that you don’t face any
“surprises” later.
GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) It might be best to put off an impor-
tant decision until a fluctuating situation becomes more stable.
Recently received news could help resolve a long-standing family
matter.
CANCER (June 21 to July 22) If you still have a problem getting
that information gap closed, you might consider asking a higher
authority to resolve the matter, leaving you free to move on to
another project.
LEO (July 23 to August 22) A family matter needs to be dealt with
at the start of the week. Once it’s resolved, the Big Cat can devote
more attention to that new opportunity that seems to hold so much
potential.
VIRGO (August 23 to September 22) Pay attention to those nig-
gling doubts. They could be warning you not to make any major
decisions until you’ve checked them out -- especially where
money matters might be involved.
LIBRA (September 23 to October 22) A business venture might
need more of your attention than you are able to provide. Consider
asking a trusted friend or family member to help you work through
this time crunch.
SCORPIO (October 23 to November 21) A more-positive aspect
helps you get a clearer focus on how to handle your time so that
you can deal with several responsibilities that are just now show-
ing up on your schedule.
SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to December 21) A very close
friend (you know who that is!) has advice that could help you
work through a confusing situation. So put your pride aside and
ask for it. You’ll be glad you did.
CAPRICORN (December 22 to January 19) A workplace situation
could turn a bit tense. The best way to handle it is to confront it
and deal with it openly. Doing so can help reveal the underlying
reasons for the problem.
AQUARIUS (January 20 to February 18) A colleague’s remarks
appear to be especially cutting. But don’t waste your time or your
energy trying to deal with the situation. You have more important
things to do.
PISCES (February 19 to March 20) Support for your work comes
as a surprise from someone you thought was critical or, at least,
indifferent. Your spouse or partner has big plans for the weekend.
BORN THIS WEEK: Your spiritual strength often acts as an inspi-
ration to help others make decisions about their lives.
(c) 2014 King Features Synd., Inc.
CVMC Auxiliary Names
Jean Rubalcaba Auxilian of the Year
Barre resident Jean Rubalcaba has been a volunteer at Central
Vermont Medical Center for 45 years, since the hospital opened in
1968.
She was born and raised in Barre and graduated from Spaulding
High School. Jean married Daniel and they raised three children
– Deborah, Daniel and Karin. She worked as a stay at home mom
and day care provider before working at Peoples National Bank,
retiring from Key Bank as a branch manager.
Jean volunteers at the information desk in the lobby, in the gift
shop, and is an active member of the Auxiliary, currently serving
on the board of directors.
Her family is very important to her. She is actively involved
with her six grandchildren, sharing Sunday dinners together,
babysitting and attending their school functions, sports, plays and
grandparents day.
The CVMC Auxiliary operates the gift shop off the main lobby
at the hospital and The Bene-Fit Shop, a thrift shop in Barre. The
Bene-Fit Shop is located to the left of Lenny’s Shoe & Apparel on
Main Street, with plenty of free parking in front of the shop. They
are open Wednesday through Friday from 10am to 4pm and
Saturdays from 9am to 2pm. All proceeds from The Bene-Fit Shop
and the gift shop are used to support programs at CVMC and
provide scholarships to local students studying for a career in
health care.
Membership in the Auxiliary is open to all persons who are
interested in the purposes and activities of the organization.
Membership dues are $10 per calendar year. Contact Robin
Brandis for more information at 802-371-4375, robin.brandis@
cvmc.org or visit www.cvmc.org for an application.
CVMC Auxiliary President Carol Welch (left) with Jean Rubalcaba,
Auxilian of the Year.
■ ■ ■
VALENTINE’S DAY
FEB. 14
February 5, 2014 The WORLD page 23
Dads, Relatives, Special Friends and Daughters
of all ages. Open To All Families!
THURSDAY, FEB. 13, 2014
6:30 - 8:30 P.M.
CAPITOL PLAZA - GOVERNOR’S BALLROOM
Central Vermont’s Premiere Hotel & Conference Center
$15 per family
in advance
Father/Daughter
Valentine
Dance
Montpelier Recreation Department
And Capitol Plaza Hotel & Conference Center
Present The
18th Annual
Information: 225-8699 or montpelierrec.org
Tickets Available at Rec. Dept., 55 Barre St.
DJ JIM SEVERANCE
Photos Available For Purchase
Photographers: Mitch Moraski, Kurt Bugliger
A Special Thanks
To Capitol Plaza
for the donation
of space
$20 per family
at the door
MONTPELIER
RECREATION
DEPARTMENT
55 Barre Street • 225-8699
S
A
T
U
R
D
A
Y
,
F
E
B
. 1
5
, 2
0
1
3
1
2
N
O
O
N
-1
:3
0
P.M
.
TWIN CITY BOWLING LANES
Barre-Montpelier Road
Buy Your Tickets Early!
48 SPACES AVAILABLE
225-8699
www.montpelierrec.org
Advanced Tickets Only
$15.00 per person
Purchased at The Montpelier Recreation Office
M
O
T
H
E
R/S
O
N
B
O
W
L
IN
G
CVTV CHANNEL 7
CHARTER
COMMUNICATIONS
OF BARRE
ALL PROGRAMING SUBJECT TO CHANGE
WITHOUT NOTICE
Wednesday 2/5
Barre City Council 9a,12p,3p
Williamstown Select 7p,10p

Thursday 2/6
Williamstown Select 6a, 9a, 12p
Spaulding High School 3p,7p,10p

Friday 2/7
Spaulding High School 6a,9a,12p
Barre Town Select 3p,7p,10p

Saturday 2/8
Barre Town Select 6a, 9a, 12p
4 PM Washington Baptist Church
5 PM Faith Community Church
6 PM Barre Congregational Church
8 PM St. Monica’s Mass
9 PM Gospel Music
10 PM Calvary Life

Sunday 2/9
1 AM Faith Community Church
2 AM Barre Congregational Church
4 AM St. Monica’s Mass
5 AM Washington Baptist Church
6:30 AM Calvary Life
8 AM Gospel Music
9 AM Washington Baptist Church
10 AM Faith Community Church
11 AM Barre Congregational Church
1 PM St. Monica’s Mass
3:30 PM Calvary Life
5 PM Gospel Music
6 PM Washington Baptist Church
7 PM Faith Community Church
8 PM Barre Congregational Church
10 PM St. Monica’s Mass
11 PM Calvary Life

Monday 2/10
Barre Town School 6a,9a,12p
Williamstown School 3, 7, 10p

Tuesday 2/11
Barre Town School 6a,9a,12p
Statehouse Programming 3-6pm
Barre City Council “Live” 7pm
Wednesday
5:30 AM Dartmouth Medical
7 AM The Painted Word
10 AM Vermont Youth Orchestra
12 PM Poetry Slam
12:30 PM Granite History
2:30 PM Burlington Authors
4 PM Instant Coffee House
4:30 PM The Painted Word
6 PM CVTSport_010313
7:30 PM For the Animals
8 PM Vermont Worker’s Center
9 PM Ask the Experts
11:30 PM Montpelier Now

Thursday
2 AM Fright Night
6 AM CVTSport_010313
8 AM For the Animals
8:30 AM Road to Recovery
9:30 AM Dartmouth Medical
11 AM For the Animals
11:30 AM Messing Around
12 PM Granite History
1:30 PM CVSWMD
2 PM Road to Recovery
2:30 PM Vermont Movie Update
3 PM Burlington Authors
4 PM Dartmouth Medical
5:30 PM The Painted Word
6:30 PM Montpelier Now
7 PM Vermont Worker’s Center
8 PM Wind Power Discussion
9:30 PM New England Cooks
Catered by Randy Henry & The Racing Chefs
WHERE: Hilltop Inns, 3470 Airport Rd, Berlin, VT
DATE: Saturday, February 8, 2014
TIME: Serving Begins @ 12:30 P.M.
COST: $10/person, $5/kids under 10, Free /kids 4 & under
Silent Auction • Quilt Raffle
Ride there! Drive there! Even Walk there!
For More Information Call:
Linda Mercy @ 479-3405 Dave Rouleau @ 371-1279
or visit our website: www.barretownthunderchickens.com
14TH
ANNUAL
Barre Town Thunder Chickens Snowmobile Club
and The Mercy Family are sponsoring the...
SKATEPARK
FUNDRAISER
POKER RUN &
PULLED PORK
DINNER WITH
ALL THE FIXIN'S
to benefit the Travis Mercy Skatepark, Barre Town
SNOW OR NO-SNOW - The Event Will Go On!
BEGIN: Great Energy Store, So. Barre, Cor. 14B WN114
END: Hilltop Inns Banquet Room, Cor. 12/14 WN16
WHEN: Saturday, February 8, 2014, 9:00 A.M.
COST: $5.00 per hand & 1 extra card for $1.00
Hilltop Inns Banquet Room
Montpelier Antiques Market
♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦
2nd & 4th Sundays October - March
Montpelier Elks Country Club
1 Country Club Rd., Montpelier, Vermont
7:30 AM - 1:30 PM
October 27 ♦ November 10 & 24 ♦ December 8 & 22
January 12 & 26 ♦ February 9 & 23 ♦ March 9 & 23
Early Buyers $5 (7:30AM) ♦ General Public $2 (9:00AM)
Visit us at: www.montpelierantiquesmarket.com
Dealer Information (802) 751-6138
Montpelier Antiques Market
♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦
2nd & 4th Sundays October - March
Montpelier Elks Country Club
1 Country Club Rd., Montpelier, Vermont
7:30 AM - 1:30 PM
October 27

November 10 & 24

December 8 & 22
January 12 & 26

February 9 & 23

March 9 & 23
Early Buyers $5 (7:30AM)

General Public $2 (9:00AM)
Visit us at: www.montpelierantiquesmarket.com
Dealer Information (802) 751-6138
Montpelier Antiques Market
♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦
2nd & 4th Sundays October - March
Montpelier Elks Country Club
1 Country Club Rd., Montpelier, Vermont
7:30 AM - 1:30 PM
October 27 ♦ November 10 & 24 ♦ December 8 & 22
January 12 & 26 ♦ February 9 & 23 ♦ March 9 & 23
Early Buyers $5 (7:30AM) ♦ General Public $2 (9:00AM)
Visit us at: www.montpelierantiquesmarket.com
Dealer Information (802) 751-6138
Our 8th
Season!
2013-2014
Montpelier Antiques Market
♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦
2nd & 4th Sundays October - March
Montpelier Elks Country Club
1 Country Club Rd., Montpelier, Vermont
7:30 AM - 1:30 PM
October 27 ♦ November 10 & 24 ♦ December 8 & 22
January 12 & 26 ♦ February 9 & 23 ♦ March 9 & 23
Early Buyers $5 (7:30AM) ♦ General Public $2 (9:00AM)
Visit us at: www.montpelierantiquesmarket.com
Dealer Information (802) 751-6138
Montpelier Antiques Market
♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦
2nd & 4th Sundays October - March
Montpelier Elks Country Club
1 Country Club Rd., Montpelier, Vermont
7:30 AM - 1:30 PM
October 27

November 10 & 24

December 8 & 22
January 12 & 26

February 9 & 23

March 9 & 23
Early Buyers $5 (7:30AM)

General Public $2 (9:00AM)
Visit us at: www.montpelierantiquesmarket.com
Dealer Information (802) 751-6138
All calendar submissions should be sent to editor@vt-world.com or
mailed to The WORLD, Attn: Calendar, 403 U.S. Route 302, Barre,
Vt. 05641. The deadline is 5:00pm, Thursday preceding publica-
tion. The Ongoing section is for free/low cost community events,
which should be verified monthly. We are no longer able to include
ongoing classes.
Ongoing Events
BARRE- Central VT Adult Basic Education. Free classes. Pre-
GED and high school diploma prep classes at Barre Learning Center,
46 Washington St. Info./pre-register 476-4588.
Additional Recyclables Collection Center. Open for collection
Tuesdays & Thursdays 12:30-5:30pm, and 3rd Saturdays 9am-1pm.
540 No. Main St. Visit www.cvswmd.org for list of acceptable items.
Vermont Independent Writers. Place and time will vary according
to weather. Info. 476-7289 or chosenwords@yahoo.com
Navigating VT Health Connect. Get help from Certified Application
Counselor Marcia Drake. Aldrich Library, Tuesdays 5-8pm.
Medicare and You. New to Medicare? Have questions? We have
answers. Central Vermont Council on Aging, 59 N. Main St., Suite
200, 2nd and 4th Tuesdays of the month. Call 479-0531 to register.
Line Dancing. Old Labor Hall, 46 Granite St., by donation, Thursdays
6:30-8:30pm.
RCIA. For those who want to learn more about the Catholic faith. St.
Monica Church, Wednesdays starting 9/25, 7pm. Pre-reg. 479-3253.
Celebrate Recovery. Recovery for all your hurts/habits/hang-ups. Faith
Community Church, 30 Jones Bros. Way, Mondays, 6-8pm. 476-3221.
Wheelchair Basketball. Barre Evangelical Free Church, 17 So. Main
St., Tuesdays, 5:30-7pm. Info 498-3030 (David) or 249-7931 (Sandy).
Community Drum Circle. At the Parish house next to Universalist
Church, Fridays, 7-9pm. Info. 724-7301.
Story Hour. Aldrich Library children’s room, Mondays & Tuesdays,
10:30am.
Central Vermont Business Builders. Community National Bank, 1st
& 3rd Tuesdays, 8-9am. Info. 777-5419.
Weekly Storytime. Next Chapter Bookstore, 158 North Main St.,
Saturdays, 10:30am. Info. 476-3114.
Overeaters Anonymous. Church of the Good Shepherd, Tuesdays
5:30-6:30pm. Info. 249-0414.
Greater Barre Democrats. Town & City residents welcome. Aldrich
Public Library, last Wednesdays, 5:15-6:15pm. Info 476-4185.
Barre Tones Women’s A Capella Chorus. 2nd flr Alumni Hall, next to
Barre Aud., Mondays, 6:30-9pm. www.barretonesvt.com or 223-2039.
Play Group. St. Monica’s Church, lower level, Thursdays during
school year, 9:30-11am.
American Legion Auxiliary Unit 10. Meets at the post, first
Thursday of each month (not Jan. or July), 6:30pm.
Vermont Modelers Club. Building & flying model airplanes year-
round, visitors welcome. Info. 485-7144.
Community Breakfast. First Presbyterian Church, 78 Summer St.,
3rd Sunday of month, FREE, 7:30-9am. 476-3966.
Lupus Support Group. 9 Jorgensen Ln., teen meeting 3rd Wednesdays
at 6:30pm, adult meeting 4th Weds., 6:30pm. Info. 877-735-8787.
Grandparents Raising Their Children’s Children. Support group.
First Presbyterian Church, 1st & 3rd Weds., 10am-noon. 476-1480.
Friends of Aldrich Public Library. Aldrich Library, 2nd floor board-
room, 2nd Tuesday of month. Info. 476-7550.
Circle of Parents. Confidential support group for parents and caregiv-
ers. Meets Tuesday evenings. Info. 229-5724 or 1-800-CHILDREN.
Central VT Amateur Radio Club. Steak House, Barre-Montpelier
Rd., 1st Wednesdays, 6:30pm. Info. 496-3566 or 496-2836.
Mothers of Preschoolers. Monthly get-togethers for crafts, refresh-
ments, etc. Christian Alliance Church, 476-3221.
Alcoholics Anonymous. Meetings in Barre, daily; call 802-229-5100
for latest times & locations; www.aavt.org.
Alzheimer’s Support Group. Rowan Court Health & Rehab, 4th
Weds. of month, 3-5pm. Info/RSVP at 476-4166.
Hedding United Methodist Activities & Meetings. 40 Washington
Street, 476-8156. Choir, Thursdays 7pm; Free Community Supper,
Fridays 5:30-6:30pm; Community Service & Food Shelf Hours:
Weds & Thurs. 3-5pm. TOPS (Take Off Pounds Sensibly),
Wednesdays 5pm, call 371-8929.
Turning Point Recovery Center. 489 N. Main St. For individuals/
families in or seeking substance abuse recovery. Recovery coaching &
other support programs. Open Mon.-Fri. 10am-5pm, Sat. noon – 5pm.
Making Recovery Easier, Tuesdays, 6pm; Wit’s End family support
group, Wednesdays, 6pm; Narcotics Anonymous– When Enough Is
Enough, Sundays, 5:30pm & Thursdays, 6:30pm; Life Skills Group,
Mondays, noon-1:30pm (lunch provided). Al-Anon- Courage to
Change, Saturdays 6-7pm, childcare provided. Info. 479-7373.
Knights of Columbus. Pine Hill Road, Barre Town, meetings second
Tuesday of every month, 7pm.
Green Mountain Spirit Chapter. National women bikers club. 2nd
Wed. of month; info grnmtnspirit@hotmail.com.
MONTPELIER- Central VT Adult Basic Education. Free classes.
Intermediate Level Reading for Adults: Thurs. 9-10am; Learning
English: Tues. or Weds. 9-10am; English Conversation: Tues. 4-5pm.
Montpelier Learning Center, 100 State St. Info/pre-register 223-3403.
Meditation, Mondays at 1pm; Intro to Yoga, Tuesdays 4pm;
Consults, Fridays 11am. Free classes, some limits apply. All at Fusion
Studio, 56 East State St. Info. 272-8923 or www.fusionstudio.org
Open Library. Open to all, books and DVDs for all ages. Resurrection
Baptist Church, open Sundays 12:30pm-2pm.
Central VT Roller Derby’s Wrecking Doll Society. Intro to roller
derby, gear supplied, bring a mouth guard. First time is free. Montpelier
Rec. Center, Barre St., Saturdays 5-6:30pm. www.twincityriot.com
Celiac Support Group. Tulsi Tea Room, 34 Elm St., 2nd Wednesdays,
4-5pm. Info. 598-9206.
MSAC Public Activities: FEAST Together, $5 sugg. donation ages
60+/$6 others, Tuesdays & Fridays, noon-1pm. FEAST To Go, bene-
fits senior meals program, $5-8.50, Thursdays, 11am-1pm. Meal reser-
vations 262-6288. All at Montpelier Senior Activity Ctr, 58 Barre St.
A Course In Miracles study group. Everyone is welcome and there
is no charge. Christ Church, Tuesdays, 7pm. Info. 619-540-4876.
Parent’s Group and Meet-Up. Connect with local parents to share
advice & information, kids welcome. Kellogg-Hubbard Library, Hayes
Rm, first Mondays, 10-11:30am. Info. mamasayszine@gmail.com
Joyful Noise Laughter Club. Playful exercises to get you moving,
breathing and laughing. Ages 8 & up. Kellogg-Hubbard Library, 2nd
& 4th Mondays (no holidays), 6-7pm. Charlotte, 223-1607.
Families Anonymous. For families or friends of those who have
issues with addiction, alcohol and/or mental illness. Bethany Church,
2nd floor youth room, Mondays, 7-8pm. 229-6219.
Freeride Montpelier Open Shop Nights. Need help w/a bike repair?
Come to the volunteer-run community bike shop. 89 Barre St., Tuesdays
6-8pm, other days seasonal, donations. Info. freeridemontpelier.org
Women’s Book Club. New members welcome. Kellogg-Hubbard
Library, East Montpelier rm, 2nd Thursdays, 6:30-7:30pm. 223-8067.
continued on next page
TOP 10 MOVIES
1. Ride Along (PG-13) Ice
Cube, Kevin Hart
2. Lone Survivor (R) Mark
Wahlberg, Taylor Kitsch
3. The Nut Job (PG) animated
4. Jack Ryan: Shadow Recruit
(PG-13) Chris Pine
5. Frozen (PG) animated
6. American Hustle (R)
7. Devil’s Due (R)
8. August: Osage County (R)
Meryl Streep
9. The Wolf of Wall Street (R)
10. Saving Mr. Banks (PG-13)
(c) 2014 King Features Synd., Inc.
8 State Street, Montpelier • 229-6788
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page 24 The WORLD February 5, 2014
2/7 Eric Bibb & Ruthie Foster, Chandler Center for the Arts - Randolph, VT
2/8 Instant Misunderstanding, Twilight Theater - Lyndonville, VT
2/14 Colin Quinn - “Unconstitutional”, Barre Opera House - Barre, VT
2/15 Vermont Vaudeville, Tupelo Music Hall - White River Jct, VT
2/18 Hamlet, Fuller Hall - St. Johnsbury, VT
2/21 Fatoumata Diawara, Flynn Theater - Burlington, VT
2/7 thru 2/22 Freud’s Last Session, Shaker Bridge Theater - Enfield, NH
2/26 Zappa Plays Zappa, Higher Ground - South Burlington, VT
2/27 Gary Clark, Jr., Higher Ground - South Burlington, VT
2/28 Bob Weir & Ratdog - SOLD OUT, Flynn Theater - Burlington, VT
3/3 DeJohnette, Lovano, Spalding, Genovese, Flynn Theater - Burlington, VT
3/4 Josh Ritter, Lebanon Opera House - Lebanon, NH
3/5 Brett Dennen, Foy Vance, Higher Ground - South Burlington, VT
3/6 North Mississippi Allstars, Jay Peak Resort - Jay, VT
3/14 Jefferson Starship: 40th Anni , Tupelo Music Hall - White River Jct, VT
3/15 Danú, Flynn Theater - Burlington, VT
3/19 Keb’ Mo’, Lebanon Opera House - Lebanon, NH
3/21 Lucky Plush, Twilight Theater - Lyndonville, VT
3/22 Cantrip, Chandler Center for the Arts - Randolph, VT
3/22 Robert Randolph & The Family Band, Jay Peak Resort - Jay, VT
3/29 Lucy Kaplansky, Tupelo Music Hall - White River Jct, VT
4/1 Tao Drummers, Lyndon Institute - Lyndonville, VT
4/4 John Gorka, Chandler Center for the Arts - Randolph, VT
4/4 Shawn Mullins, Tupelo Music Hall - White River Jct, VT
4/11 David Bromberg Quartet, Tupelo Music Hall - White River Jct, VT
4/12 The Johnny Clegg Band, Lebanon Opera House - Lebanon, NH
3/28 thru 4/13 The Other Place, Shaker Bridge Theater - Enfield, NH
4/17 Cinderella - Moscow Festival Ballet, Lyndon Institute - Lyndonville, VT
4/25 Bill Burr, Flynn Theater - Burlington, VT
5/11 The Wailin’ Jennys, Chandler Center for the Arts - Randolph, VT
5/2 thru 5/18 Joe Egg, Shaker Bridge Theater - Enfield, NH
6/20 The English Beat, Tupelo Music Hall - White River Jct, VT
oncert
Connections
2x5.5
2-5
For venue phone numbers, call
The Point at 223-2396 9:00 to 5:00
Mon.-Fri., or visit our web site at www.pointfm.com
2014
Feb 6-9
Lost Nation Theater
The Vagina
Monologues
Eve Ensler’s powerful, poignant, tough, often hilarious &
accessible collection of women’s stories. Benefts CIRCLE.
The Vagina
Monologues
Feb 13-16
Greenberg-Snell Productions
Intake
Premiere! Margot Lasher’s serio-comic award-winner.
82 year-old animal lover shatters prejudice toward aging.
Intake
feb 20-23
Ellis Jacobson
Adapted from
Samuel beckett
Jacobson’s tongue-in-cheek tribute. A fun new show, with
music by Fred Wilber, finds meaning in the absurd.
Adapted from
Samuel beckett
Three great shows over three weekends.
Thursday–Sunday, Feb 6–Feb 23
Montpelier City Hall Arts Center
Tickets: $20
$15 student/senior
7:30pm Thu-Sat / 2pm Sun
(802) 229-0492
lostnationtheater.org
SPONSORS: Capitol Copy
City of Montpelier
Eternity Web
National Life Group
The Times Argus
The Point!-FM
Vermont Arts Council
WDEV
ad courtesy of The World
Skates
Sharpened
Professionally
Expect the Best
802-622-0580
sanisportservice.com
Mondays / Barre
Tuesdays / Northfield
Wednesdays / Montpelier
Thursdays-Fridays-Saturdays / Barre
Making & Restoring Fine Violins
Violin • Viola • Cello • Bass
VIOLIN RENTALS
Only
$
15 month
476-7798
10 Hutchins Circle
Barre
Cello Rentals
only
$28/month
www.vermontviolinmaker.com
Gregoire’s VIOLIN SHOP
Rentals
Service
Sales
Strings
Books
Accessories
Appraisals
Bow Rehairing
& Restoration
Free Community Meals. Mondays: Unitarian Church, 11am-1pm;
Tuesdays: Bethany Church, 11:30am-1pm; Wednesdays: Christ
Church, 11am-12:30pm; Thursdays: Trinity Church, 11:30am-1pm;
Fridays: St. Augustine Church, 11am-12:30pm. 2nd Saturdays: Trinity
Church, 11:30am-1pm; Last Sundays, Bethany Church, 4:30-6:30pm.
Trinity Teen Night. United Methodist Church, 2nd and 3rd Fridays,
5-9pm. Volunteers needed to share talents & hobbies. Info 279-3695.
Toastmasters. Montpelier “Speakeasies” held at National Life, 1st & 3rd
Wednesdays, noon-1pm. Learn the arts of speaking, listening & thinking.
No fee for guests. 229-7455 or tdensmore@sentinelinvestments.com
Grandparents Raising Their Children’s Children. Support group,
childcare provided. Resurrection Baptist Church, 144 Elm St., 2nd
Thursday of the month, 6-8pm. Info. 476-1480.
Calico County Quilters. All skill levels welcome. Bethany Church,
Red Room, 2nd Saturday of each month, 1-3pm (NOT Oct. or May).
Co-Dependents Anonymous (CoDA). Bethany Church basement,
Tuesdays, 6:30pm. Info. 229-9036.
Brain Injury Support Group. All brain injury survivors, caregivers &
adult family members welcome to attend. Disability Rights VT, 141
Main St., first Monday of month, 5:30-7:30pm. 1-800-834-7890 x106.
Kellogg-Hubbard Library Activities. 135 Main St., 223-3338. Story
Time, Tues/Fri, 10:30am. Write On!, for aspiring authors age 6-10,
Fridays, 3:30-4pm. YA Nights: games, movies & more for teens &
tweens, 3rd Fridays, 6-9pm. Youth Chess Club, Weds, 5:30-7pm.
Read to Coco: Wednesdays, 3:30-4pm. Read with Arlo: Thursdays
3-4pm. Sit N Knit, for young knitters age 6 & up: Mondays, 3:30-4pm.
Games Unplugged: Wednesdays 1/22-3/5, 3-5pm. Conversations
with the Word Weaver, with Lois Liggett: Tuesdays, 1:30pm.
CHADD ADHD Parent Support Group. Childcare not available,
please make plans for your child. Woodbury College, second Tuesday
of month, 5:30-7:30pm. Info. 498-5928.
Overeaters Anonymous. Bethany Church, Fridays at noon. 223-3079.
Good Beginnings of Central VT. 174 River St., 595-7953. Mama’s
Circle, Thursdays, 10am-noon; Volunteer Meetings, 2nd Wednesdays,
10:30am; Babywearing Group, 2nd Thursdays, 10:30am-noon;
Bible Study. Christian Alliance Church, Weds., 7pm. 476-3221.
Al-Anon. Trinity Methodist Church, Main St., Sun., 6:15-7:30pm.
Info. 1-866-972-5266.
Al-Anon. Bethany Church basement, 115 Main St., Tuesdays &
Thursdays noon-1pm, Wednesdays 7-8pm. Info. 1-866-972-5266.
Central Vermont Support Group. Meeting at Another Way, 125
Barre St., Tuesdays 6-7:30pm. Info. 479-5485.
Community Kitchen. Unitarian Universalist, 2nd & 4th Sun., 4:30-
6pm. Info. Richard Sheir, 223-4799.
SL AA. 12-step recovery group for sex/relationship problems. Bethany
Church, Wed., 5pm. Info. 802-249-6825.
Survivors of Incest Anonymous. Bethany Church parlor, 115 Main
St., Mondays, 5pm. Please call first: 229-9036 or 454-8402.
Brain Injury Support Group. Unitarian Church, first & third Thurs.
of month, 1:30-2:30pm. Info. call toll free 1-877-985-8440.
La Leche League. Breastfeeding info and support. Good Beginnings,
174 River St., 3rd Tuesdays, 10am. Info 244-1254.
Playgroups: Dads & Kids Playgroup, Thursdays, 6-7:30pm and
Playgroup, Saturdays, 9:30-11am, both at Family Center of
Washington County. All held during school year only.
Kindred Connections Peer to Peer Cancer Support for Patients and
Caregivers. Info 1-800-652-5064 email info@vcsn.net
Christian Meditation. Christ Church, Mondays, 12-1pm.
NORTHFIELD- Civil Air Patrol Cadet Program. For ages 12-18.
Readiness & Regional Technology Center, Norwich campus, Tuesdays,
Beaders Group. All levels welcome, bring your projects. The Bead
Hive, Saturdays, 11am-2pm. Info. 454-1615.
Diabetes Discussion & Support Group. Everyone welcome. The
Health Center conf. room, 3rd Thursdays, 1:30pm. Info. 322-6600.
RANDOLPH- Caregiver Support Group. Open to anyone caring
for a loved one. Gifford Medical Ctr, second Tuesdays, 11am-noon.
Line Dancing. Chandler Music Hall, 71-73 Main St., by donation,
Wednesdays 6:30-8:30pm.
Matters of the Heart. Experts discuss ways to improve heart health.
Gifford Conference Ctr, FREE, 3rd Wednesdays, 1-2pm. 728-2191.
Grief Support Group. The Family Center at Gifford, 44 South Main
St., 2nd & 4th Tuesdays, 4-5pm. Info. 728-7100 x7.
New Business Forum. Vermont Tech Enterprise Center, 1540 VT Rte
66, 2nd Wednesdays, 11:30am-1pm. 728-9101.
Yoga Classes. All ages & levels, donations benefit Safeline. VTC
Campus Center, last Sunday of month, 2-3:30pm.
Lift for Life Exercises, Tues-Fri, 8:30am; Cribbage 9:30am &
Mahjongg 10am on Tuesdays; Art History Video Series 12:45pm &
Bridge Club 2pm Wednesdays; Foot Clinics, 1st & 2nd Weds, 10am-
noon, call to sign up. All at Randolph Senior Ctr, Hale St. 728-9324.
Cancer Support Group. For survivors, sufferers & family. Gifford
Conference Ctr, 2nd Tuesdays, 9:30-11am. 728-2270.
Storytime. Kimball Library, Wed., 11am, ages 2-5; Toddlertime, Fri.,
10:30am; Gathering for hand work, 2nd & 4th Mon., 6pm.
WASHINGTON- Central VT ATV Club. Washington Fire Station,
3rd Tuesdays, 6:30pm. 224-6889.
Art and Adventure with April, 3rd Saturdays at 11am; Storytime,
Mondays at 11am; Tech Help Drop-In, Saturdays 10am-2pm. All at
Calef Memorial Library. Info. 883-2343.
WEBSTERVILLE- Fire District #3, Prudential Committee.
Monthly meeting, 105 Main St., 2nd Tuesdays, 7pm.
WILLIAMSTOWN- Knitting Group. All handwork welcome, come
for creativity & community. Ainsworth Library, Tuesdays, 7-8:30pm.
Bible Study. Christian Alliance Church, Sun., 6pm. Info. 476-3221.
WOODBURY- Knitting Group. All hand work welcome. Library,
1st & 3rd Wed., 6:30-8pm.
WORCESTER- Knitting Night. The Wool Shed, Tuesdays, 6:30-
8:30
Playgroup. Craft, snack, outdoor time & more. Doty Elementary
pre-k room, Thursdays, 9:30-11am. For info. call Shaylyn, 223-1312.
Wednesday, February 5
BARRE- Central VT Catholic School Open House. Learn more
about this school serving students of all faiths ages 3 through grade 8.
CVCS, starts after 8:15am school Mass, until 11am. 476-5015.
MONTPELIER- Karl Miller. Solo jazz guitar. Bagitos Cafe, 28
Main St., 6-8pm. Info. 229-9212.
The Ghost of Gold Brook Bridge: The Vermont Story Songs of
Banjo Dan. Part of Osher Lifelong Learning Series. Montpelier Senior
Activity Ctr, 58 Barre St., $5 for OLLI non-members, 1:30pm.
Central Vermont Chamber of Commerce Annual Breakfast
Meeting. Keynote is Doug Babcock on “Business at Risk.” Capitol
Plaza, $35, 7:30-9am. RSVP to 229-5711 or cvchamber@aol.com
Step ‘n’ Time Line Dancers of Central Vermont. Farmers’ Night
performance features a mix of music from country and Celtic to Latin
dance, hop-hop, show tunes and more State House, FREE, 7:30pm.
Community Cinema: The Trials of Muhammad Ali. This film cov-
ers Ali’s battle to overturn the prison sentence he received for refusing
U.S. military service. Kellogg-Hubbard Library, FREE, 7pm.
Make Your Own Fashion Accessories. Learn to make your own
flower fashion accessories with Delna Boyce. Hunger Mountain
Coop, $10 members/$12 non, 5:30-7:30pm. Pre-reg. 223-8000 x202.
ST. JOHNSBURY- Mallory Lewis and Lamp Chop. Benefits
Rhythm of the Rein Therapeutic Riding Ctr. St. Johnsbury Academy,
$15 adults/$5 8th grade & under, 7:30pm. www.catamountarts.org
Thursday, February 6
CALAIS- Broken String. Bluegrass. At Whammy Bar, Maple Corner
Store, FREE, starts 7:30pm.
MONTPELIER- Vermont Entrepreneurship Day. Students, college
reps, entrepreneurs, legislators etc. are welcome. Capitol Plaza, 9am-
1pm. Register at www.vermontentrepreneur.net/registration.html
Financial Aid Workshop. Get help with FAFSA or VT grant applica-
tion. Bring tax returns, W-2s, account balances, etc. CCV Montpelier,
660 Elm St., FREE, 4-6pm. Call 800-642-3177 to register.
The Problem of Slavery in Early Vermont. Reading and book sign-
ing with author Harvey Amani Whitfield. Public welcome. VT History
Museum, 109 State St., FREE, 4:30-6:30pm. Info. 479-8519.
The Vagina Monologues. Eve Ensler’s powerful, poignant & hilari-
ous collection of women’s stories. Performances benefit Circle. Lost
Nation Theater, $20/$15 students & seniors, 7:30pm. Info. 229-0492.
continued on next page
6-8:30pm. Info. capitalcompos-
ite@yahoo.com
Clogging & Irish Step Lessons.
W/Green Mountain Cloggers,
ages 8-78, donations. Sundays
5-8pm. 522-2935.
Northfield Chess Club. Casual
games & speed chess. Northfield
Senior Center, $1, Tuesdays,
7pm. Info. 764-5880.
Playgroup. United Church of
Northfield, Wednesdays, 9:30-
11am. Held only when school is
in session. Info. 262-3292 x113.
PLAINFIELD- Cutler
Memorial Library Activities:
Classic Book Club: 1st Mondays,
6pm; Food for Thought Book
Club: 2nd Mondays, 6:30pm.
Plainfield Book Club: 3rd
Mondays, 7pm. Call 454-8504 to
confirm.
Colin McCaffrey and Bob
Amos, 6-8pm; Myra Flynn,
8-10pm. Both at Bagitos Cafe, 28
Main St. Info. 229-9212.
Public Hearing on Labelling
Food Produced with Genetic
Engineering. Starting at 5:30,
you may sign up for a slot to
testify. State House, House
Chamber, 6-8pm. Info. 828-
2233.
CENTRAL
VERMONT
®
OF BARRE
Our 31st Year ~ Over 4500 Children Served
Central Vermont Rotary Club &
The Salvation Army of Barre
2013 WORLD SANTA PROJECT
THANK YOU THIS WEEK TO:
Nathan & Cynthia (Masi) Neuenfeldt
in memory of
Theresa, Vico & Nellie Masi
Father Maurice Boucher
Christopher & Gordon Greane
Fredda & Laurie Jacobs
February 5, 2014 The WORLD page 25
Montpelier Lodge
of Elks #924
203 Country Club Road
Montpelier
223-2600 Ext #27
JACKPOT $2,000.
55 numbers or less --
FLASH BALL $200.
MINI JACKPOT $1,250.
55 numbers or less --
Excellent Parking Available
MONTPELIER LODGE OF ELKS #924
BINGO
Tuesday Nights
Tuesday 2/4/14
$
3.00 per chance for Bingo Queen of
Hearts...Pull the Queen & get
$
729!
Think Spring. Think Kind Thoughts.
Doors open at 4:00 pm
Early Birds at 6:00pm
Regular Games at 7:00 pm
~Food Available~
Kitchen opens at 5:00pm
Coffee Club
Join our coffee club! Get your card today!
BUY 6, GET 7
TH
CUP FREE!
Great Selection of
90+ WINE
Assorted Flavors
$
8
99
*to
$
16
99
*
90+ WINE
These Beer
Specials ✔
Sprecher Soda
ASSORTED FLAVORS
6-PACK 16-OZ. BOTTLES
$
5
29
+Dep.
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our continually
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& specials
VaporX
Hookah Stix
Assorted
Flavors $9.99*
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★Roll-Your-Own Headquarters★
Great Selection of Tobacco,Tubes & Machines
VERMONT WINES & ICE CIDER
We Now Have Artesano, Honeymaker
& Mannaz Meads!
Pepperwood Ass't Flavors..............................750 ml
$
5
99*
Nathanson Creek........................................1.5 liter
$
6
99*
Cancannon Glen Ellen...........................1.5 liter
$
7
99*
Duck Commander Ass't Flavors.................750 ml
$
9
99*
Tutunjian Cabernet Sauvignon..........................750 ml
$
9
99*
Hess Chardonnay & Sauvignon Blanc..............750 ml
$
10
99*
Sutter Home Ass't Flavors .......................... 1.5 liter
$
10
99*
Yellow Tail ....................................................1.5 liter
$
11
99*
Barefoot Ass't Flavors...................................1.5 liter
$
11
99*
Kendall Jackson VR
Chardonnay...........................................................750 ml
$
12
99*
Fish Eye Ass't Flavors.....................................3 liter
$
17
99*
Bota Box Ass't Flavors....................................3 liter
$
19
99*
Great Selection of 90+ Wine
Ass't Flavors ............................................ 750 ml
$
9
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23
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TRAFFIC TOBACCO
16-OZ. • Ass't Flavors
$
19
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GOLDEN HARVEST
1-OZ. TOBACCO
Ass't Flavors
$
2
19*
ROXWELL TOBACCO
Ass't Flavors
16-oz.
$
17
99*
BEVERAGE BARON
SMOKE SHOP
Low Cigarette Prices Everyday
* = +Tax ** = +Tax+Dep.
ALL CIGARETTE PRICING SUBJECT TO IMMEDIATE CHANGE WITH MANUFACTURERS’ PRICE INCREASE
SURGEON GENERAL’S WARNING: QUITTING SMOKING NOW GREATLY REDUCES SERIOUS RISKS TO YOUR HEALTH.
VERMONT
LIQUOR
OUTLET
not responsible for
typographical errors
Power Ball • Megabucks • Vermont Instant Lottery • NOBODY BEATS THE BARON!
411 North Main St., Barre
479-9227 • 476-4962 • Fax 479-9348
Specials Good Thru 2/23/2014
We Sell Hunting & Fishing Licenses
Checks By Courtesy Card Only!
ATM
ON PREMISES
LP Gas Grill
Cylinder
Bottle Drives Welcome
Advance notice appreciated
Hurry, Limited Supply On All Specials!
Open Everyday!
Monday-Friday 6AM-9PM
Saturday & Sunday 7AM-9PM
Other Store Specials Too Numerous To Mention!
BOTTLE RETURN HOURS
8AM TO 6PM DAILY! Fast, Courteous
Bottle Redemption
Beverage
Baron
EBT
Green
Mountain
Coffee
K-Cups
ASSORTED FLAVORS
24-COUNT
$
13
99
Green Mountain
Store-Brewed
Coffee
ANY SIZE
12-oz., 16-oz., 20-oz.
99
¢*
CAMEL KINGS REG.
FILTERS & CAMEL
KINGS BLUE FILTER

$
6
26*

$
61
49*
PACKS CARTONS
HURRY - LIMITED SUPPLY!
Imports & Microbrews
Corona,
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Amstel,
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•COKE •SPRITE •SUNKIST
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$
1
49
+ DEP.
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$
4
39
+ DEP.
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$
7
99
+ DEP.
Kolsch 16.9-oz. ........................................................... $1.99**
Switchback Ale 22-oz ................................................ $3.99**
Bear Republic Double IPA 22-oz. .............................. $5.49**
Crabbie's Ginger Beer
Original & Spiced Orange 4-PK ................................. $8.79**
Founder Devil Dancer 4-PK ...................................... $9.99**
Good Life 6-PK ......................................................... $10.69**
Wachusett Larry 6-PK 12-oz. cans .......................... $10.89**
Lagunitas Sucks 6-PK 12-oz. bottles ....................... $10.99**
Sixpoint Hi-Res 4-PK ............................................... $11.89**
Rock Art Imperial Stout 22-oz ................................. $11.99**
Caldera IPA 6-PK 12-oz cans ................................... $10.99**
Baxter Brewing Co. 12-PK Variety Pack
12-oz. cans .............................................................. $17.19**
Pepsi, Dew, Mug, Schweppes, Crush
$
1
49

OR

$
4
69
2 Liters
+ Dep.
12-Packs
+ Dep.
WOOD
PELLETS
40 lb. bag
$
5
99
$
279TON
MARLBORO
EDGE & NXT
Pack
$
6
26*
Carton
$
61
49*
WHILE SUPPLIES LAST!
Grizzly Pouches $4.69*
Grizzly Snuff & Long Cut
$5.49*
Double Diamond 120s
Cigars Asst Flavors
$1.99*pack $18.69*carton
Red Buck Tip Cigars 10-ct
$2.99*pack$23.99*carton
HARD CIDER SELECTIONS:
Citizens
4-pk 16-oz. can ......
$
11
99
*
Angry Orchard
&Woodchuck
12-pk 12-oz. ...........
$
13
99
*
Citizens 22-oz. Hard Cider
Dry Hopped,
Unified Press,
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$
8
99
*
PALL MALL
FILTERS

$
6
39*

$
61
99*
PACKS CARTONS
MALTERNATIVES
MIKE'S &
TWISTED
TEA
6-PK • 12-OZ.
$
7
79**
Shed, Stella Artois,
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$
14
99
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13
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POLAR
99
¢
+Dep.
1 Liter
Ass't Flavors
MILK
Skim & 1%
$
3
99
GAL.
Whole
$
4
39
GAL.
$
3
99
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2%
$
2
59
1/2-GAL.
$
2
59
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2
59
1/2-GAL.
got milk?
ALCHEMIST HEADY TOPPER
DELIVERS MONDAY P.M.
$
12
99
**
HURRY LIMITED SUPPLY
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$
75
00
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CASE 24
Like us on facebook to follow
our continually
expanding product line
& specials
CRAFT BEERS
PEPSI, DEW,
SCHWEPPES GINGER ALE
24-OZ. 24-OZ.
SINGLE 6-PACK
99
¢

$
4
69
+Dep. +Dep.
TWISTED
TEAS
18-PK
12-OZ. CANS
$
18
99**
CANADIAN CLUB
ROUTE 14 • 479-9090
Just outside of Barre
CANADIAN CLUB
BINGO
•Flash Ball 1: $150.
•Flash Ball 2: $200.
•Mini Jackpot 50#'s: $2,525.
•Jackpot 55#'s: $1,600.
Thursday Night
•Doors Open at 4:00 PM
•Premies at 6:00 PM
•Regular Games at 7:00 PM
THIS W
EEK'S SPECIAL
M
E
A
T
-
L
O
A
F
SUPER
BINGO
SUPER
BINGO
17 41 8 26 11 53
SUNDAY, FEB. 9
•Doors open 10:00AM
•Pass time 11:30AM
•Reg. 1:00PM
RESERVATIONS:
Linda 839-0663 Jeanne 461-6287
★Meals ★Snacks ★Beverages Available
*Based on attendance of 200 players
Barre Elks Club #1535
10 Jefferson Street, Barre
OVER
$
7,000*
IN CASH &
PRIZES!
SAMBEL’S
CATERING
223-6776
• Large & Small
• Parties
• Receptions
• Anniversaries
• Special Occasions
Green Mountain Care Board Public Meeting. Pavilion Building, 4th
floor, 1-4pm. Must show valid photo ID to enter. Info. at http://gmc-
board.vermont.gov/
Friday, February 7
CALAIS- Big Hat No Cattle. Texas swing. At Whammy Bar, Maple
Corner Store, FREE, starts 7:30pm.
GROTON- Crafts 4 Kids! All materials provided for “Mitten
Mates.” Make a paper mitten wreath, mobile or magnet. Drop in any-
time. Groton Public Library, FREE, 3-6pm. Info. 584-3358.
MARSHFIELD- Do the Math. This film highlights the worldwide
efforts by Bill McKibben and students toward climate change. Jaquith
Public Library, 7pm.
MONTPELIER- Eat More Bugs: Entomophagy in Vermont.
Presentation by Rachel Young, part of North Branch Nature Center
lecture series. Unitarian Church, 7pm. Info. 229-6206.
Laugh Local VT Open Mic Comedy Night. Support local comedy
by performing or watching those that do. American Legion, 21 Main
St., donations welcome, signup 7:30pm, show 8pm. Info. 793-3884.
Lunchtime Theater. Get a free peek at an upcoming play by MSAC
member Margot Lasher, plus conversation with the writer, cast & crew.
Montpelier Senior Activity Center, 58 Barre St., 12:30-1:15pm.
The Vagina Monologues. Lost Nation Theater, 7:30pm. See 2/6.
Red Tin Box. Acoustic power pop band from Lyndonville. Bagitos
Cafe, 28 Main St., 6-8pm. Info. 229-9212.
Navigating the New Vermont Health Care Exchange. Learn about
VT Health Care Connect w/Peter Sterling, Director of VT Campaign
for Health Care Security. Kellogg-Hubbard Library, 11am-2:30pm.
Guided Partner Thai Bodywork. Learn basic techniques from Lori
Flower. Come to give and receive with a friend. Hunger Mountain
Coop, $8 members/$10 non, 6:30-7:30pm. Pre-reg. 223-8000 x202.
NORTHFIELD- Community Arts: Authenticity and Identity.
Symposium participants incl. Anni McKay of BigTown Gallery, film-
maker Jay Craven, Anne Galloway, founder of VT Digger, more. Public
welcome. Norwich University, Chaplin Hall Gallery, FREE, 2-4pm.
RANDOLPH- Vermont Agronomy Plus Meeting. Hosted by UVM
Extension. VT Small Business Development Ctr, 1540 VT Rt. 66,
10am-3:30pm. Register at http://2014agronomyplus.eventbrite.com
TUNBRIDGE- Homesteading Presentation. Carl Russell and Lisa
McCrory share experiences from their organic farm, powered by draft
animals. Tunbridge Public Library, FREE, 7pm. Info. 889-9404.
Saturday, February 8
ADAMANT- Mark LeGrand, Sarah Munro & Spencer Lewis.
Adamant Community Club, $10 advance/$15 at door, optional potluck
5:30pm, show 7pm.
BARRE- Auditions: Kaleidoscope of Talent. Voice, instrumental,
dance or comedy. Spaulding High School, 9am-4pm. Performer appli-
cation at www.gmunitedway.org/talentshow.shtml Info. 229-9532.
Art Opening. Public reception for “Chaos” and other new exhibits.
Studio Place Atts, 4-6pm. Info. 479-7069.
Best Damn Chili Cook-Off. Public welcome to enter a dish or watch
festivities. Judges include WCAX’s Molly Smith, Lt. Gov. Phil Scott
& chef Jean Louis Gerin. Wilkins Harley-Davidson, 10:30am-1pm.
Murder Mystery Dinner. Come solve the murder mystery “I Wed
Three Wives.” Roast pork dinner. Hedding United Methodist Church,
40 Washington St., $15, noon and 5pm. Call 476-8946 for tickets.
BERLIN- Montessori School of Central Vermont Open House.
Learn more about Montessori education. Montessori School of
Central VT, 89 Karl Circle, FREE, 9-11am. RSVP to 223-3320.
BOLTON- Snowshoe Shuffle 5k. Benefits American Lung
Association. Bolton Valley Resort, $35 advance/$40 day of, $5 rent-
als. Donate, create or join a team at go.lungne.org/Snowshoe2014
CALAIS- Barn Band. At Whammy Bar, Maple Corner Store, FREE,
starts 7:30pm.
GREENSBORO- Cross-country Ski with Green Mountain Club.
Ski w/the GMC Montpelier chapter. All abilities, various distances at
Highland Lodge. Trail fee. Call 622-0585 for meeting time & place.
MARSHFIELD- The Wind in the Willows. Part of “Movies for
Everyone” series, this 1997 film features the Monty Python lads and
friends. Jaquith Library, FREE, 11am. Info. 426-3581.
MONTPELIER- Capital City Indoor Farmers Market. Locally
grown & prepared foods/gifts. Create a Valentine’s card w/llama fibers.
Music by Fly By Night. VT College of Fine Arts gym, 10am-2pm.
continued on next page
Barre Masonic Temple - Square & Compass Club
2 Academy Street, Barre • 479-9179
Every Saturday Night - Children Welcomed
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page 26 The WORLD February 5, 2014
ONION RIVER COMMUNITY ACCESS MEDIA CHANNELS 15, 16, 17
• Bethel • Braintree • Montpelier • Randolph • Rochester • U-32 District Towns • Waterbury Schedule is subject to change without notice.
ORCA Media Channel 15
Public Access Weekly Program Schedu
Wednesday, February 5
6:00a Seat Of The Pants Radio
7:00a Digital Tool For Farmers
8:00a Democracy Now!
9:00a Future of VT’s Working Landscape
11:30a TBA
12:00p Democracy Now!
1:00p Critical Mass TV
2:00p Spice Of Snow Festival
5:00pThe Thom Hartman Show
6:00p France 24
7:00pThe Problem of Slavery in Early VT
8:00p Vermont Musicians OnThe Air
9:00p Digital Tool For Farmers
10:00p Restore Our Communities
11:00p HealthTalk
Thursday, February 6
6:00a Chronique Francophone
7:00a Salaam Shalom
8:00a Democracy Now!
9:00a Spice Of Snow Festival
12:00p Democracy Now!
1:00p Seat Of The Pants Radio
2:00p Future of VT’s Working Landscape
3:30p VCDA Winter Meeting
5:00pThe Thom Hartman Show
6:00p France 24
7:00p Critical Mass TV
8:00pTalking About Movies
9:00p Songwriter’s Notebook
10:00p HealthTalk
10:30p Instant Coffeehouse
11:00p GMO Labeling March
Friday, February 7
6:00a Restore Our Communities
8:00a Democracy Now!
9:00a VTTreasures
9:30a VT Senate Spotlight
10:00a Sudzin Country
10:30a GMO Labeling March
11:00a Chronique Francophone
12:00p Democracy Now!
1:00p Senior Moments
2:30p Songwriter’s Notebook
3:00p Brunch With Bernie LIVE
4:00p Digital Tool For Farmers
5:00pThe Thom Hartman Show
6:00p France 24
7:00pThe Struggle
8:00p Vermont Countryside
9:00p For The Animals
10:00p Seat Of The Pants Radio
11:00p Puppet Shoppe
Saturday, February 8
6:00a Jesus By John
7:00a Hour of Refreshing
7:30a Wings of Devotion
8:00a Senior Moments
10:00a Welcome To Reality: Phase B
11:00a The Wake We Leave Behind
11:30a Bill Doyle on VT Issues
12:00p Bill Doyle on VT Issues
12:30p Spotlight On VT Issues
1:00p Cuban Bridge
2:00p Ben Patton Live In Concert
4:00p Aging Insights
4:30p Roman Catholic Mass
5:00p Washington Baptist Church
6:00p France 24
7:00p Chronique Francophone
8:00p Spice Of Snow Festival
11:00p Gay USA
Sunday, February 9
6:00a Wings of Devotion
6:30a Hour of Refreshing
7:00a Jesus By John
8:00a George Bickford: Granite Salesman
10:30a Roman Catholic Mass
11:00a Instant Coffeehouse
12:00p Washington Baptist Church
1:00pThe Struggle
1:30p VT Senate Spotlight
2:00p Shatterer of Worlds
3:00pThe Problem of Slavery in Early VT
4:00p GMO Labeling March
4:30p Vermont Countryside
5:30p Bill Doyle on VT Issues
6:00p Bill Doyle on VT Issues
7:00p Healthy Food For Local Communities
8:30pTravels With Jack
9:30pTalking About Movies
10:00p Future of VT’s Working Landscape
11:30p Aging Insights
Monday, February 10
6:00a Sudzin Country
7:00a The Problem of Slavery in Early VT
8:00a Democracy Now!
9:00a Vermont Musicians OnThe Air
10:00a Talking About Movies
11:00a Travels With Jack
12:00p Democracy Now!
1:00p For The Animals
2:00p Welcome To Reality: Phase B
3:00p Contemporary Dance & Fitness
4:00p Hunger Council
5:00pThe Thom Hartman Show
6:00p France 24
7:00p Senior Moments
8:30p Salaam Shalom
9:30p Shatterer of Worlds
10:30p VCDA Winter Meeting
Tuesday, February 11
6:00a The Struggle
6:30a For The Animals
7:00a Vermont Countryside
8:00a Democracy Now!
9:00a Salaam Shalom
10:00a VCDA Winter Meeting
11:00a Shatterer of Worlds
12:00p Democracy Now!
1:00p Storytelling Championship
3:00p Restore Our Communities
3:30p Aging Insights
4:00p Vermont Musicians OnThe Air
5:00pThe Thom Hartman Show
6:00p Welcome To Reality: Phase B LIVE
7:00p VT Senate Spotlight
7:30p Bill Doyle on VT Issues
8:00p Bill Doyle on VT Issues
8:30pTalking About Movies
9:00p Sudzin Country
9:30p VTTreasures
10:00p Contemporary Dance & Fitness
ORCA Media Channel 16
Education Access Weekly Program Schedule
Additional Educational Programming
Between Scheduled Shows
Wednesday, February 5
12:00p Millennial Writers On Stage
1:00p Catalyst: Howard Norman
2:00p Winter Farm to School Network
Gathering
3:00p Education – JoinThe Conversation
4:00p Hilltop Montessori Environmental
Roundtable
6:30p Let’s Talk About Mental Health
7:00p Montpelier School Board LIVE
Thursday, February 6
12:00p VCFA Graduation – MFA in Writing
1:30p New England Culinary Institute
3:30p New England Cooks
4:30p Madeliene Kunin – We Do!
6:30p E. Montpelier School Board
8:30p CVTS Game of the Week
10:30p Vermont Floor Hockey
Friday, February 7
12:00p Harwood Union School Board
4:30p U32 School Board
8:30p Montpelier School Board
Saturday, February 8
12:00p CVTS Game of the Week
3:00p E. Montpelier School Board
6:00p Holistically Speaking
6:30p VCFA - Distinguished Writers
7:30p Let’s Talk About Mental Health
8:00p First Wednesdays
9:30p Winter Farm to School Network Gathering
11:30p Sports Talk
Sunday, February 9
12:00p U32 School Board
4:00p Montpelier School Board
8:00p VT State Board of Education
Monday, February 10
12:00p Harwood Union School Board
4:00p Holistically Speaking
5:00p VTYouth Orchestra
7:00p New England Cooks
8:00p Goddard College – Della Mae Hilltop
10:00p Montessori Environmental Roundtable
Tuesday, February 11
12:00p First Wednesdays
1:30p Education – JoinThe Conversation
2:30p CVTS Game of the Week
4:30p VCFA - Distinguished Writers
5:30p Sports Talk
6:30p Massachusetts School of Law
8:00p New England Culinary Institute
8:30p Community Cinema
9:00p VCFA Graduations
ORCA Media Channel 17
Government Access Weekly Program Schedule
Wed, Feb. 5
6:00a Budget Adjustment Appropriations Issues
8:00a Budget Issues
8:30a Federal Transportation Funding
10:00a Whistleblower Protection Proposal
12:30p House Committee on Commerce &
Economic Development
2:30p Inside Your State House
3:00p GMO Rally
4:00pTelecommunications Issues
5:30p State of the State Address & Republican
Response
6:30p Montpelier City Council
Thu, Feb. 6
6:00a Budget Address & Republican Response
7:30a Opioid AddictionTreatment Program
9:30a FarmTo Plate Report
11:30a Montpelier Development Review Board
4:30p Montpelier Planning Commission
7:00p Green Mountain Care Board
11:30p Under The Golden Dome
Fri, Feb. 7
6:00a NY State of the State Frackdown 2014
6:30a Involuntary Treatment & Medication
9:30a Labeling Of Genetically Engineered Foods
11:30a Budget Issues
12:00p Inside Your State House
12:30p FarmTo Plate Report
2:30p Opioid AddictionTreatment Program
4:30p Budget Address & Republican Response
6:00p Montpelier Design Review Committee
8:00p Montpelier City Council
Sat, Feb. 8
6:00a Health Care Reform On Finance
7:30a TBA
8:00a GMO Rally
9:00a Randolph Selectboard
12:30p Waterbury Village Trustees
3:30p Berlin Selectboard
7:00p Bethel Selectboard
10:00p Central Vermont Regional Planning
Commission
Sun, Feb. 9
6:30a Law Enforcement Advisory Board
9:00a Introduction of Rebecca Holcombey
10:00a FarmTo Plate Report
12:00p Under The Golden Dome
1:00p Health Care Reform On Finance
2:00pTBA
3:00p Draft Property Tax Exemption Legislation
Public Hearing
5:00p Waterbury Selectboard
9:00p Waterbury Municipal Complex Building
Committee
Mon, Feb. 10
6:00a FarmTo Plate Report
8:00a Campaign for VT Press Conference
9:30a Weekly Legislative Reports
10:00a Involuntary Treatment & Medication
1:30p Hazing, Harassment & Bullying Advisory
Council
3:30p Working Lands Initiative
5:00p Montpelier Planning Commission LIVE
Tue, Feb. 11
6:00a Tar Sands Exposed
8:30a Working Lands Initiative
10:00a Labeling Of Genetically Engineered
Foods
12:00p Inside Your State House
1:00p House Committee on Commerce &
Economic Development
4:00p Governor’s Press Conference
5:30p Montpelier Design Review Committee
LIVE
7:00p Montpelier Development Review Board
Community Media(802) 224-9901 Check out our Web page at www.orcamedia.net
CVTV Channel 23 • BARRE, VT
ALL PROGRAMING SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE
Wednesday
3 AM Fright Night
7 AM VT brigade
8 AM Sports Talk
8:30 AM CVTSport.net
9:30 AM For the Animals
10 AM New England Cooks
11 AM For the Animals
11:30 AM City Room
12 PM Arts Collage Attack
12:30 PM For the Animals
1 PM CVTSport.net
2:30 PM Bill Doyle on VT Issues
3 PM Authors at the Aldrich
4 PM VYO 2013
6:30 PM CVTSport.net
8 PM City Room
8:30 PM Got Transparency?
11 PM Talking About Movies
Thursday
2 AM Fright Night
6 AM Authors at the Aldrich
8 AM City Room
9 AM VYO 2013
11 AM Sports Talk
11:30 AM City Room
12 PM Sports Talk
12:30 PM To What Degree
2 PM City Room
2:30 PM New England Cooks
4 PM City Room
4:30 PM Brattleboro Literary
Festival
5:30 PM CVTSport.net
7:30 PM New England Cooks
8:30 PM New England Cooks
9:30 PM Treasuruer of Vermont
11 PM Fright Night
Friday
2 AM Fright Night
7 AM To What Degree
7:30 AM VYO 2013
9:30 AM City Room
10 AM City Room
10:30 AM Treasuruer of Vermont
11 AM CVTSport.net
12:30 PM Cuban Bridge
2 PM Sports Talk
2:30 PM Got Transparency?
4:30 PM NECI Pastry Demo
6:30 PM Barre Tree Lighting
6:38:30 PM To What Degree?
7:30 PM City Room
8 PM To What Degree
11 PM Fright Night
Saturday
1 AM Sports Talk
2 AM Fright Night
4 AM Vermont Historical Society
6 AM New England Cooks
7:30 AM Sports Talk
8 AM Capt. Salty
9 AM To What Degree
9:30 AM Talking About Movies
10:30 AM Vermont Historical
Society
11:30 AM CVTSport.net
1 PM NECI Pastry Demo
3 PM New England Cooks
3:59:30 PM New England Cooks
5 PM New England Cooks
6 PM Montpelier Alive
7:30 PM Sports Talk
8 PM VT Genealogy Library
11 PM Fright Night
Sunday
2 AM Sports Talk
6:30 AM Sports Talk
7 AM Capt. Salty
9:30 AM CVTSport.net
10:30 AM Talking About Movies
11 AM CVTSport.net
12:30 PM New England Cooks
2 PM City Room
2:30 PM VYO 2013
4:30 PM Cuban Bridge
5:30 PM Treasuruer of Vermont
6 PM Sports Talk
6:30 PM To What Degree
7:30 PM Sports Talk
8 PM To What Degree
8:30 PM Brattleboro Literary
Festival
10 PM Fright Night
Monday
2 AM Fright Night
6:30 AM Arts Collage Attack
7 AM Birth to Three
8 AM Sports Talk
8:30 AM Authors at the Aldrich
9:30 AM Bill Doyle on VT Issues
10:30 AM City Room
11 AM Got Transparency?
1 PM Cuban Bridge
2 PM CVTSport.net
3:30 PM Sports Talk
4 PM City Room
4:30 PM New England Cooks
5:30 PM CVTSport.net
7 PM ACLU - Surveillance
Conference
Tuesday
3 AM Fright Night
7 AM VT brigade B1000
8 AM Sports Talk
8:30 AM CVTSport.net
9:30 AM For the Animals
10 AM New England Cooks
11:30 AM City Room
12 PM Arts Collage Attack
1 PM CVTSport.net
2:30 PM Bill Doyle on VT Issues
3 PM Authors at the Aldrich
4 PM VYO 2013
6 PM For the Animals
6:30 PM CVTSport.net
8 PM City Room
8:30 PM Got Transparency?
11 PM Talking About Movies
Evergreen Medicine. Workshop with clinical herbalist Rebecca
Dalgin. Dress for outdoors. VT Center for Integrative Herbalism, 252
Main St., $12/$10 for members, 1-3pm. Must pre-register, 224-7100.
Eric Friedman, 11am-1pm; Irish Session, 2-5pm; Derek Teichert,
6-8pm. All at Bagitos Cafe, 28 Main St. Info. 229-9212.
Meditating for Happiness. Ginny Sassaman will offer a “sampler
plate” of meditation and mindfulness activities. Montpelier Senior
Activity Center, $25, 9am-noon. Pre-reg. at 223-2618 by 2/3.
The Vagina Monologues. Lost Nation Theater, 7:30pm. See 2/6.
Family Hike with GMC Young Adventurers Club. Easy to moder-
ate, 2-3 miles, location to be determined. Call Lexi at 229-9810 or
Mike at 223-8493 for meeting time and place.
D.I.Y. Valentines. Make and take as many as you like for friends,
family, pets and more. Kellogg-Hubbard Children’s Library, 1-2pm.
Suite in Mudtime. World premiere sets the poetry of VT Poet Laureate
Syd Lea to music by composer Joseph Hallman. With 802 Quartet,
soprano Abigail Haynes Lennox. VCFA College Hall Chapel, 7:30pm.
PEACHAM- Northern Skies Observatory Open House. Tour the
observatory, see a demo of main telescope & solar telescope (weather
permitting) Northern Skies Observatory, 1-4pm. www.nkaf.org
STOWE- Auditions: The Secret Garden. Stowe Theatre Guild will
produce this musical, based on the children’s novel, in August 2014.
Town Hall Theatre, 67 Main St., 9am-1pm and 1:30-5:30pm.
WATERBURY- Children’s Room Birthday Celebration. Bring
your bikes, helmets and other outdoor toys and come enjoy the indoor
track, music, and free pizza & cake! For infants to kindergarten. Infant
play area available. Thatcher Brook School gym, 4-6pm.
Sunday, February 9
MONTPELIER- Montpelier Antiques Market. Furniture, ephem-
era, jewelry, postcards, more. Elks Club, Country Club Rd., $2, 9am-
1:30pm. $5 early buyers at 7:30. www.montpelierantiquesmarket.com
The Vagina Monologues. Lost Nation Theater, 2pm. See 2/6.
Clare Byrne. Performing folk music for Sunday brunch. Bagitos
Cafe, 28 Main St., 11am-1pm. Info. 229-9212.
Rosh Chodesh Gathering w/Rabbi Tobie Weisman. Meditation,
singing, & sharing about this holiday of spiritual renewal. Beth Jacob
Synagogue, 10 Harrison Ave., $10 for non-members, 3:30-5:30pm.
Seed Saving Basics. Class w/Faeterri Silver. 174 Elm St., by donation,
12:30-2:30pm. Info./registration 426-3019 or faeterri@gmail.com
STOWE- Auditions: The Secret Garden. Town Hall Theatre, 67
Main St., 1-5pm. See description 2/8.
Monday, February 10
BARRE- Granite Center Garden Club Monthly Meeting. New
members welcome. Canadian Club, 6:30pm. Info. 461-5463.
MONTPELIER- Why Be Happy When You Could Be Normal?
Part of LGBTQ reading & discussion series. Books available at KHL
circulation desk. Kellogg-Hubbard Library, 7pm.
Herbal Valentines. Experience aphrodisiac foods, massage oils,
drinks and more, with herbalist Dana Woodruff. Hunger Mountain
Coop, $10 members/$12 non, 6-7:30pm. Pre-reg. 223-8000 x202.
NORTHFIELD- Memoirist Jaed Coffin. Reading by the author of
A Chant to Soothe Wild Elephants and Roughhouse Friday. Public
welcome. Norwich University, Milano Ballroom, FREE, 4:30pm.
Tuesday, February 11
MONTPELIER- Tour Guide Information Session. Learn about
volunteering at the Vermont History Museum, and meet other tour
guides. VT History Museum, 109 State St., 10:30-11:30am. 828-1413.
Chinese New Year Celebration. Tai Chi demo, screening of a Chinese
film & light Chinese refreshments. Montpelier Senior Activity Center,
58 Barre St., $5 sugg. donation, 5pm. RSVP to 223-2518 by 2/6.
Open Mic. Bagitos Cafe, 28 Main St., 6-8pm. Info. 229-9212.
Valentine’s Day with doTERRA Essential Oils. Workshop w/
Tiffany Buongiorne. Go home with a foot scrub & recipe. Hunger Mtn
Coop, $5 members/$6 non, 5:30-7pm. Pre-reg. 223-8000 x202.
Presentation on State Education Finance System. Speakers will
discuss the impact of the state education system on local school bud-
gets and tax rates. Montpelier High School library, 6:30pm.
MORRISVILLE- Vermont Agronomy Plus Meeting. Hosted by
UVM Extension. Stone Grill Pub & Restaurant, 116 VT Rt. 15, 10am-
3:30pm. Register at http://2014agronomyplus.eventbrite.com
Wednesday, February 12
BARRE- Spotlight on Vermont Rocks. Part of “History for
Homeschoolers” series, for ages 6 to 12. VT History Center, $5 per
child/$4 for VHS members or families w/ 3+ kids, 1-3pm. 828-1413.
MONTPELIER- Sunrise to Sunset: Everyday Aromatherapy.
Workshop w/Lauren Andrews, RN. VT Center for Integrative Herbalism,
252 Main St., $20/$18 members, 6-8pm. Must pre-register, 224-7100.
Speak to Me: A Program of Words and Chamber Music. A piano
quartet from the Craftsbury Chamber Players performs music inspired
by literature. A Farmers’ Night event. State House, FREE, 7pm.
Gender Equality: A Prerequisite for Economic Growth & Political
Stability. OLLI presents Gov. Madeleine Kunin. Montpelier Senior
Activity Ctr, Barre St., $5 for OLLI non-members, 1:30pm. 454-1234.
Navigating the New Vermont Health Care Exchange. Learn about
VT Health Care Connect w/Peter Sterling, Director of VT Campaign
for Health Care Security. Kellogg-Hubbard Library, 1:30-5pm.
Mini Puppet Party. For artists ages 3-6 years. Make a cast of spirited
characters to fill the winter hours with creative antics. Kellogg-
Hubbard Library, 11am. Sign up at the children’s circulation desk.
WAITSFIELD- Auditions: Cabin Fever Follies. Acts of all ages and
types are sought for the annual community variety show. Valley
Players Theater, 6:30-7:30pm. Info./RSVP 496-6651 or 793-8362.
Thursday, February 13
BARRE- Spotlight on Vermont Rocks. VT History Center, 1-3pm.
See description 2/12.
CALAIS- Abby Jenne. At Whammy Bar, Maple Corner Store,
FREE, starts 7:30pm.
MONTPELIER- Andy Pitt and Friends. Blues/roots and folk
musicBagitos Cafe, 28 Main St., 6-8pm. Info. 229-9212.
Snowshoe with Green Mountain Club. Easy evening exploration of
local trails by moonlight. Bring a head lamp if sky is not clear. Call
Jill 223-9980 for meeting time and place.
Intake. An award-winning comic-drama by Marshfield playwright
Margot Lasher. Part of LNT’s Winterfest series. Lost Nation Theater,
$20/$15 students & seniors, 7:30pm. Info. 229-0492.
Navigating the New Vermont Health Care Exchange. Learn about
VT Health Care Connect w/Peter Sterling, Director of VT Campaign
for Health Care Security. Kellogg-Hubbard Library, 10am-2pm.
Public Hearing on Agriculture & Water Quality in VT. Hosted by
House Agriculture Committee. Starting at 6:30, you may sign up for a
slot to testify. State House, House Chamber, 7-9pm. Info. 828-2233.
Green Mountain Care Board Public Meeting. Dept. of Financial
Regulation, 89 Main St., 3rd floor, 1-4pm. Info. at http://gmcboard.
vermont.gov/
Friday, February 14
BARRE- Colin Quinn’s “Unconstitutional.” The Saturday Night
Live veteran delivers his hit off-Broadway one-man show. Barre
Opera House, $30-$34, 8pm. Info. 476-8188 or barreoperahouse.org.
Bread and Puppet: Total This and That Circus. Also used book sale
starting 5pm. Old Labor Hall, 46 Granite St., $10 adults/free for kids
12 & under, soup & bread 6pm, show 7pm. Info. 485-4554.
CALAIS- Lewis Franco Valentine’s Day Date Night. At Whammy
Bar, Maple Corner Store, FREE, starts 7:30pm.
GROTON- Crafts 4 Kids! All materials provided for “All Things
Heart.” Enjoy Valentine’s Day with crafts and cookie decorating. Drop
in anytime. Groton Public Library, FREE, 3-6pm. Info. 584-3358.
MONTPELIER- Full Moon Snowshoe Hike. Explore Montpelier’s
hillsides with NBNC staff. Snowshoes and hot chocolate provided.
North Branch Nature Ctr, $5 members/$10 non, 7-8:30pm. 229-6206.
Intake. Lost Nation Theater, 7:30pm. See description 2/13.
Heaven in My Heart. Valentine’s concert feat. flutist Karen Kevra &
harpist Rebecca Kauffman. North Branch Cafe, $10 music only/$20
incl. food & beverage pairing, seatings 6pm & 8pm. RSVP 552-8105.
Saturday, February 15
BARRE TOWN- Early Childhood Event for Barre Families. Barre
Town Elementary School, 9:30-11:30am. Snow date is 2/22.
CALAIS- Katie Trautz Mardi Gras Party. At Whammy Bar, Maple
Corner Store, FREE, starts 7:30pm.
EAST MONTPELIER- Pasta Dinner and Dessert Auction. Bring
a dessert to sell, or come ready to buy some yummy treats. Crossroads
Christian Church, 14 Fassett Road, 5:30pm. Info. 476-4672.
MONTPELIER- Cabin Fever Spelling Bee. Sign up to be on “read-
ers” team & compete against “writers” team. Kellogg-Hubbard Library,
$10 advance/$12 at door, 7pm. E-mail vista@kellogghubbard.org
Natural Science for Herbalists. First session of 4-part workshop
with Guido Mase. Vermont Center for Integrative Herbalism, 252
Main St., $280, 9am-5pm. Must pre-register, 224-7100.
Intake. Lost Nation Theater, 7:30pm. See description 2/13.
Irish Session, 2-5pm; Audrey Houle and Justin Ricker, 6-8pm.
Both at Bagitos Cafe, 28 Main St. Info. 229-9212.
PLAINFIELD- Winter Medicinal Plant Walk. Explore the winter
landscape with clinical herbalist Rebecca Dalgin. Wild Heart Wellness,
Goddard campus, sliding scale $4-$10, 1-2:30pm. Info. 552-0727.
WAITSFIELD- Spaghetti and Meatball Dinner. Car raffle winners
will be announced. Our Lady of Snows Church, $8 adults/$5 kids
6-12/free under 6, 5-7:30pm. Call 244-7734 for raffle tickets.
WARREN- Cross-country Ski with Green Mountain Club. Ski w/
the GMC Montpelier chapter. All abilities, various distances at Ole’s
Cross Country Ctr, trail fee. Call 622-0585 for meeting time & place.
Sunday, February 16
MARSHFIELD- Cross-country and Ski with Green Mountain
Club. Trip with the GMC Montpelier chapter. All abilities, bring
lunch. Call 229-9787 for meeting time and place.
MIDDLESEX- Empty Bowl Benefit. Includes soup, accompani-
ments, and a ceramic bowl to take home. Benefits VT Foodbank. The
Mud Studio, at Red Hen complex on Rte 2, minimum adult donation
is $25/$5 for meal only ages 5-18/free for kids under 5, 4:30-7pm.
MONTPELIER- Dave Moore. Performing Irish and American folk
for brunch. Bagitos Cafe, 28 Main St., 11am-1pm. Info. 229-9212.
Intake. Lost Nation Theater, 2pm. See description 2/13.
2 col x 5.25
ART EXHIBITS
BARRE- Whimsy and World View. Pet portraits and mixed
media by Christine Hartman. Barre Opera House, through 3/25.
-- Chaos: Pandemonium, Disorder and Turbulence in Art. Studio
Place Arts, Main Gallery, through 2/22.
-- Spring Loaded by Leah Sophrin and Color of Expression by
Katy Sudol. Studio Place Arts, Second Floor Gallery, through
2/22.
-- Walking Home. Works by Robert W. Brunelle Jr. Studio Place
Arts, Third Floor Gallery, through 2/22.
-- Standing for Human Dignity. Charcoal drawings in response
to protests in the Ukraine, by Sofia Shatikvska. Aldrich Public
Library, through 2/14.
BERLIN- Chasing the Blues. Paintings by Ellen Eby. Central
Vermont Medical Center Lobby Gallery, through 3/28.
MARSHFIELD- First Annual Group Art Show. Featuing 10
local artists. Jaquith Public Library, through 3/8.
MONTPELIER- Places & Faces on a Journey. Paintings by
Regis Cummings. Photo ID required. Governor’s Gallery, Pavilion
Building, through 3/28.
-- Golden Dome Cycle and Other Works - Arctic and Vermont.
Works by Ken Leslie. Vermont Supreme Court, through 3/28.
-- Nancy Gadue. Window paintings. The Cheshire Hat, 28 Elm
St., through February.
-- Retrospective: From Nature. Oil paintings by Ray Brown.
Green Bean Art Gallery at Capitol Grounds, through 2/28.
-- Sculpture Exhibit. Featuring works by Thea Alvin, Ria Blaas,
Rob Hitzig, Steve Proctor, Brian-Jon Swift & James Irving
Westermann.Vermont Arts Council Sculpture Garden, ongoing.
MORRISVILLE- From Vermont to Alaska. Paintings by Cindy
Griffith. The Copley Gallery at Copley Hospital, through 4/4.
ROCHESTER- Juice Bar Winter Show. Group show by gallery
members. BigTown Gallery, through 4/5.
STOWE- Surveillance Society. Group exhibit. Helen Day Art
Center, Main Gallery, through 4/20.
-- Claire Desjardins. Colorful abstract paintings. Helen Day Art
Center, East Gallery, through 3/2.
World Publications Scoopkit
FREE
DOWNLOAD OUR APP!
★★★★★
February 5, 2014 The WORLD page 27
Best described as a number crossword, the task in
Kakuro is to fill all of the empty square, using num-
bers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal lock equals
the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical
block equals the number on its top. No number may
be used in the same block more than once.
The idea of Go Figure is to arrive at the figure given at
the bottom and right-hand columns of the diagram by
following the arithmetic signs in the order they are given
(that is, from left to right and top to bottom). Use only the
numbers below the diagram to complete its blank
squares and use each of the nine numbers only once.
GO FIGURE
page 28 The WORLD February 5, 2014
JOB
OPPORTUNITIES
BOOTH RENTAL available
at Refecting Beauty, N Main
Street. Stylist wanted with
clientele, high traffc area,
handicap accessible. 802-
476-4030, 802-476-9472.
BOOTH RENTAL Full-Time
Stylist, Platinum Salon ask
for Renee 802-479-5403
DRIVER / AUTO
PARTS COUNTER
Full-Time
Experienced
Call Peter at
802-485-8500

IMMEDIATE OPENING for
Part or Full Time Salvage Yard
Help. Must have own hand
tools. Flexible hours. 802-
685-7799 allenstogether.net
IMMEDIATE OPENING Of-
fce Help, computer skills nec-
essary, Flexible hours. 802-
685-7799 allenstogether.net
LICENSED BOILER & FUR-
NACE TECHNICIAN/INSTALL-
ER. Experienced. Ability to
service and repair oil and/or
gas systems. Send resume to:
FurnaceTechWanted@gmail.
com or call 802-498-5601 Mon-
day-Friday, 8:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m.
NEED A CHANGE? OFF the
Top has an opening for 2
hair stylists w/cliental. Booth
Rental. Lots of FREE Park-
ing. Call Tom 802-479-0855
Part-Time
Cleaning Positions
Available
Call 595-1499
for more information
WORK AT HOME AND EARN
BIG BUCKS!
Earn up to $1,000 a week at
your leisure in your own home?
The probability of gaining big
profts from this and many simi-
lar at home jobs is slim. Promot-
ers of these jobs usually require
a fee to teach you useless, and
unproftable trades, or to provide
you with futile information. TIP:
If a work-at-home program is
legitimate, your sponsor should
tell you, for free and in writing,
what is involved. If you question
a program’s legitimacy, call the
ATTORNEY GENERAL’S CON-
SUMER ASSISTANCE PRO-
GRAM at 1-800-649-2424.
CHILDCARE
BARRE CITY Registered day-
care openings for ages 2 and
up. Please call 802-479-5175.
CHILD CARE, Registered, Expe-
rienced, Afford Fun, Loving Edu-
cational Environment. www.dai-
sydaycare.com (802)439-9197
BUSINESS
OPPORTUNITIES
LOOKING TO EARN A MIL-
LION$? Watch out for business
opportunities that make outra-
geous claims about potential
earnings. Don’t get fooled into
get rich quick scams. There are
legitimate business opportuni-
ties, but be cautious of any busi-
ness that can’t refect in writing
the typical earnings of previous
employees. TIP: Investigate
earning potential claims of busi-
nesses by requesting written in-
formation from them before you
send any money, or by calling
the ATTORNEY’S GENERAL
CONSUMER ASSISTANCE
PROGRAM, at 1-800-649-2424.
THE FAMILY HAIRLOOM (Booth
Rent) or Operate your own sa-
lon fully furnished and ready to
go! Call Todd at 802-279-4380
INSURANCE &
INVESTMENTS
$10 Funeral Insurance - Guaran-
teed Acceptance - No Exam. As
Low As $10/month for Final Ex-
pense - Call (888) 281-2580 now.
CLASSES &
WORKSHOPS
AIRLINE CAREERS begin here
- Get trained as FAA certifed
Aviation Technician. Housing
and Financial aid for qualifed
students. Job placement assis-
tance. Call AIM (866)453-6204.
AIRLINE CAREERS begin here
- Get trained as FAA certifed
Aviation Technician. Housing
and Financial aid for qualifed
students. Job placement assis-
tance. Call AIM (866)453-6204.
HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA
FROM HOME. 6-8 weeks AC-
CREDITED. Get a diploma.
Get a job. 1-800-264-8330
www.di pl omafromhome.com
PERSONALS
Have fun and fnd a genuine
connection! The next voice
on the other end of the line
could be the one. Call Tango
1-800-807-0818. FREE trial!
Have fun and fnd a genuine
connection! The next voice
on the other end of the line
could be the one. Call Tango
1-800-807-0818. FREE trial!
Meet singles right now! No paid
operators, just real people like
you. Browse greetings, exchange
messages and connect live. Try
it free. Call now 1-888-909-9905
FREE ITEMS
$100-$300 PAID for Your
Complete Junk Cars and
Trucks, FREE metal pick-
up Plainfeld. 839-6812
HEALTH CARE
LOOKING FOR A MIRACLE/
Lose 20 pounds in one week?
This is almost impossible!
Weight loss ads must refect
the typical experiences of the
diet users. Beware of pro-
grams that claim you can lose
weight effortlessly. TIP: Clues
to fraudulent ads include words
like: “breakthrough,” “effortless,”
and “new discovery.” When you
see words like these be skepti-
cal. Before you invest your time
and money call the ATTORNEY
GENERAL’S CONSUMER
ASSISTANCE PROGRAM, at
1-800-649-2424.
WANT A CURE-ALL?
Health fraud is a business that
sells false hope. Beware of un-
substantiated claims for health
products and services. There
are no “Quick Cures” - no mat-
ter what the ad is claiming. TIP:
DO NOT rely on promises of a
“money back guarantee!” Watch
out for key words such as “exclu-
sive secret,” “amazing results,”
or “scientifc breakthrough.” For
more information on health re-
lated products or services, call
the ATTORNEY GENERAL’S
CONSUMER ASSISTANCE
PROGRAM at 1-800-649-2424,
or consult a health care pro-
vider.
WANTED
$ A1-CASH PAID
$75 TO $300+
JUNK CARS, TRUCKS
802-522-4279.
COIN COLLECTOR will
Pay Cash for Pre-1965
Coins and Coin Collec-
tions. Call Joe 802-498-3692
WANTED:
BARRE FISH & GAME CLUB
Membership Buttons and Other
Memorabilia.
See You At The Gun Show
Joe 802-476-4508
WANTED: PISTOLS, Ri-
fes, Shotguns. Top Pric-
es paid. 802-492-3339
days. 802-492-3032 nights.
WANTS TO purchase miner-
als and other oil and gas in-
terests. Send details to: PO
Box 13557, Denver, CO 80201
WILL HAUL away for free: Scrap
metal, old appliances, car parts,
etc. Furnaces, boilers and demo-
litions for a fee. No job too big or
too small. Chad, 802-793-0885.
CLOTHING &
ACCESSORIES
T-SHIRTS Custom Printed.
$5.50 heavyweight. “Gildan”,
Min. order of 36 pcs. Hats
- Embroidered $6.00. Free
Catalog. 1-800-242-2374.
Berg Sportswear. 40. BNE - N
BABY/CHILDREN
ITEMS
GRACO BABY Swing in
new condition. $50 obo
802-223-2541 Diane
ANTIQUES/
COLLECTIBLES/
RESTORATION
ANTIQUE SLATE Blackboard
42x60 $400/obo. NutCracker
German Steinbach never on
display, $100. 802-485-8266
CHECK OUT the NEW SE-
LECTION of Furniture at Last
Time Around Antiques 114
No. Main St Barre. 802-476-
8830 Like Us on facebook.
TWO THRIFTY SISTERS An-
tique’s our merchandise is ever
changing “Home of quality,
friendly services.” TWO Thrifty
Sisters Antiques 124 No. Main
St Barre, VT 802-622-8000
WORLD CLASSIFIED
DEADLINE MONDAY 10AM (Display Ads Thursday at 5:00 PM)
802-479-2582 • 1-800-639-9753 • sales@vt-world.com • www.vt-world.com
JOB
OPPORTUNITIES
continued
JOB
OPPORTUNITIES
continued
WANTED
continued
continued on page 29
Granite Academy
A Barre City Middle School
Alternative Program
seeks a
Para Educator
Experience preferred, 48 credits
or an Associates Degree required
Interested candidates should send
cover letter, resume, copy of transcripts
and 3 letters of recommendation to:
Stacy Ferland – Special Services Director
Barre City Elementary and Middle School
50 Parkside Terrace
Barre, VT 05641
Position open until flled
E.O.E.
INTERESTED
IN CDL?
Classes
ongoing in Barre
Information:
476-4679
249-2886
Visit Our Website:
www.cdlschoolinvt.com
Only qualified applicants will receive a response. Valid driver’s license, excellent driving record
and access to a safe, reliable, insured vehicle is required. Send letter of interest and resume to:
WCMHS, Personnel, PO Box 647, Montpelier, VT 05601.
Contact: 802-229-1399 Fax 802-223-6423 personnel@wcmhs.org www.wcmhs.org E.O.E.
Outpatient/Reach-Up Clinician
Exciting new opportunity providing adults and families enrolled in Reach-Up
the clinical services needed to support employment and self-sufficiency by
addressing mental health and substance abuse barriers.
The Clinician will provide therapeutic and referral services, and case review/case
consultation for men and women enrolled in *Reach-up with a mental health or
substance use disorder.
The clinician will work with both WCMHS Outpatient, Central Vermont Substance
Abuse Services and State Reach Up teams. Apply for the opportunity to work with a
team of professionals across several agencies on this new and exciting initiative!
Duties Include:
•To work closely with Reach Up case managers to provide screening, brief
treatment, and referral for substance abuse and mental health conditions.
•To conduct case reviews.
•To provide case consultation to Reach Up teams on a regular basis.
•To conduct assessments and provide individual therapy, group therapy, and
family therapy.
•To screen and create treatment plan for individuals with substance abuse and
mental health problems.
•To make referrals for assessments, individual, group, and family therapies, and
medication treatment.
•To complete all relevant documentation; including authorizations for services,
clinical notes, treatment plans, administrative forms, etcetera.
•To participate in staff meetings, supervision and training.
*Reach Up helps families with children by providing assistance for basic needs and services that
support work and self-sufficiency.
All days and various shifts available.
No Phone Calls Please. Clean Background Check Required.
Apply in person.
Westview Meadows
171 Westview Meadows Road (off Independence Green) Montpelier VT
Or apply online at www.westviewmeadows.com
EOE
Part-time Dishwasher & Waitstaff
Our Walking Routes make a Great
Exercise Plan, and the Bonus is...
YOU GET
PAID
TO DO IT!
Deliver on
a Walking Route!
Once-A-Week • No Collecting
■Barre
■Montpelier
■Northfield
■Waterbury
479-2582
Classified
Deadline Is
Monday
Before 10:00AM
Thank You For Saying
I Saw It In
WANTED
EXPERIENCED
AUTOBODY
TECHNICIAN
Must have own tools.
Pay based on
experience.
Contact Kylie Leno,
Service Manager:
479-8961
February 5, 2014 The WORLD page 29
MISCELLANEOUS
!!OLD GUITARS WANTED!!
Gibson, Martin, Fender, Gretsch,
1930-1980. Top Dollar Paid!!
Toll Free: 1-866-433-8277.
“GREEN MOUNTAIN
BARGAIN SHOP”
802-461-7828
We Buy-Sell-Barter
“Lets Make a Deal”
Williamstown VT
$ A1-CASH PAID
$75 TO $300+
JUNK CARS, TRUCKS
802-522-4279.
$ CASH $
FOR JUNK VEHICLES
Paying up to $300 for junk cars
and trucks, FREE Scrap Metal
Pick-up. Call Barre, 802-917-
2495, 802-476-4815, Bob.
$10 Funeral Insurance - Guaran-
teed Acceptance - No Exam. As
Low As $10/month for Final Ex-
pense - Call (888) 271-2130 now.
$21 Car Insurance - Instant
Quote - All Credit Types - Find
Out If You Qualify - As Low As
$21/Month. Call (888) 287-2130.
$21 Car Insurance - Instant
Quote - All Credit Types - Find
Out If You Qualify - As Low As
$21/Month. Call (888) 296-3040.
1997 INTERNATIONAL School
Bus $3500,
Model 380, T444 diesel engine,
milage 139,000, new tires on
rear, full tank of diesel, runs
great. Asking $3500 obo Call
Charlie 802-439-3997. Please
call after 8pm.
AIRLINE ARE HIRING - Train
for hands on Aviation Career.
FAA approved program. Fi-
nancial aid for qualifed stu-
dents - Job placement assis-
tance. Call Aviation Institute of
Maintenance (888)686-1704
AVIATION MAINTENANCE
TRAINING Financial Aid if quali-
fed. Job Placement Assistance.
Call National Aviation Acad-
emy Today!. FAA Approved.
CLASSES STARTING SOON!
1-800-292-3228 or NAA.edu.
BUYING MOVIES, Games,
Electronics. Harry and
Lloyds 802-622-0825
DIRECTV $0 Start Costs!
150+ Channels $7.50/week!
Free HBO/Cinemax/Showtime/
Starz+HD/DVR +NFL Sunday
Ticket! Call 1-800-983-2690
DIRECTV, Internet, & Phone
From $69.99/mo+ Free 3
Months: HBO Starz SHOW-
TIME CINEMAX + FREE GE-
NIE 4 Room Upgrade + NFL
SUNDAY TICKET! Limited of-
fer. Call Now 888-248-5961
DISH TV Retailer, SAVE!
Starting $19.99/month (for 12
months). Free premium movie
channels. Free equipment,
installation and activation. Call,
Compare Local Deals!
1-800-309-1452
DO YOU have Good Used
Adult Hockey Equipment? Do-
nate it to Ice Vets Sled Hockey
Team now forming 498-3030
FIGURE SKATES; Mens Hyde
Black Leather, size 11.5, $15.
Womens Hyde White Leath-
er size 7, $15. Used, need
Sharpening. 802-229-0646
FREE DIRECTV $0 Start Costs!
150+ Channels $7.50/week!
Free HBO/Cinemax/Showtime/
Starz! Free HD/DVR! We’re Local
Installers! Call 1-800-211-0681
HARDWOOD KINDLING,
Meshbags $6.00/ea. Free de-
livery to Seniors. 802-279-2595
Have fun and fnd a genuine
connection! The next voice
on the other end of the line
could be the one. Call Tango
1-800-381-1758. FREE trial!
JUNK AUTO
PICK-UP
YOU CALL
I’LL HAUL
802-279-2595
MEET singles now! No paid
operators, just people like you.
Browse greetings, exchange
messages, connect live, FREE
trial. Call 1-877-737-9447
NAPA of Barre & North-
feld Open Sundays 9AM TO
1PM Barre 802-476-9408,
Northfeld 802-485-8500
NEW SOLAR PANELS
24 VOLT AT 230 WATTS
@ $1.95/Per WATT, Call
Charlie Hall 802-439-3997
ORDER DISH Network Satel-
lite TV and Internet Starting at
$19.99! Free Installation, Hopper
DVR and 5 Free Premium Mov-
ie Channels! Call 800-597-2464
ROTARY INTERNATIONAL-
A worldwide network of in-
spired individuals who improve
communities. Find informa-
tion or locate your local club
at: www.rotary.org. Brought
to you by your free commu-
nity paper and PaperChain.
SEE YOU AT
THE GUN SHOW
FEB 8&9
SPACE HEATER, EdenPure In-
frared Quartz 1000/Watts, Will
heat up to 1000sq/ft w/remote
control, $125. 802-229-0646
TOP CASH PAID FOR OLD
GUITARS! 1920’s thru 1980’s.
Gibson, Martin, Fender,
Gretsch, Epiphone, Guild,
Mosrite, Rickenbacker, Prai-
rie State, D’Angelico, Strom-
berg, and Gibson Mandolins/
Banjos. 1-800-401-0440.
VINTAGE WOODEN ASNES
Cross-Country Ski’S 215cm 3
pin binding, some scratches,
(2) 137.5cm Sparta Elite Ski-
Poles $125. 802-229-0646
WE are no longer attending
Farmer’s Markets but still have
good TENDERLEAN STEER
BEEF by the Half, Quarter, Whole
or individual cuts USDA inspect-
ed and vacuum sealed Bill Hill
Farms 601 Porter Brook Road
Hardwick VT. 802-472-6308
MISCELLANEOUS
continued
continued on page 30
Per Diem Position
Available For Experienced Surgical Assistant
Busy oral and maxillofacial surgery practice is looking
for caring, dependable, enthusiastic candidates that
would enjoy the challenge of assisting in a variety of
surgical procedures.
Salary commensurate with experience. Send resumes
to New England Oral Surgery, ATTN: Practice Manager,
14 North Main Street, Suite 4001, Barre, VT 05641.
E.O.E.
Only qualified applicants will receive a response. Valid driver’s license, excellent driving record and access to a safe, reliable,
insured vehicle is required. Send letter of interest and resume to: WCMHS, Personnel, PO Box 647, Montpelier, VT 05601.
Contact: 802-229-1399 Fax 802-223-6423 personnel@wcmhs.org www.wcmhs.org E.O.E.
Residential Counselor Single Steps/Segue House: Full time w/ benefits. Seeking an individual to provide for the emotional and physical
safety of residents in a group care setting experiencing mental health challenges. A residential counselor will act as a role model and teach
independent living skills, to include cooking, housekeeping and personal hygiene, assisting with medication administration, and crisis
intervention as needed. Must be willing to work a flexible schedule that will include some overnights. Hours will be split between two
residential homes in the Montpelier area. BA in Human Services or related field required.
Residential Counselor Single Steps: Part-time (14 hours per week). Seeking an individual to provide for the emotional and physical safety
of residents in a group care setting experiencing mental health challenges. A residential counselor will act as a role model and teach
independent living skills, to include cooking, housekeeping and personal hygiene, assisting with medication administration, and crisis
intervention as needed. This position will provide house coverage 14 hours per week and may include one paid overnight shift. This position
will be shared between two residential settings in the Montpelier area. This position is perfect for a college graduate interested in part time
work in the human services field. BA in Human Services or related field required.
Residential Counselor Single Steps: Hourly/Per Diem. Seeking an individual to provide for the emotional and physical safety of residents
in a group care setting experiencing mental health challenges. A residential counselor will act as a role model and teach independent living
skills, to include cooking, housekeeping and personal hygiene, assisting with medication administration, and crisis intervention as needed.
This position will provide house coverage Hourly as needed and may include days, nights, awake overnights and weekends. BA in Human
Services or related field required.
Youth Development Coordinator – Hourly: Up to 29 hours per week at $15.30 per hour. Seeking individual to provide transition planning
and independent living skills training to eligible16 to 22 year olds referred by DCF. To assist with housing needs, educational and
vocational planning, and to identify and access community resources. To develop and design creative, strength-based transition plans. To
advocate for youth in exploring and making independent choices regarding their future. Extensive collaboration with DCF, foster parents,
DOL, Voc Rehab, public schools, colleges and other relevant agencies. BA in human services or related field is required. Two years of
human service delivery with children and families preferred.
Administrative Assistant – Center for Counseling and Psychological Services (CCPS): Full time w/ benefits. This position is
responsible for providing a broad range of administrative support services to staff of the Center for Counseling and Psychological Services
and for supporting administrative functions. The hours for this position are 11:00 AM to 7:00 PM Monday through Thursday, 8:30 AM to
4:30 PM on Fridays. Minimum of high school diploma required; Associate’s Degree preferred. Minimum of two years of experience in a
fast-paced administrative office, preferably a medical setting. The ability to multi task is essential. Experience with Electronic Medical
Records a plus. Excellent interpersonal skills, word processing skills, excellent human relation skills, including outstanding telephone
etiquette and face-to-face communication skills; high level organizational abilities; keyboarding with a typing speed of at least 60 WPM;
excellent knowledge of Microsoft Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Publisher and excellent all-around computer capabilities; ability to deal
effectively with crisis situations.
Maintenance Technician: Full time w/ benefits. This position is responsible for much of the day-to-day work. Responsibilities may
include: Appliances and furnace maintenance and repair; painting; carpentry; plumbing; electrical work (wiring & re-wiring); roofing; vinyl
and wood sidings and trims and replacement/repair of broken windows and doors, maintenance of; flooring (installation and maintenance
of all types); knowledge of sprinkler systems, heating systems, fire panel systems and internal alarm systems. Assist as backup for Janitorial
and Housekeeping. Must be familiar with the following areas: Painting interior and exterior, plumbing, and flooring. Desirable skills:
Appliance and furnace repair; plumbing and heating; carpentry at all levels; electrical; the ability to read and translate blueprints. HS
Diploma or GED required.
Residential Support Specialist – Hill Street: Full-time w/ benefits. Seeking individual to provide support to residents with developmental
and medical concerns at a group home in Barre. Support includes personal care of individuals, community inclusion, communication
enhancement, household maintenance, and other team approach activities that contribute to the overall wellness of the residents. LNA
preferred; but will hire as long as agreement to get LNA within the first six months. High school diploma or equivalent (GED) required.
Behavior Interventionists/Educational Support Specialists for the following programs: Full time w/ benefits.
SBBI (School Based Behavior Interventionist): Multiple positions. Full time w/ benefits. Provide direct supervision
to enrolled child or youth within a school setting. Implement behavioral programming and provide counseling in social,
recreational and daily living skills in school and community settings. Bachelor's Degree in human services, education
or psychology preferred. If degree requirements are not complete, working toward BA/BS or related field is required.
Experience providing direct instruction and therapeutic services to children with challenging behaviors preferred.
ChOICE Behavior Intervention/Education Support Specialist: Provide direct supervision to youth (ages 12-18+)
within an integrated mental health treatment facility / educational center. Implement behavioral programming and
milieu counseling in social, emotional and recreation/leisure skills and activities of daily living in classroom, day
treatment and community settings. Provide individual and group supervision as needed.
Evergreen: Provide individualized support services to assigned youth who have significant social, behavioral and
emotional needs. Responsibilities will require the ability to implement individualized behavior/reinforcement plans,
provide direct supervision and support in areas of social skills and daily living skill development. Willingness to work
flexible hours required.
ODIN Home/School Behavior Interventionist: Full time w/ benefits. Seeking individual to provide individualized
support services to assigned youth who have significant social, behavioral and emotional needs. Responsibilities will
require the ability to implement individualized behavior/reinforcement plans, provide direct supervision and support in
areas of social skills and daily living skills development. Willingness to work flexible hours required.
New Leaf Behavior/Social Skills Interventionist: Full time w/ benefits. New Leaf Behavioral/Social Skills
Interventionist assumes the responsibility of providing direct, on-site support in the planning and executing of daily
programs to meet the developmental needs of the total group of children in care. Follows and implements standards
established by the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC), Vermont Department of
Licensing, and the New Leaf Family Center. 2 years of early childhood experience, experience working with
emotionally challenged children preferred.
Crescent House Home/School Behavior Interventionist: Full time w/ benefits. Provide individualized support
services to assigned youth who have significant social, behavioral and emotional needs. Responsibilities will require
the ability to implement individualized behavior/reinforcement plans, provide direct supervision and support in areas
of social skills and daily living skill development. Willingness to work flexible hours required.
All Behavior Interventionist positions require: Bachelor's Degree in human services, education or psychology
preferred. If degree requirements are not complete, working toward BA/BS or related field is required.
Experience providing direct instruction and therapeutic services to children with challenging behaviors
preferred. Ability to lift and carry 50 pounds and execute physical restraints required.
Outpatient/Reach-Up Community Based Case Manager: Full time w/ benefits. Seeking a collaborative, energetic, team-oriented,
creative individual to provide a complement of services to meet the support needs of adults, children, and families as part of the Outpatient
and Reach Up collaborative team. Bachelor’s Degree in social work, human services, or related field is required. Master’s degree and
community based experience preferred. One year of services delivery with adults. Sensitivity to the unique needs of clients with a history
of trauma.
Home Intervention Counselor: Full time w/ benefits. Position # 884. This is a floater position and candidate will provide fill-in for staff
vacancies or leaves. In the absence of vacancy/leaves will negotiate a mutually agreeable schedule. Provides direct care to consumers in
crisis who would generally receive services in a hospital environment. Responsible for doing related tasks which provide for a safe
environment. Program uses a recovery model to provide supportive counseling and constructive interactions to promote emotional stability.
Will participate in treatment planning and documentation, coordination and referral processes and consult with community teams.
Bachelor's degree preferred.
Home Intervention Counselor: Full time w/ benefits. Position #806 is a Saturday – Tuesday, awake overnights. Provides direct care to
consumers in crisis who would generally receive services in a hospital environment. Responsible for doing related tasks which provide for
a safe environment. Program uses a recovery model to provide supportive counseling and constructive interactions to promote emotional
stability. Will participate in treatment planning and documentation, coordination and referral processes and consult with community teams.
Bachelor's degree preferred.
Registered Nurse - Weekends: Looking for a Registered Nurse to provide weekend professional nursing supervision and care to consumers
in crisis at the Home Intervention program. This Nurse will provide both psychiatric and physical assessments, communicate with on call
psychiatric providers, facilitate admissions, and delegate medication administration duties to direct care staff, as well as provide clinical
supervision to direct care staff. This position requires strong team work as well as the capacity to function independently. The successful
candidate will have strong interpersonal skills, along with strong psychiatric and medical assessment skills. Must be an RN with a current
Vermont License.
We offer Competitive Wages & Benefits.
Please apply in person.
EOE NO PHONE CALLS
LNAs
Both locations - all shifts
Residential Care Home
Residential Care &
The Gary Home
149 Main Street
Montpelier, VT
Westview Meadows
171 Westview Meadows Road
Montpelier, VT
(off Route 12 South, turn onto Independence Green)
page 30 The WORLD February 5, 2014
WE CAN remove bankruptcies,
judgments, liens, and bad loans
from your credit file forever! The
Federal Trade Commission says
companies that promise to scrub
your credit report of accurate
negative information for a fee
are lying. Under FEDERAL law,
accurate negative information
can be reported for up to seven
years, and some bankrupt-
cies for up to 10 years. Learn
about managing credit and debt
at ftc.gov/credit. A message
from The World and the FTC.
HOME APPLIANCES
KENMORE Lockable UPRIGHT
White FREEZER 60”HX-
30WX30D, very clean, works
great, $200. 802-223-2797
MUSICAL
MUSIC INSTRUCTION: Pro-
fessional instructor/musi-
cian. Musicspeak Education
Program (www.musicspeak.
org) 802-793-8387”Servic-
es in Central VT & Beyond”
NORTH BRANCH Instruments,
LLC. Fretted Instrument Repair.
Buy and Sell used Fretted Instru-
ments. Michael Ricciarelli 802-
229-0952, 802-272-1875 www.
northbranchinstruments.com
STORAGE
8’X20’ STORAGE UNITS for rent.
Airport Rd, Berlin. 802-223-6252
8’x20’, 8’x40’ OCEAN
FREIGHT containers (new/
used) for sale. 802-223-6252.

Royalton, VT
1-877-204-3054 · (802) 763-7876
FOR LEASE OR SALE...
8I08â0|
00NIâ|N|88
DELIVERED TO YOUR SITE
PLENTY OF STORAGE TRAILERS
& CONTAINERS AVAILABLE
Call For Prices
l·8¡¡·204·3054
Exit 3
off I-89

YOU Store It!
Lock It!
And YOU
Keep The Key!
CaII 229-2222
Barre Montpelier Area
Mini Storage Warehouse
SPORTING
EQUIPMENT
DO YOU have Good Used
Adult Hockey Equipment? Do-
nate it to Ice Vets Sled Hockey
Team now forming 498-3030
NEW GORE-TEX CAMOU-
FLAGE Jacket/pants, Med/
reg, $100. NordicTrack Pro
Plus Exercisers $150. Nor-
wegian Hand knit Sweater,
100% wool w/pewter buttons,
size small $80. 802-485-8266
HUNTING/GUNS/
ARCHERY
AMMO WAREHOUSE 2861 VT
RTE 14, Williamstown (behind
Pump and Pantry)
802-771-8003. Discount Prices.
JIFFY ICE AUGER Model
Stealth 10” hole, 3Hp, $300.
RUGER MINI 14 223 4power
Scope, 4 clips, like new, $600.
360 Rounds of 223 loaded
plus brass and plus load-
ing dies $300. 802-434-3107
NEW AND used guns, muzzle
loaders, accessories, Snowsville
Store E. Braintree 802-728-5252.
SEE YOU AT
THE GUN SHOW
FEB 8&9
TAURUS PISTOL, PT-22,
.22 cal, semi-automatic, vg,
$175 firm. 802-485-3792
WANTED: PISTOLS, Ri-
fles, Shotguns. Top Pric-
es paid. 802-492-3339
days. 802-492-3032 nights.
TOOLS/
MACHINERY
TooI Warehouse OutIet, Inc.
Rt. 302 · Barre-MontpeIier
CentraI Vermont's Best
SeIection Of QuaIity TooIs
Discount Prices!
802-479-3363 800-462-7656
TOOLS REPAIRED
Air, electric, hydraulic. Tool
Warehouse Outlet, Barre-Mont-
pelier Rd.
802-479-3363, 1-800-462-
7656.
WOOD/HEATING
EQUIP.
ANTHRACITE COAL
5 Sizes in stock
Bulk & 50lb bags
BLACK ROCK COAL
www.blackrockcoal.com
1-800-639-3197
802-223-4385
FIREWOOD DRY 2012 $325.
Green $230.00/cord, 16
inches. 479-0372/839-0429
FIREWOOD, GREEN and
SEASONED call 802-454-1062
For Prices, Leave message.
FIREWOOD: Green $230/
cord, 802-461-6748
HARDWOOD KINDLING,
Meshbags $6.00/ea. Free de-
livery to Seniors. 802-279-2595
METALBESTOS INSULATED
Chimney pipes. Everyday low
price. Plainfield Hardware &
General Store, Rt2 East Mont-
pelier Rd, Plainfield. 802-454-
1000 Open 7 Days a Week
MIDDLESEX, Log Length Fire-
wood, 6/Cord $800 delivered in
Middlesex, Calais, E.Montpelier &
Worcester Areas. 802-229-4859
VT select premium
firewood, loose or
palletized
Stacked, wrapped & delivered on
1/2 cord pallet
Will deliver with forklift & place
in/on your property as long as there
is access with our machine
Can also deliver bulk, up to 3 cord
loads (loose)
$125 per pallet (1/2 cord)
delivered (2 pallet min.)
$200 per cord
delivered in Barre/Mont. area
Ask about our bulk pricing
We accept all major credit cards
Call 1-844 WOODCHUCK
or 223-9173
Email phil@VtWoodchuck.com
SNOW REMOVAL/
EQUIPMENT
1979 F150 FORD
TRUCK W/Plow $1500.00
firm 802-728-5516
SNOWMOBILES &
ACCESSORIES
1995 POLARIS CLASSIC
Electric Start, Reverse, 5110
Miles, $1000. 802-223-5687
2000 POLARIS SUPER
SPORT 550. Excellent condi-
tion, only 3700 miles. Asking
$1500. obo. 802-476-6357.
2001 SKI-DOO TOUR-
ING Black, 4200 miles,
$1700 obo. 802-229-4314
2005 POLARIS 550 CLASSIC
TWO 2004 ARCTIC CAT
Z440LX Snowmobiles with All
Extras, excellent shape. 802-
456-7049
FARM/GARDEN/
LAWN
2013 MAPLE SYRUP Clear-
ance Sale. All Grades IN 1/2
Gals. $22.00/ 1/2 Gal. Call
802-839-9773(c) Jon Palmer
CEDAR BROOK FARM; Ce-
dar Fence Posts, Brush Hog-
ging, Pasture Renovation,
Rototilling, Planting, Wildlife
Food Plots. 802-274-2955
email-ajpalmiero@gmail.com
MISCELLANEOUS
continued
WOOD/ HEATING
EQUIP.
continued
continued on page 31
STORAGE
continued
For
Classified
Advertising
That Works
Call
479-2582 or
1-800-639-9753
Thank You For Saying
I Saw It In
POTATO BARN ANTIQUES
WINTER HOURS: Fri.-Sat.-Sun. 10-4
~Weather Permitting~
(603) 636-2611
Just 40 minutes East of St. J. Rte 3 Northumberland, NH
(4 mi. North of Lancaster, NH, Fairground)
Always Buying Vintage Clothing &
Accessories, Lamps & Lighting
7500 sq.ft. of Antiques & Collectables including:
•Vintage Clothing •Costume
Jewelry •Lamps, Lighting,
Rewires & Repairs •Official
Aladdin Lamp Dealer •Glass
•China •Ephemera & more
Please Visit Our eBay & Etsy Stores,
Ladys Slipper Vintage NO
SALES
TAX!
Cookie Jar
Q: I have a “Mammy” cookie
jar marked McCoy. I paid
$300 for it at a yard sale, and
I was told it is from the 1940s.
It is 10 inches high and in
almost perfect condition.
-- Laura, St. Charles, Mo.
A: You purchased a reproduc-
tion. An authentic Mammy
Cookie Jar from McCoy is a
full 11 inches high. Even if it
had been an old one, you nev-
ertheless overpaid. Authentic
Mammy jars generally sell in
the $150 to $250 range
depending on condition.
***
Q I have several dozen View-
Master reels that I acquired
during the 1950s. Are they
worth keeping?
-- Barbara, Watts, OK
A: There is an excellent refer-
ence that should be helpful for
you to determine values:
“Stereo Views: An Illustrated
History and Price Guide” by
John Waldsmith and published
by Krause Books. Most of the
View-Master reels I’ve spot-
ted in area shops and antique
malls have been priced in the
$2 to $5 range. As I often
mention in this column, there
are exceptions to every rule.
For example, a package of 15
reels featuring views of the
1939 New York World’s Fair
recently sold at auction for
$175.
***
Q: I began collecting glass
insulators about 40 years ago,
and I have managed to gather
about 200 different ones. Is
there a reference so I can
begin determining values?
-- Stan, Longmont, Colo.
A: One of the better referenc-
es is “Insulators: North
American Glass Insulators
Price Guide” by Donald R.
Briel. Briel has more than 600
in his personal collection and
is considered an expert in this
field of collecting. You can
purchase his book at Amazon.
com. A group for collectors is
the National Insulators
Association. Contact is www.
NIA.org.
***
Q: I have a movie projector
from the 1960s, along with a
screen and a few movies. Can
you put me in touch with
someone who can evaluate
these items for me, since I
want to sell them?
-- Norma, Glen Carbon, Ill.
A: You left several key facts
out of your letter. For exam-
ple, what is the brand name of
your projector, and does it
show 8mm or 16mm films? If
it is an 8mm projector, it is
probably worth less than $50.
Write to Larry Cox in care of
King Features Weekly Service,
P.O. Box 536475, Orlando,
FL 32853-6475, or send
e-mail to questionsforcox@
aol.com. Due to the large vol-
ume of mail he receives, Mr.
Cox is unable to personally
answer all reader questions.
Do not send any materials
requiring return mail.
(c) 2014 King Features Synd., Inc.
403 U.S. RT. 302 - BERLIN • BARRE, VT 05641-2274
479-2582 • 1-800-639-9753 • FAX 479-7916
Use your VISA/MC/DISCOVER
and call 479-2582 or
1-800-639-9753
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DEADLINE: For The WORLD is MONDAY by 10:00 AM
CANCELLATIONS: A classified ad cancelled before 10:00 AM on
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The WORLD asks that you check your ad on its first publication. If you find an error please
notify us immediately so that corrections can be made. The WORLD will not be responsible
for more than one incorrect publication of the ad.
CLIP AND MAIL THIS HANDY FORM TODAY
CHECK HEADING:
■ Animals-Farm ......................500
■ Animals-Pet .........................430
■ Antiques/Restorations .........144
■ Baby/Children Items ............140
■ Bicycles ...............................220
■ Boating/Fishing ...................210
■ Building Materials ................300
■ Business Items ....................080
■ Business Opportunities .......060
■ Camping ..............................205
■ Childcare Service ................030
■ Christmas Trees ..................370
■ Class & Workshops .............103
■ Clothing & Accessories .......130
■ Computers/Electronics ........100
■ Farm/Garden/Lawn .............410
■ Free Ads ..............................108
■ Furniture ..............................180
■ Garage Sales/Flea Mkt. ......145
■ Health ..................................113
■ Home Appliances ................160
■ Hunting/Guns/Archery .........305
■ Insurance/Investments ........090
■ Job Opportunities ................020
■ Lost and Found ...................110
■ Miscellaneous .....................150
■ Musical ................................200
■ Personals ............................105
■ Professional Services .........540
■ Rideshare ............................125
■ Snow Removal Equip. .........355
■ Snowmobiles/Access. .........360
■ Sporting Equipment ............250
■ Storage................................235
■ Support Groups ..................107
■ Tools ....................................330
■ Wanted ................................120
■ Wood/Heating Equip. ...........350
■ Work Wanted .......................040
AUTOMOTIVE
■ Campers/Motor Homes .......845
■ Cars & Accessories ............875
■ Motorcycles/ATV’s ...............850
■ Trucks/Vans/Jeeps Access. .870
■Vintage/Classic Vehicles .....873
■ Work Vehicles/Heavy Equip. ....855
REAL ESTATE
■ Apts./House for Rent ...........630
■ Camps for Sale ...................650
■ Comm. Rentals/Sales .........605
■ Condominiums ....................680
■ Apt. Blds. for Sale ................685
■ Homes .................................690
■ Land for Sale .......................670
■ Mobile Homes .....................600
■ Vacation Rentals/Sales .......645
■ Wanted to Rent/Buy ............610
PHONE NUMBER ___________________________________________________________________________
LAST NAME _______________________________________________________________________________
FIRST NAME ______________________________________________________________________________
ADDRESS _________________________________________________________________________________
CITY _______________________________________________ STATE ____________ ZIP _______________
START DATE: ___________ NUMBER OF ISSUES: __________
EXACTLY HOW YOU WANT THE AD TO READ
Please print, we cannot be responsible for words we can't read.
________________________________________________________________
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Each separate word, each phone number counts as one word
Number of words ____________ times 35¢($3.50 min.) _________________(cost for one week)
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$ ■ FULL PAYMENT MUST ACCOMPANY THIS FORM ■✔
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Number ____________________________________________________
Signature __________________________________________Exp. Date ___________________
■ MasterCard
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CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING FORM
February 5, 2014 The WORLD page 31
FOOD GRADE BARRELS
“Charlie the Barrel Man” has re-
tired; Good Luck Charlie! Gary
Bicknell’s “Bicknell Barrels” has
acquired the barrel man busi-
ness. From 2 1/2 to 275 gallon
Barrels & Totes available. Plas-
tic and steel; all food grade. Call
802-439-5149 or 802-439-5519
ANIMALS/
PETS
AUSTRALIAN SHEPHERDS
4 puppies left from litter of 8.
Ready to go now, Family raised
beautiful, friendly, First shots,
wormed, tails docked. Located
in East Hardwick $500 802-274-
2633 tammiescritters.webs.com
GIFT CERTIFICATES AVAILABLE
Country
Pampered
Paws
Pet Grooming & Boarding
East Montpelier
802-229-0114
Radiant Heated Floors For Winter,
Air Conditioning In Summer
DON’T WANT TO
KENNEL YOUR DOG(S)?
Have your child friendly com-
panion animal stay with us in the
comfort of our home. Call Your
Pet Nannies, Sophie 802-229-
0378 or Shona 802-229-4176,
references available.
REGISTERED ST. BERNARD
PUPPIES Beautiful Litter,
Males & Females, First Shots
& Wormed, Available 1\24 At
$800.
802-467-1167
ANIMALS/
FARM
BROKEN IRON Ranch. Certi-
fied organic, 2nd cut $5.00/
bale, at the barn. 802-839-0409
GRASS FED BEEF Heif-
ers & Bulls For Meat or
Breading. 802-456-1028
HAY FOR sale. 1st cut $4.00/bale,
802-272-4057/802-476-5204.
Kidder’s Smokehouse. Custom
smoke & cure. We do corn-
beef. Orange. 802-498-4550.
PROFESSIONAL
SERVICES
$ A1-CASH PAID
$75 TO $300+
JUNK CARS, TRUCKS
802-522-4279.
$ CASH $
FOR JUNK VEHICLES
Paying up to $300 for junk cars
and trucks, FREE Scrap Metal
Pick-up. Call Barre, 802-917-
2495, 802-476-4815, Bob.
$99 TAX PREPARATION
at Tax Max in Barre for ap-
pointment 802-479-1040
CARPET AND
UPHOLSTERY
CLEANING
Residential & Commercial
223-6490
“Our Reputation Is Clean!”
CLEANING Profession-
ally for Commercial & Resi-
dential. Call 371-8083
CLEANING SERVICES
For Your HOME; Vaccuming,
Mopping, Windows; Kitchen &
Bathrooms. Call Tammie, 802-
249-6539.
CLEANING SERVICES Li-
censed and Insured. Home or
office, rental and construction
cleans, scheduled or one time
cleans. Call or email Linda for free
estimate 802-279-7737 Right-
away. servi ces@yahoo. com
CLEANING SERVICES: Home
or Office, One time or sched-
uled, Carpets, Clean-out, Site
Clean-ups, Real Estate Clean-
ing, Windows. 802-279-0150
We can turn your dull exisitng
concrete inside or outside into a
work of art. No need to tile,
carpet or laminate to cover your
concrete. We can do bathrooms,
man caves, garages, etc.,
to bring your room to life.
~New or Old Concrete~
Check out
ConcreteMasterpieceInc.com
to give you some ideas
Call: 1-844 WeEtchIt
802-223-9173
Email:
phil@BlacktopBeedePaving.com
DmFURNACE
MAN
•Oil Furnace Tune-Ups
•Cleanings •Repairs
•Installations
Fully Licensed & Insured
Reasonable Rates
Call Daryl
802-249-2814
HANDYMAN SERVICES:
Repai rs.Carpentry.Fl oori ng.
Painting. Electrical/Plumb-
ing, Pressure Washing. De-
bris Removal 802-279-0150
JAMIE’S YARD and TREE SER-
VICE, SNOW REMOVAL, SAND-
ING and more. Fully insured,
free estimates. Jamie Benja-
min at jamiesyardandtree@
aol.com or 802-456-8142.
PAINTING/PAPERING also
all prep work, very rea-
sonable 802-249-4817
QUALITY PAINTING, Stu-
art Morton, Interior/Exterior,
Repairs, Many Excellent Lo-
cal References. 802-229-
0681 corsica@sover.net
ROOF SHOVELING, Careful,
reasonable. Andy 802-223-5409
ROOF SNOW Removal +
Quality Full Tree Services.
Fully Insured. Call Randy @
802-479-3403 or 249-7164.
TAX RETURN PREPARA-
TION for individuals and small
businesses. Affordable, ac-
curate & convenient. Contact
Laura Hill-Eubanks. Cen-
tral Vermont, 802-552-0197,
l hi l l eubanks@greenf i el drc.
com www.greenfieldrc.com
WILL HAUL away for free: Scrap
metal, old appliances, car parts,
etc. Furnaces, boilers and demo-
litions for a fee. No job too big or
too small. Chad, 802-793-0885.
FARM/GARDEN/
LAWN
continued
PROFESSIONAL
SERVICES
continued
DON’T PUT OFF ‘TIL
TOMORROW WHAT YOU
CAN SELL TODAY!
479-2582
Or Toll Free 1-800-639-9753
Central Vermont’s Newspaper
CLASSIFIEDS
403 U.S. Route 302 - Berlin • Barre, VT 05641
Classified
Deadline
Is Monday
Before
10:00AM
GOT CLUTTER? CLEAN UP WITH THE CLASSIFIEDS.
You’ll find
yourself with
space to spare
and money to
burn when you
sell your stuff in
The WORLD
classifieds.
Call to place your
ad for as little as
$3.50 a week or
get a Garage Sale
Kit and a 15-word
ad for $9.95.
Call 479-2582
today.
Free Papers
Working For You
Will the Internet kill your free community paper?
Did instant cofee kill cofee?
New technologies change many things. But not
everything. You may tweet, blog, surf, shop, or search
online but you continue to read your free community
paper. You just proved it.
Readership of free community papers is now higher
than paid daily papers, and continues to grow. Rather
than being replaced by “instant” media, your local free
community paper has become an important part of our
neighborhood.
Te reason, which sometimes is not heard because of
all the noise about the Internet, is pretty obvious: your
free community paper does what the Internet doesn’t.
We promote connections at a local level. Free papers join
readers and advertisers in ways digital media don’t.
In fact, the local content and power of your free paper
makes advertising even more efective. We are the number
one medium for driving purchases. Tat’s important in
every product category.
Including cofee.
6 x 7.5 4color
• This tip will change your life when peeling eggs: After you have
hard-boiled your eggs, drain them and leave them in the pot. Put
the lid on the pot and shake. Shake in all directions for up to a
minute. The eggs practically slip right out of their shells. Just rinse
and prep.
-- JoAnn
• “I feed my kitty cat outside on the back porch, but she eats a
little at a time and whenever she took a break, the ants would be
all over her food. Now I serve my little princess in a teacup and
saucer I found at the thrift store. I put the food in the cup, and then
put a little water in the saucer. The teacup sits in the water on the
saucer. The ants won’t get the food ever, because they can’t cross
the water to get at it. Kitty is very happy now that she can take her
time.” -- O.W. in Arkansas
• “To distinguish your keys, especially house keys that have simi-
lar stamps, simply paint the key head with different colors of nail
polish. You could even add a very subtle dot of the matching pol-
ish on the key lock. Reapply as needed.” -- S.L. in Oregon
• Use a flat iron to iron your collar if it’s rumpled. This also works
to straighten out button holes that have crimped.
• “To mark the end on a roll of tape, save your bread tabs. Stick
one on the tape end and it will be ready and easy to start the next
time. If it’s a thick tape, you can use two clips -- one at either side
of the tape. This way, it won’t split on you.” -- M.E. in Maryland
Send your tips to Now Here’s a Tip, c/o King Features Weekly
Service, P.O. Box 536475, Orlando, FL 32853-6475 or e-mail
JoAnn at heresatip@yahoo.com.
(c) 2014 King Features Synd., Inc.
NOW HERE’S A TIP
By JoAnn Derson
Thank You For Saying
I Saw It In
Do Pets Really Need Vitamins?
DEAR PAW’S CORNER:
My neighbor insists that
giving vitamin supplements
and “homeopathic” treat-
ments to her dog “Gracie”
is key to her health. I dis-
agree that a pet needs so
much extra help. Doesn’t
pet food provide enough
nutrients?
-- Les in San Diego
DEAR LES: That answer really depends on the pet and the
type of food it’s eating, and partly on the disposition of the
owner. Dogs are living beings just like us, and need regular
feeding, exercise and medications when they’re sick.
Owners naturally want their pet to be as healthy as possible,
which is why the pet supplement market continues to grow.
Want your dog to have a shiny coat? There’s a vitamin for
that.
Vitamin and mineral supplements for pets are as varied as
similar supplements for adults, and should be given after an
owner has done his or her homework on the best vitamins for
their pet. Veterinarians often recommend specific supplements
to help pets stay healthy or recover after an illness or injury.
Senior pets also frequently are given certain supplements to
help with sore joints and other health problems that accompany
aging.
Homeopathic remedies also are popular. Many owners
swear by off-the-shelf general treatments like Rescue Remedy,
which helps calm anxious pets.
Pet foods, while providing all-around nutrition for dogs of
different sizes, increasingly have added supplements to their
formulas. Owners should be aware of which specific supple-
ments are in their pet’s food, to avoid giving too much of a
particular vitamin or mineral. And of course, check with your
pet’s veterinarian about whether supplements are needed, what
kind and how much.
Send your questions or comments to ask@pawscorner.com.
(c) 2014 King Features Synd., Inc.
HAPPY
TAILS
BOARDING
KENNEL
Jim & Shelly Roux
802-485-5296
Roxbury, VT 05699
• modern facility
• radiant floor heat
• air conditioning
• fresh air system
• indoor kennel
Cat boarding
is also
available.
• outdoor
exercise
area
Socks
~1 Year Old Neutered Male Short Hair
Like all sidekicks, I'm just plain good company.
I like attention, and I also like my solitude. I don't go
looking for trouble, but I'm no scaredy-cat, either.
If you are looking for a steady companion to travel
with you on the road of life, look no further. Socks
came to CVHS as a stray cat so we are not sure if he
has lived with canines. He currently enjoys time with
other felines and human visitors of all ages.
Socks is one of many great cats we have at our
offsite adop-
tion center at
Petsmart in
Williston,VT.
1589 VT Rte 14S • East Montpelier • 802-476-3811
www.cvhumane.com • Tues.-Fri. 1pm-5pm, Sat. 10am-4pm
page 32 The WORLD February 5, 2014
BLUE RIDGE CONSTRUCTION
BUILDING AND EXCAVATION
Renovations • Additions
Site Work • Concrete • Roofing
Siding • Driveway Repairs • Septic Systems
•Custom •Modular Homes
Design Build Services
Land/Home Packages Available
Call 229-1153
for free estimates
BUILDING GARAGES
FROM FLOOR TO ROOF
Starting At
$
8,900
24 x 24 garage, 6” concrete floors with steel
rebar, (2) 7 x 9 garage doors, one entry door.
Garages to your specifications, any size.
House Framing & Addition Work
Call 802-296-1522 • Ask for Ray
Fireplace, Stove & Chimney Maintenance
David Loughran
Barre, VT
•Chimney Building •Repairs •Liners •Caps
•Cleaning •Metalbestos
Also Foundation &
Brick Wall Repair (802) 479-3559
GREG’S
PAINTING & STAINING
Metal Roof Painting
Call 802-479-2733
gpdpainting@aol.com EPA, RRP, EMP Certified
• Handpaint or Spray
• Metal Roof Painting
• Interior/Exterior
• Guarantee
• Free Estimates
• Reasonable Low Rates
• Neat, Quality Work
• References • Insured
DEMERS
AUTO
DEMERS
AUTO
COLLISION REPAIR
All Vehicles - All Makes & Models
CALL FOR APPOINTMENT
3.5 miles from Montpelier roundabout toward East Montpelier (RT 2)
229-6262
Randy Eastman
CARPENTRY
"25 Years Experience"
522-5889
You Save Money Because There Is No Overhead
Free Estimates • References
Remodeling
New Construction
Kitchens and Bathrooms,
Additions,
Doors and Windows,
Ceramic Tile,
Hardwood and Laminate
Floors,
Stairways and Railings,
Painting
and much more.
Les Church Chris Lackey
802-249-1030
dlesc51854@aol.com
W/ 21-ro corr|lrerl & cred|l qua||l|cal|or
Still Have
Dial UpI
Get High-Speed Today!
Offer expires l/l6/l4. Pestrictions apply. Call for details.
Promotional prices start at
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Mark Alberghini
Green Mountain Satellite
Waterbury, VT
802-244-5400
www.greenmountainsatellite.getdish.com • gmsat@myfairpoint.net
Garage Doors and Openers
Sales & Service
Offering prompt, professional service and
repair on all residential makes and models
Kevin Rice, Owner Cell: (802) 839-6318
Kevin’s Doors
OPENERS
Insured
Over 20 Years Experience
P.O. Box 145, Northfield Falls, VT 05664
(802) 279-6512
territardie@rocketmail.com
My Kind Of Clean
Terri Tardie
Residential & Commercial Cleaning
Come Home To A
Clean House!
Wouldn’t it be wonderful to come home to
a clean house, without lifting a fnger?
Now, you can!
Break free from the doldrums of housework
with a professional cleaning service.
I’ll leave your home looking, smelling
and feeling freshly cleaned
for a very affordable price.
Don’t hesitate~call Beth today
802-272-5550
Montpelier & East Montpelier Area
Reliable • Dependable • Reasonable Rates
TOYO On Demand
Water Heaters
Miller Furnace
System 2000 Boilers
Thermopride Furnaces
Service & Installation
Sales & Services
Call Randy Duprey
Certified Oil & Propane Heating Technician
������� � �������� � ���� �� ���� ����������
Office 479-9798 or 522-2938
reduprey@gmail.com
Get your furnace
cleaned, repaired
or replaced!
RANDY’S HEATING SERVICES
ROOF SNOW REMOVAL
Call Us Before It’s Too Late!
ROOF REPAIRS & SERVICE
RESIDENTIAL & FLAT ROOF EXPERTS
H We install new roofs year-round H
SHINGLES • RUBBER • SLATE • METAL
Emergency Repairs 24/7 (Expert Leak Finders)
Al Smith, LLC
FREE ESTIMATES • FULLY INSURED
Call 233-1116 • alsmithroofng.com

FINANCING
AVAILABLE
Conditions
Apply

TOP TO BOTTOM CHIMNEY SERVICES
Richard Dickinson
(802) 479-1811
Chimney Building, Repairs, Caps
Stainless Steel Liners and Cleaning
Free Estimates/Insured
Mobile Home
Sales, Parts & Services
GoVillageHomes.com
HSingle Wide & Double Wide
HNew & Used (Trades Welcome)
HEnergy Star Packages
HFinancing & Site Work
HHome Parts & Fixtures
802-229-1592 • 1083 US Route 2, Berlin, VT
HDoors & Knobs / Storm Doors
HInsulated Windows / Skylights
HTubs, Faucets & Plumbing
HSkirting & Exterior Steps
HTie Down Anchoring Products
W.C. Heating
227 Felicity 2nd Ave.
Williamstown, VT 05679
Cell (802) 793-5794
$
90 Cleaning
$
65
00
/hour on Repairs
$
97
50
/hour on After Hours Calls
★ Fully Insured and Licensed ★
Free Quotes Available for Installs & Repairs
Oil/Propane Certified
Service provided on
the following:
•Water Heaters
•Furnaces •Boilers
•Space Heaters
•Oil Tanks
Toyotomi Oil and
Rinnai Gas On-Demand
Water Heaters sold
★Both Mobile Home
Approved ★
Willette’s Upholstery
Home, Auto, Boat, Recreational
Equipment, Antique Restorations
Estimates Given
Residential • Commercial
Pickup & Delivery
McLeod Road, Graniteville, VT
476-6076
Tom Moore
T&T Repeats
116 Main St., Montpelier
802-224-1360
•Light Moving
•House Clean-Out
•Landfill Runs
•Garage Clean-Out
•Reasonable Rates
Local Business
Long Distance Runs
Deliveries for
Local Businesses
TRUCK FOR HIRE!
SERVICES AT A GLANCE
ERVICE DIRECTOR
S Y
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February 5, 2014 The WORLD page 33
PUBLISHER'S NOTICE
EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY
All real estate advertising in this news-
paper is subject to the fair housing act
which makes it illegal to advertise “any
preference, limitation or discrimination
based on race, color, religion, sex,
handicap, familial status or national ori-
gin, or an intention, to make any such
preference, limitation or discrimination.”
Additionally, Vermont’s Fair Housing
and Public Accomodations Act prohibits
advertising that indicates any prefer-
ence, limitation or discrimination based
on age, marital status, sexual orienta-
tion or receipt of public assistance.
This newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real estate
which is in violation of the law. Our read-
ers are hereby informed that all dwell-
ings advertised in this newspaper are
available on an equal opportunity
basis.
To file a complaint of discrimination, call
the Vermont Human Rights Commisson
toll-free at 1-800-416-2010 (voice
& TTY) or call HUD toll free at
1-800-669-9777 (voice) or
1-800-927-9275 (TTY).
MOBILE HOMES
RENT/SALE
MUST SEE! Needs To Be
MOVED, 26’x52’ 3 Bedroom 2
bath, $30,000.00 obro, 802-456-
1060 Ask for Shannon or Ryan.
COMMERCIAL
RENTALS/SALES
We have commercial space
available for lease and sale
and businesses for sale
throughout the
Central Vermont area.
For more information, please
call John at BCK Real Estate.
John Biondolillo
BCK Real Estate
(802) 479-3366, ext. 301
John@BCKrealestate.com
COMMERCIAL SPACE FOR
LEASE; Office, Warehouse,
Retail, Shop Space. Numer-
ous prime locations through-
out Central Vermont. Call
802-793-0179 or patrick@
together.net for inquiries.
WANTED TO RENT/
SHARE/BUY
ROOMMATE NEEDED to
share home on Rt. 100, So.
Duxbury. $450/mo + $450
Security. 802-244-8666.
ROOMMATE NEEDED to Share
Apartment on VT Rte 12 North,
Near Northfield. $400.00/mo.
Non-smoking. Call 802-249-4747
continued on page 34
WE GET RESULTS! • 1-800-639-9753 • sales@vt-world.com
WE GET RESULTS! • 1-800-639-9753 • sales@vt-world.com
WE GET RESULTS! • 1-800-639-9753 • sales@vt-world.com
Wednesday, January 29, 2014 ★ DEADLINES: •Display Ads Fri. 3:00PM •Word Ads Mon. 10:00AM
DEADLINES:
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•Word Ads Mon. 10AM
Wednesday, December 25, 2013
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WED., JAN. 22, 2014
WE GET RESULTS!
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Wed., Feb. 5, 2014 ★ DEADLINES: •Display Ads Fri. 3:00PM •Word Ads Mon. 10:00AM
For Real
Estate
Advertising
That
Works
Call
1-800-639-9753
RANCH
HOME
FOR
SALE
3 bedroom,
full bath up.
2 bedroom,
full bath down.
Level lot off VT
Rt. 12, Berlin.
$168,000.
Call 793-7753
LAST DOWN
LENDER UPDATE RATE APR TERM PTS PAYMENT
Granite Hills 1/31/14 4.375% 4.535% 30 yr fixed 0 5%
Credit Union 522-5000 3.500% 3.775% 15 yr fixed 0 5%
Merchants Bank 1/31/14 5.300% 5.321% 30 yr fixed 0 20%
1-800-322-5222 3.650% 3.684% 15 yr fixed 0 20%
New England Federal 1/31/14 4.375% 4.410% 30 yr fixed 0 5%
Credit Union 866-805-6267 3.375% 3.399% 15 yr fixed 0 5%
Northfield Savings 1/31/14 4.250 4.290% 30 yr fixed 0 5%
Bank (NSB) 3.375% 3.444% 15 yr fixed 0 5%
802-485-5871
VT State Employees 1/31/14 4.250% 4.280% 30 yr fixed 0 5%
Credit Union (VSECU) 3.250% 3.301% 15 yr fixed 0 5%
1-800-371-5162 X5345
Rates can change without notice.
***APRs are based on 20% down payment. Some products are available with as little as
5% down, with purchase of Private Mortgage Insurance (PMI). The cost of PMI is not
included in the APR calculations.
Updated Weekly
Home Mortgage Rates

Rate APR Term Points Downpayment
Granite Hills CU 4.375% 4.535% 30 yr fixed
0 5%
3.500% 3.775% 15 yr fixed 0
5%
Merchants 5.300% 5.321% 30 yr fixed
0 20%
3.650% 3.684% 15 yr fixed 0
20%
NE Fed CU 4.375% 4.410% 30 yr fixed
0 5%
3.375% 3.399% 15 yr fixed 0
5%
Northfield Savings 4.250%4.290% 30 yr fixed 0
5%
3.375%3.444% 15 yr fixed 0
5%
VSECU 4.250%4.280% 30 yr fixed 0
5%
3.250%3.301% 15 yr fixed 0
5%
Does Your Home Need Repair? We Can Help!
Repairs include:
Energy efficient improvements
Heating systems, including
Alternative fuel heating sources

Make Your Home Safe and Accessible
Access Modifications include:

Grab bars
Barrier-free showers

If eligible* we can assist with an affordable loan or grant to address
health & safety concerns, correct code violations or make access modifications
for an elderly or disabled household.
————————————————————————-
*Homeowners in Washington, Orange and Lamoille counties who meet income eligibility
requirements may qualify, please call for these guidelines. For example, a four person
household in Washington County must have an annual income of $54k or less.
————————————————————————
Call today: 802-476-4493 ext:211 or visit our website: www.cvclt.org
or stop by our office
Central Vermont Community Land Trust NeighborWorks® Homeownership Center
107 N. Main Street, Barre, Vermont 05641
Supported by a $375,000 VCDP grant from the
Agency of Commerce &
Community Development
Wells and Septic systems
Plumbing and Wiring
Roof and Foundation repairs
Permanent or temporary wheelchair ramps
Flooring repair/replacement
Does Your Home Need Repair? We Can Help!
Repairs include:
Energy efficient improvements
Heating systems, including
Alternative fuel heating sources

Make Your Home Safe and Accessible
Access Modifications include:

Grab bars
Barrier-free showers

If eligible* we can assist with an affordable loan or grant to address
health & safety concerns, correct code violations or make access modifications
for an elderly or disabled household.
————————————————————————-
*Homeowners in Washington, Orange and Lamoille counties who meet income eligibility
requirements may qualify, please call for these guidelines. For example, a four person
household in Washington County must have an annual income of $54k or less.
————————————————————————
Call today: 802-476-4493 ext:211 or visit our website: www.cvclt.org
or stop by our office
Central Vermont Community Land Trust NeighborWorks® Homeownership Center
107 N. Main Street, Barre, Vermont 05641
Supported by a $375,000 VCDP grant from the
Agency of Commerce &
Community Development
Wells and Septic systems
Plumbing and Wiring
Roof and Foundation repairs
Permanent or temporary wheelchair ramps
Flooring repair/replacement
COMMERCIAL SPACE
FOR LEASE
Office, Warehouse, Retail,
Shop Space
Numerous Prime Locations
Throughout Central Vermont
For Inquiries, Call
Malone Properties
802-793-0179
patrick@together.net
P: 802-479-1154 C: 802-224-6151
Wanda French
Mortgage Loan Officer
NMLS ID: 101185
wanda.french@academymortgage.com
164 So. Main St., Barre, VT 05641
Vermont License # VT101185
Corp License #6289, and 1058 MB
USDA, FHA, VA,
Vt Housing, Conv. & Refi
IT’S TIME...
To get pre-approved for Spring!
Weston’s Mobile Home Park
ONLY 33 31 LOTS LEFT FOR RENT!
Lot rent of $320.00 month includes water, septic, and
trash removal. Close to the Interstate and Montpelier.
Ellery & Jennifer Packard
Weston’s Mobile
Home Park
229-5741ext. 103

Lots Available Year Round
Real Estate Mortgage Network is located at 542 US 302 – Berlin, Suite 3, Barre,
VT 05641. Corporate NMLS #6521. Vermont Lender License 6093 MB.
Conventional, FHA, VA, Rural Development Mortgages
Great Customer Service
14 Years of Local Mortgage Experience!
Kim Magoon
Mortgage Loan Originator
NMLS #207001
����� ������������ 
����� ������������ 
kmagoon@homebridge.com
homebridge.com/KimMagoon
HomeBridge Financial Services, Inc., formerly Real Estate Mortgage Network, Inc.
Your Partner for the Path Ahead
Holly Sheltra
Mortgage Loan Originator
NMLS #194910
����� ������������ 
����� ������������
hsheltra@homebridge.com
homebridge.com/HollySheltra
Place your classified ad online,
P
L
A
C
E
A
D
S
2
4
/7

R
IG
H
T
F
R
O
M
Y
O
U
R
H
O
M
E
!
That’s right - FREE!
The World proudly offers consumers FREE online super classified ads.
Your FREE online super classified ad will include:
Up to 350 characters, one photo, online Google map and
the ability for other consumers to email you, the seller.
More features are available for a nominal cost.
It’s easy, and
best of all... FREE!
Instructions:
Step 1: Go to www.vt-world.com
Step 2: Single click on “Classified” tab
Step 3: Single click on “Place a Classified Ad”
Step 4: Select “Internet only” or “Internet and
Print” for a fee.
Step 5: Follow the on-screen instructions online.
403 US RTE 302 - BERLIN, BARRE, VT 05641
479-2582 OR 1-800-639-9753 • Fax (802) 479-7916
www.vt-world.com • sales@vt-world.com
Hours: Monday - Friday 8:00am - 5:00pm
page 34 The WORLD February 5, 2014
APARTMENTS/
ROOMS/HOUSES
FOR RENT
2-BEDROOM HOUSE So.
Woodbury $600.00 plus
Utilities. 802-456-1028
2bdrm 2nd foor apt in GRAN-
ITEVILLE Avail after 2/1 Wash/
dry hookup/fridge/stove in-
cluded. Off-street parking,
snow/trash removal. Mins to
I-89/Hannaford/BTMES. Walk-
ing distance to general store/
playground/post offce $700/
mth no pets/smoking ref/dpst
req. Call Tom 802-522-5457.
3 BEDROOM APARTMENT
for Rent in Northfeld $1000.00
includes electricity, water
and sewer, rubbish removal.
Heat not included. Call 802-
485-8500 for application.
BARRE CITY 1 BEDROOM
Weekly or Monthly Rental, fully
furnished, All utilities included.
includes washer/dryer,$1000\
mo. Call Margaret 802-476-0908
mlferguson2002@yahoo.com
BARRE CITY 1 bedroom base-
ment apartment. Heat, hot wa-
ter, rubbish and snow removal.
Includes range and refrigerator.
New kitchen and remodeled bath-
room. Washer/dryer available.
Off-street parking for 2 vehicles.
Private entrance. No smoking,
no pets. $890/month. Deposit,
credit and background check re-
quired. Call Black Ink Property
Management, 802-223-8965.
BARRE TOWN 4 bedroom
house for rent. 20 Camel’s
Hump Drive. 2 car garage. Qui-
et neighborhood, beautiful view,
deck, private backyard. No pets.
$1500/month. Call 476-4156 or
249-0110 and ask for Burnie.
BARRE TOWN. 2 large bed-
room duplex. Cul-de-sac, ga-
rage, snow, trash removal.
Stove, frig, washer/dryer hook-
up. No pets/smoking. Refer-
ences & credit. $995.00 + de-
posit. Black Ink 802-223-8965
BARRE UNFURNISHED 2
BEDROOM. Good condition,
$800 PLUS Utilities and deposit,
washer/dryer hookup, parking,
NO Pets/smoking. 802-522-6287
BARRE, 2 BEDROOM, 1ST
FLOOR Big Kitchen, porch, park-
ing, water paid, laundry hook-
ups. Tenant pays electric and oil.
$850 + deposit. 802-310-4383
BARRE, WASHINGTON
ST, effciency/one bedroom,
ground foor, on bus route,
coin-op washer/dryer on prop-
erty. No Pets, Security deposit.
$500/month. 802-476-2092
BARRE: One bedroom 2nd foor,
$725 utilities included, no pets
or smoking. Lease, deposit, ref-
erence required. 802-476-4757.
HOMESHARE, BARRE
TOWN, unfurnished bedroom
for one. No pets, smoking ok,
$125 week. 802-622-0433.
NORTHFIELD DUPLEX 2 bed-
room, newly renovated, heat and
snow removal included. $875
plus deposit. 802-498-7478.
NORTHFIELD, HOUSE For
Rent, 2 Bdrm 1 1/2 bath. Plus
extra rooms in basement. Short
walk to Norwich University,
$1200 per month not includ-
ing utilities. No Smoking, No
Pets. Call Jeff at 802-383-8353
RETIREMENT APART-
MENTS, ALL INCLUSIVE.
Meals, transportation, activities
daily. Short Leases. Monthly
specials! Call 877-210-4130
RULE OF THUMB......
Describe your property,
not the “appropriate” buyer or
renter, not the landlord,
not the neighbors.
Just describe the property and
you’ll almost always obey the
law.
VACATION RENTALS/
SALES
PAWLEY’s ISLAND, South Car-
olina 2 Bedroom, 2 bath Condo
100 yards from beach. Quiet
and comfortable. Sleeps 6.
Weekly, monthly and seasonal
rentals. Call Ed 802-485-8396
for info, availability, and rates.
SEASONAL RENTAL; Wood-
bury, 3 Bedroom Cottage on pri-
vate pond. Bath w/shower, large
screened-in porch, canoe &
rowboat, Non-smoking, no pets.
Weekly or monthly, $800/wk,
June-October. 802-456-8732
WARM WEATHER is Year
Round in Aruba. The water is
safe, and the dining is fantastic.
Walk out to the beach. 3-Bed-
room weeks available. Sleeps
8. $3500. email: carolaction@
aol.com for more information.
LAND
FOR SALE
BCK offers expert advice on
maximizing your land investment.
Farms, estates, Maple Sugar
Orchards, and woodlands.
Call to arrange a consultation
whether you`re Buying or Selling.
Dave Jamieson - BCK Real Estate
(802) 479-3366, ext. 305
Cell: (802) 522-6702
DavidJ@BCKrealestate.com
www.VermontLandCompany.com
HOMES
GREENSBORO BEND, OLDER
2 STORY HOUSE, 3 bedrooms
upstairs, kitchen living room,
dining room and bedroom on
frst foor, full bath, some ap-
pliances, 2 acres +/-, asking
$105,900. 802-328-2008/802-
535-7867 leave message.
SINGLE FAMILY HOUSE FOR
SALE, South Main, Barre City,
$69,000.00 as is. 802-522-6287
WORRIED ABOUT
FORECLOSURE?
Having trouble paying your mort-
gage? The Federal Trade Com-
mission says don’t pay any fees
in advance to people who prom-
ise to protect your home from
foreclosure. Report them to the
FTC, the nation’s consumer pro-
tection agency. For more infor-
mation, call 1-877-FTC-HELP or
click on ftc.gov. A message from
The World and the FTC.
APARTMENTS/
ROOMS/HOUSES
FOR RENT
continued
APARTMENTS/
ROOMS/HOUSES
FOR RENT
continued
APARTMENTS/
ROOMS/HOUSES
FOR RENT
continued
FOR THE MOST CURRENT CLASSIFIED
ADS, VISIT OUR WEB PAGE:
www.vt-world.com
FAX
US!
Now Placing Your
Classified Or
Display Ad Is
Even Easier!
Our Fax Number Is
802479-7916
Please Include Contact
Person & Payment Info
VISA, MasterCard & Discover
E-mail us!
Classified & Display
ADS
Now Placing Your
Classified Or Display Ad
Is Even Easier!
Our E-mail address is
sales@vt-world.com
Please include contact person
& payment info
( Only)
479-2582 or
1-800-639-9753
Stuck Indoors?
Don’t Just Sit
There
Q: I’ve heard plenty of my
neighbors complain about
being stuck inside this
winter and unable to do
much outdoor mainte-
nance work. Well, I’ve
been around long enough
to know there’s plenty of
work to do inside, too.
Think you can remind folks about some important stuff they
could be doing while waiting for the weather to break? --
Oldster Stan, Buffalo, N.Y.
A: Stan, that’s very true. While being stuck indoors can be
maddening, there are plenty of smaller home-maintenance
tasks to take care of -- even if it’s too cold or snowy to get
out to the home-improvement store. Here are a few:
• Descale your coffeemaker or electric kettle: Check the
manufacturer’s cleaning instructions online, but in most
drip brewers you can flush several ounces of white vinegar
through the system, rinsing thoroughly with clear water.
• Clean your dishwasher: Remove any parts that can be
lifted out easily, such as racks, utensil holders, wash arms
and filter. Soak smaller parts in a sinkful of vinegar-water
solution and wipe down the racks, dishwasher interior and
the door seal. Rinse and replace all the items, then run the
empty dishwasher through a cycle to finish.
• Clean the garbage disposal by adding a few ice cubes
and lemon peels and cycling it. Rinse with running water.
• Clean the wash tub of your clothes washer by filling it
with hot water and one quart of white vinegar. Let it agitate
for a minute and then pause the cycle so that the water sits
for an hour; then resume the wash cycle to rinse.
• Vacuum the space your clothes dryer where the lint filter
sits. Inspect the dryer vent for lint buildup and remove any
lint you find.
• Tighten the hardware on cabinets and drawers -- knobs,
handles and hinges.
• Check child- and pet-proof latches and outlet covers,
and replace any that are broken.
• Vacuum out the heat registers in each room, being sure
to replace the floor vent covers immediately afterward so
pets don’t accidentally crawl in.
• Change the air filter on your heating system (you knew
I’d get that one in here).
• Rotate houseplants, shifting them to new locations to
vary the air and light they receive.
HOME TIP: Take a tour of your home and make note of as
many improvement or maintenance tasks that you can find.
Then create a schedule to tackle a few of them at a time.
Send your questions or home tips to ask@thisisahammer.
com.
(c) 2014 King Features Synd., Inc.
By Samantha Mazzotta
Let Us
Know...
if you are not
getting your
each week!
If you are in the greater
Barre-Montpelier-
Northfield Area
Call 479-2582
Other Areas Can
Call Toll Free
1-800-639-9753
ANN
CUMMINGS
272-0944
STEPHEN
BOUSQUET
793-9951
TIM HENEY
229-0345
FRED
VAN BUSKIRK
505-8035
CHARLIE CLARK
229-0345
MICHELLE
MORAN GOSSELIN
249-9002
CAROLELLISON
249-7435
MAURICE (MOE)
FORTIER
249-7628
BRENDAN
COYNE
245-4369
HREALTORS
eney
HeneyRealtors.com
81 Main Street
Montpelier
229-0345
135 Washington Street
Barre
476-6500
Truly Unique
The modest exterior of this
completely renovated Williamstown
three bedroom home hides some
dazzling interior features. Galaxy
granite countertops, stainless
appliances and a marble backsplash
are things you would never expect to
see in this price range. The custom
built stone hearth surrounding
the woodstove provides warmth
as well as luxury. Situated on 10+
subdividable acres.
$135,000.
Commercially
Zoned
Get in cheap and fix up your
downtown home....or really
take advantage of the location
and convert this highly visible
downtown building into an office
space! Currently set up as a large
single family three bedroom, one
bathroom home. The basics are
all there with updated wiring
and a new furnace. Sale includes
adjacent lot which could be used
for parking. Opportunity knocks!
$69,900.
HREALTORS
eney
HREALTORS
eney
Contact Brendan for further details
February 5, 2014 The WORLD page 35
22 Sunnyside Lane • Williamstown, VT 05679
802-479-3356 • Email: propmart@myfairpoint.net
property mart
Shirley Luther
802-479-3356
Fred Ford
802-476-6002
What A Great Valentines Day Idea: To Invest In A New Home!
Barre City:
7 rooms, 3 bedrooms, 2 baths,
2 car garage, sits on .83 acre
Priced at $179,000.
Barre City:
6 rooms, 2 bedrooms,1½ baths,
1 car garage, sits on .14 acre
Priced at $135,000.
Barre Town:
5 rooms, 3 bedrooms, 2 baths,
1 car garage, sits on .20 acre
Priced at $199,000.
Barre Town:
7 rooms, 4 bedrooms, 1 bath,
2 car garage, sits on .40 acre
Priced at $165,000.
So this is how I want them to go ok: picture
numbers 3557,3756,3679,3799 on top row
than 3556,3768,3588,,3789 on bottom row
any questions let me know and thanks
Barre City:
5 rooms, 3 bedrooms, 1 bath,
1 car garage sits on .65 acre
Priced at $138,900.
Williamstown:
6 rooms,3 bedrooms,1¾ baths,
2 car carport, sits on 11 acres
Priced at $194,000.
Williamstown:
5 rooms, 2 bedrooms, 1¾ baths,
2 car garage sits on .86 acre
Priced at $179,900.
Williamstown:
6 rooms, 3 bedrooms, 1¾ baths,
sits on 10 acres
Priced at $239,000.
Last Week’s Weather…
The Winter of 2013-2014 continued to produce cold
temperatures at least at times, but stingy on snowfall as of last
week. Snow depths actually peaked the week before on Mount
Mansfield with 42” at the stake. However the northern tier of
Vermont did quite well with 6.8” new snowfall Saturday night up
in the northern border town of Averill. They also reported 18” of
snow depth.
Stations reporting a foot on the ground or more include: Mount
Mansfield with 38”, Averill 18” Walden 17” Sutton and West
Burke region a solid 16”, Wheelock, Westfield and Sheffield all
at one foot snow depth – those snow machining take note.
Vermont Weather Extreme Stats from
Last Week…
Highest temperature: 43 degrees at Danby and Rutland State
airport Saturday afternoon February 2nd
Lowest temperature: -Minus 23 near West Burke Wednesday
morning January 29th
Heaviest melted precipitation: 0.53 at Averill ending Sunday
morning February 2nd
Biggest Snowfall: 6.8” Averill ending Sunday morning February
2nd
Most Snow depth: 40” atop Mount Mansfield Tuesday afternoon
January 28th
Global Temperature Facts For Last
Week
Last week’s hottest temperature on planet earth was 114
degrees F Atakpame (Togo)
Last week’s cold spot was minus 74 Ekyuchchyu (Russia)
Maximum 24 hour Global Precipitation
19.57 inches (flooding ) Pretoria Irene (South Africa)
Atmospheric CO2…
The latest CO2 measurement ending January 25th with Carbon
Dioxide levels at 397.98 parts per million. One year ago the
reading was 395.89 parts per million for a one year change up
2.09 ppm. Stable or non warming climate is approximately at or
below 350 parts per million.
Global Temperature Update Through
2013…
The recent slowdown of global warming is a consequence of
both a slowdown in the growth rate of climate forcings and recent
La Nina history. Given that the tropical Pacific seems to be
moving toward the next El Niño or warming phase, record global
temperatures were likely in the near term. However, the rate of
future warming will depend upon changes of the troposphere
aerosol forcing, or the amount of soot largely from Asian
countries which is highly uncertain and unmeasured.
-- Rate of global warming was slower in the past decade than
the prior three decades.
--Likely reasons for the reduced rate of warming are slower
growth of net climate forcings and cooling in the tropical Pacific
Ocean.
--Continued trend of increasing frequency of extreme hot
summer anomalies over land continued despite Pacific cooling.
--There is a substantial likelihood of an El Nino beginning in
2014, which would probably result in a record high global
temperature for 2015.
--The 14 warmest years in the data record (GISS) going back
to 1880 have all occurred since and including 1998.
--Weakening of a weak La Nina like cooling of the equatorial
eastern Pacific during the Fall helped contribute to 2013 having
the 2nd warmest Sep-Nov in the 134-year record.
--Despite the first 3-years of the present decade averaging
about the same in terms of temperature compared to the previous
decade, we have high confidence that the present decade as a
whole will still end up warmer than the previous decade due to the
fact that the planet is out of energy balance. That is, more energy
coming in compared to going out. This is mainly due to increasing
greenhouse gases over century, which are expected to further
increase.
--Large volcanic eruptions are always a wildcard and can lead
to significant, short-term cooling.
In contrast, winter temperature over land has declined in the
past 10 years. There has been recent speculation that observed
loss of Arctic sea ice may spur winter cold air outbreaks.
Kosaka and Xie simulations suggest that the recent winter
cooling is more a consequence of tropical ocean temperatures.
Climate models yield larger long-term warming in winter than in
summer, even when considering only land areas. Thus the recent
downturn of winter temperature over Northern Hemisphere land
is unlikely to continue.
The Study concludes that solar forcing is not negligible and
contributed modestly to the global warming slowdown in the past
decade, but its effect was small and overwhelmed by long-term
growth of GHGs, as confirmed by the fact that Earth was out of
energy balance, more energy coming in than going out, even
during the deep 2005-2010 solar minimum.
We conclude that a slowdown of the growth rate of the net
climate forcing probably contributed to the slowdown of global
warming in the past 15 years. The slower increase of climate
forcing cannot by itself account for a long global temperature
standstill, because we know that the planet continued to be well
out of energy balance, more energy coming in from the sun than
energy radiated to space. The dynamic variability of tropical
Pacific sea surface temperature, i.e., the ENSO (El Nino Southern
Oscillation), 2 can play a significant role on temperature change
over a decade and it has a dominant role in interannual
fluctuations.
Weather Trends Ahead…
Landing a Couple Storms…
Snowfall of around 3 to 8” was looking likely for Wednesday
making this a powder day for those who can get the day off and
take advantage of some powdery snowfall. A snowfall streaking
east-northeast from roughly Oklahoma into New England will
bring a widespread snowfall. These have been rather few this
year, but a storm track generally to our south will hold for the
time being keeping us all snow.
Another storm system tracks northeast from the central
Mississippi Valley arriving a long about Sunday. This system
might repeat Wednesday system with another moderate shot of
snow. The heavy snows will likely stay south.
Temperatures will be in the 20s by day and single digits to low
teens by night. Temperatures warmest earlier in the week will
gradually fall some, but no arctic air outbreaks were indicated.
Instead a modified polar air mass will keep conditions cold
enough to preserve snow.
Check out
Weathering Heights
on Facebook
page 36 The WORLD February 5, 2014

Barre 802-479-3366 • Montpelier 802-229-4242 • Rochester 802-767-9900 • Essex Jct. 802-878-5500
Northfield 802-485-7400 • Stowe 802-253-8484 • Morrisville 802-888-0088 • St. Johnsbury 802-748-9543
www.BCKrealestate.com www.BCKrealestate.com www.BCKrealestate.com
BUY OF THE WEEK
Search Every Listing
in Vermont at:
www.BCKrealestate.com
Northfield - $200,000 Woodbury - $115,000 Williamstown - $150,000
Corinth - $349,000
REALTOR
®
Barre - $415,000
This spacious 4 bedroom home built in 1844 with
character features storage, wide wooden floor boards,
8x17 pantry, a large room for a workshop, walking
distance to Norwich, downtown and local schools.
Close to I-89.

www.BCKrealestate.com/4149738
One level living situated on 4.5+/- acres in Woodbury.
There are open meadows, woods and local mountain
views and the VAST trail borders this property.
Finished garage which would make a great place for
a hobby, business or simply storing your recreation
equipment. Would make a great starter home.

www.BCKrealestate.com/4246012
Classic A-frame style vacation home or mountain
retreat. Close to I-89 and minutes from Norwich
University and popular skiing destinations. Features
an open living space with one bedroom downstairs
and sleeping loft upstairs. Nearly two acres of level,
park-like lawn. Don’t miss out on this classic Vermont
home.

www.BCKrealestate.com/4224950
A wonderfully designed custom home situated on 3.25
acres with magnificent mountain views of Camel’s Hump
and Sugarbush/Mad River Ski areas. This home offers
4 bedrooms & 3.5 bathrooms. Open concept design hosts
an office and a finished walkout basement for the entire
family to enjoy.
www.BCKrealestate.com/4185956
From the sugar maples to the view of Mount
Moosilauke this is amazing. You could live in this off-
grid home and sugar what the Owner calls “100 acres
of mostly maple hardwood”. This is a home you need
to see to appreciate how much has gone into it. This is
pretty much rural Vermont at its finest.
www.BCKrealestate.com/4334109
Immaculate and well cared for 4 BR, 2 BA home. Cedar
hedges make the location very private and in a quiet
neighborhood which would be ideal for families with
children. If you are looking for an incredible home for
your family, you need to see this property!
www.BCKrealestate.com/4239334
Barre - $225,000
Hardwick - $155,000
Centrally located in Hardwick Village. Recent renovations
include new flooring, paint and windows. This home
provides endless opportunities. Good storage area is also
included. Owners operate an antique business from one
section on the first floor that would make a great family/
recreation room.

www.BCKrealestate.com/4222900
Northfield - $150,000

New floors and paint throughout.
This home offers a cozy living
area, formal dining room and first
floor laundry. Detached 2 story
outbuilding with power and heat.
Located in a quiet neighborhood and
within walking distance to downtown
restaurants, shops and public
transportation. Close proximity to
I-89 and Montpelier.

www.BCKrealestate.com/4323007
Buy of the Week –
Northfield - $150,000 ( DSC
0342)
New floors and paint throughout. This
home offers a cozy living area, formal
dining room and first floor laundry.
Detached 2 story outbuilding with
power and heat. Located in a quiet
neighborhood and within walking distance
to downtown restaurants, shops and public
transportation. Close proximity to I-89 and
Montpelier.
www.BCKrealestate.com/4323007
Hardwick - $155,000
(Maskell 001)
Centrally located in Hardwick Village. Recent
renovations include new flooring, paint and windows.
This home provides endless opportunities. Good
storage area is also included. Owners operate an
antique business from one section on the first floor that
would make a great family/recreation room.
www.BCKrealestate.com/4222900
Northfield - $200,000
(4149738)
This spacious 4 bedroom home built in 1844 with
character features storage, wide wooden floor boards,
8x17 pantry, a large room for a workshop, walking
distance to Norwich, downtown and local schools.
Close to I-89.
www.BCKrealestate.com/4149738
Woodbury - $115,000 (Winter
2013)
One level living situated on 4.5+/- acres in Woodbury.
There are open meadows, woods and local mountain
views and the VAST trail borders this property.
Finished garage which would make a great place for
a hobby, business or simply storing your recreation
equipment. Would make a great starter home.
www.BCKrealestate.com/4246012
Williamstown - $150,000
(Habeck Winter 2013)
Classic A-frame style vacation home or mountain
retreat. Close to I-89 and minutes from Norwich
University and popular skiing destinations. Features
an open living space with one bedroom downstairs and
sleeping loft upstairs. The nearly two acres of level,
park-like lawn. Don’t miss out on this classic Vermont
home.
www.BCKrealestate.com/4224950
Corinth - $349,000 (Fried-
land)
From the sugar maples to the view of Mount Mucilage
this is amazing. You could live in this off-grid home
and sugar what the Owner calls “100 acres of mostly
maple hardwood”. This is a home you need to see to
appreciate how much has gone into it. This is pretty
much rural Vermont at its finest.
www.BCKrealestate.com/4334109
Barre - $415,000 (4185956)
A wonderfully designed custom home situated on 3.25
acres with magnificent mountain views of Camel’s
Hump and Sugarbush/Mad River Ski areas. This
home offers 4 bedrooms & 3.5 bathrooms. Open
concept design hosts an office and a finished walkout
basement for the entire family to enjoy.
www.BCKrealestate.com/4185956
Barre - $225,000 (Winter
2013.jpg (171 KB)
Immaculate and well cared for 4 BR, 2 BA home. Cedar
hedges make the location very private and in a quiet
neighborhood which would be ideal for families with
children. If you are looking for an incredible home for
your family, you need to see this property!
www.BCKrealestate.com/4239334
John started his career as a community banker and has
focused on commercial and residential lending. John’s
keen insight and background in finance and business
helps his prospective clients navigate the entire process
of buying or selling a home. Whether you are looking
to buy or sell a home or expand your business, John has
the expertise and professionalism to help you through the
process.
Featured Agent
JOHN DUDDIE
17 East St., Northfield
(802) 485-7400
BCKrealestate.com
It’s a great time to consider a career in real estate.
If you are looking for a flexible career and unlimited income potential,
call me today at 479-3366 Ext. 301!
We have openings in several offices throughout Vermont.
BCK Agents Get More. The End Result: You Get More!
Call John at 479-3366 or e-mail John@BCKrealestate.com
John Biondolillo
President

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