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How IMF&WB Influence 3rd World Education

How IMF&WB Influence 3rd World Education

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Published by Bert M Drona
This paper provides an overview of the roles of the IMF and World Bank from 1980 to the present.

It covers two types of impacts exerted by the IMF and World Bank in the education sector of borrowing countries: the World Bank’s direct involvement in the education sector of developing countries and country-wide economic reforms, or structural adjustment programs (SAPs), financed by the IMF as well as the World Bank.

Even with vigorous education campaigns, there will be disappointing progress unless creditors – especially the IMF and the World Bank – begin to support homegrown, national development strategies and education action plans.

In addition, the institutions need to change their policy prescriptions for ailing economies, in general, and for the education sector, in particular.
This paper provides an overview of the roles of the IMF and World Bank from 1980 to the present.

It covers two types of impacts exerted by the IMF and World Bank in the education sector of borrowing countries: the World Bank’s direct involvement in the education sector of developing countries and country-wide economic reforms, or structural adjustment programs (SAPs), financed by the IMF as well as the World Bank.

Even with vigorous education campaigns, there will be disappointing progress unless creditors – especially the IMF and the World Bank – begin to support homegrown, national development strategies and education action plans.

In addition, the institutions need to change their policy prescriptions for ailing economies, in general, and for the education sector, in particular.

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Categories:Types, Research, History
Published by: Bert M Drona on Oct 04, 2009
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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10/20/2011

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· Like private education, public education is often biased against the poor. In the case of
public or private provision, access to education for disadvantaged groups can require
subsidies.

· Unlike public systems that can run deficits, private systems must exercise financial
discipline and still remain competitive.

· Teachers’ unions can sometimes protect the employment and wage interests of public
teachers at the expense of other interests (e.g. recurrent expenses, such as materials and
training).

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· In some countries, the public sector provision of education is highly inefficient and poor in
quality. These deficiencies reduce demand for education.

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